Vous êtes sur la page 1sur 50
FEBRUARY2012
FEBRUARY2012

Perfection has a darker side.

Introducing Patrón XO Cafe Dark Cocoa.

An extraordinary blend of Patrón tequila, pure cocoa, and the natural essence of the finest coffee.

simply perfect.

patronspirits.com

The perfect way to enjoy Patrón is responsibly. © 2012 The Patrón Spirits Company, Las Vegas, NV. 30% Alc./Vol.

CONTENTS

FEATURES

Volume 63 I February 2012 I Issue No. 9

DEPARTMENTS

2 Behind The Bar by David Kratt

3 Tapping The Trade by Liane Fu

A-8 Spirit Perspective by robert Plotkin

A-10 Spiritscope by Duncan Cameron

PRICE LIST

A-32

Official Price List Section

A-77

Brand index

A-94

industry directory

A-96

The Beverage network Crossword

HOW CAN WE HELP YOU?

Subscriptions:

To subscribe, or receive help with an existing subscription or change your address, please call us:

Phone: (808) 591-0049

NEW FAX NUMBER: (808) 591-0048

e-mail: Publisher@hawaiibevguide.com

(808) 591-0048 e-mail: Publisher@hawaiibevguide.com JUST A SCAN AWAY! hawaiibevguide.com • SUBSCRIBE ONLINE!

JUST A SCAN AWAY!

hawaiibevguide.com

SUBSCRIBE ONLINE!

up load Trade events Photos

advertising editorial Planner

around Hawaii Photos

• DOWNLOAD THE FEBRUARY BEVERAGE NETWORK CROSSWORD PUZZLE! Crossword puzzle This month features clues about
• DOWNLOAD THE FEBRUARY BEVERAGE
NETWORK CROSSWORD PUZZLE!
Crossword puzzle
This month features clues about Chocolate Flavored Spirits
11
Whirls
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
12
Disavows
14
Bud
13
14
15
16
21
Tie with a rope
23
Music type
17
18
19
24
Farm building
25
Prate
20
21
22
23
27
Rend
29
Baby eating apparel
24
25
26
27
28
30
Chocolate
,
Sweet Red Wine
31
Long time
29
30
31
33
What you do to gum
34
Pincer
32
33
34
36
Old woman
37
Leaks
35
36
37
38
39
40
38
False god graven image
39
African river
40
Stiffen
41
42
43
42
Dekaliter (abbr.)
44
Dumbfounds
44
45
46
47
48
45
Chocolate Liqueur
46
Housed temporarily
49
50
51
47
Higher-ranking
48
In the direction of
52
53
54
55
50
Divided nation
51
Island country
56
57
58
59
60
61
62
53
Refuse
55
Liberal (abbr.)
63
64
65
58
Ending
60
African antelope
66
67
68
61
Moray
62
Drunk
Across
33 Fellow
64 Element
34 Corporate top dog
65 Island in Malay
35 Chinese cabbage
Archipelago
1
Dirty areas
(2 wds.)
66 Woeful
6
U.S. Air Force
37
Inclining
Grounds
10
Type of partnership
67 Solution
41
Representative
68 Chocolate Milk
13
Shred (2 wds.)
42
College head
15
South American country
Down
43
Stamping tool
16
Marvel
44
Glowing
17
Boat dock
47
Alter
1 Short-term memory
18
Canal name
48
Fee
2 Legume
19
Can metal
49
Night time light
3 Rowing tool
20
Electric light
50
Seaweed
4 Indian clans
22
Stoli Chocolat
Vodka
51
Lone
5 Sunrise
24
Tier
52
Tacked (2 wds.)
6 Highs
26
Time periods
54
Cabbage salad
7 French Painter,
28
Women’s magazine
56
Zag’s partner
“Sunday Afternoon…”
29
Prejudice
57
Canal
8 Regions
30
Cut open
59
Sights
9 Lint
31
Chasm
63
Adam’s wife
10 Of late
32
Peaked
DTLFASUSTOPS
EWAUREPPURAET
NITZEUSANIRAM
IREBZARBLUB
ELLESAREPETS
SSYBATILSSAIB
OECPAHCLLI
GNIPOLSYOHCKOB
EIDNAEDPER
LLOTWEKSWOLGA
ELOSPLEKNOOM
WALSNODEDDA
SEGAMIEIREGIZ
OENROBNOENEVE
TLUDADRAYDAS
WALSNODEDDA SEGAMIEIREGIZ OENROBNOENEVE TLUDADRAYDAS JUST A SCAN AWAY! riOJa’S new CaLLing Card Rioja’s

JUST A SCAN AWAY!

SEGAMIEIREGIZ OENROBNOENEVE TLUDADRAYDAS JUST A SCAN AWAY! riOJa’S new CaLLing Card Rioja’s Reservas and Gran
SEGAMIEIREGIZ OENROBNOENEVE TLUDADRAYDAS JUST A SCAN AWAY! riOJa’S new CaLLing Card Rioja’s Reservas and Gran

riOJa’S new CaLLing Card Rioja’s Reservas and Gran Reservas are emerging as the region’s fastest- growing wines.

are emerging as the region’s fastest- growing wines. SPeaKeaSy wiTH MiKe KeyeS Brown-Forman’s North American

SPeaKeaSy wiTH MiKe KeyeS Brown-Forman’s North American President sits down to discuss a host of industry topics.

President sits down to discuss a host of industry topics. BeyOnd THe CHOCOLaTe MarTini Brands spotlight

BeyOnd THe CHOCOLaTe MarTini Brands spotlight America’s chocolate love affair with a host of infused spirits and wines.

love affair with a host of infused spirits and wines. SMaLL iS BeauTiFuL What small stores

SMaLL iS BeauTiFuL What small stores lack in size, they make up for in service and selectivity.

lack in size, they make up for in service and selectivity. TaSTing COrner: MOre THan MaLBeC

TaSTing COrner:

MOre THan MaLBeC Argentina looks to Torrontés, Bonarda and beyond.

MaLBeC Argentina looks to Torrontés, Bonarda and beyond. Bar TaLK: THinK drinK, TOO Owen Thomson is

Bar TaLK: THinK drinK, TOO Owen Thomson is the barman for Chef José Andrés’ ThinkFoodGroup’s restaurants.

• THe Find • wineBuZZ • THe COnneCTiOn • SeaSOnS Menu • new PrOduCTS & PrOMOTiOnS uSBg LaST CaLL

Publisher/editor: Christopher Teves accounting: Josie ancog Staff Writer: Liane Fu Consultant:

Publisher/editor:

Christopher Teves

accounting:

Josie ancog

Staff Writer:

Liane Fu

Consultant:

Campbell Mansfield

Published monthly by:

Service Publications, inc.

(uSPS 018-010)

1311 Kapiolani blvd. #401 Honolulu, HI 96814

PHOne: (808) 591-0049 FaX: (808) 591-0048

TOOL OF THe Trade FOr Hawaii’S Beverage induSTry

Serving aLL iSLandS in THe 50 TH STaTe SinCe 1949!

publisher@hawaiibevguide.com

www.hawaiibevguide.com

PrOud MeMBer OF

www.hawaiibevguide.com PrOud MeMBer OF POSTMaSTer: Please send address changes to Hawaii Beverage

POSTMaSTer:

Please send address changes to Hawaii Beverage guide, P.O. box 853, Honolulu, HI 96808

Hawaii beverage Guide is an independent monthly trade publication devoted to the beer, wine and liquor industry in the entire state of Hawaii. The views expressed in this publication other than our own editorial comment do not necessarily express the opinion of the publisher. because of the confidential nature of the matter contained herein, Hawaii beverage Guide is restricted to members of the industry. Subscriptions are accepted on this basis only. Nothing may be reprinted or reproduced in whole or in part without written permission from the publisher. Published monthly by Service Publications, Inc., dba Hawaii beverage Guide. Prices are $40.00 + tax per year; $6.00 + tax per single issue, airmail extra. Periodicals postage paid at Honolulu, Hawaii. Contents copyrighted 2012 by Service Publications, Inc.

Contents copyrighted 2012 by Service Publications, Inc. national Coverage, Local advantage The beverage Network
Contents copyrighted 2012 by Service Publications, Inc. national Coverage, Local advantage The beverage Network

national Coverage, Local advantage

The beverage Network Publications are serviced by beverage Media Group, Inc.

152 Madison avenue, Suite 600 New york, Ny 10016 tel/ 212.571.3232 • fax/ 212.571.4443

www.bevnetwork.com

2 Hawaii Beverage guide February 2012

behindthebar by Davi D T. KraTT

The role we must play

What drains you behind the bar?

I ’ve got a couple things. Okay, there’s

more than that.

For example, I call her the Margarita

Lady. No matter how exact I prepare

her margarita to her specifications she complains – usually because there’s not enough tequila. So I add more tequila. Then later she’ll want more Triple Sec.

It never fails. Then she’ll nurse the drink

forever, need something every time

I walk by her and want “a fluff” so she

doesn’t have to pay for a second drink. And then, need I say it, she leaves a terrible tip. Customers like that will bleed you. But what can you do about it. You have to be polite. The other day I told a bartender coworker, “I can’t believe how nice you were to that guy.” He asked why. I told him, “Because the last time he was in the bar he went totally ballistic on you.” My coworker laughed and said, “Oh yeah, I thought he looked familiar.” Recently, a couple of regular bartender customers were at the bar talking about bartending. The younger bartender complained, “I can’t take the drunks anymore.” The older bartender responded, “Really? I consider them good customers.” So how do you reconcile the difference between how you think you should be treated and how you are treated or how about between what you really want to say or do and what you have to say or do? Is having a short memory or sense of humor the key? It doesn’t hurt. But that’s not it.

yOur PrOFeSSiOnaL PerSOna –

Both the bartender with the short

memory and the sense of humor have been around long enough to know who the regular annoying pains in the neck are and, maybe more important, know the annoying behaviors that cause the bleeding. They don’t let it sink in. It’s evident; one doesn’t remember the insignificant incidents without being reminded and the other doesn’t lose her sense of humor over it all. In short, when it’s needed, these bartenders project their professional persona to keep their inner self safe and sound. I don’t know the younger bartender very well but have seen him get frazzled. In short, he may never quite figure this one out. Have you?

SavOring THOSe MOMenTS –

Remember, all customers are not created equal! If you want to widen that gap instead of reconciling your differences, then keep giving those customers who bleed you the same special treatment you give your good customers. Don’t turn on the charm, either. That will bleed you even more and reinforce their behavior. And when you’re busy, those customers will just have to wait while you’re servicing that good customer or just have to understand that you cannot go out of your way for them. See if that helps with reconciling your differences with those customers. Oh, and if you have a customer like my Margarita Lady, tell the customer something like, “The boss said we can’t give out ‘fluffs’ or sell half-drinks anymore. But would you like to buy another drink?” n

Please send corresPondence to:

dtkratt@chartermi.net or P.o. Box 638, Grand haven, mi 49417.

to buy another drink?” n Please send corresPondence to: dtkratt@chartermi.net or P.o. Box 638, Grand haven,

taPPinGthetrade by LiaNE FU

The Grove-Kailua, Hawaii

Globally Inspired, Locally Sourced

T he Grove is a new restaurant in Kailua where Lucy’s used to be. Warmly lit in bright golden hues,

it has a hip vibe. The hostess station stands in the middle of the outside lanai which is ringed with foliage. Even as you approach, the smell of keawe wood wafts into the air with the promise of great things to come. Fred DeAngelo and family have come together to plant roots in the Kailua community with The Grove. Executive Chef DeAngelo has led many award winning restaurants:

Palamino’s, Tiki’s Bar and Grill, and most recently at Ola at Turtle Bay before opening The Grove. They called it The Grove in part because he grew up in Kailua’s Coconut Grove, but also with thoughts of a grove of Olive trees and how such trees shoot deep and long lasting roots. In Greece, such trees live for hundreds of years. However, the actual tree on their logo is the Mamani tree. It grows high on the slopes of the big island. It’s a tree that perseveres through all types of inclement weather and changes of climate. There are shades of meaning like this in all the elements of the restaurant. The menu at The Grove is globally inspired and locally sourced, in part because of the branches of his family. DeAngelo’s brother in-law is Greek, DeAngelo is part Italian, and his wife’s family is from the west side of the island. Soon to come De Angelo will bring in one whole cow a month from the big island. They will serve it from tongue to tail. He says, “At Ola the bone in rib eye, the strip loin and the tenderloin sell out in 2 days. Then it’s time for us to go to work with all the other different cuts. Lots of our cooks and crew have

never seen beef from tongue to tail in

this way. We want to give our guests the experience that it’s a local product.

It showcases the life of the animal that

we can now enjoy, a truly farm to table

experience.” DeAngelo says, “We try to show respect to the farmer who, for example,

“We try to show respect to the farmer who, for example, works the earth to give

works the earth to give us a tomato. We need to not screw it up and give it to our guests the quickest and best way we can. It’s kind of a philosophy that we strive for. We just want to be group of chefs that work with the community. We want to be able to pull basil and herbs and mint from Kailua HS because we have a teacher that works here at the bar who’s helping them to grow hydroponically. We would like to keep the circle going. We’re going to try our best and try new ways to be rooted in the community and share that experience with our guests.” He says, “We have extensive by the glass offerings and suggested pairings with our entrees on our menu, some entrees have multiple suggestions based on price point and that’s just the beginning. We also have wine flights

at

solid foundation that we know we can execute. He says, “We have a couple of really interesting and very interactive kids items. We all have small children. We

good prices. We want to build on a

would like to create the environment of

a

can bring your kids, and you can have

a

without your kids and have a great experience. We want to be a part of this community. We want to have roots here in the grove. We want to share with Kailua what we can bring.” n

neighborhood restaurant where you

great experience; or, you can come

Please send corresPondence to: liane FU certiFied sommelier & General manaGer oF the Wine stoP liane@hawaiibevguide.com

Brand profile Farm Fresh Sidney Frank Importing Reaps the American Harvest By cARA McIlwAIne A

Brand profile

Farm Fresh

Sidney Frank Importing Reaps the American Harvest

By cARA McIlwAIne

A mid a powerful culinary move-

ment fueled by artisanal-craft-

The Alternative Vodka

At first glance, American Harvest may seem to have a lot in common with vodka, yet Byrne points out that de- spite the similarities, American Har-

vest is decidedly different: “It is organ-

ic

vodka to which a proprietary blend

of

organic ingredients has been added,

creating a truly unique vodka specialty.

It’s a revolutionary way to look at the vodka category. The addition of these ingredients results in the distinctive, smooth, clean and crisp character of American Harvest.” Sidney Frank’s long-heralded asso- ciation with vodka allowed the com- pany to explore a different approach. “We wanted something that offered

a distinct taste, but that consumers

could wrap their arms around because of the emotional benefit,” Byrne ex-

SeASOnAl HARVEST BlOODy MARY
SeASOnAl HARVEST
BlOODy MARY

2

parts American Harvest

1

part freshly squeezed lemon juice

4

small cherry tomatoes

3

thin cucumber slices

Salt & pepper to taste 2-3 dashes hot sauce 2-3 dashes Worcestershire ® sauce

3 sprigs of fresh fill, 3 fresh basil

leaves and a sprig of fresh tarragon (or your own favorite fresh herbs)

ed food and drink, American

farmers are finding themselves

in the limelight, industrious champions of fresh-from-the-earth local ingredi- ents. Sidney Frank Importing Company unveiled American Harvest Organic Spirit, the first USDA Certified Organic product in its portfolio, as a celebration of the American farmer and of sustain- able agriculture. American Harvest launched in eight states in 2011. In the first quarter of 2012, the brand’s reach is extending to 13 more states—Alas- ka, Arkansas, Connecticut, Delaware, Hawaii, Kentucky, Nebraska, New Mex- ico, North Dakota, Oklahoma, South Dakota, Vermont and Washington D.C. Handcrafted in small batches using a continuous column distillation process in its Rigby, ID-based distillery, Ameri- can Harvest is made with organic winter wheat sourced from a single purveyor:

farmer Steve Rhodes. “He’s exactly what you picture when you think of an American farmer—hardworking, dedi- cated and passionate,” points out Julie Byrne, American Harvest’s marketing brand manager. “Made-in-America is what American Harvest is all about,” she continues. “So far, consumers and the trade have both been really recep- tive to our all-American and organic messaging.” To complement the Idaho wheat, American Harvest also uses water from an aquifer of the sprawl- ing Snake River. At an SRP of $23.99, American Harvest is quite competitive for the organic market.

4 Hawaii Beverage guide February 2012

plains. “American Harvest is crafted with the same American values that this country was built on: integrity, opportunity, independence, hard work, innovation and pride.”

Organic Mix

As with any product new to the market, an emphasis on its mixability is key to making an impact on bartenders. That is why Byrne points to American Har- vest’s versatility as one of its biggest assets, whether the spirit is enjoyed in its most basic form sipped on the rocks, or in one of the fresh, organic fruit li- bations whipped up by Todd Richman, Sidney Frank’s corporate mixologist. When enjoyed neat, Richman explains, “American Harvest has an aroma of sweet pastry, lemon peel and black pepper. The taste is well- balanced with a creamy mouthfeel and a long finish.” In terms of mixing, “Craft cocktails have been using fresh ingredients since the origin of the cocktail. As the pendulum continues to swing toward that on a larger scale, having an organic spirit is a natural fit,” Richman says. “American Harvest has a great taste and texture, which makes it ideal. In stirred cocktails, the viscosity is fantastic; when shaken with fresh juices, it has body and the unique brand character is showcased in the drink.” n

the unique brand character is showcased in the drink.” n Combine all ingredients in a cocktail

Combine all ingredients in a cocktail glass and muddle. Add ice and shake well. Strain over fresh ice into a rocks glass rimmed with hickory smoked salt and garnish with your favorite vegetables and herbs.

Sauvignon Blanc, north coaSt +38% in hawaii SupermarketS

ac nielsen total oahu Supermarkets current 26 weeks ending 12/10/11

Please enjoy our wines resPonsibly.

© 2012 Clos du Bois, Geyserville, California

2008 Clos Du Bois ‘Calcaire’ Chardonnay

“This is filled with airy and lifted aromatics of Ripe orchard fruit, flowers and a touch of wet stone. The wine sings with penetrating flavors of yellow and green fruit laced with just the right touch of vanilla. It is impeccably balanced and the flavors really cling to the palate for a long and satisfying aftertaste. It is elegant and quite stylish”

Roberto Viernes

Hawaii Master Sommelier & Author Of Vino Sense

Please enjoy our wines resPonsibly.

© 2012 Clos du Bois, Geyserville, California

Southern Wine & Spirits of Hawaii • Call Toll Free: 1 (888) 866-9463

On Wednesday January 18, 2012 Corzo Tequila & Apartment 3 presented “Viva la Revaluation” a night of magical cocktails and Featuring the food of central Mexico made by All Star Chef Kelii “La Lengua” Heen and Chef John Memering of Cactus Bistro. an evening with master mixologist and international man of mystery Manny Hinojosa mixing it up all night with drinks, food and great live music performed by YOZA!

mixing it up all night with drinks, food and great live music performed by YOZA! To
mixing it up all night with drinks, food and great live music performed by YOZA! To
mixing it up all night with drinks, food and great live music performed by YOZA! To

To oRdeR Call Toll FRee: 1(800)728-2570

LOCaLbrandPrOFiLe

Hawaiian Rum Processor Discovers Cooling Tower that Can Handle Extremes

www.oldlahainarum.com Maui Distillers P.O. Box 790450 Paia, HI 96779 Toll Free: (866) 687-4646

For more information, contact Delta Cooling Towers, Inc., 41 Pine Street, Rockaway, NJ 07866; (800) BUY.DELTA (289.3358) www.deltacooling.com

10
10

Hawaii Beverage guide February 2012

10 Hawaii Beverage guide February 2012

Engineered plastic cooling tower stands up to New Hampshire winters before it is relocated to Maui’s North Shore to face the harsh wind, salt air and UV rays at world famous windsurfing spots

W hen Kolani Distillers, on the

island of Maui, decided to convert

corrosives, the relentless Hawaiian sunlight would bombard the tower with harsh UV radiation that could possibly do damage to anything but the toughest plastic material. In the process of exploring alternatives, a used cooling tower constructed of heavy- duty, engineered HDPE that was obtained from a closed plant in New Hampshire. It was a Paragon Series built by Delta Cooling Towers. “I found that the cooling tower manufacturer produced a quality product, thus we could afford to buy the secondhand tower and controls, have it disassembled, shipped to Maui and reassembled at our distillery site.” Case adds that he was very impressed with the weather tolerance of the cooling tower, which had operated for about six years in the brutal winters of the northeastern U.S. and now has operated in the tropical sun at the distillery since 2006. SURPRISING SERVICE CALL After the cooling tower operated flawlessly for years in Maui, vandals smashed the blades of the tower fan. The cooling tower could not operate in Hawaii’s constant warm temperatures without the fan, they called the manufacturer’s New Jersey headquarters for help. “I explained to them what had happened, and that it was a second-hand tower,” he says. “Amazingly, they jumped right on it. They looked up the tower and identified the fan assembly we needed to replace, and shipped it out to us with service instructions.” Our maintenance people were quick to replace the entire fan assembly, Immediately afterward, the plant was back up and running again. “When you consider that the cooling tower was about 15 years old, Delta Cooling really took fabulous care of us.” The design of the cooling tower fan system provides important energy savings because the tower controls regulate the speed of the fan according to the ambient air temperature. Case says the resulting energy savings are very important to companies located in Hawaii because the energy costs here are among the highest in the country. Today, Kolani Distillers’ Old Lahaina Premium Rum is sold throughout the Hawaiian Islands, and hopes to distribute the line nationally in the near future. n

an old sugar mill into a distillery

and produce a line of rum at the site of the island’s only remaining sugar plantation, they realized they had their work cut out for them – a labor of love, hopefully. To begin with, the father and son team, Paul and Brian Case, had to make substantial investment that met the federal code governing building facilities. These were stringent, applying to stainless steel tanks, boilers and other distillation equipment. Also, the regulations required an elaborate fire containment system, one that could make 3,500 gallons of water per minute available with a flow that could be sustained for three hours. And, finally, they needed a reliable cooling tower that could remove the heat from the alcohol condenser system regardless of weather conditions. Paul Case explains that the cooling tower was integral to the operation of the distillery’s alcohol condensation process. “After vaporous alcohol leaves our stills, it runs through a condenser, which condenses the alcohol back to a liquid form so we can process it,” he says. “The condensers are cooled by water. So, we have to take that water, which becomes heated while cooling the alcohol, and send it to the cooling tower to reduce the water temperature, and then it back through the continuous condenser loop.” Selecting an appropriate cooling tower was a special consideration due to Hawaii’s year round high ambient temperatures. Also, an engineered plastic tower would be effective in handling the stiff gusts of corrosive salt air that blows in off the surf just half a mile from the distillery’s location in Paia. The winds on the North Shore of Maui are strong and constant enough to make it a premier windsurfing spot in the world. However, wind-blown salt and other corrosives are the archenemy of traditional metal clad cooling towers, which often require much maintenance. While plastic cooling towers are virtually impervious to

metal clad cooling towers, which often require much maintenance. While plastic cooling towers are virtually impervious

We’ve traveled far and wide to seek wines of distinction and tremendous value, produced by family-owned wineries committed to maintaining a small carbon footprint. The Seeker brings you top-quality wines from the regions that grow them best, offering the thrill of adventure and discovery with each sip.

the thrill of adventure and discovery with each sip. THe SeEKeR. IT’S OUt THeRe. FOLLOW US
the thrill of adventure and discovery with each sip. THe SeEKeR. IT’S OUt THeRe. FOLLOW US

THe SeEKeR. IT’S OUt THeRe.

FOLLOW US

with each sip. THe SeEKeR. IT’S OUt THeRe. FOLLOW US ENJOY RESPONSIBLY ©2012 Kobrand Corporation, New

ENJOY RESPONSIBLY

THe SeEKeR. IT’S OUt THeRe. FOLLOW US ENJOY RESPONSIBLY ©2012 Kobrand Corporation, New York, NY

©2012 Kobrand Corporation, New York, NY

www.kobrandwineandspirits.com

RESPONSIBLY ©2012 Kobrand Corporation, New York, NY www.kobrandwineandspirits.com To oRdeR Call Toll FRee: 1(800)728-2570

To oRdeR Call Toll FRee: 1(800)728-2570

RESPONSIBLY ©2012 Kobrand Corporation, New York, NY www.kobrandwineandspirits.com To oRdeR Call Toll FRee: 1(800)728-2570
RESPONSIBLY ©2012 Kobrand Corporation, New York, NY www.kobrandwineandspirits.com To oRdeR Call Toll FRee: 1(800)728-2570

newproducts&promos

ut CELEBRATES 2
ut CELEBRATES 2
 
mIA ITALIAN
mIA ITALIAN

terrAmIA ITALIAN

EXTENDS CAFÉ X pAtrÓn EXTENDS CAFÉ XO
EXTENDS CAFÉ X
EXTENDS CAFÉ X

pAtrÓn EXTENDS CAFÉ XO

ABsoLut CELEBRATES 2012 WITH TWO NEW FLAVORS

SPARKLERS SHINE

LINE WITH DARK COCOA

Absolut is known for innovation. The two newest members of the Absolut family are Absolut Miami and Absolut Gräpevine. Absolut Miami is the brand’s sixth limited- edition, city-inspired flavor; it combines citrus flavors like passion fruit and orange blossom. Absolut Gräpevine offers the true taste of white grape, balanced with notes of dragon fruit and papaya, with no sugar added.

Both the Terramia Moscato Frizzante IGT (Sicily) and the Terramia Prosecco 2010 DOC-Spumante Brut (Veneto) showcase the memorable and sweet side of Italy. With a distinctly European package, these wines are upscale yet appropriate for a wide variety of occasions, including Valentine’s Day, or as an easy apéritif wine. Terramia is marketed nationally by Antares Wine Company.

Patrón Spirits has launched its first brand extension for the successful Patrón XO Café coffee liqueur line. XO Café Dark Cocoa combines Patrón Silver, the essence of coffee and rich chocolate flavor. The chocolate used is of the Criollo cacao variety produced in Mexico’s Tabasco region. Distilled at 60 proof, the liqueur has a smooth, dry finish.

facebook.com/Absolutantareswine.com patrontequila.com

antareswine.comfacebook.com/Absolut patrontequila.com

patrontequila.comfacebook.com/Absolut antareswine.com

SRP: $21 (both)707-265-4050 SRP: $24.99

707-265-4050SRP: $21 (both) SRP: $24.99

SRP: $24.99SRP: $21 (both) 707-265-4050

SRP: $21 (both) 707-265-4050 SRP: $24.99       redBreAst 12 CASK STRENGTH COMES TO
   
   
 
 
 
 

redBreAst 12 CASK STRENGTH COMES TO THE U.S.

SWEET WHITE BUBBLES FROM ALLure FOR VALENTINE’S DAY

AntIcA sAmBucA OFFERS UNCONVENTIONAL POURING

Redbreast has announced the arrival of Redbreast 12 Cask Strength, a natural, non- chill-filtered version of Redbreast 12 that goes straight from the cask to the bottle. This is a pure representation of Redbreast 12 Year Old before water is added. The aroma is an explosion of fruits combined with vanilla and pine from the casks, and the finish is long and complex.

Sweet wines are HOT and highly-sought for Valentine’s Day. New Allure Bubbly White Moscato joins the recently released Allure Bubbly Pink Moscato. Allure Bubbly White Moscato is a California wine that is fresh, fun, lively, affordable and sweet! Allure is marketed nationally by Domaine Napa Wine Company.

Imported from Italy, Antica Sambuca is made with all natural ingredients and brings new accessibility to the Sambuca category. Antica Classic has the traditional anise flavor, with a sweet finish; Antica Black is a bold variation infused with licorice root sourced from Southern Italy. Each Antica Sambuca bottle has a proprietary, built-in retractable pourer.

SRP: $65

SRP: $65

domainenapa.comSRP: $65 anticasambuca.it/site/usa

anticasambuca.it/site/usaSRP: $65 domainenapa.com

707-265-4060SRP: $19.99

SRP: $19.99707-265-4060

12 Hawaii Beverage guide February 2012

(L to R) James Torres, Darren Sakai, Anna Israel, Marian & Alex Thropp - SWS

(L to R) James Torres, Darren Sakai, Anna Israel,

Marian & Alex Thropp - SWS of Hawaii. Christmas at the Fairmount Orchid.

Thropp - SWS of Hawaii. Christmas at the Fairmount Orchid. (L to R) Wendell Lesher, Chef

(L to R) Wendell Lesher, Chef Nick, Chuck Wilson,

Alex Thropp & Mark Liberato - SWS of the Big Island Crew poured during the “Italian Week” event at the Four Seasons Hualalai Resort on the Big Island.

event at the Four Seasons Hualalai Resort on the Big Island. (L to R) Jeremy Sylva,

(L to R) Jeremy Sylva, Sales Rep - SWS of Hawaii

& Tami Orozco, Owner - Tango Contemporary

Café. Tango Contemporary Cafe held an Italian

Wine Dinner featuring Banfi Vintners, Alta Luna,

& Castello di Monastero on 01.17.12.

Alta Luna, & Castello di Monastero on 01.17.12. (L to R) Chef Gomes, Seng Berkoss, Dave

(L to R) Chef Gomes, Seng Berkoss, Dave

Eriksen, Mike Ferrante & Alex Thropp - AWS of Hawaii. The Annual Groth Wine Makers Dinner was held at the Manta Restaurant in the Mauna Kea Beach Hotel.

held at the Manta Restaurant in the Mauna Kea Beach Hotel. (L to R) Selene Wayne

(L to R) Selene Wayne - Buyer, Island Naturals Pahoa & Rick Kimura - SWS of Hawaii. Island Natural Pahoa’s monthly tasting event featured Sam Smith Beers.

Pahoa’s monthly tasting event featured Sam Smith Beers. (L to R) Ashley Mosher, Bartender - O’Toole’s

(L to R) Ashley Mosher, Bartender - O’Toole’s

& Jeremy Sylva, Sales Rep - SWS of Hawaii. O’Toole’s ”Whiskey of the Month” program featured Jameson Irish Whiskey in January 2012.

arOUndhaWaii

Jameson Irish Whiskey in January 2012. arOUnd haWaii (L to R) Chuck Furuya, Tom Alejado, Alex

(L to R) Chuck Furuya, Tom Alejado, Alex Thropp

& Patrick Almarza. Sansei Seafood Restaurant

on the Big Island is home to the monthly trade tasting hosted by AWS of Hawaii.

home to the monthly trade tasting hosted by AWS of Hawaii. (L to R) Mark K.

(L to R) Mark K. Liberato - SWS of HI, Paul Horner - Resort Mgr, Sheraton Keahou Beach Resort & Wendle Lesher - SWS of HI. Christmas at Sheraton Keahou Beach Resort‘s Hulihee Palace held a benefit for “Habitat for Humanity” on 12.10.11 & featured Chandon Brut, Rodney Strong RRV Pinot Noir, Nobilo Sauvignon Blanc, Cht Ste Michelle Riesling, Markham Sauvignon Blanc, Sterling Merlot, Villa Mt Eden Cab Sauvignon.

Blanc, Sterling Merlot, Villa Mt Eden Cab Sauvignon. (L to R) Colleen Wenzel, Owner - Snappers

(L to R) Colleen Wenzel, Owner - Snappers

& Jeremy Sylva, Sales Rep - SWS of Hawaii.

Snappers Sports Bar & Grill featured Old Lahaina Rum & Hawaiian Vodka. Snappers supports Hawaii Made products!

SEASON’S MENU DESSERT FIZZ Created by The Cocktail Guru, Jonathan Pogash 1 ½ oz. Van
SEASON’S MENU
DESSERT FIZZ
Created by The Cocktail Guru,
Jonathan Pogash
1 ½ oz. Van Gogh Dutch
Chocolate Vodka
1 large strawberry chopped
1 tsp. agave nectar
¼ oz. fresh lemon juice
SEASON'SMENU
3 oz. Champagne
or sparkling wine
Handful of mint leaves
Try
Our ! .
Sweet
Valentine
Muddle the strawberry and mint with
agave and lemon. Add Van Gogh Dutch
Chocolate Vodka and strain into chilled
Champagne flute. Top with sparkling
wine or Champagne. Garnish with a
strawberry slice on the rim.
Recipes
MALIBU
FIG & KISSES
CRANBERRY KISS
BLACK
2
oz. Figenza Fig
Flavored Vodka
1 oz. Vision Vodka
& GINGER
1 dash Grand Marnier
2
oz. Champagne
1 part Malibu Black
Muddled raspberries
1½ oz. cranberry juice
½ oz. fresh lime juice
2 parts ginger ale
1 oz. Champagne
Serve over ice
in a tall glass.
Pour Figenza over
muddled raspberries in
Champagne flute. Top
with Champagne.
Combine Vision Vodka, Grand
Marnier, cranberry juice and
lime in a shaker over ice, and
shake to combine. Strain into a
chilled Champagne flute, and
top up with Champagne. Serve
garnished with a cherry.
BLUSHING BERRY
BOURBON BALL
BO
1 ½ oz. Voli
Raspberry Cocoa
½ oz. Raspberry liqueur
Splash of diet cranberry juice
COCKTAIL
COCK
2 2
oz. Eva
oz. Evan Williams Bourbon
2 2
oz. Crème de cacao
oz. Crè
1 1
½ oz. Hazelnut liqueur
½ oz. H
Mix ingredients together and
serve over ice in a rocks glass.
Fill a shaker with cracked ice
and blend. Strain into a
martini glass. Garnish with
bourbon balls.

February 2012

14 Hawaii Beverage guide February 2012

arOUnd haWaii Master Mixologist & Brand Ambassador for Corzo & Cazadores, Manny Hinojosa, hosted a
arOUnd haWaii Master Mixologist & Brand Ambassador for Corzo & Cazadores, Manny Hinojosa, hosted a

arOUndhaWaii

arOUnd haWaii Master Mixologist & Brand Ambassador for Corzo & Cazadores, Manny Hinojosa, hosted a tequila

Master Mixologist & Brand Ambassador for Corzo & Cazadores, Manny Hinojosa, hosted a tequila education training seminar for Foodland & Young’s Market Company of Hawaii Chain Division at Young’s Market Company of Hawaii. Cholo’s Homestyle Mexican food truck catered the event.

Cholo’s Homestyle Mexican food truck catered the event. Robert Gasior, Times Wine specialist with the Kendall
Cholo’s Homestyle Mexican food truck catered the event. Robert Gasior, Times Wine specialist with the Kendall

Robert Gasior, Times Wine specialist with the Kendall Jackson “Undercover Boss” Television appearance display at Times Kunia. Kendall Jackson President, Rick Tigner, went undercover on the popular CBS show on January 29th 2012.

undercover on the popular CBS show on January 29th 2012. Recent Seeker Wine Launch at Young’s
undercover on the popular CBS show on January 29th 2012. Recent Seeker Wine Launch at Young’s

Recent Seeker Wine Launch at Young’s Market Company of Hawaii General Sales Meeting that was held on 01.20.12.

of Hawaii General Sales Meeting that was held on 01.20.12. (L to R) Phyllis Horner, Kobrand
of Hawaii General Sales Meeting that was held on 01.20.12. (L to R) Phyllis Horner, Kobrand

(L to R) Phyllis Horner, Kobrand Hawaii State Manager & Chad Stevens, YM Maui Branch Manager. Recent Seeker Wine Launch at Young’s Market Company of Hawaii General Sales Meeting that was held on 01.20.12.

arOUndhaWaii

arOUnd haWaii Grey Goose hosted customers, VIPs, celebrities and media on the 18th green at the
arOUnd haWaii Grey Goose hosted customers, VIPs, celebrities and media on the 18th green at the
arOUnd haWaii Grey Goose hosted customers, VIPs, celebrities and media on the 18th green at the

Grey Goose hosted customers, VIPs, celebrities and media on the 18th green at the 2012 Sony Open at Waialae Country Club & featured their Grey Goose golf cart & debuted the new Dewar’s golf cart.

Goose golf cart & debuted the new Dewar’s golf cart. Bombay Sapphire hosted a cruise for
Goose golf cart & debuted the new Dewar’s golf cart. Bombay Sapphire hosted a cruise for
Goose golf cart & debuted the new Dewar’s golf cart. Bombay Sapphire hosted a cruise for

Bombay Sapphire hosted a cruise for the USBG, VIP Media & customers, with featured cocktails by Tim Rita and Joey Gottesman. Mark Noguchi and Kelii Heen from He’eia Pier Food catered the event.

and Kelii Heen from He’eia Pier Food catered the event. CORZO & USBG HI BAR CRAWL
and Kelii Heen from He’eia Pier Food catered the event. CORZO & USBG HI BAR CRAWL
and Kelii Heen from He’eia Pier Food catered the event. CORZO & USBG HI BAR CRAWL

CORZO & USBG HI BAR CRAWL via PARTY BUS Event • January 16, 2012 Master Mixologist & Brand Ambassador for Corzo & Cazadores Manny Hinojosa, returned to Honolulu and kicked it off with yes

A party bus bar crawl

visiting USBG brothers and sisters at their fine establishments sipping the best tequila’s there are CORZO & CAZADORES. Pick up and welcome cocktails were created by Manny Hinojosa and Tim Rita Jr. (of the Modern Honolulu) at the Lobby Bar in the the Modern Honolulu.

Rioja’s

New Calli N g Card

Reservas emerge as fastest-growing wines from Spain’s most famous region

By Kristen Bieler

wines from Spain’s most famous region By Kristen Bieler R afael Momene of La Rioja Alta

R afael Momene of La Rioja Alta noticed a dramatic shift in his portfolio last year:

U.S. sales of his Viña Alberdi Reserva wine doubled, and sales of his Viña Ardanza

Reserva quadrupled. Priced at $20 and $29 respectively, La Rioja Alta’s Reservas are significantly pricier

than its Crianza ($14) yet have become the winery’s fastest-growing wines in the American market.

Momene isn’t alone—dozens of Rioja producers report a sim- ilar phenomenon with their Reservas, and the numbers reveal that among aged Rioja wines, Reservas and Gran Reservas are picking up major steam. Rioja’s wines stand out among all others—including those from the rest of Spain—by their extended aging, both in barrel and bot- tle. Crianzas must be aged 24 months before release, 12 in barrel;

All photographs courtesy of Vibrant Rioja / Wines of Rioja

Reservas must be aged for 36 months, 12 in barrel; and Gran Reservas are required to spend 24 months in barrel and an ad- ditional 36 in bottle. (Joven—“young”— wines have no age requirements.) Though overall imports from the re- gion have been rising steadily for years, the growth was driven primarily from Joven and Crianza wines—until now. “The Reserva and Gran Reserva catego- ries compose 20% of our exports but have experienced over 50% growth in the past two years,” reports Ana Fabiano, brand ambassador and trade director of Vibrant Rioja and author of the just-published book The Wine Region of Rioja. While young wines are still fueling im- portant growth in the value sector, when it comes to aged wines, the “consumers are clearly trading up for higher-end aged wines,” says Pia Mara Finkell, Vibrant Rioja director of communications. “More and more bodegas are now making their Reserva their flagship wine—in Rioja, Reserva is where it’s at.”

PeRfect Middle GRound

Reservas expertly straddle the line between complexity and freshness. “Reservas offer the most favorable combination of aging, value and quality from Rioja,” says Doug Jeffirs, director of wine sales at Binny’s Beverage Depot in Chicago. While they showcase the refinement that comes from age, they still possess the sultry ripe fruit of a young wine (compared with Gran Reser- vas which can take on nutty flavors and a tawny color). In other words, Reservas of- fer exactly what the increasingly sophisti- cated U.S. market is looking for. “Crianza and Joven are great every- day drinking wines, but the real identity of Rioja shines in the Reservas—they display balance of fruit and oak, polished tannins, acidity and great complexity, all characteristics that consumers appreci- ate, especially when pairing with food,” says Felipe Gonzalez-Gordon of Gonzalez Byass USA, Inc., owner of Rioja’s Beronia estate (whose Reserva is up 40%).

faMiliaRity BReedS tRade-uP

The sales surge says a lot more about con- sumer and trade familiarity with Spain and Rioja than it does about the econ-

Rioja’ S r eservas

and Rioja than it does about the econ- Rioja’ S r eservas The marriage of tradition

The marriage of tradition and innovation is quintessentially captured at Marqués de riscal’s Ciudad del Vino—“city of wine”—completed in 2006. The Frank gehry-designed complex includes a hotel, wine therapy spa, restaurant and conference center. inset: Tempranillo, the grape variety that anchors rioja.

Rioja’S ReSeRVaS weRe uP 44% in 2011; GRan ReSeRVaS weRe uP 90%

omy, most believe. “I’m sure the general trade-up trend is contributing, but more importantly, it’s the heightened awareness by customers of Rioja wines, particularly Reservas,” says Jeffirs. “Rioja has always held a special place at the top of the wine world with very few other regions like Bordeaux or Champagne. As soon as people have the proper introduction— or reintroduction—to Rioja, they realize that it offers what no other region can.” According to Joel Feigenheimer, director of purchasing for China Grill, it’s simple: “As Americans become more comfortable with Rioja, they continue to move towards the better crafted Riojas. They are looking for the best combina- tion of quality and value, which these wines deliver.”

one-of-a-Kind Value

Barrel and bottle aging is expensive, which makes it pretty amazing that most Reservas

expensive, which makes it pretty amazing that most Reservas fall in the $15 to $30 range.

fall in the $15 to $30 range. “Rioja wines in general provide some of the greatest value among old world wines,” says Mark Tucker, director of marketing at Vision Wine & Spirits, who represents Rioja Bordon/Fran- co-Españolas. “Consumers demand value today—they want a $15 bottle of wine that they feel is worth $20 or $25 and this is Rioja’s calling card.” Last year Rioja Bordon’s Reserva leapt ahead as the winery’s best-selling SKU in the U.S. It’s aged about 20 months in oak and at least two years in the bottle—that’s over 3½ years of aging for a retail price of $14-$15. Juan Carlos Llopart, export man- ager for Rioja Bordon/Franco-Españolas, says “I do believe the American consumer is knowledgeable enough today to compare the quality they are getting with a 2004 Reserva to a New World wine that is aged for a few months at the same price.” There are indeed many 2003, 2004 and 2005 Reservas on the market that cost a quarter of a Burgundy or California Caber- net from the same vintage. “Retailers want to give their customers authenticity and value,” says Fabiano. “It is very difficult to find a wine at this price point that one can drink now or cellar for 5-15 years for a spe- cial occasion. Reservas fill this niche.”

Rioja’ S r eservas

Rioja’ S r eservas   R i O j A 101 ■ Located in northern Spain,
Rioja’ S r eservas   R i O j A 101 ■ Located in northern Spain,
Rioja’ S r eservas   R i O j A 101 ■ Located in northern Spain,
 

R i O j A

101

Located in northern Spain, on both sides of the River Ebro, Rioja is arguably Spain’s most established wine region, having been demarcated as far back as 1787, regulated in 1926, and granted status as Spain’s first and only Denominación de Origen Calificada in 1991.

The three main subregions are Rioja Alavesa, Rioja Alta and Rioja Baja. Annual regional production currently stands at 280 to 300 million liters, of which 90% is red.

Rioja wines are typically aged in 225-litre oak casks made of American

oak, with periodic rackings, followed by further bottle aging. New oak is traditionally not a priority; rather, aging

in

cask is intended to allow wines to

mature and tannins to integrate.

The different Rioja wine categories are based on minimum aging periods, which can vary between one and three years in barrel and between six months and six years in the bottle, depending

on whether the wine is to be a Crianza,

a

Reserva or a Gran Reserva.

While Rioja reds are ready to enjoy upon release, they tend to plateau and can be held for many years as well.

Rioja is based primarily on Tempranillo (which grows widely across Spain), often with Garnacha, Graciano and Mazuelo.

Generous in fruit (strawberry), with hints

of

spice and vanilla, Rioja at all price

points is particularly food-friendly, with structure (tannin and acidity) that helps

it

pair especially well with bold foods.

Sommeliers approve as well. “I love to offer our guests wines that have some good bottle age,” says Joe Campanale, owner/beverage director at New York’s L’Artusi and dell’anima restaurants. “Our guests often comment that it is nice to find a well-aged wine at a reasonable price. With Rioja Reserva, you’re able to find wines that are ready to drink upon re- lease and guests appreciate that.” Sommeliers see the advantage of Rioja wines in their signature food-friendliness (high acid, in-check alcohol levels, ele- gance), but also from a storage/wine list per- spective: “These wines can be placed on a wine list or cellared which is ideal for restau- rants,” says Fabiano. Also, while the number of French and Italian restaurants still dwarf Spanish ones, Ricky Febres, national brand director for Marqués de Riscal, notes, “The popularity of tapas has contributed to the growth and appreciation of Spanish wines by the American consumer.”

a Style eVolution?

Some see a shift in Rioja wine style that may contribute to their recent enthusiastic embrace by American drinkers. The aging requirements haven’t changed since they were authorized in 1980, but there is a larg- er stylistic range emerging in the region:

Some producers choose to age for longer than required, which imparts a more tra- ditional taste profile, while others go with the minimum time in barrel to maintain more defined fruit flavors. Modern-leaning producers rely on new oak barriques while traditionalists use large, old casks. Collin Williams, CSW and wine buy- er for Spec’s Wine, Spirits and Finer Foods in Houston, Texas, sees Rioja producers leaning toward a style that is more ap- pealing to the American consumer: “Oak

regimens, skin maceration and extraction times, even brix levels are shifting to cre- ate wines that emphasize fruit rather than wines that are make in an oaky, dusty style.” He adds that the newer style makes them perfect for “Napa Cabernet custom- ers that are branching out.” Fabiano has observed a “stronger un- derstanding of Riojan Tempranillo” on the part of winemakers, particularly evident in the Reserva wines resulting in “more concentration, fruit-forward flavors and complexity” which better meets today’s palate preferences. Jeffirs, too, sees some stylistic shifting (“a bit more modern and refined”) but believes the real change is in the broadening of offerings: “There is tre- mendous variety from Rioja today—this has been hugely important in appealing to the American palate.” Most producers don’t deny the change:

“Can anyone imagine dressing like our parents or grandparents?” asks Gonzalez- Gordon. “Like most things in life, Beronia has evolved and continues to evolve. In the past it was all about acidity—which is why many wines were light and thin. Growers picked earlier and aged longer in barrel, which yielded very different wines than you see in the marketplace today. Rioja has wisely adapted.”

MaxiMizinG untaPPed Potential

Spain is the world’s third largest wine producer, but roughly 70% of Spain’s wines are consumed in Europe—they only command a 5% share of the U.S. wine market. Underrepresentation like this equals tremendous opportunity for growth. “I would say practically every wine consumer is a Rioja consumer—the category offers enough diversity to suit any palate and occasion,” says Gonzalez-Gordon.

The emergence of the new, younger consumer has proved a benefit for the region, as well as the increasing sophis- tication of the American palate. “We know for a fact that as the wine popula- tion grows and the consumer gets more knowledgeable, the more they appreciate the sophistication of the Reserva style of wine,” says Momene. “There is more work to be done on the trade end in three areas:

improving distribution, maintaining price stability, and education.”

BacK in the SPotliGht

Has Rioja’s boost been fueled by the growing popularity of Spanish wines across the board? “It’s the other way around,” believes Feigenheimer. “The question should be, ‘How much have Spanish wines benefited from the grow- ing popularity of Rioja?’” Statistics over the last 25 years back him up, says Fa- biano, confirming that Rioja has been a real leader in paving the way for other Spanish regions.

Rioja’ S r eservas

If anything, says Jeffirs, the Span- ish wine surge has allowed Rioja to once again take center stage in wine universe:

“I think it’s brought some focus back to Rioja. There is a lot of excitement about Spanish wines today, but with many, you don’t know what you are getting until you try them. Rioja has the advantage of being able to combine the new and the old—modern winemaking and a millen- nium of heritage—without losing its spe- cial identity with the consumer.”

RiOjA Rese R va selections Muriel reserva 2005 (Quintessential, $20) crafted from 40-year old-plus vines,
RiOjA Rese R va selections
Muriel reserva 2005
(Quintessential, $20)
crafted from 40-year old-plus
vines, this 100% tempranillo
was aged 24 months in french
and american oak; it’s round,
smooth and velvety with equal
parts fruit, spice and vanilla
encased in ultra-fine tannins.
founded by monks in the
14th century, Remelluri
honors the region’s heritage
by cultivating low-yielding old
vines, hand-picking all fruit
and using natural yeasts and
american oak. Refined flavors
of spice, chocolate and
stewed fruit are supported by
polished tannins.
of
crushed herbs, plums, dried
cherry and leather.
flavors underscored by notes of
clove and vanilla.
conDe De valDeMar
reserva 2005
(C
i V, $20)
ostatu reserva 2006
(de Maison Selections, $33)
Sourced from the estate’s
oldest vines (50 years plus),
this full-bodied 100% tem-
ranillo spends some time in
new french oak and features
pronounced ripe fruit laced with
hints of anise and soft tannins
on the medium-long finish.
a
rich, full-bodied Reserva
Dinastia vivanco
reserva 2005
(Opici wines, $25)
Vivanco’s stand-out Reserva
is decidedly more modern in
style. Sourced from old vines
in high-altitude vineyards in
the Rioja alta region, it spends
24 months in oak (50% new
french) and 24 more in bottle.
dark, rich, fruit-forward and
smooth, it is beautifully bal-
anced and perfect to drink now.
produced by one of the
region’s forward-thinking pio-
neers. it’s packed with spicy
cherry and vanilla flavors all
held up by bright acidity. also
look for their stunning Gran
Reserva ($40), which spends
25 months in french and
american oak and showcases
silky fruit flavors with hints of
nuts and spice.
raMón BilBao
reserva 2006
(w.J. deutsch & Sons, $17)
Ripe blackberry and plum
flavors are balanced by mature
notes of leather and tobacco
in this layered Rioja alta wine,
which spent 20 months in amer-
ican oak followed by 20 months
of bottle aging. the addition
of 10% Mazuelo and Graciano
adds peppery spice notes.
Marques De riscal
reserva 2006
(Shaw-ross international, $18)
founded in 1858, Riscal leans
more traditional in style with
their Reserva; it spent 24
months in american oak and
shows terrific elegance to its
plush red fruit flavors, subtle
oak notes and smooth tannins.
look also for Riscal’s delicious
2001 Gran Reserva which is a
favorite of critics ($45).
Beronia reserva 2007
(San Francisco wine
exchange, $18)
an exceptionally balanced
wine with a perfect marriage
between maturity and fresh
fruit—and a lot of wine for the
price. less overt oak notes
make it ideal with food or own
its own. founded in the 1970s
the Gonzales-Byass family
(makers of tio Pepe Sherry)
purchased the estate in 1982.
la rioja alta viña
alBerDi reserva 2005
(Michael Skurnik wines, $20)
Made by one of the most
respected and significant
producers in Rioja (la Rioja
alta has about 6½ million
bottles stored at any one time
in
its cellars), this possesses
the complexity of a wine twice
its price. dense and pure,
it
offers seductive layers of
spicy vanilla, balsamic and
rioja BorDon
wild berries.
reserva 2006
(Vision wine & Spirits, $14)
castillo laBastiDa
reserva 2004
(winebow, $20)
the talented Manuel Ruiz crafts
this vanilla- and raspberry-
scented 100% tempranillo.
Stainless steal fermentation and
some french oak result in a
delicious Reserva with hints of
spice and flowers on the palate.
Bordon’s history goes back 100
years and their wines express
a
nice middle ground between
rioja antaño reserva
cHecK vintaGe
la rioja alta viña
arDanza reserva 2001
(Michael Skurnik wines, $29)
modern and traditional. ferment-
the winery’s top-tier Reserva
ed and aged for 18 months in
new american oak, this deeply-
(C
i V, $12)
spends three years in ameri-
a
real steal for a Reserva,
caMpo viejo
reserva 2006
(Pernod ricard USa, $14)
on the fresher, fruitier spectrum
of Reservas, this ruby red wine
features bright, tasty cherry
colored, refined red shows notes
this low-priced red is a blend
can oak and six in bottle yet
remains remarkably bright and
of
fruit, earth and leather.
of
blend of 80% tempranillo
balanced. unlike the alberdi,
with bits of Graciano, Mazuelo
and Garnacha; it spends 12
months in american oak and
displays the classic Rioja mix
it
has 20% Garnacha in the
blend, and reveals silky flavors
reMelluri reserva 2006
(de Maison Selections, $31)
of
orange peel, leather, spice
and earth.
All photographs courtesy of Vibrant Rioja / Wines of Rioja
beyoND the
beyoND the
beyoND the By jEFFERy lIndEnMuTH A KISS FROM MOTHER EARTH 2 oz. 360 Double Chocolate 1
beyoND the By jEFFERy lIndEnMuTH A KISS FROM MOTHER EARTH 2 oz. 360 Double Chocolate 1

By jEFFERy lIndEnMuTH

beyoND the By jEFFERy lIndEnMuTH A KISS FROM MOTHER EARTH 2 oz. 360 Double Chocolate 1

A KISS FROM MOTHER EARTH

2 oz. 360 Double Chocolate

1 oz. Agave Nectar

3 oz. Cream Chocolate Syrup

Drizzle chocolate syrup in glass. Shake remaining ingredients with ice and strain into glass. Garnish with Japanese Pocky Sticks.

and strain into glass. Garnish with Japanese Pocky Sticks. America’s Love for Chocolate Infuses Spirits and

America’s Love for Chocolate Infuses Spirits and Wine

f f or fans of classic cocktails like the pre-Prohibition Brandy Alexander, with its dose of sweet, dark crème de cacao, and for legions of chocolate martini fans cultivated in the 1990s, choco- late and happy hour go together like Romeo and Juliet. The rela-

tionship of chocolate and beverage alcohol is clearly built on a passionate foundation, and now a host of spirits and wine producers are spotlighting the romance between the popular couple, injecting the luxurious taste of chocolate directly into the bottle with unprecedented frequency. Here’s how to enjoy, and sell, these decadent drinks, just in time for Valentine’s Day celebration.

vodka shows staying power

Sometimes it seems the martini menu is like a box of chocolates, with myriad variations of “chocotinis,” most of which rely on proprietary chocolate vodka for their flavor, often accented with sweet or cream liqueurs. Although the chocolate martini may be more a seasonal special- ty than trendy standard these days, the latest incarnations of chocolate vodka

ensure the drink is more than mere nov- elty, emphasizing sophisticated brands, compound flavors and authenticity of chocolate flavor. For William Grant & Sons’ Stolich- naya, the newly introduced Chocolat Razberi flavor strikes the right balance between traditional and innovative, ac- cording to Jill Palais, senior brand man-

ager. “We’ve been seeing a huge trend

in flavored vodka, especially with sweet, indulgent types of flavors, like Swedish Fish, whipped cream and cotton candy doing very well among younger consumer, ages 21-29. We wanted to offer something indulgent, while staying in our premium Stoli style, so a chocolate flavor like Chocolat Razberi is perfect,” says Palais. According to Palais the compound flavor of fruit and chocolate has proven versatile, capitalizing on the confec- tionery trend with cocktails like the Chocolat Raz Cake Martini and The Tootsie, which combines with orange juice to eerily mimic the flavor of a Tootsie Roll.

CHOCOlATE KISS 2 parts Pinnacle Chocolate 1 part White Crème de Menthe 1 part White
CHOCOlATE KISS
2
parts Pinnacle Chocolate
1
part White Crème de Menthe
1
part White Crème de Cacao
Shake with ice and strain into
chilled martini glass. Garnish
with a chocolate kiss and
mint leaf.
ChoCoLAte oN the SIDe Not all wine-friendly chocolate needs to be inside the bottle. Artisan
ChoCoLAte
oN the SIDe
Not all wine-friendly
chocolate needs to be
inside the bottle. Artisan
chocolate company Brix ChoColAte
(www.brixchocolate.com) formulates
chocolates meant to pair with specific
wines. Founded in 2008, Brix was cre-
ated by Dr. Nick Proia, a pulmonolo-
gist and wine enthusiast, with the goal
of introducing a healthier alternative
to the classic wine-and-cheese pair-
ing. the four Brix offerings—Milk
Chocolate, Dark Chocolate, extra Dark
Chocolate and Smooth Dark Choco-
late—are single-origin chocolate from
Ghana that highlight red fruit flavors
that won’t overwhelm wine. each is
designed to pair with a specific wine
type (Smooth Dark is built for spar-
kling wines and sweet wines, as well
as medium-bodied reds, for example).
An eight-ounce bar has a retail price
of $9.99-$12.99.

Introduced in 2002, Van Gogh Dutch Chocolate Vodka continues to be a mix- ologist favorite for its richly layered, roasted chocolate aromas, derived from a double infusion of real chocolate and Columbian coffee beans, nicely balanc-

Godiva, a powerful brand in the realm of edible chocolate, retains their line of rich and creamy liqueurs, in flavors of Chocolate, Caramel, Mocha and White Chocolate, while adding two new chocolate vodkas to the mix. Godiva Chocolate Infused Vodka and Godiva Chocolate Raspberry Infused Vodka, inspired by the top-selling Godiva Chocolate Raspberry Truffle, are clear, super-premium flavored vodkas, retailing for about $30/750 ml. With the 80 years of credentials in fine chocolate, the Godiva brand adds value to the flavors and creates a crossover prod- uct, with Diageo noting that it appeals to adults who enjoy ultra-premium vodka and quality chocolate. Alchemia Vodka, from the centu- ry-old Polmos Bialystock Distillery in Poland, emphasizes naturally-infused raw ingredients, including single-origin chocolate nibs, in its line of flavored vodkas. The somewhat cryptic name of Czekoladowa does not seem to deter chocolate fans from giving the vodka a taste, according to Jourdan Lawlor, Al- chemia brand manager. “It ranks num- ber one in sales among the flavors,” says Lawlor, referring to the vodka’s flavored siblings, Imbirowa (ginger) and Wis- niowa (wild cherry). “We sample the product at tastings with displays of cocoa nibs and huge chunks of chocolate that absolutely help to draw people to the ta- ble and make a memorable impression,” says Lawlor.

chocolate vodka

ing sweet signature cocktails with its sophisticated hint of bitterness. Van Gogh extended its choco-line in 2011 with a “Rich Dark” itera- tion, inflected with notes of coffee and nutmeg. Three Olives is another flavored- vodka specialist to join the chocolate crowd. The flavor is a natural for the “Three-O” brand, which emphasizes vod- ka’s fun, mixable personality and has 17 flavors in its portfolio. Of course, one of the classic handicaps for edible chocolate is its rap as fattening. Voli—producer of low-calorie fruit and fusion flavored vodkas—is in position to cater to the weight-watching crowd with

its Raspberry Cocoa flavor, which checks in at 60 proof.

you got your chocolate in my wine

And it tastes great… if the wave of choc- olate-infused wines is any indication. The current spectrum of chocolate and wine blends casts a broad net, ranging from those that align with creamy liqueurs, to off-dry reds, and some that include a more subtle touch of chocolate, complementing a traditional red wine.

touch of chocolate, complementing a traditional red wine. CHOCO-lAT CHERRy BlISS 1 part Choco-Lat 1 part
CHOCO-lAT CHERRy BlISS 1 part Choco-Lat 1 part Amaretto Almond Liqueur 1 part Milk ½
CHOCO-lAT CHERRy BlISS
1 part Choco-Lat
1 part Amaretto Almond Liqueur
1 part Milk
½ part Grenadine syrup
Garnish with whipped cream and
a cherry.

selections

1 part Amaretto Almond Liqueur 1 part Milk ½ part Grenadine syrup Garnish with whipped cream
1 part Amaretto Almond Liqueur 1 part Milk ½ part Grenadine syrup Garnish with whipped cream
1 part Amaretto Almond Liqueur 1 part Milk ½ part Grenadine syrup Garnish with whipped cream
1 part Amaretto Almond Liqueur 1 part Milk ½ part Grenadine syrup Garnish with whipped cream
1 part Amaretto Almond Liqueur 1 part Milk ½ part Grenadine syrup Garnish with whipped cream
1 part Amaretto Almond Liqueur 1 part Milk ½ part Grenadine syrup Garnish with whipped cream
1 part Amaretto Almond Liqueur 1 part Milk ½ part Grenadine syrup Garnish with whipped cream
1 part Amaretto Almond Liqueur 1 part Milk ½ part Grenadine syrup Garnish with whipped cream

choco fLAvor

Hal Landvoigt, winemaker for Wash- ington state–based Precept Wine, uses natural chocolate flavors to craft several red wine and chocolate blends, including Chocolate Shop, a blend of vinifera wine and chocolate that has become the num- ber-one tasting room seller, even outpac- ing Precept’s many conventional wines. Chocolate Shop and The Chocolate Cellar are also targeted to tap into the burgeoning “sweet red” wine category, with 7% and 8% residual sugar respec- tively, while Red Decadence offers a drier 5%. “The products we have had the big- gest success with, Chocolate Shop and Chocolate Cellar, are really designed to be chocolate flavor forward. Red Decadence and some of the other wines exhibit more of an interplay between the red wine and chocolate flavors. The goal is to create a balanced wine that carries the chocolate flavoring without masking or competing with it,” says Landvoigt. According to Sarah Cline, Choco- late Shop brand manager, most chocolate wine fans purchase off-premise, with the brand excelling in Kroger and Safeway supermarkets throughout the West as well as Cost Plus World Market, Total Wine & More, Fresh & Easy Neighbor- hood Market and Bashas’ Grocery. “These chains have seen great success during the ‘chocolate holidays’—Valentine’s Day, Easter, Halloween and Christmas. Our outstanding chocolate sales in our tasting room tells us that Chocolate Shop will be an outstanding offering on-premise as well,” says Cline, noting that restaurants

and wine bars offer fertile ground for chocolate wines. Last Valentine’s Day, Maverick Wine Group introduced Truffle Mer- lot, a “grown-up version of chocolate wine—a true red wine, with choco- late on the finish,” according to Rhoda Bruner business development manager for Maverick Wine Group. As a varietal wine with some residual sugar, Truffle Merlot is poised to compete with block- buster red blends with a touch of residual sugar, and the forthcoming line exten- sions—Truffle Chiffon Chardonnay and Truffle Pink Moscato—seem to reassert that strategy. With about 10,000 case sales for 2011, Bruner believes that number will grow exponentially, with market expansion now at 32 states and representatives equipped to assist with POS and tastings that include Brix chocolate, designed specifically to pair with wine. “We are finding that once we get the wine in the consumer’s mouth, we have repeat buyers,” says Bruner.

creamy concoctions

The other side of chocolate wine departs more dramatically from table wine, utiliz- ing wine more as the alcohol base for creat- ing a creamy chocolate drink, a style with its own legions of and impressive growth. Wine Spectator recently reported that ChocoVine, blended in Holland by Team Products, a division of DeKuyper, shipped 450,000 cases in 2010 and is on track to

become a million-case brand in 2011.

Introduced in December 2010, Cocoa

di Vine is distinguished by its aromatic

white wine base using Torrontés, Pedro Ximénez and Moscato grapes imported from Argentina, as opposed to red wine. “We worked with a creamery to put it to-

gether and we tried different many samples before settling on this. The color looked a

lot better than the red, and the wine was

fresher tasting, more like a Yoo-hoo,” says Don Opici, fourth-generation partner in

the family-owned Opici Wines. Exceeding 20,000 case sales in 2011, Cocoa di Vine is a newer entrant with a great deal of interest and impressive growth opportunity according to Opici. With about 90% of sales off-premise, Opici notes that sales appear to be some-

what seasonal approaching their first year

in the market, peaking in February and

slowing in the summer. Opici’s confidence

in the category is so strong that they re-

cently added two new variations of Cocoa

di Vine: Chocolate Cherry and Espresso.

“Everybody loves chocolate. It does not seem like the category is going away, but rather gaining momentum,” says Opici.

is going away, but rather gaining momentum,” says Opici. MIlKy MInT 2 oz. Adult Chocolate Milk
MIlKy MInT 2 oz. Adult Chocolate Milk ¼ oz. Creme de Menthe 1 oz. Whipped
MIlKy MInT
2 oz. Adult Chocolate Milk
¼ oz. Creme de Menthe
1 oz. Whipped vodka
hersey’s chocolate syrup
Muddle Hershey’s Kisses (or Andes Mints),
mint leaves and Hershey’s Chocolate Syrup.
Add drink ingredients, shake strain and pour
into a chilled, Hershey’s Chocolate Syrup-
lined martini glass. Top with whipped vodka.

wine & hybrid

into a chilled, Hershey’s Chocolate Syrup- lined martini glass. Top with whipped vodka. wine & hybrid
into a chilled, Hershey’s Chocolate Syrup- lined martini glass. Top with whipped vodka. wine & hybrid

selections

into a chilled, Hershey’s Chocolate Syrup- lined martini glass. Top with whipped vodka. wine & hybrid
into a chilled, Hershey’s Chocolate Syrup- lined martini glass. Top with whipped vodka. wine & hybrid
into a chilled, Hershey’s Chocolate Syrup- lined martini glass. Top with whipped vodka. wine & hybrid
into a chilled, Hershey’s Chocolate Syrup- lined martini glass. Top with whipped vodka. wine & hybrid
into a chilled, Hershey’s Chocolate Syrup- lined martini glass. Top with whipped vodka. wine & hybrid
into a chilled, Hershey’s Chocolate Syrup- lined martini glass. Top with whipped vodka. wine & hybrid

new hybrids

While chocolate is no newcomer to the liqueur category (crème de cacao is back bar staple

under a variety of labels), much of the current chocolate action involves vodka and wine, and recent launches suggest the experimentation is not done yet. Adult Chocolate Milk, created by two old high-school friends reunited on Facebook, invites drinkers to “relive your youth at 40 proof,” capitalizing on nostalgic flavor and fun retro packaging. “It seems to go back to

a time in life when things were simple and

responsibilities were not such a big deal,” says Nikki Halbur, co-creator and partner in Adult Beverage Company. Adult Chocolate Milk— dairy-based, with chocolate and vodka—is being distributed in 40 states in partnership with W.J. Deutsch & Sons Ltd., and is popular

chilled from the fridge, like real chocolate milk, and in candy-inspired cocktails. In an unlikely union, Bottega Gianduia Liqueur, imported by Palm Bay, is made by infusing Alexander Grappa with Gianduia hazelnut chocolate. With its Italian pedigree, this creamy 34 proof liqueur makes it a perfect topping for gelato, although sipping on the rocks is natural as well. If chocolate works with grappa, then

it should not be no great a shock to see it

also work with tequila. Brand new for the first quarter of 2012, Patrón XO Cafe Dark Cocoa combines chocolate with high-quality

Patrón Silver tequila and a touch of coffee in

a 60 proof liqueur. “When we looked at how

we could build on what makes Patrón XO Cafe so special, chocolate was such a natural fit,” says Ed Brown, president and CEO of

Patrón Spirits International. The taste is not

as sweet as many other coffee liqueurs, with a

smooth yet dry finish. Perhaps a sign that old is set to become new again: cordial specialist DeKuyper has just launched three new liqueurs under its JDK&Sons Crave label—Chocolate Mint, Chocolate Cherry and Chocolate Chili. And the chocolate wine category appears set to ex- pand as E&J Gallo is test-marketing its $11 ChocolatRouge in two variations (Cream and Red) in eight states. No matter how you like your chocolate—in dessert, on the side, or as a liquid indulgence— it’s a flavor trend that shows staying power and seasonal opportunities. n

WhIPPING uP

WhIPPING uP
staying power and seasonal opportunities. n WhIPPING uP With soccer moms talking in terms of cacao

With soccer moms talking in terms of cacao percentages and Wine Spectator sampling chocolate-infused wines, chocolate has migrated to the sophisticated mainstream, creating an opening for more casual confectionary flavors in beverage alcohol. Leading that movement is whipped cream, a flavor that has quickly leaped to the front of the pack of White Rock Distilleries’ Pinnacle Vodka portfolio. Pinnacle Whipped (35% ABV, $14.99 retail) topped 750,000 cases when final sales for 2011 were tallied, making it the best-selling flavored vodka in the U.S.

While some veteran vodka pro- ducers have resisted adding confec- tionary flavors like whipped cream, deeming they might seem inconsis- tent with their current flavor range, Smirnoff has jumped in with both feet, debuting both Smirnoff Whipped Cream (30% ABV, $12.99 retail) and Smirnoff Fluffed Marshmallow (35% ABV, $12.99 retail) during the holiday 2011 season. Also jumping into the creamy vodka arena: Georgi and Burnett’s. Likewise, beverage alcohol is finding its way into whipped toppings, like Whipped Lightning, a range of flavored whipped cream (including Pumpkin Pie, Chocolate Mint and Coconut) infused with grain alcohol

whipped
whipped
Mint and Coconut) infused with grain alcohol whipped selections to achieve 16.75% alcohol by volume and
Mint and Coconut) infused with grain alcohol whipped selections to achieve 16.75% alcohol by volume and

selections

and Coconut) infused with grain alcohol whipped selections to achieve 16.75% alcohol by volume and packaged
and Coconut) infused with grain alcohol whipped selections to achieve 16.75% alcohol by volume and packaged

to achieve 16.75% alcohol by volume and packaged in a pressurized can. According to producer Maple Grove Products, based in Atlanta, Georgia, Whipped Lightning is not a food prod- uct, but a beverage alcohol product and therefore features alcohol rather than nutritional labeling. Kingfish Spirits of Shaker Heights, Ohio, offers an alcohol-infused whipped cream under the name Cream (15% ABV). Each 375-ml can yields 26 1-oz. servings in popular flavors like Vanilla and Peppermint. With serving recommendations as a topping for desserts, coffee, mixed drinks and Jell-O shots, whipped cream may prove to be every bit as versatile a partner as chocolate.

coffee, mixed drinks and Jell-O shots, whipped cream may prove to be every bit as versatile
coffee, mixed drinks and Jell-O shots, whipped cream may prove to be every bit as versatile
coffee, mixed drinks and Jell-O shots, whipped cream may prove to be every bit as versatile

speak easy

speak easy Brown-Forman’s Michael J. Keyes President, North American Region The Beverage Network sat down with

Brown-Forman’s Michael J. Keyes

President, North American Region

The Beverage Network sat down with Brown-Forman’s Mike Keyes, to discuss the longevity of flavored whiskey, the changing dynamics of social responsibility and opportunities in the crowded vodka category

on whiskey

The Beverage NeTwork: With your long experience in working in the whiskey business, what untapped potential do you see?

Mike keyes: Whiskey has grown enor- mously, yet it still gets far less proportional shelf space than vodka. I think many retail- ers feel that they have to stock every flavor of vodka—even though over 80% of vodka sold is unflavored. Why is it that every new vodka flavor deserves shelf space whether it sells or not, but whiskey has to scratch, claw and fight for it? We’ve got to change the way the industry views whiskey.

TBN: Interestingly though, whiskey, too, is seeing a flavor explosion.

Mk: Right now, whiskey is one of the most innovative areas in all of beverage alco- hol. We’re having tremendous success with a new product from Jack Daniel’s called Tennessee Honey. Remarkably, all flavored whiskies began to perform better when Jack Daniel’s entered this market— it shows that big brands can boost an entire category like a rising tide that lifts all boats. There is also a lot of other fasci- nating innovation in the whiskey world— white whiskey, for example—but the jury is still out. Flavored whiskey is real: It’s happening in significant volumes.

TBN: Were you worried that Jack Daniel’s Tennessee Honey would hurt the base brand?

Mk: We were confident that Tennessee Honey would sell, but yes, we were con- cerned that it could cannibalize the parent brand. The opposite has happened: Hon- ey has helped our brand equity—sales of the base brand have continued to grow. It’s also made it more accessible. Jack Daniel’s has always been blessed with a broad range of demographics—we joke that our consumers are anywhere from LDA (Legal Drinking Age) to DND (“Damn Near Dead”) and they range from “Bikers to Bankers.” We were concerned that Tennessee Honey could detract from Jack Daniel’s masculine image, but it has merely broadened the franchise to include not only more core consumers but female consumers, African-Americans and Hispanics.

TBN: You could rightly argue that Southern Comfort was the original flavored whiskey—how do you explain its phenomenal success?

Mk: Southern Comfort has been so suc- cessful largely because of its accessibil- ity to new consumers. When I worked in the Scotch business people always talk- ed about acquiring the taste for Scotch.

I don’t know that most consumers have

the patience to acquire a taste for any- thing anymore, and I don’t know if they have to. Southern Comfort Lime, which came out a few years ago, was one of the most successful product launches in our history, and the brand family is well over one million cases.

TBN: “Accessible” isn’t a word we would use to describe the brand’s most recent line extension, Fiery Pepper. Who is the consumer for this product?

Mk: Southern Comfort was born in New Orleans and Tabasco is another Louisiana native, so combining the two seemed like

a natural affiliation. The flavor profile is very

interesting, and while it’s not intended for everyone (people have a love/hate rela- tionship with Tabasco) some consumers are going to really gravitate to the hot, spicy flavor. It’s what we call a challenge product—having a shot of this at a bar be- comes a ritual. From a retailer perspective, the co-branding of Southern Comfort and Tabasco makes a powerful union.

TBN: There is a lot of innovation at the luxury end of bourbon as well.

Mk: Absolutely Boutique whiskies are getting the same attention that single malt Scotches were getting a few years ago. We just released the Woodford Reserve Masters Collection, which is a co-pack featuring dual rye offerings—one that has been matured in a new charred cask and one matured in an aged cask. Addition- ally Woodford Reserve will soon release its first permanent line extension with Double Oaked, an ultra-premium bourbon which has been twice barreled in white oak, cre- ating an exciting new taste profile. Brown- Forman is the only spirits company that makes all their own barrels; it allows us to experiment with toasting and charring.

on new products

TBN: How can retailers balance new product trial with established best- sellers given shelf space limitations?

Mk: Retailers have new products coming their way daily and it’s overwhelming. In de- termining which to stock, I would look first for uniqueness: If it’s a new brand, does it have a reason for being? Of course, while every new Brown-Forman product may not hit a home run, we always start with the premise that each brand has a unique selling proposition. Next, I would look at equity: What is the power of the brand that the new product is an extension of?

TBN: You are currently launching two new vodka brands—where do you do see opportunity in this crowded category?

A conversation with industry professionals

Mk: Chambord Vodka was released last year and we’ve had some great success with it in the African-American market, particularly with women. We’ve also had some success with it in the GLBT com- munity. On-premise retailers have under- stood the brand proposition a bit better than the general off-premise market. In March, we will also be debuting Little Black Dress Vodka, an extension of the popular wine brand, which resonated in- credibly well with female consumers.

TBN: What are the ingredients for a successful new product introduction in the marketplace?

Mk: When you come out with a new product, the best thing you can do is pick a few markets and concentrate your efforts. It’s very easy to lose your focus and your ability to put resources behind a brand if you launch in too many markets at once. In the future, while you will see some national launches from us (brands like Southern Comfort Fiery Pepper and Tennessee Honey), you will also see many more regional launches. I think we’re going to be more focused and more disciplined with the non-national, more regional, introductions.

on the industry

TBN: We’re starting to see more spirits advertising on TV. How do you think this will impact the industry?

Mk: The wine, spirits and beer industries treat social responsibility so differently. Beer is protective of its status as “every man’s drink” and the wine industry is pro- tective of its relationship with food. The spirits industry wrestled for a very long time with its identity. For years, spirits suppliers had a gentlemen’s agreement to stay away from television advertising, while beer and wine went on heavy. That really hurt the spirits industry—spirits be- came known as “hard liquor” and was regarded in the public mind as more of a social problem. Over the last decade,

spirits suppliers are getting on televi- sion and leading responsibility initiatives which has really helped normalize spirits to a great degree. I would argue that the most responsible companies in our in- dustry right now are spirits companies.

TBN: What do you see ahead for tequila, another category Brown- Forman has a large stake in?

Mk: Tequila is kind of like the new vod- ka—a very competitive, dynamic and growing category. The growth of the Hispanic American population will con- tinue to fuel it. We are well positioned with El Jimador, the #1 premium te- quila in Mexico, and Herradura, the #1 super-premium tequila in Mexico, as well as our popular priced Pepe Lopez brand. Tequila is different from other spirits brands; it is more like wine in that the agave crop experiences gluts and shortages like grapes do, which leads to pricing roller coasters. If I was a re- tailer, I would be looking at which brands can go through these cycles and give me the best opportunity for long-term prosperity.

TBN: There is a lot of debate about whether luxury is coming back. What do you see happening?

Mk: We believe strongly in the luxury business. Most people don’t realize that Brown-Forman is the most premium spirits company in America—85% of our products are over $15. On-premise is a very important place for us so if that business isn’t vibrant, we hurt in a larger way than other competitors. Yet some of our greatest successes in this time pe- riod have come from our most expen- sive brands. Woodford Reserve hasn’t missed a single year of double-digit growth and Sonoma-Cutrer—which is the #1 white tablecloth Chardonnay in America—continues to grow. If you have a product with a unique offering that fills a niche, I still think it’s a very exciting segment.

Clockwise: Central Bottle photos by Dawn Colquitt-Anderson / Perman by Lara Kastner / Siverlake by George Simian

/ Perman by Lara Kastner / Siverlake by George Simian small is beautiful What small shops

small is

beautiful

Kastner / Siverlake by George Simian small is beautiful What small shops lack in size, they
Kastner / Siverlake by George Simian small is beautiful What small shops lack in size, they

What small shops lack in size, they make up for in service and selectivity

By Brandy Rand

A mericans are known for super-sizing just about everything, from hamburgers to SUVs. We’ve come to associate bigger with better, and often make purchase decisions at stores that offer the widest selection at the lowest price. And when it comes to

alcohol, large club, grocery and regional chains tend to dominate certain markets. Because they buy in bulk, these retailers often promote leading brands at discounted prices compared to a neighborhood wine and spirits store. Suppliers and distributors also focus more heavily on these “A” stores, as it often makes the most business sense to do so. It is, after all, about volume, right? Not so fast…. >>>

Just as consumers began trekking to farmer’s markets to pay more for a just- picked tomato, they also started searching for craft beers, esoteric wines and local spirits. Emulating the shopping experi- ence at a European market—buy what you need, when you need it, from someone

you know—little shops started springing up across the country. Their goal? To get personal with customers and brands. And to present wine based on style, context and taste profile—not ratings. “Everyone deserves a neighborhood place,” declares Randy Clement from

Silverlake Wine Los angeLes, Ca
Silverlake Wine
Los angeLes, Ca

“Customer service, no snobbery, no pretense and everyone is welcome. We may own the store, but the people who come here are what define it.”

-Randy Clement

Perman photography by Lara Kastner

Silver Lake Wine in Los Angeles. He and his partners opened eight years ago in the artsy, growing Silver Lake neighborhood and doubled the size of the store to 2,500 square feet after three years in business. Getting customers was about shaking hands and creating an environment that was the antithesis of a typical “big box” liquor store. “We hired interior designer Ana Henton to create a cool space and we are also cardboard free.” The aesthet- ics play an important role—warehouse versus cozy, creating an environment that most people prefer. Clement goes a step further by promising you will never find any brand sold at a chain store on his shelves: “Everything we have is boutique and small production.”

Central Bottle Wine & Provisions CaMbRidge, Ma
Central Bottle
Wine & Provisions
CaMbRidge, Ma

“The shop is blossoming in to something that is really customer- centric. I feel like a host when we open our doors and we have a party every day! Our staff speaks multiple languages and offers choices to our customers. We are all like family and friends.”

-Maureen Rubino with business partner Liz Vilardi

retail gets intimate

With limited space, a common key to success across these stores is their ability to eschew big brands and focus on bur- geoning producers, both global and local. Maureen Rubino from Central Bottle Wine & Provisions in Cambridge, MA, works only with small distributors to of-

fer a hand-picked selection of around 100 beers and 700 wines. “We carry products we can become intimate with and know the winemakers,” she says. “Larger stores carry more recognizable brands and can move volume this way, while we work with small vendors.” And customers don’t seem to mind. In fact, those who frequent small shops build a rapport with the staff and happily try recommendations based on their sugges- tions. As Craig Perman of Perman Wine Selections in Chicago explains, there is no advantage in overstocking his shelves:

“Rather I taste, search and narrow down the best of the best and give my customers my opinions on the best selections avail- able.” He looks at this as a competitive advantage, often having access to limit- ed-quantity items, or “hidden gems” that aren’t available to mass-market chains.

Perman Wine Selections ChiCago, iL “Ultimately I think it all boils down to my personal
Perman Wine Selections
ChiCago, iL
“Ultimately I think it all boils down to
my personal relationships with my
customers. When you are a wine
consumer you try and find someone
you can trust, someone who knows
what you like, and you build on the
relationship.”
-Craig Perman
Dry Dock Wine & Spirits bRooKLYn, nY “We have so much to thank for our
Dry Dock Wine & Spirits
bRooKLYn, nY
“We have so much to thank for
our success, the location of the
store in a transitional (groovy!)
neighborhood with a large food
market just blocks away. But above
all, it’s about the people we hire
who are passionate about putting
the right bottle in the right hands
every time.”
-Mary dudine Kyle
with co-owner Ron Kyle

At the 800-square-foot Dry Dock Wine and Spirits in Brooklyn, the loyal Red Hook neighborhood clientele shops a “meticulously curated” selection. Co-own- er Mary Dudine Kyle tries to meet her customers’ needs as much as she can. “We have established ourselves as a destina- tion shop for spirits and unique offerings of small production wines at great prices.” Like the other small stores, she empha- sizes the need for spectacular service, cit- ing the lack of individual attention and highly trained staff at larger stores. “We work hard at making your visit fun and memorable,” she says, citing weekly tast- ing events and a personal account service that tracks customers’ purchase to allow staff to establish a taste profile and easily suggest items to suit their tastes.

service sells

With intimate space, hand-selected SKUs and knowledgeable staff, service plays a critical role in repeat business. Stores offer

SMaLL iS

BeautifuL

Little’s Wine & Spirits

denVeR, Co

Little’s Wine & Spirits denVeR, Co
iS BeautifuL Little’s Wine & Spirits denVeR, Co “We taste every bottle that walks through this

“We taste every bottle that walks through this shop. We can describe it personally to each and every customer. We are able to bring very eclectic varietals and producers because it is a ‘hand-sell’ store.”

-ashley hausman

tastings and support community events as an important opportunity to build rela- tionships with customers. Little’s Wine & Spirits in Denver also offers in-depth educational workshops and partners with local restaurants for dinner events. Ridge- field, Connecticut’s Cellar XV Wine Market provides free gift-wrapping, while Bauer Wine and Spirits in Boston goes the extra mile (literally) with free deliv- ery and hassle-free shipping in-state. Bauer even has veteran bartend- ers on staff who work with caterers and corporations looking for advice on food pairings and choosing the right mix for parties. General Manager Howie Rubin sees communication as a factor in keeping customers coming back. Besides weekly email blasts promoting things like a Sam- pler Case (12 wines chosen by staff at a 15% discount), Bauer maintains a weekly blog with events, pictures and wine picks, as well as Facebook and Twitter accounts.

A constant flow of information is vital,

agrees Clement of Silverlake Wine, who has over 30,000 newsletter subscribers:

“We are interwoven with our community

in all that we do.”

Central Bottle is an integral part of their Kenmore Square neighborhood in Cambridge, MA, with an eclectic mix of

MIT students, Google executives and res- idents. When they opened in 2009, they were cautiously optimistic their concept

of a Venetian enoteca would be accepted.

“We wanted to be a meeting spot where people could hang out, buy wine, have a snack and hang out,” says partner Mau-

reen Rubino. With a special liquor license

to serve wine by the glass once a week,

she says business is thriving.

Cellar XV Wine Market RidgefieLd, CT “We work very hard, have good employees and a
Cellar XV Wine Market
RidgefieLd, CT
“We work very hard, have good
employees and a loyal customer
base. Plus we try to give the best
value we can to the customers at the
lowest prices in order to compete
with the ‘big box’ stores, chains and
the Internet.”
-doug Thompson
Bauer Wine & Spirits bosTon, Ma
Bauer Wine & Spirits
bosTon, Ma

“It’s hard work but we are successful because we keep prices as low as we can, we hire the right people for the job and we have a passion for what we do. If you don’t have pas- sion for your job in this business, it shows and people lose trust in you.”

-howard Rubin with Randall grahm of bonny doon Vineyard

For small brewers, distillers and wineries, these stores are sometimes the only marketing vehicle available to sell their products. At the same time, this aspect of discovery is what makes a small store appealing to consumers looking to broaden their palate. It’s a win-wine situation, as the chaotic, un- wieldy universe of wines and spirits is reframed on a manageable scale, with- out losing diversity or compromising quality. “We know what our beer, wine and spirits taste like—period,” points out Rubin, making the daunting task of helping customer choose what to drink just that much easier. The lesson for suppliers and distribu- tors here: Don’t overlook the little guys, especially if you have a unique product with a story to tell. For these small stores, it’s not about discounts or advertising; it’s about providing the customer with some- thing special. n

Photograph by Greg Powers

BAR TALK

Think Drink, Too

Owen Thomson, ThinkFoodGroup, Washington, D.C.

BY ALIA AKKAM

Owen Thomson, ThinkFoodGroup, Washington, D.C. BY ALIA AKKAM While we hear much about the food from

While we hear much about the food from chef José Andrés at restaurants span- ning The Bazaar in LA, China Poblano in Las Vegas and Zaytinya on his home turf of DC, the cocktails are equally impres- sive thanks to ThinkFoodGroup’s roving barman, Owen Thomson.

THE BEVERAGE NETWORK:

ThinkFoodGroup decided to close D.C.’s beloved Café Atlantico last year and morph it into America Eats Tavern, an exciting pop-up concept. Tell us about the bar program.

O T: The cocktail program here focuses on snapshots of America’s past, offer- ing the most classical renditions we can for the drinks. Most people have heard of a Mint Julep or a Sazerac for instance, but it is unlikely that the majority of our guests have ever had one executed in the way the drinks were intended. We also get to play around with some drinks that people are less familiar with, like Benjamin Franklin’s personal recipe for milk punch or the old New England field worker’s drink, the Switchel.

TBN: Before your current post, you introduced a successful drink menu to Bourbon, in the Adams Morgan neighborhood. Why do you think it was able to thrive?

O T: We had a great time defying every- one’s preconceived notions of what a bar should be in Adams Morgan. Every- one would tell us nobody wants anything but rail vodka and light beer. Myself and the other bartenders thought we could do better so we started pulling in every-

thing that we liked to drink and anything that seemed interesting, and just had fun playing. Our guests really began to appreciate it. I’ll always be proud of what we put together there: a regular bar where you could sit and drink your tallboy of PBR next to someone else drinking a swizzle or fizz.

TBN: You are responsible for the drink programs at all of José’s

restaurants. How do you establish

a unique experience for each one

while maintaining consistency and

a unified feel?

O T: I always try to instill in our bartend- ers that they should be proud of what they do and welcome every guest as if they were walking into their own home. After that it’s imperative that we are very knowledgeable about the products we carry and the drinks we make so that once we’ve welcomed our guest we can start directing their experience. People go out to bars in order to relax and have

a good time; nothing makes that easier than a hospitable bartender.

TBN: What is your process for creating the drinks?

O T: I do a lot of R&D in the lead up to an opening and we try to start with

a strong drink menu that has a little

something for everyone and really fits in with the concept. The other big

factor is regular tastings with José, which make sure that the program really reflects his vision of the prop- erty. Once we get open it’s a whole new ballgame. I love to work with all

open it’s a whole new ballgame. I love to work with all the bartenders and help

the bartenders and help them put to- gether their own ideas for drinks and get them in front of José as well. Help- ing to take ownership of the menu just further solidifies their ownership of the bar and the atmosphere that they create.

TBN: What propelled you to launch the D.C. Craft Bartenders Guild?

O T: We used to hold a regular tasting

group at Bourbon on Monday nights.

We were always reading about the great things bartenders were doing in NYC and San Francisco and thought, Why not here? We saw a few other independent guilds popping up in Washington and Oregon and we figured it would be a great way to grow a community and

Ten of

us sat down one afternoon in 2008 and threw some money in a hat so we could buy a website and we planned out the first annual Rickey Month to showcase local D.C. bartenders making our own versions of a quintessentially D.C. cocktail. Since then we have grown to 60 or so members and have built a really strong community here.

focus some attention on D.C

TASTING CORNER

More Than Malbec

Argentina Looks to Torrontés, Bonarda and Beyond

BY JIM CLARKE

Y ou might not realize it from scanning the Argentina sections of American wine shops, but only a third of Argentina’s red wine- grape plantings are Malbec. Indeed, Malbec has the hot hand; ex- ports to the U.S. have been rising consistently for the past several

years, accounting for almost 60% of their wine exports (red and white) in 2010. Nonetheless, Argentine producers are increasingly looking to other varieties, wary of the dangers of putting all their eggs in one basket. “I think what we need to do is give people more chances to try our other varietals,” says Matias Fragas, export general manager for Ernesto Cate- na Vineyards. “They will certainly find the ‘Argentina’ signature when they taste.”

A signature white makes a logical complement to Malbec, and Torrontés is the most viable contender. Fragas says about three times as much Torrontés is harvested than Chardonnay, their second most-planted white. It constitutes only 4% of exports to the U.S. at the moment, but that number has been growing dramatically. There are actually three varieties using the name, Torrontés Sanjuanino, Torrontés Mendocino, and Torrontés Riojano; the latter is the most highly regarded of the three. It’s believed to be a cross between Muscat of Alexandria and Criolla Chica, and the former’s aromatic contribution is quite apparent, supported by fresh acidity when grown in cool, high- altitude vineyards in the La Rioja and Salta regions, the small town of Cafayate in particular.

ARGENTINA

WINE REGIONS

BOLIVIA BRAZIL CHILE PARAGUAY Salta Catamarca La Rioja San Juan URUGUAY ARGENTINA Mendoza Neuquén ATLANTIC
BOLIVIA
BRAZIL
CHILE
PARAGUAY
Salta
Catamarca
La Rioja
San Juan
URUGUAY
ARGENTINA
Mendoza
Neuquén
ATLANTIC
OCEAN
Rio Negro

Las Compuertas, Mendoza

Altitude is Key

A second red is also a possibility. “At Ni-

eto we feel the varietal that shows the greatest potential after Malbec is Bon- arda,” says Guillermo Brandariz, region- al manager at Nieto Senetiner. With over 50,000 acres, mostly in Mendoza, it’s the country’s second most-planted red. “If we compare Bonarda in Men- doza to its native northern Italy, there are some stark contrasts. In Mendoza, especially at the higher altitudes where Nieto grows Bonarda, the grape gives

highly concentrated, full-bodied wines with dark color, ripe red fruit flavors and smooth, sweet tannins.” Some research suggests Bonarda has nothing to do with the Italian variety of the same name but

is instead actually Corbeau, a rare va-

riety from the Savoie region of France. In any case, Branariz says high-altitude vineyards and controlling yields are es- sential to making quality Bonarda. However, Argentina doesn’t need to rely on specialty varieties to sell wine; so-called international varieties also do well there. Nicolas Catena, patriarch of the family behind the eponymous Catena wines as well as brands like Luca, Alma Negra, and Tikal, says he visited California in the 1980s and was inspired

by what he found in Napa and Sonoma; when he returned home he planted Cabernet Sauvignon and Chardonnay

and applied the techniques he had seen

in California.

TASTING CORNER

Jacques Lurton consulted for Catena early on, and was unim- pressed. “He told me, ‘This Caber- net tastes like Languedoc Cabernet’,” says Catena. “It put me in mind on the topic of average temperature, and I immediately started think- ing of planting in cooler climate,” an approach which has since done well for Cabernet as well as many other varieties. “In Argentina, Cabernet Sau- vignon and Chardonnay are the varietals that do best after Malbec,” says Fragas. “As far as the differ- ence with Cab and Chards from other parts of the world, I think that the altitude of the vineyards, the lack of rain and the sunlight exposure clearly give distinctive characteristic to our wines, both in texture and aromatics. What most exporting wineries have to agree on is a common strategy to support Cabernet Sauvignon as our second flagship varietal.” While Torrontés, Bonarda, Chardonnay and Cabernet Sau- vignon battle it out for the role of Malbec’s sidekick, some wineries are exploring other grapes. Pinot Noir is taking hold in Patagonia, to the south of Mendoza, where it even gets cool enough for sparkling wine production. Syrah accounts for one-eighth of the country’s red wine vineyards, and it, too, has its

supporters; Alejandro Canovas, winemaker at Bodega Vistalba, sin- gles out Syrah from the Uco Valley for spice and herb notes not found in wines from other regions like San Juan. The Zuccardi family in Mendoza grows over 31 varieties, including unusual ones like Caladoc, a Gren- ache-Malbec cross, and Tempranillo.

They bottle the latter both as a vari- etal wine and as part of their flagship ‘Zeta’ blend, together with Malbec and Cabernet Sauvignon. Multi- variety blends are relatively uncom- mon, but Canovas, who makes three blends for Vistalba, says blending is

a logical response to Argentina’s ter-

roir: “In Argentina there are various terroirs that suit a wide range of va- rieties” ranging from Torrontés to lesser known grapes like Semillon and Petit Verdot. In the end even Malbec itself may not be as monolithic and con- sistent as it seems. “I think it is more about the terroir, but even we as Ar- gentineans are still learning about it, says Fragas. “A winemaker very

close to us always says that we need

to put the ‘last name’ to Malbec, and

I agree. If in 3 years from now U.S.

wine drinkers ask for a Malbec from ‘Vista Flores’ or ‘Gualtallary’ or ‘Agre- lo,’ [three sub-regions of Mendoza] then we would have really achieved something exceptional.”

ARGENTINA WINES

achieved something exceptional.” ■ ARGENTINA WINES Master Sommelier Roger Dagorn MALBEC OUTSHINED? The annual
achieved something exceptional.” ■ ARGENTINA WINES Master Sommelier Roger Dagorn MALBEC OUTSHINED? The annual
achieved something exceptional.” ■ ARGENTINA WINES Master Sommelier Roger Dagorn MALBEC OUTSHINED? The annual
achieved something exceptional.” ■ ARGENTINA WINES Master Sommelier Roger Dagorn MALBEC OUTSHINED? The annual
achieved something exceptional.” ■ ARGENTINA WINES Master Sommelier Roger Dagorn MALBEC OUTSHINED? The annual
achieved something exceptional.” ■ ARGENTINA WINES Master Sommelier Roger Dagorn MALBEC OUTSHINED? The annual

Master Sommelier

Roger Dagorn

MALBEC OUTSHINED?

The annual Argentina Wine Awards are organized to help promote exports. The 2011 event featured a blind judging by 12 international sommeliers and seven Argentine experts. Of 17 table wines that earned a Trophy—the highest distinction awarded— only four were Malbecs. Find a complete list of medal winners at winesofargentina.org.

WHITE TROPHY WINES

medal winners at winesofargentina.org. WHITE TROPHY WINES $7-$13 ■ Callia 2010 Reserve Torrontés $13-$20 ■

$7-$13

Callia 2010 Reserve Torrontés

$13-$20

Doña Paula Estate 2010 Sauvignon Blanc

Xumek 2010 Chardonnay

RED TROPHY WINES

$7-$13

Argento 2009 Bonarda

Kaiken 2009 Cabernet Sauvignon

$13-$20

Amado Sur (Trivento) 2009 Red Blend

Broquel (Trapiche) 2009 Malbec

La Mascota (Santa Ana) 2009 Cabernet Sauvignon

$20-$30

Benvenuto de La Serna 2006 Trisagio Red Blend

Trivento 2008 Golden Reserve Syrah

Punto Final 2008 Reserva Malbec

$30-$50

Bramare (Viña Cobos) 2008 Cabernet Sauvignon

Caro (Rothschild-Catena) 2007 Red Blend

Las Moras 2006 Gran Shiraz Zonda Valley

Bramare (Viña Cobos) 2008 Rebon Vyd. Malbec

>$50

Lindaflor 2006 Malbec

Felix Blend 2007 Red Blend

■ Bramare (Viña Cobos) 2008 Rebon Vyd. Malbec >$50 ■ Lindaflor 2006 Malbec ■ Felix Blend
■ Bramare (Viña Cobos) 2008 Rebon Vyd. Malbec >$50 ■ Lindaflor 2006 Malbec ■ Felix Blend
■ Bramare (Viña Cobos) 2008 Rebon Vyd. Malbec >$50 ■ Lindaflor 2006 Malbec ■ Felix Blend
THEFInD tHEFIND
THEFInD
tHEFIND

IN THE BE KNOW!

THEFInD tHEFIND I N T H E B E K N O W ! X-ray Marks

X-ray Marks THE BoX For tHE MaCaLLan

B E K N O W ! X-ray Marks THE BoX For tHE MaCaLLan to showcase

to showcase the art of whisky to new audiences, the Macallan looks to partner with artists who share a similar devotion to their craft. this edition features X-ray images by famed uK photographer nick Veasey, who captured the essence of the Macallan’s “Six Pillars”—a peacock feather, scissors, a liquid drop, a whisky still, a cask and the Macallan’s Easter Elchies House—each with its own story. inside the boxes: the Macallan’s Sherry oak 12 Years old, sold individually with SrP $49.99, in line with un-boxed versions of the whisky. themacallan.com

line with un-boxed versions of the whisky. themacallan.com BourBon To Hang Your Hat on CHoosE Your
line with un-boxed versions of the whisky. themacallan.com BourBon To Hang Your Hat on CHoosE Your
line with un-boxed versions of the whisky. themacallan.com BourBon To Hang Your Hat on CHoosE Your

BourBon To Hang Your Hat on

CHoosE Your PoiSon (CurE)

Has modern science finally caught up with the after-effects of overindulgence? Bytox is a “remedy patch” designed to replenish vitamins and nutrients lost by the body; it can be applied during or after a night out. rally Labs’ FDa-approved Blowfish takes an effervescent, morning-after approach, delivering caffeine with maximum-strength pain reliever. Both hangover helpers are SrP $2.99; taking up minimal counter space, they make attractive impulse items. Blowfish has wholesale pricing of $1.79 via a 25-packet display; forhangovers.com, 800-970-1793. Bytox wholesales for $1.70 per unit, minimum order 25; bytox. com, 646-583-1000.

Dating back to 1865, the Stetson hat tradition is legendary. the uncompromising character and standards represented by John B. Stetson’s motto—“Make things right and the best they can be”—are now at work in the spirits world. Working with Vision Wine & Spirits, the company has crafted an 84- proof Kentucky straight John B. Stetson Bourbon, using native american corn and locally sourced grain, double- distilled in copper pots and aged in charred white oak barrels for four years. SrP $26.99 visionwineandspirits.com

barrels for four years. SrP $26.99 visionwineandspirits.com PogasH PèrE ET FIls PEn CoCKtaiL CLaSSiCS Jonathan Pogash,
barrels for four years. SrP $26.99 visionwineandspirits.com PogasH PèrE ET FIls PEn CoCKtaiL CLaSSiCS Jonathan Pogash,
barrels for four years. SrP $26.99 visionwineandspirits.com PogasH PèrE ET FIls PEn CoCKtaiL CLaSSiCS Jonathan Pogash,

PogasH PèrE ET FIls PEn CoCKtaiL CLaSSiCS

Jonathan Pogash, “the Cocktail Guru,” has joined forces with rick rodgers for the 75 th anniversary edition of the Mr. Boston official Bartender’s Guide ($20; Wiley & Sons, 2011), the little red book behind bars around the globe. the book contains almost 1,500 recipes—many from some of the world’s best bartenders—plus tips, tricks and an informative glossary for the 21 st century reader. Meanwhile, Jonathan’s father, Jeffrey Pogash, has released Bloody Mary ($40; thornwillow Press, 2011). the letter-press printing makes it a great collector’s item, and readers are privy to Jeffrey’s recipe for the “Best Bloody Mary in the World.” thecocktailguru.com

WineBuZZ

Wine BuZZ WINE BUZZ sparkling…red …And sweet! Targeting Moscato drinkers, Piedmont’s Ricossa Antica Casa, part of

WINEBUZZ

sparkling…red …And sweet!

Targeting Moscato drinkers, Piedmont’s Ricossa Antica Casa, part of MGM Mondo del Vino, is releasing a new sparkling red from the Casorzo DOC in the U.S. market. The new entry, Ricossa “Casorzo” (5.5%-abv), is made from ripe, sweet Malvasia grapes in the low-alcohol (5.5%) style of Moscato. It joins a Ricossa Antica portfolio also including Barolo, Barbera d’Asti, Moscato d’Asti and Gavi wines. SRP: $15.99 touchstone-wines.com

d’Asti and Gavi wines. SRP: $15.99 touchstone-wines.com Malbec Gets Cheeky Some industry watchers call Malbec the
d’Asti and Gavi wines. SRP: $15.99 touchstone-wines.com Malbec Gets Cheeky Some industry watchers call Malbec the

Malbec Gets Cheeky

wines. SRP: $15.99 touchstone-wines.com Malbec Gets Cheeky Some industry watchers call Malbec the new Shiraz, thanks

Some industry watchers call Malbec the new Shiraz, thanks to its red-hot sales and consumer-friendliness. As new brands continue to emerge, is anyone surprised to see labels display a little more attitude to complement the Andean altitude? The 100% varietal Battle Axe Malbec, imported by Liquid Brands, is sourced from estate vines that are between 80 and 100+ years old. Vivid ruby- purple, the wine delivers intense red fruits, subtle spice and toasty notes from 12 months in new French oak barrels. SRP: $17.99 freakingawesomewines.com

garnet line is Born AGAin

Since its debut under the Saintsbury label back in 1983, Garnet has been a go-to name for people who love value in California Pinot Noir. Now, as part of Vintage Point (makers/ marketers of brands including Hundred Acre, Layer Cake, Luna, Arnold Palmer and others), Garnet has undergone a makeover and line extension. Joining the flagship Carneros Pinot Noir (2010 SRP $20) are a 2009 Monterey Pinot Noir ($15), 2010 Sonoma Coast Chardonnay ($15) and a single-vineyard 2010 Rodgers Creek Sonoma Coast Pinot Noir ($30). vintagepoint.com

Creek Sonoma Coast Pinot Noir ($30). vintagepoint.com Moscato + brachetto = MoChetto Given that Moscato and
Creek Sonoma Coast Pinot Noir ($30). vintagepoint.com Moscato + brachetto = MoChetto Given that Moscato and
Creek Sonoma Coast Pinot Noir ($30). vintagepoint.com Moscato + brachetto = MoChetto Given that Moscato and
Creek Sonoma Coast Pinot Noir ($30). vintagepoint.com Moscato + brachetto = MoChetto Given that Moscato and

Moscato + brachetto = MoChetto

Given that Moscato and Brachetto vines both thrive in Italy’s Piedmont zone, and given that both are card-carrying sweeties in the bottle, the idea of combining these two grapes in one wine is quite natural. Imported by Napa-based Quintessential and dubbed Mochetto, grapes for the pink, gently sweet and slightly effervescent wine were sourced in the Venezie subzone of the Veneto; alcohol is 5.5%. Each variety’s signature fruit (peach and berry) is perceptible; the 10% portion of Brachetto adds a little richness. SRP: $16.99 quintessentialwines.com

adds a little richness. SRP: $16.99 quintessentialwines.com luxury is in the bag for kruG As if

luxury is in the bag for kruG

As if Krug Champagne itself were not enough to say “luxury,” the iconic Champagne now has its very own carrying case. The Krug “Flanerie” is handcrafted from supple leather and conceals an insulated sleeve that keeps a pre-chilled bottle of Krug Grand Cuvée or Krug Rosé at perfect drinking temperature. Just the thing for high-end BYO occasions or a special gift. The Krug Flanerie retails for $190 and is in nationwide but limited release, from the same distributors that already carry the bubbly.

retails for $190 and is in nationwide but limited release, from the same distributors that already
retails for $190 and is in nationwide but limited release, from the same distributors that already

THECONNECTION

THE CONNECTION THE CONNECTION M e d i A ! & Apps s o c i

THECONNECTION

MediA! &

Apps

sociAl

NEW! Mobile Apps

Bacardi Serves Up Tennis Ace Rafael Nadal

As part of its “Champions Drink Responsibly” social responsibility campaign, Bacardi Limited has launched an international prize competition. Get the chance to “Ace Rafa,” as in Bacardi’s Global Social Responsibility Ambassador Rafael Nadal. Fans who participate in an online virtual reality game and successfully “ace” the Grand Slam winner by using the RoboServ 3000 go into a free drawing to win a spot in the Grand Final. Lucky finalists will meet Nadal in Mallorca, Spain later this year to try and “ace” him in person. The contest runs through March 31 st . facebook.com/ChampionsDrinkResponsibly or acerafa.com

Pernod Absinthe Superiere & Wagmag Go Mobile For The Arts

Pernod Absinthe Superieure and Wagmag , the monthly art guide for Brooklyn, NY, have joined forces to offer info and interaction with the artsy borough via a new mobile app for iPhone and Android users. The free app, “The Art & Absinthe Guide to Brooklyn,” features Wagmag ’s monthly gallery and event listings along with cocktail lounges that serve Pernod Absinthe Superieure (and retail accounts where the liqueur can be purchased). The app connects users with GPS mapping as well as Facebook, Twitter and Foursquare integration. itunes.com or market.android.com

bevnetwork.com

SUPPORT IS JUST A CLICK AWAY

bevnetwork.com SUPPORT IS JUST A CLICK AWAY goCharge Partners With Patr ó n Spirits GoCharge, a

goCharge Partners With Patrón Spirits

GoCharge, a leading manufac- turer and distributor of mobile device charging kiosks, has part- nered with Patrón Spirits to bring mobile charging convenience to NYC bars. The patent-pending technology of goCharge is a hit in this fast-paced world of smartphone dependence—the kiosks can charge up to 16 mobile devices at once. Patrón Spirits gains exposure within goCharge’s 50-location NYC Bar Network, which includes exclusive branding for Patrón XO Cafe and Ultimat Vodka. Each branded goCharge kiosk features a digital touchscreen to entertain customers with brand-specific content while they recharge their devices. gochargerentals.com

Hennessy Tags KAWS Bottles With QR

gochargerentals.com Hennessy Tags KAWS Bottles With QR Hennessy fans recently seeking out the limited-edition

Hennessy fans recently seeking out the limited-edition Hennessy VS bottle designed by pop artist KAWS have gotten a treat. As part of the promotion, Hennessy has created custom QR codes that were placed on the bottle. The code leads consumers to the interactive microsite hennessykaws. mobi, which offers exclusive Hennessy/ KAWS content, including a video about the collaboration and the artist’s inspirations. Visitors can also download the limited-edition label as a wallpaper option for their phones, as well as several Hennessy cocktail recipes. Over 1.5 million consumers have already scanned the Hennessy KAWS bottle, with 2.1 million

views of the mobile site and videos.

1.5 million consumers have already scanned the Hennessy KAWS bottle, with 2.1 million views of the

SHOPPING NETWORK

S HOPPIN G NETWORK

For More Information Contact:

The Beverage Network 152 Madison Avenue, Suite 600 New York, NY, 10016

Lauren Howery 212.571.3232, Ext. 103 E-mail: lhowery@bevmedia.com

BARWARE Custom Pints, Mugs, Shots & More DRINK TOKENS Plastic or Wood with Your Logo
BARWARE
Custom Pints, Mugs, Shots & More
DRINK
TOKENS
Plastic or Wood
with Your Logo
www.drinktokens.com
Free Catalog!
1-800-233-0828
www.kardwell.com

KARDWELL INTERNATIONAL, INC.

www.kardwell.com KARDWELL INTERNATIONAL, INC. ATMs & ATM deals! FIVE (5) YEAR WARRANTY! PARTS &
www.kardwell.com KARDWELL INTERNATIONAL, INC. ATMs & ATM deals! FIVE (5) YEAR WARRANTY! PARTS &
ATMs & ATM deals! FIVE (5) YEAR WARRANTY! PARTS & PAPER* Cash/Surcharge deposited Daily! DSL.
ATMs & ATM deals!
FIVE (5) YEAR WARRANTY!
PARTS & PAPER*
Cash/Surcharge deposited Daily!
DSL. Internet Ready ATMs.
NEW ATMs from $1,995
(Free Delivery/Install Extra)
Need Service
Repairs/Parts?
New ATMs
are ADA
compliant!
Upgrade
Your ATM?
Also available:
Credit & Debit Processing
Prepaid Products
BILL Pay/Cash Advance
Much more!
800.499.1068 ext.101
Since 1996 we’ve been delivering what YOU expect!
* The above is subject to availability, credit, bank
and ATM contract(s). ATM minimum transaction
volume restrictions apply. Texans: add sales tax
Franco’s ® Cocktail Mixes Phone: (954) 782-7491 ★ ( 800) 782-4508 ★ Fax: (954) 786-9253

Franco’s® Cocktail Mixes

Franco’s ® Cocktail Mixes Phone: (954) 782-7491 ★ ( 800) 782-4508 ★ Fax: (954) 786-9253 e-mail:
Franco’s ® Cocktail Mixes Phone: (954) 782-7491 ★ ( 800) 782-4508 ★ Fax: (954) 786-9253 e-mail:

Phone: (954) 782-7491 ( 800) 782-4508 Fax: (954) 786-9253 e-mail: francocktl@aol.com

www.francoscocktailmixes.com

(954) 782-7491 ★ ( 800) 782-4508 ★ Fax: (954) 786-9253 e-mail: francocktl@aol.com www.francoscocktailmixes.com

ALL NEW Liquor Store POS System

ALL NEW Liquor Store POS System Computerizing has never been so affordable POS SYSTEM FOR $1,399
ALL NEW Liquor Store POS System Computerizing has never been so affordable POS SYSTEM FOR $1,399
ALL NEW Liquor Store POS System Computerizing has never been so affordable POS SYSTEM FOR $1,399
Computerizing has never been so affordable
Computerizing
has never
been so
affordable
POS System Computerizing has never been so affordable POS SYSTEM FOR $1,399 refurbished $599 FREE SHIPPING!
POS SYSTEM FOR $1,399 refurbished $599 FREE SHIPPING!
POS SYSTEM FOR
$1,399
refurbished $599
FREE SHIPPING!
POS SYSTEM FOR $1,399 refurbished $599 FREE SHIPPING! *Tax charged in NJ Corner Store POS Software
POS SYSTEM FOR $1,399 refurbished $599 FREE SHIPPING! *Tax charged in NJ Corner Store POS Software
POS SYSTEM FOR $1,399 refurbished $599 FREE SHIPPING! *Tax charged in NJ Corner Store POS Software

*Tax charged in NJ

Corner Store POS Software ($499 value) Over the phone installation and 1 hour over the phone training! 17,000 SKU liquor/beer/wine database, or free import of your own database

S HOPPIN G NETWORK

S HOPPIN G NETWORK
S HOPPIN G NETWORK

AT THE BAR

By ROBERT PLOTKIN

Bar StationS – Ground Zero for Profitability

W hile there’s no such

thing as the perfectly

designed bar, some are

much easier to work than others. Every misplaced step the bartender takes costs the bar money in lost productivity. Beverage operators are passionate about the logistics of drink production—how the workstations are configured, where equipment is placed relative to the workstation and how the inventory is merchandised. They are, after all, responsible for ensuring that the facility is designed to operate at peak efficiency; anything less negatively impacts revenue and service. “I think one explanation for poorly designed bars is that operators are often forced to make compromises between concept and function,” suggests Steve Goumas, owner of the Rula Bula Irish Pub in Tempe, Arizona. “While such concessions are unavoidable, the result is often a great looking bar that nightly operates in chaos. Those design changes might work on paper, but the impact they have on bartender productivity may result in lost sales for the life of the business.”

The operational hubs of the bar are the bartenders’ workstations, which should always be facing out to the bar top so that the bartenders can see what’s going on. When designing a bar, the objective is to position nearly everything a bartender needs to prepare any drink within a six-foot radius. The focal point of the

workstation is the ice bin. It should be constructed of stainless steel with a rigid frame construction. The balance of the equipment and supplies should be positioned around the station to create an effective use of space so that drink orders can be made with

a minimum of wasted motion.

Wasted motion negatively impacts speed of service Since most bartenders are right- handed, equipment and supplies should be positioned so that there is a minimum of cross-handed operations required making drinks, says David Commer of Commer Beverage Consulting and former T.G.I.Friday’s beverage director.

“For example, right-handed bartenders naturally pick-up bottles with their right hands and glasses with their left. To maximize efficiency, glasses should be stored to the left of a workstation, allowing the bartender to pick-up the glasses with their left-hand and add the ice using the scoop in the right hand. Likewise, a hand sink is ideally positioned to the right of the workstation allowing the bartender to dump the excess ice and fluid from his mixing equipment, blender or returned glasses with a minimum

of movement.”

Well liquors should be positioned in a speed rack mounted to the front of the workstation for immediate access. A speed rack is a stainless steel, enclosed shelf designed specifically to hold liquor bottles. Two-tiered (double)

a-8 Hawaii Beverage guide february 2012

speed racks are also available. Call brand liquors and liqueurs can be placed in speed racks to the left and right of the bartenders’ workstation. These speed racks are frequently mounted on the sides of top-loading beer boxes or four- compartment sinks. Premium, super-premium and top-shelf liquors and liqueurs should be merchandised in display cases optimally located directly behind the workstation on the back bar above 42 inches. This will allow bar guests to easily see the products and prevent bartenders from having to stoop down to retrieve them. To save on storage space behind the bar, design the shelves of the display case wide enough (approximately 12-16 inches) to accommodate positioning bottles two deep. This will allow you to shelve a backup of each brand—with few exceptions— and eliminate some of the need for undercounter liquor storage.

tEMPtinG nEWCoMErS

The other equipment that should be located near the bartenders’ workstation includes the draft beer system and the refrigeration equipment, such as the reach-in cooler and top-loading beer box. Reach-in doors should be hinged so they open toward the bartenders’ workstation for easy access. Shared equipment, such as automatic glass washer, a three- (four-) compartment sink unit and the glassware drain boards should be positioned equidistant between the workstations, thereby reducing

the amount of cross-traffic between the bartenders. It is important that bartenders have adequate lighting behind the bar for drink making. Florescent lighting mounted underneath the bar top and abutting the bar die is usually sufficient. Track lighting behind the bar may also be effective. The bar top area directly in front of the bartenders’ workstation serves several functions. The garnish tray and frequently used single service items, such as straws, sip sticks, sword picks and cocktail napkins or drink coasters are placed on the bar top in front of the station for easy access to both the bartenders and servers. This area is also where servers pick-up their drink orders and return dirty glassware. The surface area for beverage pick-up must be large enough for several drink orders to be placed on cocktail trays. Speed of service is impeded and a backlog can occur if there isn’t sufficient surface area allocated for staging finished drink orders. Brass rails are normally used to delineate this section of the bar top as a service area. It is also advisable to use the area adjacent to the workstation for the sundry smallwares and the bartenders’ mixing equipment. This shelf area is ideal for storing mixing tins, mixing glasses, bar spoons, spring strainers, bottle opener, wine opener, cutting board and paring knives. The surface of this shelf should be covered with glassware netting to allow the wet mixing equipment to air dry. “The physical layout of the bar largely determines the placement

of equipment, liquor displays and workstations, which in turn, dictates the speed at which bartenders can make drinks and provide hospitable service,” says Jean-Pierre Etcheberrigaray, vice-president of food and beverage for Intercontinental Hotels. “A difference of three feet one way or another may not seem like much when you’re deciding where to position a glass-washer, but it can add up to hundreds or even thousands of extra steps for bartenders a week. That’s a lot of wasted time.” And after all, time is money.

#

#

#

ROBERT PLOTKIN is a judge at the Ultimate Spirits Challenge and author of 16 books on bartending and beverage management including Secrets Revealed of America’s Greatest Cocktails. He can be reached at www.AmericanCocktails.com or by e-mail at robert@barmedia.com.

We accepting major

spiritscope

credit cards On LInE @ hawaiibevguide.com

By

DunCan

H.

scope credit cards On LInE @ hawaiibevguide.com By DunCan H. We have now made it easier

We have now made it easier for you to keep up with what’s new and happening in Hawaii's liquor trade.

For further information call us at the Hawaii Beverage Guide

(808) 591-0049

february 2012 Hawaii Beverage guide a-9

spi Ri T scop E

By DuNCAN H. CAmERON

SEnator LovES LoCaL BEEr … Senior political leaders rarely seem to make public statements supporting the alcohol beverage industry. So it was as refreshing as a tall cold one to see that new York’s senior Senator, Chuck Schumer, has lent his support to efforts to promote beers made in the state. “Local breweries across the state are proven job creators, helping support 60,000 new York jobs and brewing not simply great beer, but billions for our local economy too,” said Schumer. “Craft breweries have catapulted new York to the top shelf of beer states, and our beers are more than ready for prime time….I’m strongly urging new York restaurants, bars and convenience stores alike across the state to take a close look at new York’s beers, and consider putting them on their shelves or on their menu. It would be a win-win, both for those selling the beer, and for the breweries making it.” What are YOUR elected officials doing to help you?

PriCELESS … A great debate is taking place in the United Kingdom on how to deal with what seems like a growing amount of alcohol abuse in various forms. Alcohol consumption in France, Germany and Italy is reportedly down by between 37 and 52 per cent since 1980. In the UK it is up nine per cent. nearly 1.2 million people in England needed inpatient hospital treatment for alcohol-related conditions in 2010-11 - a 9 per cent increase on the previous year. Liver disease is reportedly the only major illness that is on the increase in Britain. The quick fix crowd has latched onto the idea that low prices, especially in supermarkets, are the key culprit. They want “minimum pricing” policies to significantly reduce low cost promotions. However, Health Secretary Andrew Lansley does not think it is that simple. Lansley notes that while alcohol pricing is fairly uniform, rates of alcohol problems vary widely from place to place in the country. The Health Secretary says there are “big problems” with the minimum pricing idea, which would penalize the

poor, conflict with European Union competition laws, and do little to tackle dangerous drinking. Lansley is expected to soon unveil a new comprehensive strategy. The strategy is expected to feature Mr Lansley’s concept of community alcohol partnerships, where police, retailers and regulators unite to crackdown on underage drinking and alcohol-fuelled antisocial behavior. This sounds a lot like ideas pioneered in the U.S. by the Responsible Hospitality Institute, which has forged industry/ activist/government partnerships in several U.S. cities. It will be an interesting drama to watch overseas, with real implications for our own society.

on tHE BaLL

associated with home packaging of foods and beverages, including moonshine, ubiquitous Ball Mason jars are moving up-market – sort of. Carson Home Accents’ Rednek Wine Glass -- a Ball Mason jar glued to a Libbey candlestick holder -- is an instant hit. In less than a year, the product has had $5 million in sales. “One of our salespeople saw this item on a shelf at a Hallmark store,” said John Hill, vice president of Carson Home Accents. The company subsequently met the original inventor of the product, Okie Morris, 43, and signed a licensing deal with her. Morris, who lives in newport news, Va., was in a thrift store last year when she spotted an old Mason jar in one room and a Libbey candlestick holder in another. “It just hit me to put these two items together and call it a redneck wine glass,” she said. “We didn’t know how big this thing would turn out,” said Hill. “When we realized in the summer that we were shipping 100,000 glasses a month, we hired 20 more people to handle the

More frequently

production. That’s a 40% jump in our employment.” The Rednek Wine Glass is no.1 on the bestsellers list for glassware and drinkware items on Amazon as we prepare this column. HErE CoMES rELiEf - aGain There is new help for hangover sufferers arriving just in time to help over-

a-12 Hawaii Beverage guide february 2012

imbibing revelers ring in the new Year. The Hangover Recovery Shot has officially been made available at around 3,000 7-Eleven stores in the US as well as a large number of GnC nutritional supplement stores say representatives of the product’s manufacturer, Hangover Joe’s Get Up & Go. The product is a “scientifically formulated” 2oz shot that combines caffeine, select amino acids, antioxidants, B vitamins and herbs specially engineered for hangover relief results. Hangover Joe’s Get Up & Go has a licensing agreement with Warner Bros Consumer Products to manufacture and distribute The Hangover Recovery Shot. The product packaging features characters from the hit movies “The Hangover” and “The Hangover Part 2”. These guys should know, right? Check it out: http://www.hangoverjoes.com/.

ExPortS BooMinG … Better grab some California wine while you can – the folks overseas are buying at a record rate topping $1 billion in 2011 for just the third time ever. Industry sources are reporting gains on the order of 25% annually for the past two years. Many think exports will hit $2 billion by 2020 or before. More than one- third of California’s wine exports by value are sent to the 27 member states of the European Union, but despite the debt crisis engulfing the euro zone and the recent sales decline in the crucial UK market, the weak dollar is helping to maintain producers’ competitive edge. Meanwhile, exports to China have surged up 35% in the year to date and now account for about 5% of all exports. And shipments to Canada have built on strong growth during 2010, bringing in about $300m of revenue in the year to date, substantially up on last year’s 12-month total of just over $240m.

Duncan H. Cameron has been writing for and about the spirits industry since 1971. Send questions or comments to 4211 Oakhill Road, Fredericksburg, VA 22408.

SUNDAY

MONDAY

TUESDAY

WEDNESDAY THURSDAY

FRIDAY

SATURDAY



A Calendar of Promotable Events for Your On- or Off-Premise Business.

HEAT UP FEBRUARY!

Between the Super Bowl, Grammy Awards and Oscars, this will be a month of High Fives and (in many places),

low temps. Regardless of the weather winter is delivering this year, you can cook

up some exciting promotions for

 

February that will make you and your customers

   

forget the thermometer! At a time of year when your competitors

   

and their customers may be in hibernation, you can grab new business by offering fun times and warm hospital-

ity. The economy looks like it is recovering and

Americans are ready to have some fun - if the price is right. Put

your heart into a strong Valentine’s Day promotion - maybe start

a week early to help those without a “Valentine”

find one! But don’t limit yourself and your customers to the “regular” occasions.

Here is a list loaded with special

interest promo or trivia contest possibilities. Remember - February is American Heart Month - and research is

             
 

continuing to show that moderate drinking (not just red wine) may actually be good for your heart! It is also Afro-American History Month, National Cherry and National Bird Feeding

 

Freedom

1

2

Groundhog Day, 1892-W. Painter invents bottle cap, *1905-Ayn Rand, *1947- Farrah Fawcett,

1844-saxophone

3

Independ.

4

Day, *1968-Lisa

1st played in public, 1870-15th Amend.,

Day (Sri Lanka), *1913-Rosa Parks, *1947-Dan Quayle, *1962-Clint Black, *1948- (Mr.) Alice Cooper, *1973-Oscar de la Hoya.

Marie Presley,

*1901- Clark Gable, *1937-Don Everly, *1931-Boris Yeltsin, *1944-Sen. Michael

*1894-Norman

Rockwell, *1940-

Month. So feed

a cherry to some bird!

 

Fran Tarkenton,

*1953-Christie

*1956-Nathan Lane.

B.

Enzi (R-WY).

Brinkley, *1937-Tom

 

Smothers.

 

Super Bowl 46,

5

1952- Elizabeth

6

Full Moon,

7

1910-Boy

8

1964-Beatles

9

1863-Fire

10

600 BC-1st

11

*1934-Hank

II

“Queened”,

1827-1st

Scouts of Am.

hit U.S. TV, *1773-William H. Harrison, (9th Pres., 3/4-4/4, 1841), *1914-Gypsy Rose Lee & Ernest Tubb,

extinguisher

Emperor of Japan, *1847 -Thomas A. Edison, *1922-Leslie Nielsen, *1962-Sheryl Crow,

Aaron, *1962-

*1895-G. H. (“Babe”) Ruth, *1911-Ronald Reagan (40th Pres., 1981- 1989), *1919- Zsa Zsa Gabor, .*1950-Natalie Cole.

U.S. ballet, *1883- James Hubert “Eubie” Blake, *1962-Garth Brooks, *1966-Chris Rock, *1804-John Deere , *1978-Ashton Kutcher.

formed,*1828-Jules

patented,

Jennifer Jason

Verne, *1931-James

*1893-Jimmy

Leigh, *1942-Roger

Dean, *1940-Ted

 

Durante,

Stauback, *1969-

Koppel, *1920-Lana

*1939-Roberta

Bobby Brown.

Turner, *1955-John

Flack, *1930-Robert

*1969-Jennifer

Grisham.

 

*1977-Shakira.

Wagner, *1955-Greg

Aniston.

   

Norman.

Grammy

12

1937-”Prince

13

Valentine’s

14

Lupercalia-

15

*1957-LeVar

16

*1936 Jim

17

*1920-Jack

18

Awards tonight,

Valiant” comic

Day, 1859- Oregon is 33rd state, 1912-Arizona is 48th state, *1894 -Jack

(Roman fertility

Burton, *1959- John McEnroe, Jr. &

Brown (football),

Palance, *1933- Yoko Ono, *1955- John Travolta, *1957-Vanna White, *1964-Matt Dillon.

*1809-Abraham

1st run, *1950-Peter Gabriel, *1944- Stockard Channing

festival), Susan

*1963-Michael

Lincoln, (16th Pres., 1861 -1865),

B.

Anthony Day,

Ice T.

Jordan, *1925-

*1564-Galileo

 

Hal Holbrook,

*1980-Christina

&

Jerry Springer,

Benny, *1948-Teller

Galilei, *1812 -Charles L. Tiffany

*1954-Rene Russo,

Ricci, *1955-Arsenio

*1923-Chuck Yeager,

(of Penn &

).

*1981-Paris Hilton.

 

Hall.

*1933-Kim Novak.

   

(jeweler), *1951-Jane

 

Seymour.

 

1878-Edison

19

President’s

20

1885-Wash.

21

1900-

22

1945-Marines

23

1857-Los

24

*1873 Enrico

25

patents phono-

Day, 1962-John

Monument,1972-

Hawaii joins US,

raise U.S. flag on Iwo Jima, *1939-Peter Fonda,

Angeles Vineyard Soc. organized, Flag Day (Mexico),

Caruso, *1913- Jim Backus (Mr. Magoo), *1966-Tea Leoni, *1943- George Harrison & Sally Jessy Raphael.

graph, *1924-

Glenn orbits,

Nixon in China, *1927 -Erma Bombeck,

*1732-George

Lee Marvin,

*1963-Charles

Washington (1st

*1940-Smokey

Barkley, *1954-Patty

*1955-Kelsey

 

Pres.-1789-1796),

*1685-George

*1874-Honus

Robinson,

Hearst, *1927-Sidney

Grammer, *1979- Jennifer Love Hewitt,

*1932-Former Sen. Ted Kennedy (D- MA), *1950-Julius

Frederick Handel.

Wagner, *1942-Sen.

*1960-Prince

Poitier, *1924-Gloria

Joseph Lieberman

Andrew, *1963-Seal.

Vanderbilt, *1966-

 

*1986-Charlotte

 

(?-CT), *1955-Steve

 

Cindy Crawford.

Church.

Erving.

 

Jobs.

Academy

26

Independ.

27

1854-Repub.

28

Bachelors

29

     

Awards, *1916 Jackie Gleason, *1846-William F. (Buffalo Bill) Cody, *1932-Johnny Cash, *1928-Fats Domino, *1829-Levi Strauss, *1920-Tony Randall.

Day (Dominican

Party formed,

Day, 1929- Grand Teton National Park established.

Rep.), 1991-Kuwait

*1915-Zero Mostel,

liberated, *1932-

 

*1930-Gavin

Elizabeth Taylor,

MacLeod, *1940-

   

*1934-Ralph Nader,

Mario Andretti,

*1953-Michael

 

*1944-Bernadette

Bolton.

Peters.

SUNDAY

 

MONDAY

TUESDAY

WEDNESDAY THURSDAY

FRIDAY

SATURDAY

february 2012 Hawaii Beverage guide a-13

nEwSFRonT

Corporate

sKyy sPirits changes naMe to caMPari aMerica

Skyy Spirits, the wholly owned subsid- iary of Davide Campari-Milani S.p.A. has changed its public identity in the U.S., Canada and Puerto Rico to Cam- pari America. This change aligns the company more closely with its Milan- headquartered parent corporation and its affiliates, collectively known as Gruppo Campari. Rare Breed Distill- ing, the makers of Wild Turkey whiskies in Lawrenceburg, KY, has also changed its public identity to Campari America. The production facility remains the Wild Turkey Distillery.

snow queen vodKa aPPoints caliBre Brands as u.s./ny distriButor

Snow Queen Vo dka, organic vodka produced in Kazakhstan, is now distributed by Calibre Brands LLC. The brand has achieved a celebrity following, gracing the shelves of international luxury venues. Calibre Brands LLC has been established in the heart of Manhattan to distribute Snow Queen. Initially, the company is working with a small number of premium accounts to replicate a method of support that proved successful for Snow Queen Vod- ka in Europe. The company is headed by Nick Spencer, who relocated from London to build sales in New York and expand availability across the U.S.

w.J. deutsch & sons naMed iMPorter For licor 43

W.J. Deutsch & Sons and Diego Zamora SA have extended their relationship. As of March 1 st , Deutsch will be the exclu- sive U.S. importer for Licor 43 and will be responsible for all sales and market- ing activities in America. Licor 43 is a liqueur produced in Caragena, located in southeastern Spain; the spirit draws

its name from the 43 Mediterranean herbs and fruits used to create it. The exact formula, derived from a thousand- year-old recipe, is known only by three members of the Zamora family.

WIne

yao FaMily wines deButs with 2009 vintage

Retired NBA star Yao Ming has established a new Napa Valley wine company: Yao Family Wines. The company’s inaugu- ral wine has just been released in the U.S., after a late 2011 release in China. The first wine is a 2009 Napa Valley Cabernet Sauvignon. Yao Family Wines sources the grapes for its Cab- ernet Sauvignon from estab- lished Napa Valley Vineyards. The label, designed by Chuck House, features a hand-drawn illustra- tion of Napa with the Chinese character for “Yao,” representing both cultures Yao Ming is a part of.

chaMPagne lanson arrives in aMerica

After a quiet introduction to the U.S. market, French Champagne house Lan- son is gearing up to make a splash with their Champagnes this year. Lanson was founded in 1760, making it one of the oldest Champagne houses. Long a top- seller in the UK and around the world, Lanson is now available in America. Lan- son offers two main varieties for the U.S. market: Lanson Black Label Brut, made predominantly from Pinot Noir and Lan- son Brut Rosé, a delicately balanced wine, both priced from $49-59 per bottle.

new yorK wine & graPe launches new caMPaign

The New York Wine & Grape Founda- tion, which represents the state’s winer- ies, has launched a campaign entitled “New York Drinks New York.” The campaign is centered on New York City,

New York.” The campaign is centered on New York City, a-14 Hawaii Beverage guide february 2012

a-14 Hawaii Beverage guide february 2012

and is a multi-faceted program for wine trade, media and consumers intended to set the stage for a long-term effort to raise awareness of the quality of New York State wines. The program includes “cellar visits” by NYC media and trade to the Hudson River Region, the Fin- ger Lakes and Long Island, a multi-day market visit to NYC by 38 participating wineries and in-store tastings at city re- tailers. Additionally, the foundation has launched an advertising campaign and a dedicated website, nydrinksny.com.

spIrIts

suPerstar Fergie Partners with voli light vodKa

Voli has announced that Grammy-win- ning artist Fergie is now a partner and owner. She will work with Voli Light Vodkas to promote the brand as a low calorie alternative for the fitness-minded cocktail consumer. “It has always been our goal to align with a vibrant, fun and sexy female such as Fergie,” said Adam Kamenstein, CEO of Voli Light Vodkas. Rapper Pitbull is also a partner and own- er in the brand. 2011sales volume grew 1000% over 2010.

own- er in the brand. 2011sales volume grew 1000% over 2010. KahlÚa sParKs connections with delicioso

KahlÚa sParKs connections with delicioso Brunch cluB

Kahlúa has turned the heat up on brunch with the launch of the Deli- cioso Brunch Club, an online resource designed to inspire connections. The free-to-use application features décor tips, cocktail suggestions and brunch recipes from Food Network chef and cookbook author Marcela Valladolid. Consumers are encouraged to join the

Directory

THE ESTATES GROUP

 

SOUTHERN WINE & SPIRITS of HI 1544 Haleukana St., Bay #12, Lihue (808) 245-2999 (Fx) 245-3327

JMD BEVERAGES Warehouse

 

A

DIVISION OF YOUNG'S MARKET COMPANY

771

Eha St. #21, Wailuku

(808) 242-1120

94-501 Kau St., Waipahu,

676-6190

 

(Fx) 244-5436

 

(Fx) 676-6224

JOHNSON BROS. of HI

JAPAN FOODS (HI) LTD.

 

HAWAII WHOLESALERS

31

So. Wakea Ave. , Kahului

871-4842

 

887

N. Nimitz Hwy

537-9528

(Fx) 877-2797

 

(Fx) 526-0389

AMERICAN WINE & SPIRITS of HI

 

JMD BEVERAGES 99-1265 Halawa Valley St Aiea 487-9985 (Fx) 487-8011) JOHNSON BROTHERS of HI

 

882-1841

PARADISE BEVERAGES

 

P.O. Box 44635, Kamuela

(Fx)

1-808-882-1401

21

La'a St., Kahului

244-3144

ANHEUSER-BUSCH SALES OF HI

SANDWICH ISLES CELLARS

1011 Munu St., OrderDesk

487-5355

, 75-5563 Kauhola St

16-211 Wiliama St

Keaau, 96749

966-7474

400

Hookahi Street, Suite B-102, Wailuku

487-0008

,

Kailua-Kona.329-9515

Customer Assistance

249-0095

 

(Fx) 485-2626

(Fx) (888) 249-0599

KOTAKE SHOKAI

 

YOUNG'S MARKET COMPANY of HI 73-4854 Kanalani St., Kailua-Kona.326-2768 (Fx) 329-9421

 

1812

Kalani

847-3926

SOUTHERN WINE & SPIRITS of HI

 

231

Lalo Pl., Kahului

871-8406

NISHIMOTO TRADING CO. LTD-HI

 

(Fx) 871-9112

331

Libby

832-7555

COASTAL WINE & SPIRITS of HI

 

TANIKAI INC.

(Fx) 841-3853

61-3785 Maluokalani #12, Kawaihae

882-1841

787

Alua St.,

242-6831

PARADISE BEVERAGES

P.O. Box 44635, Kamuela

(Fx) 1-808-882-1401

 

(Fx) 244-0794

94-1450 Moaniani St.,Waipahu OrderDesk

678-4000

678-4100

THE ESTATES GROUP

 

DEPARTMENT OF LIQUOR CONTROL

 

A

DIVISION OF YOUNG'S MARKET COMPANY

 

SANDWICH ISLES CELLARS Customer Assistance

 

73-4854 Kanalani St., Kailua-Kona 326-2768 (Fx) 329-9421

CITY & COUNTY OF

768-7355

(808) 216-4520

711

Kapiolani Blvd. #600

(Fx) 591-2700

JOHNSON BROS. of HI, INC.

website: www.honolulu.gov/liq

SOUTHERN WINE & SPIRITS of HI

Kawaihae Industrial Cntr., Bldg. # B, Bay 7

882-1026

155

Kapalulu Pl., Suite 300

591-8825

Kawaihae 96743

(Fx)

882-1420

COUNTY OF HAWAII East Hawaii West

 

OrderDesk

(888)

866-9463

961-8218

(Fx) 591-9121

PARADISE BEVERAGES

 

327-3549

 

452

Kalanianaole Ave., Hilo

935-1168

101

Aupuni St. #230, Hilo

(Fx) 961-8684

KAUAI WHOLESALERS

 

73-5581 Olowalu,

 

329-2242

website: www.hawaii-county.com/directory/ dir_liquor.htm

 

AMERICAN WINE & SPIRITS of HI

SOUTHERN WINE & SPIRITS of HI

1544

Haleukana St., Bay #12, Lihue

245-2999

61-3785 Maluokalani #12, Kawaihae. 882-1841

COUNTY OF 2145 Kaohu St., #105 Wailuku website: www.co.maui.hi.us/ departments/Liquor

(Fx)

243-7753

(Fx) 245-3327 ANHEUSER-BUSCH SALES of HI

P.O. Box 44635, Kamuela

(Fx) (808) 882-140

243-7558

2955

Waapa Rd.

245-3263

MAUI WHOLESALERS

YOUNG'S MARKET COMPANY of HI

AMERICAN WINE & SPIRITS of HI

COUNTY OF KAUAI

241-6580

3071

Aukele St,

245-4734

231

Lalo Pl.,

871-8406

4444 Rice St. Ste 120, Lihue . (Fx) 241-6585

 

(Fx) 245-1748

(Fx) 871-9112

website: www.kauai.hawaii.gov

COASTAL WINE & SPIRITS of HI

ANHEUSER-BUSCH SALES of HI

(click on “Departments”, then click on “Liquor Control”)

 

1544

Haleukana St.,Bay #12,Lihue . 245-2999