Vous êtes sur la page 1sur 28
WHITNEY GREECEBURNS MOURNED ‘THE VOW’ TOP MOVIE RIOTS CONTINUE DESPITE PAGES 2 and 27 AUSTERITY
WHITNEY
GREECEBURNS
MOURNED
‘THE VOW’
TOP MOVIE
RIOTS CONTINUE DESPITE
PAGES 2 and 27
AUSTERITY PLAN
BUSINESS PAGE 10
DATEBOOK PAGE 17
Monday • Feb. 13, 2012 • Vol XII, Edition 154
www.smdailyjournal.com

City looks to ban ‘bad’ items

San Carlos may follow county’s lead or go its own way when dealing with plastic bags,polystyrene

By Michelle Durand

DAILY JOURNAL STAFF

Call it the city of green living. Days look numbered for both plastic bags and polystyrene food containers in San Carlos with the City Council Monday night taking up possible bans on both. The question seems to be not so much if the city will prohibit the use but whether it will go it alone with individual ordinances or emulate

prohibitions drafted by the county. San Mateo County has already implemented its ban on food con- tainers made of polystyrene, better known as the trademark Styrofoam, so joining in doesn’t require that much effort. However, although county of- cials appear in favor of banning or limiting the use of plastic bags, the Board of Supervisors is still consid- ering its options and has yet to put anything ofcially on the books.

Proponents have said they want more information first including gauging the interest of cities in launching a wider spread joint effort. Joining the county in that effort will require a little patience. The timing is the main factor on whether to move ahead or wait for the county, said San Carlos Mayor Andy Klein who wants a ban on both bags and polystyrene. “I am in favor of using a county ordinance if they can get other cities

of using a county ordinance if they can get other cities Andy Klein to join in

Andy Klein

to join in a time- ly fashion. If the county is going to take a long time, then I would like to see us go alone. It all really comes down to how much time the

county is going to take,” Klein said. The county’s efforts are currently

estimated to take roughly a year, allowing cities to consider it early next year. Councilman Ron Collins general- ly favors a ban but said he still needs answers on what will be banned and in what places. “I don’t know what the rush is,” Collins said. Collins also wants to hear from opponents and understand all the

See BAN, Page 19

from opponents and understand all the See BAN , Page 19 A weekly look at the

A weekly look at the people who shape our community

Empire state of mind

Contest allows San Bruno couple to wed in New York on Valentine’s Day

By Heather Murtagh

DAILY JOURNAL STAFF

Angela Vega and Lubin Masibay recently reenacted the movie “King Kong” in their San Bruno apart- ment. While the nal cut doesn’t include all the scenes of Vega fainting, Masibay climbing the cardboard skyscrapers or the couple flying around their living room making airplane noises, it was pretty notable (Don’t worry. The fun stuff is in the seven-minute blooper reel). But it was the two-minute entry that made an impact on Facebook and earned the couple one of four spots to get married at the Empire State Building on Valentine’s Day. The event was sponsored by the Empire

See WED, Page 19

The event was sponsored by the Empire See WED , Page 19 Angela Vega and Lubin

Angela Vega and Lubin Masibay will get married in New York tomorrow after winning a contest.

Redwood City looks at ways to expand parking downtown

DAILY JOURNAL STAFF REPORT

Redwood City ofcials will consider opening up a library parking lot to the public with metered spots, adding nearly three dozen more highly-sought spaces to its downtown stock and potentially raising another $37,000 annually. Redwood City’s downtown events and businesses have proven so popular that parking spaces are in high demand. One of the library parking lots known as Lot C is currently only open to city eet vehicles, city staff and permit holders. On Monday night, Community Development Director Bill Ekern and City Manager Bob Bell will ask the City Council to consider incorporating the lot into the city’s pay-by-space meter system like those in adja- cent library Lot B. Doing so will make 33 spaces available to the general public while another 14 will remain designated for library staff. Separating Pennsylvania Avenue from Lot C and also adding it to the meter zone is another suggestion aimed at improving the

See PARK, Page 19

Custodian recognized for saving choking girl

By Heather Murtagh

DAILY JOURNAL STAFF

When a third grade girl started choking at Gareld Elementary in Redwood City earlier this month, custodian Luis Hinestroza was there to help. During lunch Friday, Feb. 3, the girl began to choke, Principal Michelle Grifth said. Quickly, one of the children got assis- tance. The little girl wasn’t able to cough, was struggling to breathe and Hinestroza was there to administer the Heimlich maneuver. Four pushes later, the meat and bread were dislodged, said Grifth. “He thought so quickly and did not even hesitate,” Grifth said.

See GIRL, Page 19

said Grif fi th. “He thought so quickly and did not even hesitate,” Grif fi th
said Grif fi th. “He thought so quickly and did not even hesitate,” Grif fi th
said Grif fi th. “He thought so quickly and did not even hesitate,” Grif fi th
said Grif fi th. “He thought so quickly and did not even hesitate,” Grif fi th

2 Monday Feb. 13, 2012

FOR THE RECORD

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Thought for the Day

“An explanation of cause is not a justification by reason.”

— C.S.Lewis,English author (1898-1963).

This Day in History

1861

Abraham Lincoln was officially declared winner of the 1860 presiden- tial election as electors cast their bal-

lots. In 1542, the fth wife of England’s King Henry VIII, Catherine Howard, was executed for adultery. In 1741, Andrew Bradford of Pennsylvania published the rst American magazine. “The American Magazine, or A Monthly View of the Political State of the British Colonies” lasted three issues. In 1914, the American Society of Composers, Authors and Publishers, known as ASCAP, was founded in New York. In 1920, the League of Nations recognized the perpetual neu- trality of Switzerland. In 1935, a jury in Flemington, N.J. found Bruno Richard Hauptmann guilty of rst-degree murder in the kidnap-slaying of the son of Charles and Anne Lindbergh. (Hauptmann was later executed.) In 1945, during World War II, Allied planes began bombing the German city of Dresden. The Soviets captured Budapest, Hungary, from the Germans. In 1960, France exploded its rst atomic bomb in the Sahara Desert. In 1961, the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York announced that three statues in its collection, supposedly Etruscan terra cotta warriors, were, in fact, forgeries. In 1972, the 11th Winter Olympics ended in Sapporo, Japan. In 1980, the 13th Winter Olympics opened in Lake Placid, N.Y. In 1988, the 15th winter Olympics opened in Calgary, Alberta, Canada. In 1991, during Operation Desert Storm, allied warplanes destroyed an underground shelter in Baghdad that had been identied as a military command center; Iraqi ofcials said 500 civilians were killed. Ten years ago: John Walker Lindh pleaded not guilty in feder- al court in Alexandria, Va., to conspiring to kill Americans and supporting the Taliban and terrorist organizations. (Lindh later pleaded guilty to lesser offenses and was sentenced to 20 years in prison.)

to lesser offenses and was sentenced to 20 years in prison.) Singer Peter Gabriel is 62.

Singer Peter Gabriel is 62.

Birthdays

Actress Kelly Hu is Actress Mena 44. Suvari is 33.
Actress Kelly Hu is
Actress Mena
44.
Suvari is 33.

Former test pilot Charles E. “Chuck”Yeager is 89. Actress Kim Novak is 79. Actor George Segal is 78. Actress Carol Lynley is 70. Singer-musician Peter Tork (The Monkees) is 70. Actress Stockard Channing is 68. Talk show host Jerry Springer is 68. Actor Bo Svenson is 68. Actor David Naughton is 61. Rock musician Peter Hook is 56. Actor Matt Salinger is 52. Singer Henry Rollins is 51. Actor Neal McDonough is 46. Singer Freedom Williams is 46. Rock musician Todd Harrell (3 Doors Down) is 40. Singer Robbie Williams is 38. Rhythm-and-blues performer Natalie Stewart is 33.

is 38. Rhythm-and-blues performer Natalie Stewart is 33. KORE CHAN/DAILY JOURNAL Lion dancers from Tim Wong

KORE CHAN/DAILY JOURNAL

Lion dancers from Tim Wong Martial Arts School performs in downtown San Mateo Saturday afternoon in the third annual Lion Dance Festival sponsored by the Downtown San Mateo Association and Self-Help for the Elderly.

In other news

Church where Whitney Houston first sang remembers her

NEWARK, N.J. — Congregants at the Newark church where Whitney Houston got her start came together Sunday to mourn her sudden death. Houston, 48, died Saturday at a Beverly Hills, Calif., hotel, authorities said. The cause wasn’t known, her publi- cist said. The pop star began singing at the New Hope Baptist Church in Newark as a child. And while parishioners had fond memories of her many performances there over the years, they said her and her family’s longtime membership and serv- ice to the church is what they will never forget. Houston was born in Newark and raised in East Orange, and many said she never forgot her Jersey roots. Her mother, Grammy-award winning gospel singer Cissy Houston, had led the musical pro- gram at the 112-year-old church. Whitney’s cousin, singer Dionne Warwick, also sang in its choir. “The pastor asked us to support the Houston family, to share our love and God’s love with them and to give them strength in this sad time,” said Shawn Cooper, 32, of Newark as he left an early morning service, which was only open to church members. “I haven’t been a regular churchgoer, but felt I should be here today because this is a time for the

community to come together,” Cooper said, noting the church was full Sunday morning. “The Houston family means a lot to this community, they have done a lot for this community, and being there for them is the best thing we can do as a community today.” Several other parishioners voiced simi- lar sentiments as they made their way into the church, ignoring the bitter cold tem- peratures and moderate to gusty winds. A few sympathy cards were tied to a fence post at the church, including one addressed “to the greatest songstress ever.” Next to it, a small bouquet of fresh owers uttered softly in the brisk morn- ing air. Speaking outside the church before the service, New Hope’s Pastor Joe Carter asked reporters gathered to respect the Houston family’s privacy. “The family shared Whitney with the world, but Whitney was a mother, a daughter, and a sister, and that’s the focus we want to keep in front of everyone today. We ask that in this time of grief, you respect their privacy,” Carter said. A former classmate at a Newark high school recalled Houston in a phone interview as a sweet, bub- bly yet unpreten- tious girl.

interview as a sweet, bub- bly yet unpreten- tious girl. Dr. Maria Pane said she attended

Dr. Maria Pane said she attended Mount Saint Dominic Academy with Whitney Houston. The two had home- room together as well as physical educa- tion, French and art. “She was such a beautiful, kind girl and very quiet that to be honest with you, I had no idea there was a star in the mak- ing,” said Pane, who now lives in Maryland. Pane said the two rode the bus together after school, and she remembered Whitney’s favorite way to pass the time at the bus stop: practicing her dance rou- tines. In a statement late Saturday night, New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie called the singer “a true New Jersey treasure” who died too soon. “Her terribly premature death is an awful loss for her family and the incredi- ble New Jersey musical family. Her soar- ing talent put her in the pantheon of great New Jersey musical talents like Frank Sinatra, Count Basie and Bruce Springsteen. Our prayers are with her family.” Some of Houston’s fans came to the church Sunday as a way of dealing with their grief. Among them was Charice Crawford, a 34-year-old Irvington resi- dent who said the singer’s music became the soundtrack to her life. “This is where I needed to be this morning,” said Crawford, who does not belong to the church. “I understand why I couldn’t attend the service, but being here helps ease the grief of her passing.”

but being here helps ease the grief of her passing.” THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME by David

THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME

by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek

Unscramble these four Jumbles, one letter to each square, to form four ordinary words.

EUCIJ

letter to each square, to form four ordinary words. EUCIJ ©2012 Tribune Media Services, Inc. All
letter to each square, to form four ordinary words. EUCIJ ©2012 Tribune Media Services, Inc. All
letter to each square, to form four ordinary words. EUCIJ ©2012 Tribune Media Services, Inc. All

©2012 Tribune Media Services, Inc. All Rights Reserved.

KLANP

Tribune Media Services, Inc. All Rights Reserved. KLANP SEYPLE ZFLEIZ Find us on Facebook
Tribune Media Services, Inc. All Rights Reserved. KLANP SEYPLE ZFLEIZ Find us on Facebook

SEYPLE

Media Services, Inc. All Rights Reserved. KLANP SEYPLE ZFLEIZ Find us on Facebook http://www.facebook.com/jumble
Media Services, Inc. All Rights Reserved. KLANP SEYPLE ZFLEIZ Find us on Facebook http://www.facebook.com/jumble

ZFLEIZ

Services, Inc. All Rights Reserved. KLANP SEYPLE ZFLEIZ Find us on Facebook http://www.facebook.com/jumble Now
Services, Inc. All Rights Reserved. KLANP SEYPLE ZFLEIZ Find us on Facebook http://www.facebook.com/jumble Now
Services, Inc. All Rights Reserved. KLANP SEYPLE ZFLEIZ Find us on Facebook http://www.facebook.com/jumble Now
Find us on Facebook http://www.facebook.com/jumble
Find us on Facebook http://www.facebook.com/jumble

Now arrange the circled letters to form the surprise answer, as suggested by the above cartoon.

Ans: TO Jumbles: Saturday’s Answer: (Answers tomorrow) BUILD ONION SAVAGE COWARD Before deciding on a
Ans:
TO
Jumbles:
Saturday’s
Answer:
(Answers tomorrow)
BUILD ONION SAVAGE COWARD
Before deciding on a new stereo system, he
wanted to get this — SOUND ADVICE

Lotto

Feb. 10 Mega Millions Daily Four 3 4 18 29 50 20 4 9 6
Feb. 10 Mega Millions
Daily Four
3
4
18 29
50
20
4
9
6
2
Mega number
Feb. 11 Super Lotto Plus
Daily three midday
1
2 18
34 43
27
2
3
4
Mega number
Daily three evening
Fantasy Five
1
9
9
5
15
19
22
32
three evening Fantasy Five 1 9 9 5 15 19 22 32 The Daily Derby race

The Daily Derby race winners are No. 10 Solid Gold in first place;No.07 Eureka in second place; and No.08 Gorgeous George in third place.The race time was clocked at 1:43.60.

Local Weather Forecast

Monday: Breezy. Showers likely. Highs in the lower 50s. Northwest winds 20 to 30 mph with gusts to around 45 mph. Monday night: Mostly cloudy. Breezy. A slight chance of showers in the evening.

Lows in the lower 40s. Northwest winds 20

to 30 mph

midnight. Tuesday: Partly cloudy. Highs in the mid 50s. Northwest

winds 10 to 15 mph. Tuesday night: Partly cloudy. A slight chance of showers. Lows in the lower 40s. Northwest winds 15 to 20 mph. Chance of showers 20 percent. Wednesday: Partly cloudy in the morning then becoming mostly cloudy. A slight chance of showers. Highs in the mid

50s.

cloudy. A slight chance of showers. Highs in the mid 50s. Becoming 15 to 20 mph

Becoming

15 to 20 mph after

The San Mateo Daily Journal

800 S. Claremont St., Suite 210, San Mateo, CA 94402

Publisher: Jerry Lee jerry@smdailyjournal.com

smdailyjournal.com

twitter.com/smdailyjournal

Editor in Chief: Jon Mays jon@smdailyjournal.com

scribd.com/smdailyjournal

facebook.com/smdailyjournal

To

Events:

News:

Delivery:

Career:

(650) 344-5200 Fax: (650) 344-5290 ads@smdailyjournal.com calendar@smdailyjournal.com news@smdailyjournal.com circulation@smdailyjournal.com info@smdailyjournal.com

As a public service,the Daily Journal prints obituaries of approximately 250 words or less with a photo one time on the date of the family’s choosing.To submit obituaries,email information along with a jpeg photo to news@smdailyjournal.com.Free obituaries are edited for style,clarity,length and grammar. If you would like to have an obituary printed more than once,longer than 250 words or without editing,please submit an inquiry to our advertising department at ads@smdailyjournal.com.

THE DAILY JOURNAL

LOCAL

Monday Feb. 13, 2012

3

The Restless Lawman — Wyatt Earp

• Feb. 13, 2012 3 The Restless Lawman — Wyatt Earp W yatt Earp was a

W yatt Earp was a restless man. He began life in the state of Illinois. He and his family lived in Iowa,

then returned to Illinois, rode a wagon to California, took a job in Missouri before he left under a cloud of suspicion of horse thief and stealing, was “lost” for a while, took jobs in Kansas, traveled to Texas to gamble, returned to Kansas, then on to Tombstone, Arizona Territory, hid out in Colorado and nally returned to California. In all of these wanderings he, in just 30 sec- onds, built up a reputation that followed him to his grave. His father, Nicolas, became the peace ofcer while in Illinois (a municipal constable) and sold liquor on the side. After leaving Illinois in disgrace (and almost jail) he surfaced in Missouri in 1868 when Nicholas again became became the local constable. This time, he didn’t bootleg liquor and became the justice of the peace. Wyatt became appointed constable in place of his father, however, he had learned so of the bad habits of his father and was accused of keeping money he had collected for the city as well as stealing a horse. He apparently felt comfort- able doing these things as he did borderline and illegal activities the rest of his life. To put things in perspective, however, life in the

life. To put things in perspective, however, life in the PHOTO COURTESY OF THE SAN MATEO

PHOTO COURTESY OF THE SAN MATEO COUNTY HISTORY MUSEUM

Wyatt Earp (age 21) before the O.K. Corral incident.

1800s was like living on the edge. The west- ern part of the United States was just being settled and law enforcement and other famil- iar government activities we know today had yet to be established. A law enforcement of- cer (policeman, police chief, sheriff, consta- ble, marshal, etc.) did not have the backing of laws and the community like we have now days. Anybody could be sheriff because the pay was dismally low, and to do your duty you had to form your own law and rules to gain the respect of a many times lawless community. It was a tough task for anyone and not many lawmen survived very long. Death was many

times the reward for taking this task. After eeing Missouri a wanted man, Wyatt surfaced in the frontier town that was a termi- nal for the cattle driven up from Texas. On April 21, 1875, Wyatt joined the Wichita mar- shal’s ofce where he received several public acclamations for his enforcement work. He was cool under re, determined, forceful, very seldom backed down from a confrontation when he could win and was well liked. On one occasion, he held off a mob of armed men and cowboys after an incident dealing with col- lecting for an unpaid piano in a brothel. This incident was one of many in which Wyatt set- tled potentially dangerous incidents peaceful- ly. He was very skillful in calming rowdies and if he couldn’t settle the event peacefully, he used the barrel of his long Buntline Special to subdue the man. He could become too excitable also and, in Wichita, his answer to a confrontation with a city ofcial was to use his sts. He left Wichita on April 2, 1876 and headed for the next cattle terminal — Dodge City, Kan. His reputation continued to follow him to Tombstone, Ariz. after he left Dodge City on Sept. 9, 1878. When he left, he was accompanied by a former prostitute, Celia Anne “Mattie” Blaylock. When Wyatt arrived in the small settlement of Tombstone, law as we know it was almost nonexistent. There were many factions in the town that had aligned themselves to survive in this wilderness that was awash with silver from the abundant mines in this territory. Two newspapers were at odds with themselves, the “cowboys” (a derisive term) ran the town with the help of the Clanton and McLaury families

See HISTORY, Page 6

Police reports

Do-it-yourself dentist?

A drill worth $500 was taken on the 2000 block of Chess Drive in San Mateo before 8:13 a.m. on Thursday, Feb. 9.

BURLINGAME

Vehicle burglary. A vehicle was burglarized on the 1200 block of Bayshore Highway before 7:54 a.m. Sunday, Feb. 5. Burglary. A man was arrested for burglary on the 600 block of Airport Boulevard before 6:55 a.m. Saturday, Feb. 4. Petty theft. A camera was taken on the 1300 block of Bayshore Highway before 1:45 a.m. Saturday, Feb. 4. Vandalism. A residence was egged on the 1100 block of Cabrillo Avenue before 11:09 p.m. Friday, Feb. 3. Stolen vehicle. A vehicle was taken on the 600 block of Airport Boulevard before 10:13 p.m. Friday, Feb. 3. Petty theft. A laptop was taken from a hotel conference room on the 100 block of Anza Boulevard before 12:49 p.m. Friday, Feb. 3. Stolen vehicle. A trailer was taken on the 1600 block of Rollins Avenue before 10:46 a.m. Tuesday, Jan. 31.

REDWOOD CITY

Residential burglary. A computer and pair of shoes were taken from a house that was entered while the residents were home on Rolison Road before 7:03 a.m. Sunday, Feb. 5. Assault with a deadly weapon. Several sub- jects jumped a man resulting in a laceration to the head and pain to the ribs and abdomen near the intersection of Woodside Road and Alameda de las Pulgas before 3:47 a.m. Sunday, Feb. 5.

to the ribs and abdomen near the intersection of Woodside Road and Alameda de las Pulgas
to the ribs and abdomen near the intersection of Woodside Road and Alameda de las Pulgas
to the ribs and abdomen near the intersection of Woodside Road and Alameda de las Pulgas

4 Monday Feb. 13, 2012

THE DAILY JOURNAL

4 Monday • Feb. 13, 2012 THE DAILY JOURNAL Aren’t You Curious? Stop by and check
4 Monday • Feb. 13, 2012 THE DAILY JOURNAL Aren’t You Curious? Stop by and check
4 Monday • Feb. 13, 2012 THE DAILY JOURNAL Aren’t You Curious? Stop by and check
4 Monday • Feb. 13, 2012 THE DAILY JOURNAL Aren’t You Curious? Stop by and check
Aren’t You Curious? Stop by and check out our 2 Bedroom 1 Bedroom and Studio
Aren’t You Curious?
Stop by and check out our
2 Bedroom
1 Bedroom and
Studio Apartments
Jr. 1 Bedroom coming soon!
Tours Daily between
10AM and 4PM
Active Independent & Assisted Living
• Day trips & 50+ activities every week
• Two blocks from Burlingame Avenue
• Secured underground parking
• Luxurious apartments, with full kitchens
850 N. El Camino Real, S.M. • 650-344-8200
License# 41050763
• www.sterlingcourt.com

THE DAILY JOURNAL

STATE/LOCAL

Monday Feb. 13, 2012

5

Dem convention showcases rising stars

By Juliet Williams

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

SAN DIEGO — This weekend’s gathering of California Democrats showcased two of the party’s rising stars, with state Attorney General Kamala Harris and Lt. Gov. Gavin Newsom showing off their formida- ble political skills and contrasting approaches as the state’s majority party prepares for an eventual changing of the guard. Harris and Newsom are telegenic and charismatic, and both quiet a room when they take the micro- phone. They are among the most admired young leaders in their party and are viewed as the most likely candidates for governor in 2018 — or sooner, if Gov. Jerry Brown opts not to seek a second term — or U.S. Senate, should Sen. Dianne Feinstein win re-election and decide to step aside in the next few years. Newsom, 44, is the former San Francisco mayor best known for issu- ing marriage licenses to gay couples eight years ago this Sunday, setting off a national debate about gay mar- riage that remains unresolved. He was

elected lieutenant governor in 2010 after a short-lived run for the Democratic gubernatorial nomination before he yielded to Brown. Harris, 47, nar-

rowly won elec- tion as California’s top law enforce- ment ofcer in 2010 after six years as San Francisco district attorney, beat- ing Los Angeles County District Attorney Steve Cooley. She was a deputy district attorney in Alameda County from 1990 to 1998. The two have been cast as political rivals for a decade, rst in San Francisco, and now on a statewide stage, and draw much of their politi- cal strength from the same reservoir of voters and liberal causes. They also have the same political consultants. They were two of the most dynam- ic speakers amid a long stream of addresses by elected ofcials on Saturday, the busiest day of the Democratic Party’s weekend conven- tion in San Diego. Both drew an audi-

weekend conven- tion in San Diego. Both drew an audi- Kamala Harris ence of more than

Kamala Harris

ence of more than 2,000 when they took the stage. Harris won the crowd over with a rousing speech just days after she announced that California

had joined a nationwide settlement with the largest lenders over the foreclosure crisis. California, where the economy has been pummeled since the start of the recession, eventually stands to receive $18 billion from the terms of the set- tlement. That amount was far more than most observers had predicted the state would get and billions beyond what was initially on the table, Harris said. Newsom was among those who had urged her to seek a bigger piece of the pie for California. In her address to convention partic- ipants, Harris slammed what she called the faulty logic “that says AIG was too big to fail, but a regular fam- ily’s home is too triing to matter. “In fact, I’ll tell you what’s too big

ing to matter. “In fact, I’ll tell you what’s too big Gavin Newsom to fail: I

Gavin Newsom

to fail: I say it’s our middle class that is too big to fail,” she said, bringing the crowd to its feet as she recited a too-big-to-fail list that included quali- ty public education, health care and women’s rights. “California Democrats, when we pull together, we are too big to fail.” The end of her speech was met with thunderous applause. Newsom also came into the week- end convention on a political high note, after the state Supreme Court ruled last week that Proposition 8, the 2010 voter-approved statewide meas- ure banning gay marriage, was unconstitutional. Supporters are expected to challenge that decision, eventually to the U.S. Supreme Court. Newsom called the changing tide on gay marriage a “generational call to action.” “It’s about what’s possible when we Democrats stand up on principle and move from ‘I wish’ to ‘I will,’ when we stop being well-behaved, biting our tongues, waiting our turn and stand up and ght for the things we believe in, regardless of the prevailing political winds,” Newsom said to applause.

Local briefs

Arrest made in January stabbing outside Half Moon Bay wedding

A 17-year-old alleged gang member was arrest- ed by San Mateo County sheriff’s detectives Friday morning in connection with the January stabbing of four people outside a wedding in Half Moon Bay, according to the sheriff’s ofce. The stabbing occurred on Main Street outside the I.D.E.S. Hall at about 11:20 p.m. on Saturday, Jan. 28. Four men in their 20s were leaving a wedding reception at the hall when they were approached by a group of male suspects and stabbed by at least one of the suspects. All four victims were transported to a hospital for treatment and were released. The sheriff’s ofce said that potential suspects were identied as young men afliated with the Media Luna Norte — or Half Moon North — gang. The juvenile, who lives in the Half Moon

Bay area, was arrested at about 10:30 a.m. Friday. He was booked into the San Mateo County Youth Services Center.

Firefighters rescue paraglider stranded on cliff

Fire ghters in Daly City rescued a paraglider stranded on a cliffside in the area of Mussel Rock on Saturday, re ofcials said. Rescue crews responded to the area shortly before 3 p.m. The man was trapped 150 feet below the bluff. Fire crews used a picket system to get down the cliff to the man, and evaluated him for injury. He was carried back up to the bluff and transported by ambulance to San Francisco General Hospital for further evaluation.

public to help identify vandals who threw paint

on private property on Saturday.

Ofcers responded to a home near Bridge Road and Stonehedge Road where sometime between 11 a.m. and noon a suspect or suspects

threw several cans of paint on to a driveway and

a driveway gate, according to Hillsborough

police. No one was injured, but the vandalism caused major damage to the property, police said. Anyone who might have witnessed the inci- dent or seen anything suspicious in the area is asked to contact the Hillsborough Police Department at (650) 375-7470.

Obituaries

Miguel Madrigal

Miguel Madrigal age 89, passed away Feb. 10 at his residence. Miguel was born in Aguililla Michorgan, Mexico on March 2, 1922 and was a resident of Redwood City for over 40 years. He is sur- vived by his wife, Maria; son Miguel (Maria); and grandchildren Monica, Miguel Angel, and Jessica. Friends are invited to attend a Funeral Mass at St. Anthony’s Church, 3500 Middlefield Road,

Menlo Park, on Tuesday, Feb. 14 at

10 a.m. with interment following at

Holy Cross Catholic Cemetery, Menlo Park.

James David Swack Jr.

James David Swack Jr., Born July

25, 1952, passed away Thursday Feb. 9 from a heart attack. He was

59 years old. A long time resident of

Millbrae, he attended Capuchino High School and was an auto tech- nician for many years and later worked for San Mateo School District. He is survived by his lov- ing wife, Catherine; daughters Corrine, Jaime, Katlin and son Jonathan; and grandchildren, Tatiana, Amaya and JC. He is also survived by his mother, Aline Swack and sister, Barbara Killeen. Jim was preceded in death by his father, James Swack. His hobbies included playing the guitar, shoot- ing targets, World War II golf and summers in Twain Harte. Family and friends are invited to attend a Memorial Service, Tuesday, Feb. 14, 11 a.m. at Chapel of the Highlands, 194 Millwood Drive at El Camino Real in Millbrae. In lieu of flowers, the family suggests memorial contributions be made to your favorite charity.

advertisement Vandals throw several cans of paint on driveway Police in Hillsborough are asking the
advertisement
Vandals throw several
cans of paint on driveway
Police in Hillsborough are asking the
ATTENTION:
SAN BRUNO- A local doctor’s shocking new
FREE report reveals the real truth about
ill-fitting, irritating dentures that pop-up, gag
you or get stuck when you are eating.
Denture Sufferers
FREE Report
Reveals …
“Shocking Truth
About How To Stop
Being a Victim to
Wearing Those
Agonizing Dentures
Once & for ALL!”
If you’ve been told that you do not have
any options and you are stuck with those
dentures your entire life, then you must find
out the 3 dangers that denture wearer’s face
and the new revolutionary alternatives that
are changing peoples lives daily!Readers of
the recent special report have discovered
that they can now have better fitting,
stronger, more enjoyable teeth—quickly
and easily WITHOUT the frustrations and
embarrassment that dentures can cause.
Don’t suffer with those irritating and
uncomfortable things anymore…
you don’t have to!
Ready to find out how
to Say Goodbye to
Dentures NOW?
Schedule a no obligation
consultation, call us directly
at 650-588-4255
Limited to the first 17
people to call. Please
mention this ad.
To receive your copy of this FREE report:
Text SMILE to 650-669-8476 and we’ll get
you the report right away!
Or call our prerecorded message hotline at
650-669-8476.
No live person will answer.

6 Monday Feb. 13, 2012

LOCAL

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Occupy protesters jailed after march in Oakland

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

OAKLAND — Police have arrested two Occupy Oakland pro- testers and are looking for a third suspect after a confrontation between the protesters and police Saturday night. The arrests came as a group of about 20 protesters confronted a California Highway Patrol officer after he made a traffic stop in an unrelated matter in the city’s downtown around 11 p.m., Oakland police Sgt. Chris Bolton said. As Oakland ofcers assisted the CHP ofcer, a woman kicked an Oakland police sergeant, Bolton said. She was arrested on suspicion of battery on a peace ofcer and other charges. As she was being taken into cus-

tody, police arrested a man they say tried to pull her from arresting of- cers. He was booked on suspicion of attempting to unlawfully intervene. Their names have not been released. During the confrontation, a pro- tester also hit the Oakland police sergeant in the head with a protest sign and ran from the area, Bolton said. The sergeant wasn’t injured. Saturday’s protest started earlier in the evening with a group of about 75 people marching as part of a weekly march over what organizers say is police brutality. The arrests Saturday comes two weeks after police arrested more than 400 people when a midday march escalated into a clash between some rock-throwing pro- testers and police who responded with tear gas.

CITY WELCOMES NEW FIREFIGHTERS

who responded with tear gas. CITY WELCOMES NEW FIREFIGHTERS PETER MOOTZ Mike Keefe, John Healy and

PETER MOOTZ

Mike Keefe, John Healy and San Mateo Fire Chief Dan Belville welcomed Gino Lavezzo from San Mateo, Gino Timpano from Millbrae and Mark Volkman from South San Francisco as new members of the San Mateo Fire Department.The three men recently completed 14 weeks of training.They join the department this week.

14 weeks of training.They join the department this week. HISTORY Continued from page 1 and they
14 weeks of training.They join the department this week. HISTORY Continued from page 1 and they

HISTORY

Continued from page 1

and they had the backing of Sheriff Johnny Behan. The Clanton boys were rustlers who stole cattle from Mexico and sold them in the United States. They also stole cattle from within the Arizona Territory and sold them in Mexico. The government in Tombstone was weak and the citizens felt threatened by the cowboys. This climate ended in the most famous shootout in U.S. history — the gun- ght at the O.K. Corral in which 30 seconds of gun play established Wyatt Earp, Doc Holliday and the Earp brothers, Virgil and Morgan, as the heroes of law enforcement. Unfortunately, the outcome kindled a reaction that Wyatt could not understand the rest of his life. He was tried for murder due to his part of the gunplay, was acquitted and freed, but eventually lost a brother who was killed by one of the Clanton clan. Ike Clanton was acquitted and freed and the Earps unleashed their form of family justice that ended in many deaths and the necessary exit of Wyatt to the state of Colorado before he could be arrested. Wyatt eventually settled in California. The Earp home in Colton, Calif. (near Riverside) became a stop for Wyatt but he moved on to renew an acquaintance with the former mis-

tress of the Tombstone sheriff, Josephine Sarah Marcus, who lived in San Francisco. This friendship lasted almost 50 years as they continued to move about the west — California, Alaska, Utah mainly — never set- tling down very long. Wyatt ran gambling dens, bars, worked real estate, refereed box- ing matches but never again became a “law man.” He nally settled down in Los Angles and became a movie addict. He met many of the big cowboy stars — John Wayne, William S. Hart, Tom Mix and many others. Wyatt longed to have a movie made of his life as he felt he had helped establish law in the West when no law had existed. The producers, however, were reluctant to tackle the lm. At the end of his life, a reporter captured Wyatt’s life in hundreds of hours of interviews and in a book immortalized the life of Wyatt Earp. When Wyatt died Jan. 13, 1929 in Los Angeles, Wyatt’s life had not yet reached the multitude of movie goers that were yet to experience the Wild West as Wyatt Earp had experienced it. Wyatt was buried in the Marcus family plot at the Hills of Eternity cemetery in Colma, Calif. His Jewish wife, Josephine, was buried next to him when she died in 1944.

Rediscovering the Peninsula by Darold Fredricks appears in the Monday edition of the Daily Journal.

when she died in 1944. Rediscovering the Peninsula by Darold Fredricks appears in the Monday edition

THE DAILY JOURNAL

NATION

Monday Feb. 13, 2012

7

GOP: Birth control ap far from over

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

WASHINGTON — Conserv-atives said Sunday the ap surrounding President Barack Obama’s birth con- trol mandate was far from over, with Senate Republican Leader Mitch

McConnell saying he’ll push to over- turn the requirement because it was another example

of government meddling. While a senior White House of- cial shrugged off such remarks, declaring the issue resolved and new legislation unlikely, the heat- ed rhetoric from

Republicans sug- gested the GOP would try to keep the debate alive in an election year to rally conservatives and seize upon voter frustration with big government. “It’s riddled with constitutional

problems,” McConnell said of Obama’s broader health-care plan. “And this is what happens when the government tries to take over health care and tries to interfere with your religious beliefs.” Last week, Obama backed down on a mandate that religious-afliated employers such as Catholic hospi- tals and colleges cover birth control in their health insurance plans. In a tweak of the rule, those employees would be offered free coverage directly from their health insurer. But employers would not provide or pay for it. The White House says the plan won’t drive up costs because birth control, similar to other preventative care measures, is less expensive than pregnancy. But opponents say that unless drug makers stop charging for contraception, the cost is likely to get passed on to employers regardless.

the cost is likely to get passed on to employers regardless. Mitch McConnell The fight begins:Obama’s

Mitch

McConnell

The fight begins:Obama’s budget going to Congress

By Martin Crutsinger

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

WASHINGTON — The new budget that President Barack Obama is sending to Congress aims to achieve $4 trillion in decit reduction over the next decade by restraining government spending and raising taxes on the wealthy. To help a weak economy, Obama’s proposal Monday requests increases in transportation, education and other areas. While administration ofcials on Sunday defended the plan as a bal- anced approach, Republicans belit- tled the effort as a repeat of failed policies that did too little to attack soaring costs in such programs as Medicare and threatened growth by raising taxes. The debate is almost certain to go all the way to Election Day in November with gridlock keeping Congress from resolving many press- ing issues on expiring tax cuts and across-the-board spending cuts until a lame-duck session at year’s end.

spending cuts until a lame-duck session at year’s end. Barack Obama Obama’s spending blue- print for

Barack Obama

Obama’s spending blue- print for the budget year that begins Oct. 1 projects a decit for this year of $1.33 trillion. That would mean four straight years of trillion-

dollar-plus decits. The budget will project a decline in the decit to $901 billion in 2013 and continued improvements shrinking the decit to $575 billion in 2018. Republicans said Obama’s plan was a stark reminder that the Democratic president had failed to meet the pledge he made after tak- ing ofce in 2009 to cut the decit in half by the end of his rst term. But Jacob Lew, Obama’s chief of staff, said the administration had to contend with a deep recession and soaring unemployment that had driven the decits higher than any- one anticipated. He said Obama’s

plan would cut the decit below 3 percent of gross domestic product by 2018, to levels that economists generally view as sustainable. He said faster decit cuts now would set back an economy still struggling with high unemploy- ment. Lew, Obama’s former budget

chief, also said it was critical that Congress agree to extend a payroll tax cut due to expire at the end of February. Failure to extend it, he said, would cause another hit to the economy. “I think there is pretty broad agreement that the time for austerity is not today,” Lew said during a series of appearances on Sunday talk shows. “Right now we have an

aus-

economy that’s taking root

terity measures right now would take the economy in the wrong way.” House Republicans are preparing their version of Obama’s budget that will propose sharper reductions in government entitlement programs such as Medicare while avoiding any tax increases.

Santorum plans aggressive strategy against Romney

By Steve Peoples

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

PORTLAND, Maine — A day after Mitt Romney regained some momentum in the Republican presi- dential contest, his rival Rick Santorum went on the attack, calling the front-runner “desperate” while promising to compete aggressively to win the state where Romney grew up. Santorum said Sunday he could do “exceptionally well” in Michigan, where Romney’s father served as gov- ernor. The Midwestern state and Arizona host Republican presidential nominating contests on Feb. 28.

“We’re going to spend a lot of time in Michigan and Arizona, and those are up next. And that’s where we’ve really been focusing on,” Santorum told

ABC’s “This Week.” He suggested that a strong showing in those contests would make the presidential contest “a two- man race,” dismissing current rivals Newt Gingrich and Ron Paul. Santorum shrugged off his third-

Newt Gingrich and Ron Paul. Santorum shrugged off his third- Mitt Romney Rick Santorum place finish

Mitt Romney

and Ron Paul. Santorum shrugged off his third- Mitt Romney Rick Santorum place finish Saturday in

Rick Santorum

place finish Saturday in cau- cuses in Maine, where he didn’t actively com- pete, as well as his second- place finish in a straw poll of conservative

activists. Romney has been painting Santorum as a long-time Washington insider who pursued home-state projects. Santorum on Sunday described Romney’s recent criticism as “desperate.”

Nation briefs

U.S. seeks to mine social media to predict future

SAN FRANCISCO — The U.S. government is seeking software that can mine social media to predict everything from future terrorist attacks to foreign uprisings, accord- ing to requests posted online by fed- eral law enforcement and intelligence agencies. Hundreds of intelligence analysts already sift overseas Twitter and Facebook posts to track events such as the Arab Spring. But in a formal “request for information” from potential contractors, the FBI recent- ly outlined its desire for a digital tool to scan the entire universe of social media — more data than humans could ever crunch.

Man charged in plot to kill Utah governor

SALT LAKE CITY — A Utah man who police say threatened to assassinate Gov. Gary Herbert is now facing multiple felony charges. Brian Biff Baker was charged Friday in Salt Lake City’s 3rd District Court with felony counts of drug and weapons possession, along with a misdemeanor count of threatening elected ofcials. Court records show no hearings are set in the case. The 52-year-old Baker is being held in the Salt Lake County jail. Bail is set at $25,007. It was not immediately clear whether Baker had an attorney.

R.I. player wins $336 million Powerball jackpot

PROVIDENCE, R.I. — Lottery ofcials say someone who played the Powerball in Rhode Island has won the $336.4 million jackpot. The new multimillionaire has not stepped forward and the lottery has not said where the winning ticket was sold. To win, the player had to match all of Saturday’s ve numbers, 1-10- 37-52-57, and Powerball number 11. Because of rising sales, the jackpot nearly doubled from $173.5 million on Feb. 1.

37-52-57, and Powerball number 11. Because of rising sales, the jackpot nearly doubled from $173.5 million
37-52-57, and Powerball number 11. Because of rising sales, the jackpot nearly doubled from $173.5 million
37-52-57, and Powerball number 11. Because of rising sales, the jackpot nearly doubled from $173.5 million
37-52-57, and Powerball number 11. Because of rising sales, the jackpot nearly doubled from $173.5 million
37-52-57, and Powerball number 11. Because of rising sales, the jackpot nearly doubled from $173.5 million
37-52-57, and Powerball number 11. Because of rising sales, the jackpot nearly doubled from $173.5 million

8 Monday Feb. 13, 2012

WORLD

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Al-Qaida backs Syrian revolt

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

BEIRUT — Al-Qaida’s leader has called for the ouster of Syria’s “pernicious, cancerous regime,” raising fears that Islamic extremists will try to exploit an uprising against President Bashar Assad that began with peaceful calls for demo- cratic change but is morphing into a bloody, armed insurgency. The regime has long blamed ter- rorists for the 11-month-old revolt, and al-Qaida’s endorsement creates new difculties for the U.S., its Western allies and Arab states try- ing to gure out a way to help force Assad from power. On Sunday, the

22-nation Arab

called

U.N.

Security

Council to cre-

joint

peacekeeping

force for Syria,

Damascus

rejected it

immediately. In an eight-minute video message released late Saturday, al-Qaida chief Ayman al-Zawahri called on Muslims to support Syrian rebels. “Wounded Syria is still bleeding day after day, and the butcher (Bashar Assad) isn’t deterred and

day, and the butcher (Bashar Assad) isn’t deterred and Bashar Assad League for ate but the

Bashar Assad

League

for

ate

but

the

a

doesn’t stop,” said al-Zawahri, who took over al-Qaida after Osama bin Laden was killed by U.S. special forces last May. “However, the resistance of our people in Syria is escalating and growing despite all the pains, sacrices and blood.” The United Nations estimates more than 5,400 people have been killed in Syria since the uprising began in March. But that gure is from January, when the U.N. stopped counting because the chaos in the country has made it all but impossible to check the gures. While many of the anti-govern- ment protests sweeping the country remain peaceful, the uprising as a

whole has become more violent in recent months as frustrated demon- strators and army defectors take up arms to protect themselves from the steady military assault. An increas- ing number of army defectors known as the Free Syrian Army have launched attacks, killing sol- diers and security forces. Syria now has become one of the deadliest conflicts of the Arab Spring, and many fear the country of 22 million at the heart of the Arab world is on the verge of a civil war that could engulf the region. In a grave escalation of the vio- lence, a string of suicide attacks have killed dozens of people since

late December. The latest, twin bombings in the major northern city of Aleppo, killed at least 28 people on Friday, the government said. Some 70 people were killed in ear- lier attacks in the capital, Damascus, on Dec. 23 and Jan. 6. All the blasts struck security targets. Nobody has taken responsibility for the attacks, but the regime said they have the hallmarks of al-Qaida and immediately blamed the global terror group. Saturday’s statement by al- Zawahri appears to bolster Assad’s accusations, but the Syrian opposi- tion and the Free Syrian Army reject the government’s claims entirely.

Palestinian unity deal faces hurdle

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

RAMALLAH, West Bank — A mounting rebellion by Hamas lead- ers in Gaza against a breakthrough power-sharing agreement with Palestinian President Mahmoud Abbas highlights a potentially fatal aw — the deal never spelled out how the Western-backed leader can take charge again in Gaza, the terri- tory he lost to a violent takeover by the Islamic militants. Former bitter foes Abbas and Khaled Mashaal, Hamas’ top leader in exile, signed the Qatar-brokered deal in Doha last week, saying they are committed to a true partnership. As part of the agreement, Abbas is to head an interim unity government that replaces rival administrations in the West Bank and Gaza and leads the Palestinians to general elections.

and Gaza and leads the Palestinians to general elections. Mahmoud Abbas Abbas needs to strike a

Mahmoud

Abbas

Abbas needs to strike a deli- cate balance to make it work. The Palestinian leader has to sat- isfy international demands that the interim govern- ment — to con-

sist of politically independent technocrats — not be a front for Hamas, shunned by the West as a terror group. If it is seen as too close to Hamas, the Palestinians would likely lose hundreds of mil- lions of dollars in Western aid. At the same time, he risks sabo- tage from Hamas leaders in Gaza if

he tries to strip them of too much of their power. In the nearly ve years it ruled the territory, Hamas hired

some 40,000 civil servants and security forces, many of them sup- porters of the movement, while 62,000 troops and civil servants forced out by the 2007 takeover — many of them pro-Abbas — are waiting to return to their old govern- ment jobs. Gaza leaders of Hamas have voiced their misgivings in increas- ingly strident tones. The Hamas bloc of legislators last week said the deal is illegal because Abbas cannot serve as both president and prime minister. On Saturday, the Hamas strong- man in Gaza, Mahmoud Zahar, complained that Mashaal did not consult with other leaders in the movement before signing the deal and that the decision-making Shura Council should meet to correct what he termed a mistake.

World briefs

Venezuela’s opposition chooses Chavez’s challenger

CARACAS, Venezuela — Opponents of President Hugo Chavez voted in their rst-ever pres- idential primary on Sunday, choos- ing a single challenger they hope will have what it takes to nally defeat Venezuela’s leader after 13 years in ofce. Henrique Capriles, the front-run- ner among ve contenders accord- ing to pre-election polls, predicted a high turnout. “We’re going to surpass all expec- tations of participation,” Capriles said after voting in Caracas.

9 die in Kosovo avalanche; child pulled out alive

Rescuers have pulled a 5-year-old

RESTELICA,

Kosovo

girl alive from the rubble of a house attened by a massive avalanche that killed both her parents and at least seven of her relatives in a remote mountain village in southern Kosovo. Col. Shemsi Syla, a spokesman for the Kosovo Security Force, said Sunday ofcers discov- ered the girl when they heard her voice and cell phone. Her home was buried under 10 meters of snow.

UK gov’t: Press must face tougher penalties

LONDON — Britain’s govern- ment minister responsible for the media said Sunday the country’s press must face tougher penalties for breaches of standards in the wake of the tabloid phone-hacking scandal. Culture Secretary Jeremy Hunt also said newspapers must change their system of self-regulation, but insisted the government should not have any role in enforcing stan- dards.

Serious Back or Neck Trouble? Leg/Arm Pain or Numbness?

Have You Been Diagnosed With a Bulging, Herniated or Degenerative Disc?

There Is New Hope!

A Health Center Dedicated to Severe Disc Conditions

You’ve seen the ads and heard the radio commercials about my Non- Surgical Spinal Decompression treatment. At Crossroads Health Center, I’ve created an entire facility dedicated to patients with severe disc conditions that have not responded to traditional care. My revolutionary, Crossroads Method, provides a very high success rate to patients with serious back, neck, leg and arm pain – even when all else has failed. This FDA cleared; non-surgical treatment allows us to rehabilitate your herniated or degenerative disc(s) by reversing internal pressure and enabling your disc(s) to heal from the inside out. We succeed where other treatments have failed – by removing the pressure that is causing pain to your disc(s) and nerves – without drugs, injections, invasive surgery or harmful side effects.

drugs, injections, invasive surgery or harmful side effects. The only office to have “The Crossroads Method”

The only office to have “The Crossroads Method”

This method which includes computerized true disc decompression is considered by many doctors to be the most advanced and successful non-invasive treatment of serious back, neck, leg or arm pain.

This procedure allows for a much higher success rate by increasing hydration of your discs, flexibility, relaxation of muscles and ligaments along with improving muscle and core strength, balance and posture. This results in a more effective and lasting solution to your pain. There are no side effects and no recovery time is required. This gentle and relaxing treatment has proven to be effective… even when drugs, epidurals, traditional chiropractic, physical therapy and surgery have failed… The Crossroads Method has shown dramatic results.

Patient Testimonials

During the 1 1/2 years of having constant daily lower back pain and spasms, I took anti-inflammatory and pain medication, but nothing helped lessen the pain. When an MRI showed that I had two degenerative discs, I went through a series of lumbar epidural injections without success. The only thing that made the pain and spasms go away was Spinal Decompression treatments at Crossroads Health Center. Four years later and I am still pain-free! Lisa K.

Crossroads Health Center

San Mateo: 177 Bovet Rd. #150 • San Mateo, CA 94402 (in the NeuroLink offices) 650-231-4754 Campbell: 420 Marathon Dr., Campbell, CA 95008 • 408-866-0300 • www.BayAreaBackPain.com

How Will I Know If I Qualify for Treatment?

When you come in for a complimentary consultation we will ask a series of questions and perform a comprehensive examination to determine exactly where the pain is coming from. If x-rays are necessary, we can take them in our office. Once we determine the cause of your pain we will let you know if we can help you and if you qualify for our treatment protocol. If we don’t feel like we can help we will refer you to someone who can.

Dr. Thomas Ferrigno D.C. Crossroads Health Center CALL NOW Free Consultation and Examination with Dr.
Dr. Thomas Ferrigno D.C.
Crossroads Health Center
CALL NOW
Free Consultation and
Examination
with
Dr. Thomas Ferrigno D.C.
Crossroads Health Center
San Mateo 650-231-4754
Campbell 408-866-0300
www.BayAreaBackPain.com
Free visit cannot be used with Medicare or
Federal Insurance Plans.

THE DAILY JOURNAL

OPINION

Monday Feb. 13, 2012

9

Sugar and obesity

— Chicago Sun-Times

N obody is overly sweet on sugar these days, but a bunch of scientists out West have

taken concerns about Nature’s sweeten- er to an extreme. In a paper published recently, a team of scientists in California argued that sugar is so addictive it should be heavi- ly taxed and regulated, like alcohol and drugs. They even want to set a legal age for buying sugar. That’s excessive. That said, there’s no denying we have

Other voices

a national problem with obesity, and

sugar is heavily to blame. Americans

eat and drink roughly 22 teaspoons of sugar every day, three times as much as they did 30 years ago. Not all of that comes out of the sugar bowl. Much of

it is hidden inside processed food and

even bread and cereal. Obesity contributes to a wide range of health problems. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, about 112,000 deaths in the United States are associated each year

with obesity, and the total medical costs came to $147 billion in 2008.

A new study of more than a million

people found that people who carry extra weight report more everyday pain. How bad is it? Over two decades, obesity rates have doubled in adults, and the percentage of adolescents who are above their normal weight has

tripled. The needle on the nation’s bath- room scale is pointing in a scary direc- tion. But let’s be sensible. Let’s eat more healthfully and get more exercise. And let’s not listen to scientists who want a new Prohibition, this time for sugar.

Letters to the editor

Spreading the love for Redi-Wheels

Editor, In acknowledgement of St. Valentine’s Day Feb. 14, please consid- er this letter a “Love Letter” to all the people who serve at San Mateo County Transit District Redi-Wheels. From all the phone representatives, the dispatch-

ers, the drivers, the ofce staff, to the advocates and above all, the taxpayers (I am one too) here in San Mateo County, you have saved my life. Following an injury accident in November 2011, I had nowhere to turn to be able to see physicians, get to the pharmacy, get groceries, go to the bank, still take my college classes - every-

thing we do in our cars.

Wheels for me now and in the foresee- able future. Redi-Wheels is the most unbeliev- able county service you could ever know. Not only have I had rides on weekends, but actually on Christmas Day. The reservationists are kind, the dispatchers are friendly, and the drivers — I love them — they are the “face” of Redi-Wheels. They have even come early “because it is raining.” Thank you — SamTrans and Redi- Wheels. I love you!

It is all Redi-

Patricia Smith

San Mateo

Risky bonds from a ‘fiscally irresponsible entity’

Editor, In reviewing county nances as part of due diligence aimed at a special dis- trict bond backed by the county, I found a recent article in your publica- tion concerning efforts by county supervisors to deal with endemic decits. This part of the article “County tack- les budget, considers building lease”

published in the Feb. 1 edition of the Daily Journal on San Mateo County’s plans to cover its budget decit caught my eye: “Large contributors to those gures are the new jail costs and debt service, negotiated salaries and retire- ment and increasing health and dental premiums for employees.” If reported accurately, there is no mention that, in their discussions, county supervisors have considered the notion of bringing county employee benets in line with those of the gener- al public — that is, by reducing them and saving money. Based on this article and my review of the county’s nances, I’m probably going to avoid investing for my clients in bonds issued or guaranteed by a s- cally irresponsible entity.

Gary Miller

Laguna Niguel

Reforming immigration policy with the holistic perspective

Editor, As a Christian, I strongly believe that there is an undeniable responsibility to love and showing compassion for the stranger among us. Immigration reform should not be pushed off the table because it’s an election year. It’s an ongoing moral issue as it determines whether a family lives in poverty and whether a parent is separated from his or her child. Comprehensive immigration reform is needed because, in a family, it is not just one person that is affected. Piecemeal approaches will only help some while leaving others behind. I experienced this rsthand in the immi- gration of my wife from Canada. The immigration law system is broken, and the people that work within it are disil- lusioned. Passing anti-immigrant legislation is not the solution: we’ve already learned about the scal and social costs of

Arizona-SB-1070-style legislation. “Self-deportation” isn’t as easy as anti-immigrant activists make it sound — making life miserable is not only discriminatory, but also hateful toward people trying to work with the system if given an opportunity. Attrition through enforcement is also ineffective and relies on many of the discriminatory techniques aimed at self-deportation. I’ve seen the harmful effects of such strategies on my com- munity right here in East San Carlos. The current laws that are being pro- posed by states are discriminatory in nature and ultimately will not better our country’s immigration system.

Dr. Jonathan Lopez San Carlos

Wary of money tainted by salt

Editor,

A Stanford research group recently

reported that, for decades, many doc- tors were paid handsomely to tout the health benets of smoking tobacco. That led me to think of how Cargill and DMB Associates are currently spread- ing their money around Redwood City to show how much they “care” about the city. I urge those who take that money to think carefully about whether to believe their claims of supposed bene ts to Redwood City through their proposed Saltworks development: can adding 30,000 residents really reduce trafc congestion? Is the solution to current ooding and future sea level rise really to put more residents and businesses below the level of the high tides? Is paving restorable wetlands really the best way to restore them? I don’t think so. Please don’t be deceived by their money.

Karen Davis

Redwood City

Jerry Lee , Publisher Jon Mays, Editor in Chief Nathan Mollat, Sports Editor Erik Oeverndiek,

Jerry Lee, Publisher

Jon Mays, Editor in Chief

Nathan Mollat, Sports Editor

Erik Oeverndiek, Copy Editor/Page Designer

Nicola Zeuzem, Production Manager

Kerry McArdle, Marketing & Events

Michelle Durand, Senior Reporter

REPORTERS:

Julio Lara, Heather Murtagh, Bill Silverfarb

Susan E. Cohn, Senior Correspondent: Events

Carrie Doung, Production Assistant

BUSINESS STAFF:

Charlotte Andersen

Charles Gould

Gale Green

Jeff Palter

Donica Shisler

Kris Skarston

Kevin Smith

INTERNS, CORRESPONDENTS, CONTRACTORS:

Carly Bertolozzi

Jenna Chambers

Kore Chan

Elizabeth Cortes

JD Crayne

Darold Fredricks

Brian Grabianowski

Andrew Lyu

Nick Rose

Andrew Scheiner

Sally Schilling

Carole Shattil

Chloee Weiner

Sangwon Yun

OUR MISSION:

It is the mission of the Daily Journal to be the most accurate, fair and relevant local news source for those who live, work or play on the MidPeninsula. By combining local news and sports coverage, analysis and insight with the latest business, lifestyle, state, national and world news, we seek to provide our readers with the highest quality information resource in San Mateo County. Our pages belong to you, our readers, and we choose to reflect the diverse character of this dynamic and ever-changing community.

SMDAILYJOURNAL.COM

Follow us on Twitter and Facebook:

SMDAILYJOURNAL.COM Follow us on Twitter and Facebook: facebook.com/smdailyjournal twitter.com/smdailyjournal

facebook.com/smdailyjournal

twitter.com/smdailyjournal

facebook.com/smdailyjournal twitter.com/smdailyjournal Online edition at scribd.com/smdailyjournal Letters to the

Online edition at scribd.com/smdailyjournal

Letters to the Editor

Should be no longer than 250 words. Perspective Columns Should be no longer than 600 words.

• Illegibly handwritten letters and anonymous letters will not be accepted.

• Please include a city of residence and phone number where we can reach you.

• Emailed documents are preferred. No attachments

please.

• Letter writers are limited to two submissions a

month.

Opinions expressed in letters, columns and perspectives are those of the individual writer and do

not necessarily represent the views of the Daily Journal staff.

Correction Policy

The Daily Journal corrects its errors.

If you question the accuracy of any article in the Daily Journal, please contact the editor at news@smdailyjournal.com or by phone at: 344-5200, ext. 107

Editorials represent the viewpoint of the Daily Journal editorial board and not any one individual.

The wild

race for supervisor

A month ago there were just two announced candidates for an open seat on the Board of Supervisors. Today there are at least six. The primary election June 5 for

Rose Jacobs Gibson’s seat will narrow the eld back to two. What a difference from the past history of one super candidate running virtually unopposed. That history has inspired calls for changing the way we choose our supervisors from countywide to district elections. And there is even a pending lawsuit to require that to happen. Two years ago there was also a competitive race for an open seat on the board, the most competitive election in a decade. Four well-known candidates were running for Mark Church’s vacant position — Dave Pine, the eventual victor who was then a member of the San Mateo Union High School district board of trustees; Richard Holober, a well- known labor leader and a member of the San Mateo County Community College District board; Millbrae’s Gina Papan; and Burlingame Councilwoman Terry Nagel. This race is going to be very different. District 4 includes Redwood City, Menlo Park, East Palo Alto and the unincorporated areas of North Fair Oaks and Oak Knoll. The six candidates are not as well known as the four main contenders in 2010. No candi- date will have a monopoly of endorsements from the county’s political elite. The candidates are Kirsten Keith, mayor of Menlo Park; Shelly Masur, Redwood City school board trustee; Memo Morantes, San Mateo County school board trustee; Ernie Schmidt, Redwood City planning commissioner; Carlos Romero and David Woods, both East Palo Alto council- men.

*** Memo was rst to announce. He has the support of former

assemblyman Gene Mullin, East Palo Alto Mayor Laura

Martinez; Sheriff Greg Munks and San Mateo Councilwoman Maureen Freschet plus most of his colleagues on the county school board. So far, Shelly Masur seems to have the lead on big name countywide endorsements — state Sen. Leland Yee, Supervisors Dave Pine and Don Horsley and an impressive list of councilmembers: Christine Wozniak, Belmont; Michael Brownrigg, Burlingame; Pam Frisella and past member, Linda Koelling, Foster City; Christine Krolik, and Marie Chuang, Hillsborough; Jeff Gee, Barbara Pierce, Jeff Ira, John Seybert, and former member Diane Howard, Redwood City; Ron Collins, Andy Klein, Mark Olbert and Bob Grassilli, San Carlos; Dave Lim, San Mateo and Rich Garbarino, South San Francisco. Schmidt, Keith, Woods and Romero have not pro- duced their list of endorsements yet although Redwood City Mayor Alicia Aguirre is endorsing Schmidt and Jacobs-Gibson has indicated her support for Woods. *** Rose was appointed in 1999 to ll the board seat vacated by Ruben Barrales (who went on to run for statewide ofce and lost). Both Rose and Ruben were favored by the county’s polit- ical establishment. and had no trouble winning a countywide race. In the 2010 election, the county’s prime political endorse- ments were split by the four candidates. But it’s much more difcult now when there are six. The two most recent District 4 supervisors came from prima- rily minority communities, Gibson, East Palo Alto and Barrales, North Fair Oaks. In the upcoming race three candi- dates are Latinos — Morantes, Romero and Schmidt — and one African American, David Woods. The county’s new Latino PAC does not plan to support a candidate in the June primary. They will wait to see who emerges in the run-off in November. The pending lawsuit regarding the California Voting Rights Act argues that minority candidates would do better in district rather than countywide elections. But in this primary that might not be true given the number of so-called minority can- didates running. It’s also unusual to have two members of a city council vying against each other for the same county posi- tion as in the case of Romero and Woods. It’s also strange that most of the Redwood City councilmembers are supporting a Redwood City school boardmember, Masur, rather than a member of the city’s planning commission, Schmidt. Keith is a late entry and by announcing so late she may have forfeited the endorsements of several of her city council colleagues in other cities. In the 2010 election, Nagel, then Burlingame mayor, entered late and had a difcult time catching up. However, it’s way too early to speculate on the outcome. The two top vote getters in June will vie in November. They will probably be the ones who raise the most money and have the most important endorsements. Stay tuned.

money and have the most important endorsements. Stay tuned. Sue Lempert is the former mayor of

Sue Lempert is the former mayor of San Mateo. Her column appears every Monday. She can be reached at sue@smdai- lyjournal.com.

10 Monday Feb. 13, 2012

BUSINESS

THE DAILY JOURNAL

10 Monday • Feb. 13, 2012 BUSINESS THE DAILY JOURNAL Class B Drivers needed! Join an
10 Monday • Feb. 13, 2012 BUSINESS THE DAILY JOURNAL Class B Drivers needed! Join an
10 Monday • Feb. 13, 2012 BUSINESS THE DAILY JOURNAL Class B Drivers needed! Join an
Class B Drivers needed! Join an amazing team in a Luxury hotel environment Director of
Class B
Drivers needed!
Join an amazing team in a Luxury hotel environment
Director of Revenue
Sales & Catering Coordinator
Breakfast Restaurant Servers
In Room Dining Server PM
Host/Hostess PM
Housekeepers
Job Hotline: 650-508-7140
Please visit: www.qhire.net/sofitel
Or in person at 223 Twin Dolphin Drive, Redwood City
fill out an application and take an online assessment
EOE/Drug Free Workplace
and take an online assessment EOE/Drug Free Workplace The case for dull stocks By Bernard Condon

The case for dull stocks

By Bernard Condon

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

NEW YORK — Investors thinking of buying a piece of Facebook after it goes public are hoping it will perform like Google, whose stock has risen 500 per- cent since its debut seven and a half years ago. But they may want to spare a thought for companies slightly less exciting — a truck leasing company, perhaps, or a manufacturer of ball bearings. Stocks of those two have left Google, and the investors who didn’t get into it early, in the dust in the past several years. So have more than half the com- panies in the Standard & Poor’s 500 index. Since the stock market peaked on Oct. 9, 2007, Ryder System Inc., which rents moving trucks, has returned 26 percent, counting dividends. Timken, the ball bearing company, 49 percent.

And the staid Johnson & Johnson, the 125-year-old maker of Tucks ointment to relieve hemorrhoids among thousands of other products, has trounced Google, too — returning 12 percent with divi- dends. Google is up more than most stocks if you pick a different starting point, like 2004. But measured from the market peak, it’s down 1.5 percent. In other words, the people who got in then still haven’t broken even — four and half years later. Even Microsoft, the lumbering soft- ware company whose best days are widely considered behind it, has done better, returning 12 percent, counting dividends. The lesson is that when it comes to hot stocks, you can sit on losses for years if you happen to buy at the top and can’t make up ground with dividend checks. “They move like rockets, straight up,” says Robert Russell, president of Russell

& Co., a wealth management company

in Ohio. “But they can fall back to earth, too.”

In a ling earlier this month, Facebook

said it plans to sell a yet-unknown stake for $5 billion, the largest for an Internet company’s initial public offering. The buzz is that the offering could value the whole company at as much as $100 bil- lion — more than Hewlett-Packard, AOL and Yahoo combined. Whether the newly public stock — ticker symbol FB — will prove prof- itable for investors is another matter. For a taste of the dangers of buying stock in companies in the spotlight, check out the performance of Internet IPOs last year. You’ve done OK if you got in at the offering price, set before the stock starts trading. But that’s mostly reserved for the favored customers — pension funds, mutual funds, hedge funds and other institutions. The little guy isn’t doing nearly as well.

Drillers cut natural gas production

By Kevin Begos

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

PITTSBURGH — As natural gas prices continue to drop, the recent nationwide boom in drilling is slowing. Drillers don’t make money if prices go too low — and drilling wells isn’t cheap. “It is safe to say that there will be fewer natural gas wells drilled in 2012,” said Kathryn Klaber, president of the Marcellus Shale Coalition, an industry group based in Pennsylvania. In recent weeks, several companies have announced plans to cut gas produc- tion around the nation, but experts say the low prices are also opening up new markets. When the shale drilling boom was starting in 2008 the average price for a

unit of gas was about $8. Two years ago it was down to $5.50, and now it’s dropped to about $2.50. Part of the rea- son is that the shale gas formations became productive more rapidly than expected, as thousands of new wells have been drilled nationwide. Industry reports note that the national count of active new gas drilling rigs fell to 775 in early February, down from about 1,500 in 2008. Yet Klaber said that the low prices cre- ate opportunities for more people and industries to use the product. For exam- ple, some drilling companies are focus- ing more on the so-called “wet gas” that sells for a higher price because it can be transformed by reneries into consumer products such as plastics and fertilizer. Last month, Chesapeake Energy of

Oklahoma City said it is reducing the number of new dry gas drilling rigs from 47 to 24 this year. In addition, it imme- diately cut existing production by about 500 billion cubic feet per day, adding

that if low prices persist, it may double the cut, to 1 billion cubic feet per day. The company said that about 85 per- cent of its nationwide drilling expendi- tures this year will be toward the more protable wet gas.

A spokesman for Chesapeake didn’t

respond to a request for comment. Experts say the companies have ways to cushion the low prices. It’s called hedging, and business people have used such tools for hundreds if not thousands of years, said Sara Moeller, a professor of business at the University of

Pittsburgh.

Greece passes new austerity deal amid rioting

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

ATHENS, Greece — Greece’s parlia- ment early Monday approved harsh new austerity measures demanded by bailout creditors to save the debt-crippled country from bankruptcy, after rioters in central Athens torched buildings, looted shops and clashed with riot police. The historic vote paves the way for Greece’s European partners and the International Monetary Fund to release (euro) 130 billion ($171 billion) in new rescue loans without which Greece would default on its debt mountain next month and likely leave the eurozone — a sce- nario that would further roil global mar- kets. Sunday’s clashes erupted after more than 100,000 protesters marched to the parliament to rally against the drastic cuts, which will ax one in ve civil service jobs and slash the minimum wage by more than a fth. At least 10 buildings were set on re, including a movie theater, bank and cafe- teria, and looters smashed dozens of shops in the worst riot damage in years. Dozens of police ofcers and at least 37 protesters were injured, 23 suspected rioters were arrested and a further 25 detained. As the vote got under way early Monday, Prime Minister Lucas Papademos urged calm, pointing to the country’s dire nancial straits. “Vandalism and destruction have no place in a democracy and will not be tol- erated,” Papademos told parliament. “I call on the public to show calm. At these crucial times, we do not have the luxury of this type of protest. I think everyone is aware of how serious the situation is.” Since May 2010, Greece has survived

the situation is.” Since May 2010, Greece has survived A demonstration in Athens’Syntagma (Constitution) square

A

demonstration in Athens’Syntagma (Constitution) square Sunday.

petrol

bomb

explodes

near

riot

police

during

a

huge

REUTERS

anti-austerity

on a $145 billion ((euro) 110 billion) bailout from its European partners and the IMF. When that proved insufcient, the new rescue package was approved. The deal, which has not yet been nalized, will be combined with a massive bond swap deal to write off half the country’s private- ly held debt. But for both deals to materialize, Greece has to persuade its deeply skepti- cal creditors that it has the will to imple- ment spending cuts and public sector reforms that will end years of scal proi- gacy and tame gaping budget decits. As protests raged Sunday, demonstra- tors set bonres in front of parliament and dozens of riot police formed lines to keep

them from making a run on the building. Security forces red dozens of tear gas volleys at rioters, who attacked them with rebombs and chunks of marble broken off the fronts of luxury hotels, banks and department stores. Clouds of tear gas drifted across the square, and many in the crowd wore gas masks or had their faces covered, while others carried Greek ags and banners. A three-story building was completely consumed by ames as reghters strug- gled to douse the blaze. Streets were strewn with stones, smashed glass and burnt wreckage, while terried passers-by sought refuge in hotel lounges and cafete- rias.

WARRIORS BASKETBALL: HOUSTON ROCKETS COME TO TOWN AND LOSE >>> PAGE 16 Monday, Feb. 13,
WARRIORS BASKETBALL: HOUSTON ROCKETS COME TO TOWN AND LOSE >>> PAGE 16
Monday, Feb. 13, 2012
<< Stanford women crush UCLA, move to 22-1, page 13
• The ‘X’ Factor at Westminster dog show?, page 15

‘A little magic’ pushes Serra to victory

By Julio Lara

DAILY JOURNAL STAFF

It’s playoff time on the West Catholic Athletic League soccer pitch and during the postseason stretch, sometimes you need a little more than just quality soccer to win a game. “(Come) playoff time you need a little magic,” said Serra head coach Jeff Panos, “and I think we got that today. “

Apparently, the Padres have soc- cer players that double as magicians and on Saturday against Valley Christian in the WCAL tournament, Tim Trzeciak and Nick Schnabel reached into their hats and pulled out a 2-1 victory-rabbit. The win advances the No. 2 seed- ed Padres into the seminals of the tournament where they’ll play Archbishop Mitty. “We had tough conditions today,” Panos said, “with the slick turf and

the wind played a little bit of a fac- tor I think. And Valley Christian is a very well organized, disciplined squad. They were playing for their season, their season is done now, so you can tell they wanted every bit of it.” Serra knew they were in for a bat- tle - in their two games against the Padres this season, the Warriors showed improvement, rst losing 2- 0 but then drawing 2-2 in the second leg.

For their spark, Valley Christian relied on the speed of Alex Mitchell and the creativity of Jacob Gronlund in the mideld. Serra got the two best looks in the

rst half though. The rst came on a corner kick in the 17th minute when

a Darren Finn header looked des-

tined for soccer ball heaven and only a miraculous saved the V.C. goalkeeper prevented ultimate glory. A couple of minutes later, another

brilliant effort by Serra was thwart- ed when Lee Vella’s volley from just outside the penalty box beat all mortals on its way to the net, but was stopped coldly by the crossbar. The ball made a beeline straight down and appeared to possibly

cross the goal line, but the danger was cleared without a goal signal by the referees. The teams were tied 0-0 come

See SERRA, Page 12

Mickelson crushes Tiger

Wins Pebble Beach

By Doug Ferguson

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

PEBBLE BEACH — Phil Mickelson rallied from six shots behind to win for the fourth time at Pebble Beach, a nal round made even more memorable by the guy in a red shirt who was among the rst to congratulate him Sunday on the 18th green. Turns out that Tiger Woods was just along for the ride. Mickelson closed with an 8-under 64, beating Woods by 11 shots in a one-sided showdown at the Pebble Beach National Pro-Am. “I just feel very inspired when I play with him,” said Mickelson, who has posted the better score the past ve times he has played alongside Woods in the nal round. “I love playing with him, and he brings out some of my best golf. I hope that he continues to play better, and better, and I hope that he and I have a chance to play together more in the nal rounds.” Woods, one shot out of the lead on the sixth hole after 54-hole leader Charlie Wi fell apart early, followed his rst birdie of the nal round with three straight bogeys, starting with a three- putt from 18 feet on the par-3 seventh. It never got much better from there. He nished a miserable day with another three-putt on the 18th for a 75, the only consola- tion coming from belief that he’s closer than ever to putting it all together. “I didn’t hit it as bad as the score indicated, but I putted awful,” Woods said. “As good as I felt on the greens yesterday, I felt bad today. Anything I tried to do wasn’t working. Consequently, I made a ton of mistakes on the green.” At least he got to watch a clinic. Mickelson went from six shots behind to a

See PEBBLE, Page 12

went from six shots behind to a See PEBBLE , Page 12 REUTERS Phil Mickelson tees

REUTERS

Phil Mickelson tees off on the eighth hole during the final round of the Pebble Beach National Pro-Am in Pebble Beach Sunday.

Lin, Rubio revive teams

By Jon Krawczynski

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

MINNEAPOLIS — One point guard has practically been a house- hold name since he started playing professionally at 14, a lottery pick who has made the two-year wait for his ashy passes well worth it. The other went undrafted out of Harvard and unwanted in his rst two stops in the NBA before a des- perate team and a desperate coach gave him the chance he needed on the game’s biggest stage. In their own different, yet equally dynamic ways, Ricky Rubio and

Jeremy Lin have put their dor- mant franchises on their backs and given a jolt to the NBA’s long-standing mission of bringing the game to every

corner of the world. As the rst American-born player of Chinese or Taiwanese descent, Palo Alto High School alum Lin is re-opening doors in Asia that some feared to be closing in the wake of

doors in Asia that some feared to be closing in the wake of Jeremy Lin Yao

Jeremy Lin

Yao Ming’s retirement. He’s led the New York Knicks to ve straight victories and has become an instant fan favorite at Madison Square Garden after Golden State and Houston both sent him packing. Rubio is the Spanish sensation who has fans in Barcelona watching on Internet feeds in the wee hours of the morning. His infectious play has made him an instant rock star in the Twin Cities and has the Timberwolves gunning for the play- offs for the rst time since 2004. Together, they give the NBA two

See GUARDS, Page 12

Blues beat Sharks

By R.B. Fallstrom

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

ST. LOUIS — Alex Pietrangelo had two goals, David Perron also scored with a two-man advantage

and Andy McDonald added an assist

in his return from a concussion that

sidelined him for 51 games, sending the St. Louis Blues to a 3-0 victory over the San Jose Sharks on Sunday night. Jaroslav Halak earned his sixth shutout in just 10 starts, one more than All-Star teammate Brian Elliott has, as the Blues extended a fran- chise record by earning at least one

point in 19 consecutive home games. They’re 16-0-3 at home since a 5-2 loss to Chicago on Dec. 3 and an NHL-best 24-3-4 overall, topping their total of 23 wins last season. Antti Niemi made 25 saves for the

Pacific Division-leading Sharks, who came up empty in the opener of

a season-long, nine-game trip. San

Jose, which next plays at home Feb.

28 against the Flyers, has lost three

of four overall.

The Sharks were 0 for 4 on the power play after going 7 for 14 in

See SHARKS, Page 14

12 Monday Feb. 13, 2012

SPORTS

THE DAILY JOURNAL

SERRA

Continued from page 11

recess. “They kind of out-manned in the mideld with the formation they play,” Panos said of his halftime adjustments, “so we were looking for ground balls to get through their defense because I think we got the speed up front to be able to run on to it. We talked about getting the ball through. We got the two goals and I think they were deserved.” The scores were rewards for Serra’s hustle. “We’re a little banged up right now,” Panos said, “this is our fourth game in eight days, so we’re missing about three keys guys today.” Stepping up rst for the Padres was Trzeciak. In the 47th minute, No. 24 pressured the goalkeeper on a routine clearance. It’s one of those plays that as a player you do your due diligence knowing that more often than not, the goalie is just going to boot the ball down eld. But on this occasion, the ball was deected by a charging and leaping Trzeciak and made its way into the empty V.C net. “He came off the bench and gave us a huge lift,” Panos said of Trzeciak, “(he) almost willed the ball into the goal on that rst goal.” Serra’s hustle was rewarded in similar fashion 10 minutes later. Once again, pressure up top caused just enough Warrior-confusion to force a lethal turnover in their defen- sive third. And there to turn the ugly into beautiful was Schnabel, who nished in world-class fashion for the 2-0 Padre lead. Valley Christian pressed with their season hanging in the balance and got a tasty through ball from Gronlund in the 71st minute that

Marshall Deogracia corralled and scored with. But any other V.C. threat was han- dled without issue by the Serra defense. “I have no complaints,” Panos said. “Anytime you can win a West Catholic playoff game, you’re happy. This squad has won 14 games this year, so they’re full of con- dence.”

Serra 67,Valley Christian 55

Two days after losing in the annu- al Jungle Game and seeing Archbishop MItty lock up the WCAL regular season title, the Serra basketball team traveled to Valley Christian and earned a 67-55 victory in the season nale. Junior Henry Caruso led the charge with 22 points and 16 rebounds, senior Jason Barsocchini chipped in with nine points and jun- ior Andre Miller nished with 11 rebounds and 5 assists. The win puts the Padres at 20-4 (11-3 WCAL, second place) on the season with the rst round of the WCAL playoffs up next. Serra will be the No. 2 seed in the playoffs and will host the seventh-seeded Riordan Crusaders on Tuesday night. Tip-off is set for 7 p.m.

Serra wrestling

finishes second

The Padre wrestling team nished second at the WCAL Tournament held at St. Francis High School on Saturday. Serra placed eight wrestlers in the nals, with four Padres capturing individual league championships. Travis Roberts picked up the 126- pound title. Jerry DeLaRosa accom- plished the same feat at 132 pounds. Chad Thodos is your 184-pound champion and the same can be said of Tim Glauninger at 222.

GUARDS

Continued from page 11

fresh young faces to trumpet to hoops-hungry hotbeds in Asia and Western Europe. “The world is changing,” Rubio said after his Wolves lost to Lin’s Knicks 100-98 on Saturday night. “It’s not only America, it’s not only Europe. The world is the world. It’s growing up. Everybody’s following the NBA and they love if they have some players from their cities.” Star players from overseas or with international appeal are nothing new to the NBA, which has marketed itself globally better than the other

three major American sports of foot- ball, baseball and hockey. Germany’s Dirk Nowitzki is a for- mer MVP who won a title last year, Spain’s Pau and Marc Gasol are high-prole players and Yao helped shepherd the league into China. But as point guards, Lin and Rubio have the ball in their hands and control of the game at all times. And while their games, back- grounds and upbringings have been nearly polar opposites, the electrici- ty they provide serves as a tie that binds. “Both ll up the stat sheet, both play extremely hard and both are just infectious not only in their play but their personality as well,” Timberwolves All-Star Kevin Love

said. “People just seem to love both of them. “Ricky was kind of a fairy tale before he came over here and has really blossomed into a tremendous player and is only going to get bet- ter. But Lin, he really came out of nowhere.” Lin is the scorer, having poured in 109 points in his rst four starts, including 38 in a victory over the Lakers on Friday night that pushed coverage of the Super Bowl champi- on Giants off the back pages of the Big Apple tabloids. That’s more than any player has had in his rst four starts since the NBA-ABA merger, besting Allen Iverson, Michael Jordan and Shaquille O’Neal.

PEBBLE

Continued from page 11

two-shot lead on the par-5 sixth hole when he rolled in a 20-foot eagle putt, adjusting his read after watch- ing Woods’ amateur partner — Dallas Cowboys quarterback Tony Romo — miss from a similar line. Woods holed a bunker shot for birdie on No. 12, but right when it looked like a two-shot swing that could give Woods some momentum, Mickelson made a 30-foot par putt. With Woods out of the way, Mickelson made a 40-foot par putt on the 15th hole to keep a three-shot cushion, and he was never chal- lenged from there. He wound up with a two-shot win over Wi, who four-putted for double bogey on the opening hole and never recovered. Mickelson, who nished at 17- under 269, became only the ninth player in PGA Tour history with 40

career wins. This one was special for many reasons, and the thrashing he gave Woods was but a small part of it. His wife, Amy, ew up for the weekend and gave him a pep talk Friday in the rain at Monterey Peninsula when Mickelson was going nowhere. He ran off five birdies, got back into the tourna- ment and picked up a win he didn’t see coming. As much as Woods talks about his game being close, Mickelson felt the same way. His last win was the Houston Open last April, and while he thought he was putting well, his scores didn’t reect it. “It’s one of the more emotional victories for me than I’ve had, and the reason is I’ve had some doubt these last couple of weeks, given the scores I’ve shot,” Mickelson said. “Having these great practice ses- sions, I started to wonder if I’m going to be able to bring it to the golf course. So this gives me a lot of condence and erases the doubt.” The last shred of doubt came on

the 14th, a diabolical green that turn birdies into bogeys without caution. Woods hit a wedge that went down the side of the green, requiring two chips to get on the green. He made bogey. Mickelson’s caddie, Jim “Bones” Mackay got in his hear. “He erased all doubt and said, ‘Let’s get aggressive and make birdie, we need one more here,”’ Mickelson said. “It just got me aggressive and into a positive frame of mind.” He went at the ag and made birdie. Wi, who started the nal round with a three-shot lead, birdied his last two holes for a 72 and his fth runner-up nish on tour. It was the third straight week that the winner began the nal round at least six shots behind a 54-hole leader going for his rst tour victory. “I fought back and hung in there, because the four-putt on the rst hole, I was really shook up pretty badly and my strokes were pretty iffy at best,” Wi said.

four-putt on the fi rst hole, I was really shook up pretty badly and my strokes
four-putt on the fi rst hole, I was really shook up pretty badly and my strokes

THE DAILY JOURNAL

SPORTS

Monday Feb. 13, 2012

13

Stanford women crush UCLA

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

STANFORD — Stanford can always depend on the Ogwumike sisters, and now some other play- ers are chipping in. Nnemkadi Ogwumike had 25 points and eight rebounds, and No. 4 Stanford beat UCLA 82-59 on Sunday. Chiney Ogwumike added 19 points for the Cardinal (22-1, 13-0 Pac-12), who won their 19th straight since losing at Connecticut on Nov. 21. Toni Kokenis scored 12 points and Josyln Tinkle added 10 points and nine rebounds. “We count every night on Nneka

and Chiney,” coach Tara VanDerveer said. “This was a big game for Jos and we had others score and getting assists. To get to where we want to go, we

need other peo- ple contributing.” Chiney Ogwumike was limited to eight minutes in the first half because of foul trouble. “I wouldn’t necessarily say it changes the dynamics,” Nneka Ogwumike said. “I think it helped

the dynamics,” Nneka Ogwumike said. “I think it helped Nnemkadi Ogwumike other people step up. Tink

Nnemkadi

Ogwumike

other people step up. Tink had a great game. When we needed her on the perimeter, she stepped up, and when we needed her down low, she got in there. I think we did a good job of finding each other.” Markel Walker had 16 points and 10 rebounds for the Bruins (12-12, 7-6 Pac-12), who lost their second straight following a four- game winning streak. Thea Lemberger added 13 points. Rebekah Gardner scored 15 and became the 26th UCLA player to surpass 1,000 points. She now has

1,006.

“I think our whole team loves the challenge,” said Walker, who averages a double-double after

missing the first seven games because of offseason thumb sur- gery. “Playing against the sisters is hard because they both rebound so well and they run the floor so well. They just don’t stop; they keep working.” Stanford extended its school record home winning streak to 76 games and 70 against Pac-12 opponents, which includes tourna- ment games. The Cardinal need one more win or a California loss to clinch at least a share of their 12th consecu- tive conference title. UCLA made the Cardinal work during a tight first half. Stanford never led by more than five and the

Bruins held early advantages in rebounding and points in the paint. But the Cardinal went on a 19-6 run — with 13 points from the Ogwumike sisters — that spanned both halves to open a 42-32 advan- tage with 16:23 remaining. UCLA never got closer than eight the rest of the way. “We showed flashes,” Bruins coach Cori Close said. “We have the ability to force Stanford into playing out of rhythm. We have to learn how to sustain that.” The Bruins missed their last nine shots of the first half over more than 6 1/2 minutes but still led 26- 23 with 5:21 left by hitting eight straight free throws.

West Virginia women slip by No. 2 Notre Dame 65-63

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

SOUTH BEND, Ind. — Notre Dame coach Muffet McGraw said her team had it coming to them. “I thought we’ve been building up to this game now for a couple of weeks,” she said. “We just haven’t played well for a long time.” The second-ranked Irish almost played well enough Sunday, but West Virginia ended their 21-game winning streak with a 65-63 victory. Brooke Hampton made two free throws with 4.6 seconds left to give the Mountaineers (18-6, 8-3 Big East) the lead and a 15-footer by Natalie Novosel of Notre Dame bounced off the rim as time expired. “This is a great win for us,” Mountaineers coach Mike Carey said. “We were below .500 three or four years ago and we beat Louisville at Louisville when they were ranked third in the country. This is right up there (with our best wins ever).” The Mountaineers came in on a three-game winning streak and were condent heading into Sunday, according to center Asya Bussie who had 22 points and eight rebounds. “I just think we were more focused,” she said. “We prepared all week and we just came in and did what we had to do to get the win.” Bussie hit a turnaround jumper with 39 sec- onds to go that tied the game at 63. Skyler Diggins had a career-high 32 points for Notre Dame (24-2, 11-1), which came into the game leading the nation at 83.2 points per game.

Diggins missed a contested layup that could have tied the score with less than 10 seconds to play. She fouled Hampton at midcourt as she went for a steal with 4.6 seconds to go. Hampton then made the free throws that gave her four points for the game — all from the line. Diggins said her team stopped playing defense. “We just were not attacking,” she said. “We were getting transitions at rst and then we stopped playing defense and they scored. We haven’t practiced with intensity this week and it showed. But it’s not the end of the season. It’s just a bad loss. We’ve got to come back and make sure we are ready for the rest of the sea- son.” The Mountaineers forced Notre Dame into 17 turnovers. “I think we had to sit down and get a little physical with them,” Carey said. “Because if you don’t they are just going to throw you out of the way and go get a layup. I’ve watched a lot a lot of tape on them and (that is what they do). So we tried to get our guards to sit down and body them up a little bit more.” Ayna Dunning added 11 points for the Mountaineers, who nished with a 41-33 rebound advantage. “This was a big win for us,” Carey said. “We lost ve seniors from last year and they were almost 90 percent of our offense. For these girls to get this type of win on the road will do a lot for our condence because we are young. We have to build on this.”

Stanford men breeze past USC by 12 points

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

LOS ANGELES — Chasson Randle made

all four of his 3-point shots in the second half to finish with 16 points and Stanford beat USC 59-47 on Sunday, completing its first season sweep of the Trojans since

2005.

Josh Owens added 15 points for Stanford (17-8, 7-6 Pac-12). The Cardinal had lost

five of their previous six after a 15-3 start. Stanford beat USC 51-43 at home on Dec.

31.

Greg Allen scored 13 points for USC (6- 20, 1-12 Pac-12). Byron Wesley scored 10 of the Trojans’ first 13 points, but had only three the rest of the way and finished 6 for 15 from the field. Sophomore Andy Brown hit a 3-pointer midway through the first half to give Stanford a 15-11 lead, the biggest by either team until the Cardinal opened the second half with an 8-0 run that gave them a 28-18 advantage with 17:27 left in the game. The Trojans went 12:43 without a field goal until Garrett Jackson turned a short hook shot into a three-point play that cut Stanford’s lead to 30-24 with 14:27 left. Allen cut the deficit to four on another 3- pointer with 12:26 remaining, and Maurice

Jones got USC within 35-33 on a fast-break layup about 1 1/2 minutes later. But Stanford responded with an 11-0 run ignited by Owens’ dunk, and Randle added back-to-back 3-pointers 33 seconds apart. USC got no closer than nine points the rest of the way, as Randle made a break- away layup off his steal of Maurice Jones, Andrew Zimmerman added a layup and Randle hit another 3-pointer to give Stanford a 59-39 lead with 3:08 left. Both teams shot under 35 percent in the first half, with Stanford leading 20-18 at intermission. After committing 22 turnovers in a 72-61 loss to UCLA on Thursday, the Cardinal coughed up the ball 10 times over the first 20 minutes — four times on offensive fouls — against an injury-ravaged Trojans squad that came in leading the Pac-12 in scoring defense and turnover margin. The only teams USC has beaten — Cal State Northridge, Morgan State, South Carolina, UC Riverside, TCU and Utah — are a combined 50-93. TCU (14-10) is the only one with a winning record. The Trojans’ only conference win came against Utah, which was in the Mountain West Conference last season before the Pac-10 expanded to 12 schools.

win came against Utah, which was in the Mountain West Conference last season before the Pac-10
win came against Utah, which was in the Mountain West Conference last season before the Pac-10
win came against Utah, which was in the Mountain West Conference last season before the Pac-10
win came against Utah, which was in the Mountain West Conference last season before the Pac-10

14 Monday Feb. 13, 2012

SPORTS

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Red Wings unstoppable at home

By Larry Lage

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

DETROIT — The Detroit Red Wings equaled an NHL record with

their 20th straight win at home, beat- ing the Philadelphia Flyers 4-3 Sunday night on the strength of Johan Franzen’s tiebreaking goal early in the third period. The league mark was set by the Boston Bruins during the 1929-30 season and matched by Philadelphia

in 1976. Detroit can break the record

with a win Tuesday night over the Dallas Stars at Joe Louis Arena. Philadelphia rookie Brayden Schenn had a career-high two goals, helping the Flyers take the rst of two leads they couldn’t keep against

a team that hasn’t lost at home since Nov. 3 against Calgary. Detroit goalie Joey MacDonald overcame shaky clearing attempts that led to two goals and nished with 26 saves. Sergei Bobrovsky stopped 21 shots for the Flyers. Bobrovsky’s head was on a swivel

in the opening minute of the third

period when Henrik Zetterberg and Nicklas Lidstrom made diagonal passes to set up Franzen in front of the net for his 22nd goal. Bobrovsky got a break moments later when Valtteri Filppula deked him and lifted a shot over the open net. The Flyers went on the power play midway through the third but could- n’t tie the game. They pulled Bobrovsky with just more than a minute left to add an

extra skater, but he had to go back in net briey when Franzen got to a loose puck and Kimmo Timonen was called for holding him. Lidstrom played in his 1,550th game, the most by an NHL player who spent his entire career with one team. He broke the mark set by for- mer Red Wings great Alex Delvecchio. Fans stood and chanted, “Let’s go Red Wings!” during the nal min- utes and cheered wildly when the

clock hit zero. Early on, Philadelphia took advan- tage of facing MacDonald instead of Jimmy Howard, who missed his fth straight game with a broken right index nger. MacDonald misplayed a puck behind the net to help Schenn score late in the rst period and couldn’t clear a rebound early in the second, setting up Schenn’s second goal that put the Flyers ahead 2-1. Pavel Datsyuk tied it 2-all a few minutes later on a power-play goal from the left circle. MacDonald didn’t have much of a

chance to stop Maxime Talbot’s go- ahead goal late in the second period. Talbot got behind Detroit’s defense and flipped the puck past MacDonald. Henrik Zetterberg’s one-timer a couple of minutes later tied the game at 3 entering the third. The Red Wings are hoping Howard will return Friday night at home against Nashville. Fired-up fans at Joe Louis Arena wanted to see a league mark matched and one of them hurled an octopus

see a league mark matched and one of them hurled an octopus REUTERS Detroit Red Wings

REUTERS

Detroit Red Wings defensman Jakub Kindl and Nicklas Lidstrom celebrate with goalie Joey MacDonald their victory over the Philadelphia Flyers giving the Red Wings a record-tying 20th consecutive home win.

on the ice during the national anthem, an act usually reserved for a playoff game. Niklas Kronwall kept them happy, putting Detroit ahead 1-0 midway through the rst period with a one- timer from just inside the blue line on a power play. The puck got past Bobrovsky before he could see it because Todd Bertuzzi was obstruct- ing his view, standing in front of the crease. Schenn was in the perfect spot to score into an open net late in the rst period when MacDonald didn’t get much wood on a clearing attempt from behind the net, turning it over to Danny Briere, who quickly got the puck to Schenn in front of the net. Schenn’s second goal gave Philadelphia its rst lead 5:22 into the second from the bottom of the left circle, beating Zetterberg to a loose puck that was poorly cleared by MacDonald off a rebound. NOTES: Schenn, the fth pick in the 2009 draft, was acquired by Philadelphia last summer from Los Angeles as part of the Mike Richards Kronwall’s goal was his 12th, topping his career high set last The NBA’s longest home winning streak in a season was set by Chicago with 37 straight victories during the 1995-96 season; the 1978 Pittsburgh Pirates and 1988 Boston Red Sox each won 24 straight at home for baseball’s longest single- season home winning streaks since 1919 and the Miami Dolphins won 27 straight at home from 1971-74 in what has stood as the longest home winning streak in NFL history.

SHARKS

Continued from page 11

the previous four games. Halak was yanked from his previous start,

a 4-3 victory over the New Jersey Devils.

But he is 13-2-3 in his last 19 starts since Nov. 29 and his 1.66 goals-against average during that time and prior to Sunday was the NHL’s best.

Perron has six goals in the last four games, the last three on the power play, and 10 goals in 30 games overall. He returned in early December from a concussion sustained on a mid-ice hit by the Sharks’ Joe Thornton that knocked him out for more than a year. The Blues immediately plugged McDonald into the regular rotation plus power-play duty, and he added an element of speed to the lineup. McDonald earned the second assist on Pietrangelo’s goal. The Blues have four power-play goals in the last two games after entering the week-

goals in the last two games after entering the week- end in a 2-for-35 slump. St.

end in a 2-for-35 slump. St. Louis is 3-0 against the Sharks this sea- son, outscoring them 7-2 including a 1-0 shutout by Elliott on Dec. 10 in St. Louis. It’s the Sharks’ first three-game losing streak against the Blues since dropping five in a row Jan. 9 to Dec. 18, 2003. The Sharks were whistled for three penal- ties in a span of 3 minutes and Pietrangelo capitalized with his ninth goal on a two-man advantage at 15:03 of the first. San Jose was outshot 10-7 in the period, managing just three shots in the last 15 minutes. Ryan Clowe and Brad Winchester drew tripping and elbowing penalties in the sec- ond period, respectively, and it cost the

Sharks again. Perron whiffed on a rebound attempt from the side of the net but got a second chance when the puck deflected off Niemmi’s back, and he slipped in a backhan- der. Pietrangelo added an empty-net goal with 5.9 seconds to go, shooting from in front of the St. Louis net.

Notes: Pietrangelo scored for the first time in nine games, although he had four assists

during that straight to the

Niemmi has lost four Logan Couture’s

career-best, eight-game point streak ended. He totaled five goals and seven The Blues are 22-1-1 when leading after two periods.

eight-game point streak ended. He totaled five goals and seven The Blues are 22-1-1 when leading
eight-game point streak ended. He totaled five goals and seven The Blues are 22-1-1 when leading
eight-game point streak ended. He totaled five goals and seven The Blues are 22-1-1 when leading
eight-game point streak ended. He totaled five goals and seven The Blues are 22-1-1 when leading

THE DAILY JOURNAL

SPORTS

Monday Feb. 13, 2012

15

Jessica Korda wins Women’s Australian Open

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

MELBOURNE, Australia — Jessica Korda broke out her father’s trademark scissor-kick celebration Sunday when she won the Women’s Australian Open at Royal Melbourne for her rst LPGA Tour title. She decided against the cart wheels that her father, Petr, did when he won the 1998 Australian Open tennis title. Maybe she was still dizzy following a topsy-turvy nal day of the tournament. After losing the lead with a late bogey run, the 18-year-old American fought back to take the last spot in an improbable six-play- er playoff, then won with a 25-foot birdie putt on the second extra hole. “It is a really special place for my family,” Korda said. “For my rst win, I honestly could not have thought of a better place.” What did her father say when they spoke by phone after the victory? “That he was, ‘So proud of me and we’ll talk about the three-putts after,”’ she said. She closed with a 1-over 74 to n- ish at 3-under 289 in the first women’s professional event at Royal Melbourne, the difcult sand- belt layout that was the site of the

the dif fi cult sand- belt layout that was the site of the Jessica Korda 2011

Jessica Korda

2011 Presidents Cup. Stacy Lewis, Brittany Lincicome, Julieta Granada, So Yeon Ryu and Hee Kyung Seo also were in the playoff that

matched the largest in LPGA Tour history. Ryu and Seo, playing ahead of Korda and Nikki Campbell in the second-to-last group, topped the leaderboard at 4 under going into the final hole of regulation, but made bogeys to set up the big play- off. Lewis finished with a 70, Lincicome and Granada shot 71, and Ryu and Seo 73. Split into threesomes on the par-4 18th, all six players parred the rst extra hole. Lincicome’s 6-foot

birdie try circled the cup and stayed out. “I couldn’t have hit it any better,” Lincicome said. “It was perfect,

Lips out and comes

perfect

back to you.” Playing in the rst threesome, Lincicome also narrowly missed a 15-foot birdie try on the second playoff hole.

“Same thing on the second putt,

hit it exactly where I wanted to hit it and it just didn’t break,” Lincicome said.

A few minutes later in the second

group, Korda made her birdie putt, and won when Granada missed a 12-footer that would have sent the two back to the 18th tee.

“I was really calm,” Korda said. “I

knew what the putt did because I’d had it before and it did not move. I was a little higher up and more to the right. I knew the line and I knew the speed. All I had to do was just hit it. It started breaking. I thought, ‘Oh, my goodness no, don’t lip out, don’t break too early.’ I don’t even know what side of the hole it hit. I was overwhelmed by everything.” Making her 16th start as an LPGA Tour member, Korda took a one-stroke lead into the round and was two ahead at 7 under after birdieing three of the rst eight holes. Then she made it a lot more excit- ing than she wanted. She had a double bogey on No. 9, bogeyed 10, birdied 11, and

bogeyed Nos. 14-16 to drop to 2 under — two strokes behind Ryu and Seo. Korda then ran — yes, ran — to the 17th tee.

“I was kind of upset,” she said. “I needed to let off some steam. The way I throw off steam is I go for a run. It calmed me down. I was run-

ning around the parking lot this morning, too. I was doing circles around the cars.” Her mind was racing, too. “I thought, ‘You’ve got to be kid-

ding me,”’ Korda said. “I was lip- ping out and not reading my putts correctly. But I thought, ‘Come on,

you can still get it back.’

walking down the fairway like an absolute goof.” She rallied with a birdie on the par-5 17th — “After I made the birdie, I was OK, like, ‘I can do this,”’ she said — and parred the

I was

18th.

Projected to jump from 285th to 30th in the world ranking, she became the sixth youngest winner in LPGA Tour history and the fourth youngest to win a 72-hole event. “All the times, I was down last year, it is all worth it,” she said. “It made me grow up. It made me real- ize that you’ve got to change your life to live out here and this is proof. I know that all the hard hours I put in and will keep putting in are real- ly worth it. Every moment.” Jenny Shin nished a stroke out of the playoff at 2 under after a 70.

Top-ranked Yani Tseng, the win- ner the last two years at Commonwealth Golf Club, was 1 under after a 74. She had a three- hole stretch Friday in her second- round 76 when she dropped six strokes with a quadruple-bogey 8 and two bogeys. On Sunday, she had a triple bogey on the par-4 fourth, and bogeyed 15 and 16. “If I didn’t have the two bogeys late, I probably still would have had a chance,” Tseng said. “So it’s good that I hung in there and fought back.” Katie Futcher also was 1 under after a 74. DIVOTS: Korda earned The scoring average Sunday was 74.92 and the four- round total was 76.492.

Els squeezes into Match Play

PEBBLE BEACH — Ernie Els can plan on a trip to Arizona for the Match Play Championship — just barely. Sunday was the nal week to qualify for the first World Golf Championship of the year, and the Match Play takes the top 64 players off the world ranking. Pebble Beach winner Phil Mickelson is not play- ing that week, so Els gets the nal spot at No. 65.

The ’X’ Factor at Westminster — the xoloitzcuintli

By Ben Walker

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

NEW YORK — Jose Barrera enjoys pretty things. A jewelry

designer to the stars, his gold-plated breastplate is what Beyonce wore

for

album. These days, he’s showing off another gem — Alma Dulce, his tiny, trembling xoloitzcuintli. His what? With the Westminster Kennel Club dog show set to begin Monday, time to know your Xs and Os. So start with the xoloitzcuintli, one of six new breeds welcomed this year to Madison Square Garden. “They are exotic,” Barrera said.

Sasha Fierce”

her

“I Am

“You can’t take her for a walk around the block without someone stopping you to ask, ’What is that, how do you spell that?”’ Commonly known as a Mexican hairless, and featuring oversized batlike ears, they’re pronounced “show-low-eats-QUEEN-tlee.” That’s according to Amy Fernandez, an expert who’s written books about the breed. “We go around with little cards at shows telling people how to say it. Otherwise, you would lose your voice doing it every time,” she said. Fernandez planned to enter two of her xoloitzcuintli in America’s most distinguished dog show. There are 10 ready to compete, though little Alma Dulce will sit out this time at only 2 1/2 years old.

Alma Dulce will sit out this time at only 2 1/2 years old. The Mexican hairless

The Mexican hairless

The “show-low” expected to show best is Georgio Armani, the

rst xolo to win best in show at an American Kennel Club event. “As magni cent a dog of any breed that we might see,” praised David Frei, longtime television host of Westminster. More than 2,000 pooches will take part, coming in 185 breeds and varieties. Among the favorites to become top dog are a wire fox terri- er, a smooth fox terrier, an affenpin- scher and a couple of standard poo- dles. Judge Cindy Vogels, who comes from a terrier background, will point to her pick as best in show around 11 p.m. Tuesday. CNBC and the USA Network will share the TV coverage on the rst night, then USA will show the winner. Last year, Hickory the Scottish

deerhound earned the prized silver bowl. Among the popular winners from the past were Uno the beagle, Josh the Newfoundland and J.R. the bichon frise. This year’s six new breeds to Westminster are the xoloitzcuintli, the Entlebucher mountain dog, the Norwegian lundehund, the American English coonhound, the Finnish lapphund and the Cesky ter- rier. Watching any of them win would be a surprise — it’s taken more than a quarter-century for any newcomer to take the top honor. Seeing any xolo is pretty rare, be it in the nonsporting group or any- where else. Sporting an Aztec name that meant “dog of the gods,” the xolo dates back 3,000 years, Fernandez said.

gods,” the xolo dates back 3,000 years, Fernandez said. Rebarts Interiors 247 California Dr Burlingame CA
Rebarts Interiors 247 California Dr Burlingame CA 650-348-1268 FREE 990 Industrial Rd Ste 106 San
Rebarts Interiors
247 California Dr Burlingame CA
650-348-1268
FREE
990 Industrial Rd Ste 106 San Carlos, CA
650-508-8518
Measuring &
M-F 10-5PM SAT 11-4PM
Evening Appointments Available
www.rebarts.com
Installation
Follow-us at Rebarts Interiors
26609

16 Monday Feb. 13, 2012

SPORTS

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Guards lead Warriors past Rockets

By Antonio Gonzalez

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

OAKLAND — Monta Ellis had 33 points and seven assists, David Lee added 15 points and 13 rebounds and the Golden State Warriors beat the Houston Rockets 106-97 on Sunday night for their second straight victory over a Western Conference playoff contender. Rookie reserve Klay Thompson and Stephen Curry had 14 points apiece and each made some big shots late to help the Warriors upset anoth- er top team. Golden State also won at Denver on Thursday night. Kevin Martin started to break out of a recent shooting slump with 28 points and Luis Scola had 14 points and 13 rebounds for the Rockets, whose three-game winning streak ended. Houston is 3-2 on its current road stretch and has a chance to head home with a winning trip Tuesday at Memphis. The Warriors started to pull away in the fourth quarter with a mix of

substitutes and starters. Ekpe Udoh came off the bench and nished with a strong layup at the rim, drawing a foul on Chase Budinger to convert a three-point play. Thompson followed with a 3- pointer on the next possession, Lee added a put-back dunk and a three- point play and Golden State opened up a 93-80 lead with 7:24 remaining. Too late and too much for Houston to comeback. The Rockets scored six straight capped by Patrick Patterson’s tip to quickly close within seven and give Golden State a brief scare. With the game starting to slip back within reach, a familiar force for the Warriors made sure it didn’t. Curry dribbled along the baseline and nished with an acrobatic, one- handed reverse layup underneath the rim despite getting sent tumbling to the hardwood by Scola. Curry made the free throw for the three-point play to put Golden State back in front by 10 and all but seal the victory. The two franchises suddenly tied

2/12 2/13 2/16 2/17 2/19 2/21 2/23 @Capitals @Tampa @Carolina @Detroit @Jackets @Toronto 4:30p.m. 4:30p.m.
2/12
2/13
2/16
2/17
2/19
2/21
2/23
@Capitals
@Tampa
@Carolina
@Detroit
@Jackets
@Toronto
4:30p.m.
4:30p.m.
4p.m.
9:30a.m.
4p.m.
4p.m.
VERSUS
CSN-CAL
CSN-CAL
NBC
CSN-CAL
CSN-CAL
2/12
2/13
2/15
2/17
2/18
2/20
2/22
vs.Suns
vs.Blazers
@OKC
@Memphis
vs.Clippers
@Phoenix
7:30p.m.
7p.m.
5p.m.
5p.m.
7:30p.m.
6p.m.
CSN-BAY
CSN-BAY
CSN-BAY
CSN-BAY
CSN-BAY
CSN-BAY

together by a similar player move tried to make their own marks. New York sensation Jeremy Lin was waived by Golden State in December after splitting last season between the Warriors and the NBA Development League. Houston picked the point guard up for a cou- ple of weeks before cutting him, and the Knicks decided to give him a look. All Lin has done since is help New York to ve straight victories and engulfed the NBA in swift and stun- ning fashion. So much so that Rockets coach Kevin McHale acknowledged he went to a Bay Area sports bar Saturday night to watch Lin lead the Knicks past the Minnesota Timberwolves, where McHale had previously coached. Sunday’s matchup had little of the same intrigue. After going scoreless for almost three minutes to start the game, the Rockets scored 13 straight — includ- ing the last six points by Scola — to take a 13-5 lead.

TRANSACTIONS

BASEBALL TEXAS RANGERS—Agreed to terms with C Mike Napoli on a one-year contract. BASKETBALL MIAMI HEAT—Signed C Mickell Gladness to a 10- day contract. HOCKEY CAROLINA HURRICANES—Recalled F Jerome Samson from Charlotte (AHL).Reassigned F Drayson Bowman to Charlotte.

NHL STANDINGS

EASTERN CONFERENCE

Atlantic Division

 

W

L

OT

Pts

GF

GA

N.Y.Rangers

36

13

5

77

153 110

Philadelphia

31

18

7

69

182 169

Pittsburgh

32

19

5

69

175 148

New Jersey

31

20

4

66

154 155

N.Y.Islanders

23

24

8

54

131 159

Northeast Division

 
 

W

L

OT

Pts

GF

GA

Boston

34

17

2

70

184 120

Ottawa

28

22

8

64

169 181

Toronto

28

22

6

62

171 166

Montreal

23

24

9

55

149 149

Buffalo

24

25

6

54

136 158

Southeast Division

 
 

W

L

OT

Pts

GF

GA

Florida

27

17

11

65

141 152

Washington

28

22

5

61

153 155

Winnipeg

26

25

6

58

139 161

Tampa Bay

24

25

6

54

155 185

Carolina

20

25

11

51

142 172

WESTERN CONFERENCE

Central Division

 

W

L

OT

Pts

GF

GA

Detroit

38

17

2

78

182 135

St.Louis

34

14

7

75

139 111

Nashville

32

18

6

70

158 148

Chicago

29

20

7

65

174 171

Columbus

16

34

6

38

131 185

Northwest Division

 
 

W

L

OT

Pts

GF

GA

Vancouver

34

15

6

74

178 138

Calgary

26

22

8

60

134 151

Colorado

28

25

4

60

146 159

Minnesota

25

22

8

58

125 144

Edmonton

22

28

5

49

147 165

Pacific Division

 

W

L

OT

Pts

GF

GA

San Jose

30

17

6

66

153 127

Los Angeles

27

19

11

65

124 124

Phoenix

27

21

8

62

148 144

Dallas

28

24

3

59

145 157

Anaheim

22

24

9

53

144 163

Two points for a win,one point for overtime loss or shootout loss.

Sunday’s Games N.Y.Rangers 3,Washington 2 Florida 4,N.Y.Islanders 1 Anaheim 5,Columbus 3

NBA STANDINGS

EASTERN CONFERENCE

Atlantic Division

 

W

L

Pct

GB

Philadelphia

19

9

.679

Boston

15

12

.556

3 1/2

New York

13

15

.464

6

Toronto

9

20

.310

10 1/2

New Jersey

8

21

.276

11 1/2

Southeast Division

 
 

W

L

Pct

GB

Miami

21

7

.750

Atlanta

18

10

.643

3

Orlando

17

11

.607

4

Washington

6

22

.214

15

Charlotte

3

24

.111

17 1/2

Central Division

 

W

L

Pct

GB

Chicago

23

7

.767

Indiana

17

10

.630

4 1/2

Milwaukee

12

15

.444

9 1/2

Cleveland

10

16

.385

11

Detroit

8

21

.276

14 1/2

WESTERN CONFERENCE

Southwest Division

 
 

W

L

Pct

GB

San Antonio

19

9

.679

Dallas

17

11

.607

2

Houston

16

12

.571

3

Memphis

14

13

.519

4 1/2

New Orleans

4

23

.148

14 1/2

Northwest Division

 
 

W

L

Pct

GB

Oklahoma City

21

6

.778

Denver

16

12

.571

5 1/2

Portland

15

13

.536

6 1/2

Utah

13

12

.520

7

Minnesota

13

15

.464

8 1/2

Pacific Division

 

W

L

Pct

GB

L.A.Clippers

17

8

.680

L.A.Lakers

16

12

.571

2 1/2

Phoenix

12

15

.444

6

Golden State

10

14

.417

6 1/2

Sacramento

10

17

.370

8

Sunday’s Games L.A.Lakers 94,Toronto 92 Boston 95,Chicago 91 Washington 98,Detroit 77 Miami 107,Atlanta 87 Golden State 106,Houston 97

L.A.Lakers 94,Toronto 92 Boston 95,Chicago 91 Washington 98,Detroit 77 Miami 107,Atlanta 87 Golden State 106,Houston 97
L.A.Lakers 94,Toronto 92 Boston 95,Chicago 91 Washington 98,Detroit 77 Miami 107,Atlanta 87 Golden State 106,Houston 97
L.A.Lakers 94,Toronto 92 Boston 95,Chicago 91 Washington 98,Detroit 77 Miami 107,Atlanta 87 Golden State 106,Houston 97

THE DAILY JOURNAL

DATEBOOK

Monday Feb. 13, 2012

17

T his week’s tip comes by way of a friend in the media, a knowledgeable

T his week’s tip comes by way of a

friend in the media, a knowledgeable

cat owner (and PHS/SPCA adopter)

perplexed by a common, messy issue: her cat who has been using a litterbox regularly, now limits her visits to No. 1. For No. 2, her new spot is behind the curtains! She’s tried scold- ing her cat and believes her cat can tell she means business, but this hasn’t changed the cat’s “business.” PHS/SPCA behaviorist Anika Liljenwall had this advice. First, cats do not respond well to punishment and it usu- ally only increases their stress level and makes the issue worse. And if you scold her after she’s pooped, she has no idea why she’s being scolded. The best way to ensure consis- tent litterbox use is to have a large, uncovered litterbox with unscented litter, and place it in an open area far away from her food. Even if you have just one cat, consider a second box. Clean them at least once daily as many cats will not go in a box they deem too dirty. Finally, take her to the vet for a checkup, just to make sure there isn’t an underlying med- ical cause. In terms of dealing with the actual mess, use a pet-formulated enzymatic cleaner to get rid of the smell; most regular household cleaners are not powerful enough to remove the smell for the cat. Many elimination issues are also due to stress. To ease stress and make kitty happier and well-adjusted, make sure she has toys and lots of tall places to climb. If she is an indoor/outdoor cat, there could be something outside (other cats, raccoons, etc.) causing her stress. This is one of the reasons we recommend for most cats to be indoor- only. Also, think about any recent changes to your household or routine that could have preceded this problem.

Scott oversees PHS/SPCA’s Customer Service, Behavior and Training, Education, Outreach, Field Services, Cruelty Investigation, Volunteer and Media/PR pro- gram areas and staff. His companion, Murray, oversees him.

‘The Vow’shows love sells

By David Germain

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

LOS ANGELES — Love triumphed over action at the weekend box ofce with a No. 1 debut for the romantic drama “The Vow.” Studio estimates Sunday show that the love story starring Rachel McAdams and Channing Tatum took in $41.7 million to come in ahead of two new action tales and the rst 3-D “Star Wars” reissue. Landing a close second with $39.3 million was Denzel Washington and Ryan Reynolds’ action thriller “Safe House.” Coming in solid- ly at No. 3 was Dwayne Johnson’s family action sequel “Journey 2: The Mysterious Island” with $27.6 million. And adding to George Lucas’ riches was the 3-D premiere of “Star Wars: Episode I — The Phantom Menace,” which was No. 4 with $23 million. That raises the lifetime domestic total for “Phantom Menace to $454.1 million. This was the rst non-holiday weekend that four movies opened with more than $20 mil- lion each, said Paul Dergarabedian, analyst for box-ofce tracker Hollywood.com. The only other time when four new releases did that well was over Christmas weekend in 2008, he said. “It felt like a summer weekend to me,” Dergarabedian said. “This was like a great big valentine from Hollywood to the audience, or from the audience to Hollywood.” The four big debuts maintained Hollywood’s strong business during the nor- mally sleepy winter. Overall domestic rev- enues totaled $193 million, up 19.3 percent from the same weekend last year, when “Just Go with It” led with $30.5 million. So far this year, domestic receipts are at $1.2 billion, 19 percent ahead of 2011’s. “I really believe people are in a movie- going mode,” said Nikki Rocco, head of dis- tribution for Universal, which released “Safe House.” “There have been great choices so far this year. I feel honestly that the mild weather has helped them enjoy wintertime for what it is. They’re not stuck inside, they’re not snowed in. Maybe people like to get out of the home rather than cocooning.” Timed to Valentine’s Day on Tuesday, “The Vow” stars McAdams as a woman who awak- ens in the hospital after a car wreck with no

who awak- ens in the hospital after a car wreck with no “The Vow”was the weekend’s

“The Vow”was the weekend’s top movie.

Top ten movies

1.“The Vow,”$41.7 million ($9.7 million in- ternational). 2.“Safe House,”$39.3 million ($10.2 million international). 3.“Journey 2:The Mysterious Island,”$27.6 million ($25.5 million international). 4.“Star Wars: Episode I — The Phantom Menace”in 3-D,$23 million ($20.5 million international). 5.“Chronicle,”$12.3 million. 6.“The Woman in Black,”$10.3 million. 7.“The Grey,”$5.1 million. 8.“Big Miracle,” $3.9 million ($400,000 in- ternational). 9.“The Descendants,”$3.5 million. 10.“Underworld Awakening,”$2.5 million.

memory of her husband (Tatum) and the last ve years of her life. Women accounted for 72 percent of the audience for “The Vow,” whose receipts in just its rst two days exceeded the movie’s $30 million production budget. “There are certain movies that women, no pun intended, vow they are going to see, and this is that kind of movie,” said Rory Bruer, head of distribution for Sony, whose Screen Gems banner released “The Vow.” “I do think a lot of men are going to be seeing it on Feb. 14. It’s a great date movie, and I think the men who do see it on Valentine’s Day are going to be thoroughly entertained.” “The Vow” added $9.7 million in 20 over- seas markets to bring its worldwide total to $51.4 million. The audience was split evenly between males and females for “Safe House,” which

stars Washington as a CIA traitor who turns himself in and winds up on the run with his rookie minder (Reynolds). “Safe House” also took in $10.2 million from 25 overseas territories to lift its world- wide total to $49.5 million. “Journey 2” stars Johnson, Michael Caine, Josh Hutcherson and Vanessa Hudgens in a follow-up to the 2008 hit “Journey to the Center of the Earth,” a modern take on Jules Verne’s sci-