Vous êtes sur la page 1sur 38

New Era University College of Business Administration Bachelor of Science in Accountancy

MINI-MARKETING PLAN

SUBMITTED BY:
Reginfel Dianne Nasol Vanessa Olleres Rofel Padilla Magic Earvin Rodriguez Jeraldine Rosales Herzavet Rosanes Rheman Rosas Irish Mae Salazar Christine Joy Suyom Ma. Cecilia P. Tagay Venice Vicente 2BSA2 (MW 1:00-2:30PM)

CHAPTER 1 Background and History of the Company


History of the Company
Unilever is a BritishDutch multinational fast-moving consumer goods company. Its products include foods, beverages, cleaning agents and personal care products. It is the world's third-largest consumer goods company measured by revenues and the world's largest maker of ice cream. The company started in the 1890s, William Hesketh Lever, founder of Lever Bros, wrote down his ideas for Sunlight Soap his revolutionary new product that helped popularize cleanliness and hygiene in Victorian England. It was 'to make cleanliness commonplace; to lessen work for women; to foster health and contribute to personal attractiveness, that life may be more enjoyable and rewarding for the people who use our products'. This was long before the phrase 'Corporate Mission' had been invented, but these ideas have stayed at the heart of our business. In a history that now crosses three centuries, Unilever's success has been influenced by the major events of the day economic boom, depression, world wars, changing consumer lifestyles and advances in technology. And throughout we've created products that help people get more out of life cutting the time spent on household chores, improving nutrition, enabling people to enjoy food and take care of their homes, their clothes and themselves. In the late 19th century the businesses that would later become Unilever were among the most philanthropic of their time. They set up projects to improve the lot of their workers and created products with a positive social impact, making hygiene and personal care commonplace and improving nutrition through adding vitamins to foods that were already daily staples. Today, Unilever still believes that success means acting with 'the highest standards of corporate behavior towards our employees, consumers and the societies and world in which we live'. Over the years we've launched or participated in an ever-growing range of initiatives to source sustainable supplies of raw materials, protect environments, support local communities and much more. At the beginning of the 21st century, our Path to Growth strategy focused us on global high-potential brands and our Vitality mission has taken us into a new phase of development. More than ever, our brands are helping people 'feel good, look good and get more out of life' a sentiment close to Lord Leverhulme's heart over a hundred years ago. Building on this heritage, our priorities now are inspiring people to take small everyday actions that can add up to a big difference for the world from laundry brands that help minimize wasted water and packaging to nutritious, easily prepared and affordable meals and snacks.

History in the Philippines


Unilever Philippines, Inc. was established in the year 1927. Known until a few years ago as Philippine Refining Company (PRC), Unilever Philippines started as an oil milling business which at its peak produced nearly 100,000 tons of coconut oil annually. The company has been a leader in introducing new technologies into the country since the early days of its existence - margarine production in the 1930's, non-soap detergents, shampoos and toothpaste in the 1960's and 1970's and state of the art sulphonation technology and cogeneration power plant in the 1980's. The nineties has seen the company focusing on several improvements in the Environment front one of which was the introduction of the first 100% biodegradable detergent bar in the Philippines.

Timeline
Although Unilever wasn't formed until 1930, the companies that joined forces to create the business we know today were already well established before the start of the 20th century.

19th Century

1900's

Unilever's founding companies produced products made of oils and fats, principally soap and margarine. At the beginning of the 20th century their expansion nearly outstrips the supply of raw materials.

1910's

Tough economic conditions and the First World War make trading difficult for everyone, so many businesses form trade associations to protect their shared interests.

1920's

With businesses expanding fast, companies set up negotiations intending to stop others producing the same types of products. But instead they agree to merge - and so Unilever is created.

1930's

Unilever's first decade is no easy ride: it starts with the Great Depression and ends with the Second World War. But while the business rationalises operations, it also continues to diversify.

1940's

Unilever's operations around the world begin to fragment, but the business continues to expand further into the foods market and increase investment in research and development.

1950's

Business booms as new technology and the European Economic Community lead to rising standards of living in the West, while new markets open up in emerging economies around the globe.

1960's

As the world economy expands, so does Unilever and it sets about developing new products, entering new markets and running a highly ambitious acquisition programme.

1970's

Hard economic conditions and high inflation make the 70s a tough time for everyone, but things are particularly difficult in the fast-moving consumer goods (FMCG) sector as the big retailers start to flex their muscles.

1980's

Unilever is now one of the world's biggest companies, but takes the decision to focus its portfolio, and rationalise its businesses to focus on core products and brands.

1990's

The business expands into Central and Eastern Europe and further sharpens its focus on fewer product categories, leading to the sale or withdrawal of two-thirds of its brands.

21st Century

The decade starts with the launch of Path to Growth, a five-year strategic plan, and in 2004 further sharpens its focus on the needs of 21st century consumers with its Vitality mission. In 2009, Unilever announces its new corporate vision working to create a better future every day with brands that help people look good, feel good and get more out of life.

Logo
Obviously the big blue U of our logo stands for Unilever. But look a little closer and youll see there is much more to it. Our logo was designed to include 24 icons, each of which represents something important to Unilever. From a lock of hair symbolizing our shampoo brands to a spoon, an ice cream, a jar, a tea leaf, a hand and much more, the little icons all have a meaning.

Sun Our primary natural resource, the sun evokes Unilever's origins in Port Sunlight and can represent a number of our brands. Flora, SlimFast and Omo all use radiance to communicate their benefits. Hand A symbol of sensitivity, care and need. It represents both skin and touch. Flower Represents fragrance. When seen with the hand, it represents moisturizers or cream. Bee Represents creation, pollination, hard work and bio-diversity. Bees symbolize both environmental challenges and opportunities. DNA The double helix, the genetic blueprint of life and a symbol of bio-science. It is the key to a healthy life. The sun is the biggest ingredient of life, and DNA the smallest. Hair A symbol of beauty and looking good. Placed next to the flower it evokes cleanliness and fragrance; placed near the hand it suggests softness.

Palm tree A nurtured resource. It produces palm oil as well as many fruits coconuts and dates and also symbolizes paradise. Sauces or spreads Represents mixing or stirring. It suggests blending in flavors and adding taste. Bowl A bowl of delicious-smelling food. It can also represent a ready meal, hot drink or soup. Spoon A symbol of nutrition, tasting and cooking. Spice & flavours Represents chilli or fresh ingredients. Fish Represents food, sea or fresh water. Sparkle Clean, healthy and sparkling with energy. Bird A symbol of freedom. It suggests a relief from daily chores, and getting more out of life. Tea A plant or an extract of a plant, such as tea. Also a symbol of growing and farming. Lips Represent beauty, looking good and taste. Ice cream A treat, pleasure and enjoyment.

Recycle Part of our commitment to sustainability. Particles A reference to science, bubbles and fizz. Frozen The plant is a symbol of freshness, the snowflake represents freezing. A transformational symbol.

Container Symbolises packaging - a pot of cream associated with personal care. Heart A symbol of love, care and health.

Clothes Represent fresh laundry and looking good. Wave Symbolises cleanliness, freshness and vigour. Liquid A reference to clean water and purity.

Mission
As a multi-local multinational we aim to play our part in addressing global environmental and social concerns through local actions and in partnership with local governments and organizations.

Vision
Every day, our products touch the lives of over 160 million people whether that's through feeling great because they've got shiny hair and a brilliant smile, keeping their homes fresh and clean, or by enjoying a great cup of tea, satisfying meal or healthy snack. 1. A clear direction The four pillars of our vision set out the long term direction for the company where we want to go and how we are going to get there:

We work to create a better future every day We help people feel good, look good and get more out of life with brands and services that are good for them and good for others. We will inspire people to take small everyday actions that can add up to a big difference for the world. We will develop new ways of doing business that will allow us to double the size of our company while reducing our environmental impact.

2. Small actions, big difference Weve always believed in the power of our brands to improve the quality of peoples lives and in doing the right thing. But today, with the scale of the challenges the world faces, its easy to believe that our individual actions are too small to make a difference. 3. A better future for the planet As our business grows, so do our responsibilities. We recognize that global challenges such as climate change concern us all. Considering the wider impact of our actions is embedded in our values and is a fundamental part of who we are.

Objectives
Were constantly learning more about the links between food and well-being it helps us create more foods that make a positive contribution to health. 1. Adding vitality to the Filipino child With Unilevers strong re-entry to the foods business in Asia, an opportunity was presented to expand our CSR efforts, focusing this time on undernourished children. As a direct consequence of poverty, a considerable number of Filipino children are malnourished or undernourished. This condition in the early years of children hinder

proper body and mental development, directly affecting the mental and physical capacity of the general citizenry in the long term. 2. Sustainable supplemental feeding Under this program we aim to establish a sustainable supplemental feeding and livelihood program in selected communities. Together with partner organisations such as Kabisig ng Kalahi, Mead Johnson, and various local government units, the program provides a venue for employees to share their time, knowledge, and talents with the people in these chosen communities usually in areas where we operate. 3. Increase parenting skills Pasiglahin aims to normalize the nutritional levels of children within a span of six months by providing 1 hot nutritious meal a day and by increasing the awareness and skills of their parents. Each project module feeds 30 of the most undernourished children from 0 to 6 years old from selected communities close to where Unilever operates. 4. Science & technology From small improvements to big ideas, innovation enables us to meet people's needs and aspirations in ways that engage and appeal.

Board of Directors Executive Directors


The Executive directors are those members of the Unilever executive (UEX), including the group chief executive, who are also directors of Unilever. Paul Polman Chief Executive Officer Paul Polman, Chief Executive Officer, was appointed an Executive Director to the Boards of Unilever PLC and Unilever NV in October 2008, the first time an external candidate was chosen for the role.

Jean-Marc Huet - Chief Financial Officer Jean-Marc Hut joined Unilever in February 2010 as Chief Financial Officer.

Non-Executive Directors
The non-executive directors are the independent element in Unilever's governance. Michael Treschow Chairman Unilever N.V. and PLC Michael has had a distinguished career with a range of multinational companies in both Executive and Non-Executive roles. He has been awarded prestigious honours by Sweden, Spain and France in recognition of his contribution to trade relations. Louise Fresco Louise Fresco is an agricultural scientist and a Professor of International Development and Sustainability at the University of Amsterdam.

Ann Fudge An MBA graduate of Harvard University, Ann M. Fudge is an honorary director of Catalyst, a director of The Rockefeller Foundation and is on the board of overseers of Harvard University. Charles Golden An MBA graduate of Lehigh University in Pennsylvania, Charles Golden subsequently distinguished himself in two industries: automotive and pharmaceutical. Dr Byron Grote Byron Grote has a PhD in Quantitative Analysis from Cornell University. After holding various executive posts within BP, he was appointed as a Managing Director in 2000 and became Chief Financial Officer in 2002. Sunil Bharti Mittal Sunil Bharti Mittal is an entrepreneur who founded the Indian group, Bharti Enterprises. Its telecoms company, Bharti Airtel, has operations in 19 countries in Asia and Africa, with over 223 million customers. Hixonia Nyasulu A former Unilever marketing employee, Hixonia Nyasulu now chairs the Board of Sasol Ltd and serves on the JPMorgan SA Advisory Board.

The Rt Hon Sir Malcolm Rifkind, MP Sir Malcolm Rifkind has been a Member of the UK Parliament since 1974 and served as a minister under Conservative governments over an 18-year period, eventually becoming Foreign Secretary. He is also a qualified barrister and Queens Counsel. Kees Storm Kees Storms financial career saw him rise to become Chairman at AEGON in 1993 a position which he held with great distinction until 2002. He now serves on supervisory Boards at KLM, PON Holdings, AEGON, Baxter and InBev, as well as at Unilever. Paul Walsh Paul Walsh was appointed Chief Executive Officer of Diageo in 2000. Recognising his success in building Diageo into a world renowned company, Paul received the Decade of Excellence Award at the UK National Business Awards in 2008.

UNILEVER Leadership Executive (ULE)


The Unilever Leadership Executive (ULE) is responsible for managing profit and loss, and delivering growth across our regions, categories and functions. Paul Polman Chief Executive Officer Paul Polman, Chief Executive Officer, was appointed an Executive Director to the Boards of Unilever PLC and Unilever NV in October 2008, the first time an external candidate was chosen for the role. Douglas Anderson Baillie Chief HR Officer Douglas Baillie is a British national, born (1955) and educated in Zimbabwe. Doug graduated from the University of Natal with majors in Business Finance, Marketing and Business Administration and joined Unilever South Africa in 1978.

Professor Genevive Berger Chief Research & Development Officer Genevive Berger was educated in physics and medicine, and holds three doctorates: a PhD in Physics, a PhD in Human Biology and a Medical Doctorate. Kevin Havelock President, Refreshment Kevin Havelock was appointed President of Unilevers Refreshment category, which comprises our ice cream and drinks brands, in September 2011. Previously, he was Executive Vice President for Unilevers global Ice Cream businesses.

Jean-Marc Hut - Chief Financial Officer Jean-Marc Hut joined Unilever in February 2010 as Chief Financial Officer.

Alan Jope President, North Asia Alan Jope was appointed President of Unilevers businesses across North Asia in September 2011. The region includes China, Hong Kong, Taiwan, Japan and Korea.

Dave Lewis - President, Personal Care Dave Lewis has had a long career at Unilever, starting in 1987 and moving through different roles in home and personal care in Europe, South America and Asia. Harish Manwani Chief Operating Officer Harish Manwani is an honours graduate from Mumbai University and has a master's degree in management studies. He also attended the Advanced Management Program at the Harvard Business School.

Antoine de Saint-Affrique President, Food Antoine de Saint-Affrique was appointed President of Unilevers Food category in September 2011. He has worked in roles across Unilever since 2000, most recently as Executive Vice President for Unilevers world-leading skincare brands. Pier Luigi Sigismondi - Chief Supply Chain Officer Pier Luigi Sigismondi was appointed Chief Supply Chain Officer and a member of the Unilever Executive in September 2009. An Italian national, he holds a Masters in Industrial & Systems Engineering from the Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, Georgia. Keith Weed - Chief Marketing and Communication Officer Keith Weed began his career with Michelin and joined Unilever in 1983, moving on to senior positions in France and the USA and global roles. He holds a first-class degree in engineering from the University of Liverpool. Jan Zijderveld - President, Europe Jan Zijderveld joined Unilever in 1987, moving through a variety of roles in Australasia, Europe, the Middle East and Asia.

Senior Corporate Officers


Unilever's senior corporate officers are responsible for ensuring that Board meetings and Board committee meetings are supplied with the information they need.

Tonia Lovell - Chief Legal Officer & Group Secretary Tonia Lovell has a degree in law from Sidney Sussex College, Cambridge and was admitted as a solicitor and a member of the Law Society in November 1993.

Akhter Mateen Chief Auditor Akhter Mateen has an MBA in Finance from the Institute of Business Administration Karachi. Akhter was born in Pakistan in 1962.

Charles Nichols - Group Controller Charles Nichols was born in the UK in 1961. He has a degree in chemistry from Jesus College, Oxford and is a fellow of the Chartered Association of Certified Accountants.

Branches Unilevers Laboratory Branches


Our strategic research and development laboratories are located in Netherlands, the US, China and India. Bangalore, India The Bangalore R&D centre contributes to brands including Lifebuoy, Pureit, Ponds, Fair and Lovely, Radiant, Omo, Brooke Bond, Lipton, Walls and Knorr. Unilever's recent initiative on water purification was also driven out of this laboratory. the UK, the

Colworth, UK The Colworth lab is part of an innovation eco-system where Unilever R&D,

entrepreneurs and academics (the site is near Oxford and Cambridge universities) can network and collaborate.

Port Sunlight, UK Port Sunlight is one of Unilevers largest centres for research and development, creating new and improved products for global markets.

Shanghai, China Our Shanghai research centre focuses on global research and development for brands including Amora, Clear, Domestos, Dove, Hellmanns, Knorr, Lipton, Lux, Magnum, OMO, Ponds and Rexona.

Trumbull, North America Trumbull R&D centre supports over a dozen brands across Unilevers Skin, Hair and Deodorants categories including Ponds, Lux, Dove, Axe, Vaseline, Fair & Lovely, Lifebuoy, Suave, Q-Tips, Degree, Sunsilk, Caress, Lever 2000 and TIGI.

Vlaardingen, the Netherlands Vlaardingen R&D is the global development centre for our spreads and dressings brands, and the regional development centre for laundry, skincare, haircare and machine dishwashing products.

Facilities and Factory Layouts

About 150 million times a day someone somewhere chooses a Unilever product. Unilever's food products range includes the Knorr brand, Bertolli pasta sauces and dressings, Walls and Ben & Jerry's ice creams and Lipton and Brooke Bond teas, while its cleaning products include brands such as Cif, Comfort, Domestos and Persil. What is unusual in such a fast changing and market sensitive business, is that Unilever is still located in its original HQ built in the 1930's when the company was formed. Over the past 70 years, the building at 100 Embankment has become a Thames-side landmark on the north end of Blackfriars Bridge. Home to Unilever's global HQ, '100VE'- as it is now called - has undergone a transformation behind its listed faade and art deco entrance to bring the workplace into 21st century. 100VE last had a major refit in the 1970s and since then both workplace design and philosophy -and the company - have moved on. Recognizing that a cellular office environment was unsuitable for a growing global business, Unilever faced the choice of relocating to another site in London or beyond, or undertaking a major refurbishment of the existing building. Unilever chose the latter in part to retain this strong link with its historic home. Floor plates create a central atrium that gives an impressive 'wow' factor on entering but also provides transparency and links between the floors. Glass floored walkways across the space provide ghostly footprints as people walk from one side to the other. ' Transparency' was identified as key objective in developing its new workplace. During the consultation process it was discovered that feeling connected to the business was directly linked to the visibility of those who lead it. To achieve improved 'transparency', senior executives and the boardroom are situated within the workspace on the sixth floor and not tucked away on the top floor as had been the case previously. Elsewhere, the use of natural light and glass has been maximized, and bold branding panels create a vibrant open plan workspace.

CHAPTER 2 Product History


History of Soap
Soap is a cleansing agent created by the chemical reaction of a fatty acid with an alkali metal hydroxide. Chemically speaking, it is a salt composed of an alkali metal, such as sodium or potassium, and a mixture of "fatty" carboxylic acids. The cleansing action of soap comes from its unique ability to surround oil particles, causing them to be dispersed in water and easily rinsed away. Soap has been used for centuries and continues to be widely used as a cleansing agent, mild antiseptic and ingestible antidote to some forms of poisoning. However, it is unknown exactly when soap was discovered. Ancient writings suggest it was known to the Phoenicians as early as around 600 B.C., and was used to some extent by the ancient Romans. During these times, soap was made by boiling tallow (animal fat) or vegetable oils with alkali containing wood ashes. This costly method of production coupled with negative social attitudes toward cleanliness made soap a luxury item affordable only to the rich until the late eighteenth century. Methods of soapmaking improved when two scientific discoveries were made in the late eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries. In 1790, the French chemist Nicholas Leblanc (1742-1806) invented a process for creating caustic soda (sodium hydroxide) from common table salt (sodium chloride). His invention made inexpensive soap manufacture possible by enabling chemists to develop a procedure whereby natural fats and oils can react with caustic soda . The method was further refined when another French chemist, Michel Eugne Chevreul (1786-1889), discovered the nature of fats and oils in 1823. As soap production became less expensive and attitudes toward cleanliness changed, soapmaking became an important industry. Before the end of World War II, soap was manufactured by a "full-boiled" process. This process required mixing fats and oils in large, open kettles, with caustic soda (NaOH) in the presence of steam. With the addition of tons of salt, the soap was made to precipitate out and float to the top. Here, it was skimmed off and made into flakes or bars. This process required large amounts of energy and over six days to complete one batch. After World War II, a continuous process of soap manufacture became popular. In the continuous process of soap manufacture, fats and oils react directly with caustic soda. The saponification reaction is accelerated by being run at high temperatures (248F; 120C) and pressures (2 atm). Glycerin is washed out of the system and soap is obtained after centrifugation and neutralization. This process has several advantages over the "full-boiled" process. It is more energy efficient, time efficient, allows greater control of soap composition and concentration, and the important by-product, glycerin, is readily recovered. Both manufacturing methods yield pure soap. Certain chemicals can be added to this pure soap to improve its physical characteristics. The foam in soap is enhanced by additives such as fatty acids. Glycerin is added to reduce the harshness of soap on the skin. Other additives include fragrances and dyes.

Kinds and Varieties of Soap


While soaps original objective to remove dirt and germs from users skin remains its primary function, in recent years there has been a mini-revolution of sorts, resulting in a plethora of soap choices. The array of soap types, scents and textures all must be considered when it comes to keying into customer preferences. From conventional soaps to foams and powders, cleaning contractors and end users have many options to choose from, including: Conventional soaps Conventional soaps are activated by the action of an alkali on fat or fatty acids. They come in liquid, bar or powder form. These are the soaps that we use mainly to remove dirt from our skin. We use them to wash our hands or when taking a showering. They come in liquid, bar or gel form and they are usually scented. Some soap has moisturizers to prevent having dry skin. Antimicrobial soaps They are formulated to destroy or inhibit the growth of microorganisms. These are popular among hospitals. Antiseptic soaps Antiseptic soaps fight bacterial invaders of the body. An antiseptic hand wash agent has antimicrobial activity and is designed for use on skin to remove bacteria. The most popular form is the hand sanitizers. These usually come in handy when youre out of the house and there is a need for you to wash or clean your hand even without the use of soap and water. Hand sanitizers usually come in small bottle containers so they can conveniently fit your purse. Foam soaps They are infused with air, creating lather for more thorough coverage. Less water is used for lathering, which cuts hand washing time. Beauty soaps Beauty soaps are likely to feature attractive fragrances; they also carry ingredients to address a variety of skin type issues. There are soaps specifically for oily skin types, dry skin types, etc. Still, there are beauty soaps to treat various skin ailments such as acne. Beauty soaps that whiten skin are also very popular. Novelty Soaps Soaps that take the shape of various items, such as a rubber, duck or soap-on the-rope, are termed as novelty soaps. Their purpose is not only cleaning dirt and grime, but also providing amusement and enjoyment. Manufactured especially for kids, such soaps are generally designed a novel manner to allure the kids. Perfumed Soaps With a few additional ingredients and perfumes, manufacturers are out with soaps. Some even give the soaps a new design to fit their varied range of products, but the fact is that these perfumes can be easily attained in the form of colognes and deodorants as well. Furthermore, he basic idea behind using soap is to rise the dirt off. By adding perfumes, the soap counts as a potential source of skin irritation for allergic people.

Guests Soaps Miniature soap that are molded and shaped into attractive shapes are gust soap. These are basically meant for use by the guests either in the main bathroom or separate guest bathroom. Flowers, sea shells and rounds are some popular and commonly used shapes for guest soaps. Medicated Soaps Medicated soaps are also similar to original soaps, the only difference being the addition of antiseptics and disinfectants. While some are highly useful, others simple tag their soaps as medicated for the sake of inducing customer to buy them. It possesses strong bactericidal and anti-inflammatory properties. Their ingredients used to produce such soap include menthol, camphor, carbolic acid, and formalin.

Laundry Soaps Formulated especially to clean grease, solid particles and organic compounds from clothes, laundry soaps are mild disinfectants that are available in liquid, powder and gel forms. They can be used in different conditions and water temperatures. However, they work best in hot or warm water. Kitchen Soaps Kitchen soaps are further categorized into two: cleaners and dish detergents. Cleaners assist in eliminating heavy oil or solid particles and hard-to-remove stains and hence, are prepared with mild abrasives. Dish detergents, on the, other hand, fight against grease and release the solid dirt particles in the foam that is produced by the detergent. Dish detergents are of two types, namely, machine dishwasher and hand dishwashing detergents.

Health Benefits of Soap


Hand washing for hand hygiene is the act of cleaning the hands with or without the use of water or another liquid, or with the use of soap, for the purpose of removing soil, dirt, and/or microorganisms. The Centers for Disease Control says the most important way to prevent the transmission of dangerous diseases is to frequently wash your hands with soap and water and/or use a hand sanitizer. If soap and water are not available it is recommended to use a hand sanitizer that contains at least 60 percent alcohol or contains a "persistent antiseptic" such as SHBAN Alcohol Free Hand Sanitizer with povidone-iodine. It also has high viricidal activity against many different kinds of viruses, including enveloped viruses such as the flu virus, the common cold virus, and HIV, though is notably ineffective against the rabies virus. According to Rotter (1999), soaps are approximately 100 times more effective against viruses than any form of hand washing. The application of water alone is inefficient for cleaning skin because water is often unable to remove fats, oils, and proteins, which are components of organic soil. However, since pathogens removed from the skin have to be rinsed away, there must be a reasonable flow of water. Therefore, removal of microorganisms from skin requires the addition of soaps or detergents to water. Currently most products sold as "soaps" are actually detergents, so that is the substance most used to wash hands. Hot water that is comfortable for washing hands is not hot enough to kill bacteria. Bacteria grow much faster at body temperature (37 degree Celsius). However, warm, soapy water is more effective than cold, soapy water at

removing the natural oils on your hands which hold soils and bacteria. Contrary to popular belief however, scientific studies have shown that using warm water has no effect on reducing the microbial load on hands. Solid soap, because of its reusable nature, may hold bacteria acquired from previous uses. Yet, it is unlikely that any bacteria are transferred to users of the soap, as the bacteria are rinsed off with the foam. This hygienic behavior has been shown to cut the number of child deaths from diarrhea (the second leading cause of child deaths) by almost half and from pneumonia (the leading cause of child deaths) by one-quarter. There are five critical times in washing hands with soap and/or using of a hand antiseptic related to fecal-oral transmission: after using a bathroom (private or public), after changing a diaper, before feeding a child, before eating and before preparing food or handling raw meat, fish, or poultry, or any other situation leading to potential contamination and see below. To reduce the spread of germs, it is also better to wash the hands and/or use a hand antiseptic before and after tending to a sick person. In other words, using soap everyday and including it in our daily routine provides the following health benefits: helps minimize the spread of influenza diarrhea prevention avoiding respiratory infections a preventive measure for infant deaths at their home-birth-deliveries

Brand and Product Chosen

Dove Soap Dove is a personal care brand owned by Unilever. Dove products are manufactured in Argentina, Australia, Brazil, Canada, Germany, India, Ireland, Netherlands, Thailand, Turkey and United States. The products are sold in more than 35 countries and are offered for both women and men. The Dove trademark and brand name is currently owned by Unilever. Dove's logo is a silhouette profile of the brand's namesake bird, the colour of which often varies. We chose the Dove Pink Beauty Cream Bar in this marketing plan to enrich the popularity and market share of the product through making evaluations and suggestions in its marketing make up. We have chosen this variant of the Dove Soap because it is less popular than the all-known Dove White Beauty Bar. Dove care solutions are no doubt is the most widely recognized brands of body care treatment items such as Dove soap currently. Plenty of individuals trust Dove goods to become kind and gentle to their skin colour. Dove items are made in USA, Brazil and Germany. Even though their packaging varies in colour, the all bear the same brand. Dove is widely recognized as nice body care

Dove soap; it also produces numerous personal treatment solutions. Dove solutions, formulated to become pH neutral, contain numerous kinds of synthetic surfactants and vegetable oil based elements that happen to be known for their gentleness about the pores and skin. The firm requires so much pride from the unique moisturizing properties of its attractiveness soaps that they changed the phrase cleaning cream to moisturizer cream. Although it may well be considered a fairly basic procedure, it is truly critical that you should use correctly if you would like to have the most beneficial chance of beating acne. Soap is fixed into our minds from our birth. There is a confusing quantity of diverse forms of soap out there. You will find a host of unique forms of cleansers readily available right now as well. You can find Dove Soap that clean your skin tone as you wash and also the truth is that these soaps usually strip your pores and skin of important oils and dry them out entirely. It is also a best to wash your face far more than once within the morning and before sleeping. It is been advised to wash your face just twice a day with dove soap. Cosmetics and skin tone treatment solutions quantity to over many billion in sales. Mothers wish to keep their babies skin tone irritation and need to control marks. As we get older we need to have items for our skin tone as it gets a lot more dry and sensitive. One of the most typical soap is Dove soap is very best for obtaining up dirt off the skin tone so it might be washed off. This soap gives much more moisture and makes it less irritating for the skin colour. The marketing of soap does really small to inform the customer of how the soap is made and how the elements affect your skin tone. Individuals, it would seem do not have to believe about elements; they merely buy based on simplicity. Instead, they use soaps that contain fragrances and other elements that may cause allergic reactions. When you need to appear and feel your ideal, occasionally you need to have a support from skin colour treatment goods. When it comes towards the finest body care and face care treatment merchandise, you really should know you will find a variety of price ranges and high quality which are obtainable for a customer working with any kind of budget. If you have oily pores and skin, Dove Soap can be a very best pores and skin treatment item to combat this specific appearance includes use of gentle Cleansing Wash, which is soap and oil-free. For normal to combination skin colour, Dove Soap is self-foaming cleanser and treatment of oil, as nicely as removes dead skin colour cells. Oily skin tone consumers really should appear for items which are oil-free, as nicely as non-pore clogging. The Dove Product One of the most popular beauty products Philippines in terms of soaps and body washes is Dove Soap. For years, Dove has been one of the Philippines' top soaps that offer a way to gain smooth and fair looking skin without worrying too much on how old the user is. But have you ever asked where did one of the top beauty products Philippines came from? One thing that all Filipinos know is that Dove Soap came from one of the biggest corporation in the Philippines today, Unilever. So what is Dove? Dove is a personal care brand owned by Unilever. Dove is primarily made from synthetic surfactants, as well as some vegetable oil based soap ingredients, such as sodium palm kernelate. Dove is formulated to be pH neutral, with a pH that is usually between 6.5 and 7.5. The Dove trademark and brand name is currently owned by Unilever. Dove's logo is a silhouette profile of a dove, the color of which often varies. History wrote that Dove has been positioned throughout its history without referring to it as "soap", but as a

"beauty bar" with one-fourth cleansing cream; they stress its moisturizing of skin while washing in contrast to the drying effects of regular soaps (which their advertising calls simply "soap"). Advertisements reinforced the message by showing the cream being poured into the beauty bar. In 1979, the phrase "cleansing cream" was replaced with "moisturizer cream". In 1979, a Pennsylvania dermatologist showed that Dove dried and irritated skin significantly less than ordinary soaps. As a result of this study, Unilever started aggressive marketing and won more than 24% of the market by 2003. Popular Marketing Campaigns In 2006, Philippines witnessed one of Dove's greatest campaign, the Dove Self-Esteem Fund. As one of the best beauty products philippines, Dove purports to be "an agent of change to educate and inspire girls on a wider definition of beauty and to make them feel more confident about themselves". To this end, Dove have created a number of largely online-only short films, including Daughters (which also aired in a 75-second spot during the Super Bowl XL), Evolution (which won two awards at the Cannes Lions International Advertising Festival), Onslaught, and Amy.Visit the website http://www.myayala.com. Marketing campaigns In 2006, Dove started the Dove Self-Esteem Fund. It purports to be "an agent of change to educate and inspire girls on a wider definition of beauty and to make them feel more confident about themselves". To this day, Dove have created a number of largely online-only short films, including Daughters (which also aired in a 75-second spot during the Super Bowl XL), Evolution (which won two awards at the Cannes Lions International Advertising Festival), Onslaught, and Amy.. The Dove Campaign for Real Beauty

The Dove brand is rooted in listening to women. Based on the findings of a major global study, The Real Truth About Beauty: A Global Report, Dove launched the Campaign for Real Beauty in 2004. The campaign started a global conversation about the need for a wider definition of beauty after the study proved the hypothesis that the definition of beauty had become limiting and unattainable. Among the studys findings was the statistic that only 2% of women around the world would describe themselves as beautiful. Since 2004, Dove has employed various communications vehicles to challenge beauty stereotypes and invite women to join a discussion about beauty. In 2010, Dove evolved the campaign and launched an unprecedented effort to make beauty a source of confidence, not anxiety, with the Dove Movement for Self-Esteem. Dove Soap Ingredients

Dove Beauty Products and the Dove soap ingredients can actually improve your skin's appearance. For example, the Dove face products contain five essential nutrients along with vitamins, green tea extract and spring water. Instead of just cleansing and moisturizing, the Dove soap ingredients leave your skin so healthy it glows.

What is Dove soap composed of? The Dove soap ingredients for the "white bar" are: sodium cocoyl isethionate, stearic acid, coconut acid, sodium tallowate, water, sodium isethionate, sodium stearate, cocamidopropyl betaine, sodium cocoate or palm kernelate, fragrance, sodium chloride, tetrasodium EDTA, trisodium etidronate, BHT, titanium dioxide and sodium dodecyl benzene sulfonate. Each of the Dove soap ingredients has its purpose and role to play in providing you with the cleanest, freshest and softest slin possible. Besides Dove and soap products, you can consider experiencing one of Dove's unique shampoos and conditioners that effectively moisturize your hair without weighting it down. Dove Soap Variants Dove White Beauty Bar The key to beautiful skin is: moisture. Now you now why dove created moisturizing cream and put it into a beauty bar.

Dove Fresh Moisture Beauty Bar Dove has combined its hydrating milk with the scent of cucumber and green tea that leaves you with the clean, cool feeling of hydrated skin.

Dove Pink Beauty Cream Bar The key to beautiful skin is: moisture. Now you now why dove created moisturizing cream and put it into a beauty bar. Dove Gentle Exfoliating Beauty Bar Dove beauty bar combines ultra-fine exfoliating beads to clear away the old, dull skin with its moisturizing milk to nurture new, radiant skin Dove Go Fresh Energizing Beauty Bar Invigorating beads that act as a little wake-up calls for your skin. It is the sparkling scent of grapefruit and lemongrass in an ultra-light hydrating formula.

CHAPTER 3 Evaluation and Recommendation of Product


Brand Name Brand name is any name, design, style, words or symbols, singly or in combination that distinguish one product from another in the eyes of the c so es It is seen as a crucial part of ut m r. marketing now. It also considered as the psychological wrapping around the product. Brands are used by people or company to establish their status. In a world of hype and stereotypes, Dove provides a refreshingly real alternative for women who recognize that beauty comes in all shapes and sizes. Dove has grown from a US-only soap bar into one of Unilever's biggest global brands. It is now the world's #1 cleansing brand. During the 1990s, the group began to extend the brand across the complete personal care spectrum, and Dove now encompasses a wide range of products from bar soap to shower gel, and from deodorants to shampoo-conditioners. Dove has attracted widespread media attention since 2004 for its marketing. The series of ads for Dove portraying the "real beauty" of ordinary women. Dove Evolution Campaign can be a very good example of brand evolution when the company use viral advertisment to clarify their brand message so that it is more understandable to the consumers and/or partners. Since the brand was launched in 1957, the Dove advertising message has been a constant: It's not soap. It's a beauty bar. The picture of cream pouring into the bar was the iconic image Dove used in ads for nearly five decades. No longer just a beauty bar, Dove was to be a beauty brand, encompassing products such as body wash, deodorant, hair care and body lotion. Nothing in its heritage had prepared the brand to represent all of these functions. Dove now had to come up with a message that could speak for all its products. And the message is "The Real Truth About Beauty" as you can see from the commercials. To help the customers their own brand of beauty, Dove provides a wide range of cleansing and personal care products that make a genuine difference to the condition and feel skin and hair. Now the world's top cleansing brand, Dove started its life in 1957 as a beauty soap bar that was clinically proven to be milder for dry, sensitive skin than other leading soaps: half of women have dry skin. This promise remains at the heart of the brand and has been extended to a number of other products, supported by the industry's longest-running medical program. Since the 1980s, for example, we've launched a moisturizing body-wash, deodorants, body lotions, facial cleansers and shampoos and conditioners, giving the consumers a comprehensive range of solutions to bring out your true inner beauty. The commitment to delivering real results is mirrored in the advertisements. The current campaign has been featured on over 25 major TV channels and in more than 800 articles in opinion leading newspapers from El Pais to Le Parisien, from The Sun to

The Times, as well as in popular women's magazines. Over the last few years, Dove has focused on delivering products that inspire women to enjoy their own beauty and individuality. As part of the Campaign for Real Beauty, the Dove Self-Esteem Fund (DSEF) demonstrates commitment to the brand's mission 'to make more women feel beautiful every day, by widening today's view of beauty and by inspiring women to take great care of themselves. The DSEF aims to educate and inspire young girls through a series of tools and workshops which ultimately protects and nurtures their body-related self-esteem and enables them to become fully realized adults.

Packaging Packaging involves designing and producing the container or wrapper for a product. The package may include the products primary, secondary and the shipping package. The dove soap packaging is basically made of carton inside out. It is the typical packaging used for soaps because it has moisturizing barriers, easy open and handy.

Labeling Labeling is any written, electronic, or graphic communications on the packaging. It requires all consumer commodities be labeled to disclose net contents, identity of the product, and the name and place of business of the product's manufacturer, packer or distributor. The labeling of Dove followed the necessary contents in the packaging area. It has the logo, name, manufacturers name, ingredients, barcode and hazards that all can be found at the back part of the soap carton.

Recommendation The dove soap was already known in the past years since it started to boom when the millennium comes. There is no other thing that the group could recommend on the brand itself, because it already proves its stability on the market for several years as stated earlier. Perhaps a variety of products could be done, by making a liquid soap, laundry soap and even cleaning agents such as acids that remove stains on our toilets and even fresheners. It was recommended to at least deal with producing this variety because it promotes a guarding family from any bacteria and even caring with the skin of individual. It could be under the scope of the objective that may satisfy the consumers desires. And another thing is their target market that focuses only to the young girls and women. It can be possible if they could make brand of Doves for men for extensive usage just like how they do for women. On the other hand, packaging and labeling were closely related to each other, because after the packaging, simultaneously it was labeled, and because of this the Uniliver Company were successful from the very beginning when they take the risk of releasing their product in the market. Since then, from our in depth research, the first thing that the company must comply was producing products including packaging with the aim of helping our environment. We think that there is no other recommendation on packaging and labeling since it already stands for many years. In case it may be improved by means of producing recyclable packaging, with a minimal cost expectedly.

CHAPTER 4 Evaluation and Recommendation of Price


Dove Pink Beauty Cream Bar Dove Pink returns for the sixth consecutive year to proudly support The National Breast Cancer Foundation. Every product in the range has been splashed with pink and have soft, floral fragrances which provide a fresh and feminine scent. Dove Pink Beauty Cream Bar has a refreshing light formula that helps skin retain its natural moisture. It contains Doves signature moisturising cream helping to improve the condition of skin. Uses ultra mild pH neutral cleansers to ensure skin is enriched with essential moisture and cleansed without irritation or dryness. It is suitable for all skin types, including sensitive skin. It helps skin retain its natural moisture, bringing out its softness and true beauty without leaving skin dry like soaps can. Dove Pink Beauty Bar is pH neutral and suitable for all skin types, including sensitive skin. Dove believes real beauty reveals itself in many different ways. One of those ways is when people get together and support each other during difficult times in life. Do something really beautiful. Buy any product from the Dove Pink range and make a difference by supporting the NZ Breast Cancer Foundation. Ingredients (from box) Sodium Cocoyl Isethionate, Stearic Acid, Coconut Acid, Sodium Tallowate, Water, Sodium Isethionate, Sodium Stearate, Cocamidopropyl Betaine, Sodium Cocoate Or Sodium Palm Kernelate, Fragrance, Sodium Chloride, Tetrasodium EDTA, Tetrasodium Etidronate, BHT, Titanium Dioxide (CI 77891), Red 17 (CI 26100). Product Information Dove Pink Beauty Bar is made in Germany and distributed Unilever. Evaluation Dove products specially Dove pink beauty cream bar prefer to use the marketskimming pricing because when they offer their new product they prefer to use a high pricing strategy. They only offer a small amount of price or lesser amount when the product is release for months. They offer a lesser quantity of the products like from the original release from 135grams for 55 pesos and decrease to 100grams for 45 pesos. They also use market bundle, they pack a 3 pieces of 100 grams for only 120 pesos to encourage the costumers to buy because they can save 15 pesos when they buy it. One of the closest competitors of Dove is the Olay products they are also offer similar product like Dove. They offer Olay whitening soap as same as Dove offered. Olay whitening soap is much higher than Dove soap with a quantity of 120grams they offer it for also 55 pesos and their 90grams for 45 pesos. As you can see Olay used same price

like dove but the customers cant see the real difference between the two products in first see. They will think that the two products are the same even if theres a big difference regarding to the content and the quantity it posses. Another competitor of Dove is Belo. Belo products also have similarities with Dove but they offer their products much lower than Dove and Olay. They offer Belo soap with a quantity of 90grams for 40 pesos.

Olay

Dove

Belo

120grams-55pesos 90grams-45pesos

135grams-55pesos 100grams-45pesos

90grams-40pesos

As you can see in the diagram above, the price of the Dove soap is on the middle of the prices of the Olay and Belo soap. Therefore, Break-even pricing is used. The Dove soap is not much higher or not much lower. The price is just exact and can afford by the customers. Recommendation The researchers found out that the price of Dove pink beauty cream bar soap has a great impact to market. Dove has an excellent selling points because there are lot of sales promotion happening in the brand. Many customers are purchasing Dove soap. Among the 3 compared soaps above, Dove soap is on the middle of the two. The customers maybe prefer to choose Dove because it has a high quantity and has an affordable price. It can also purchase by whole sale that can cost much lower than that when you buy one by one. The consumers must be wise in buying soaps. It is not only the price that we should see first but most of all the quantity and the benefits of the chosen product. The price was set to break-even to make a target profit. The price of the soap is just exact and it has been purchase by many consumers all over the world. It was highly recommended not just because of the contents or the ingredients of the products but also on the quantity and price itself.

CHAPTER 5 Evaluation and Recommendation of Place


Researches The study on the dove products which was under the parent company Unilever sought that the place of the products where it was first released doesnt have any remarkable studies. Perhaps, the said products were driven out to the market by means of going hand in hand with the promotions and marketing strategies to introduce doves products. Hence, from the beginning the place would be on England, and then later on United States. It was known for the later years by means of getting along with the idea of the UN and dealing with the probable cause of answering peoples needs. History of product release In the 1890s, William Hesketh Lever, founder of Lever Bros, wrote down his ideas for Sunlight Soap his revolutionary new product that helped popularize cleanliness and hygiene in Victorian England. It was 'to make cleanliness commonplace; to lessen work for women; to foster health and contribute to personal attractiveness, that life may be more enjoyable and rewarding for the people who the said products. This was long before the phrase 'Corporate Mission' had been invented, but these ideas have stayed at the heart of our business. Even if their language and the notion of only women doing housework has become outdated. In a history that now crosses three centuries, Unilever's success has been influenced by the major events of the day economic boom, depression, world wars, changing consumer lifestyles and advances in technology. And throughout we've created products that help people get more out of life cutting the time spent on household chores, improving nutrition, enabling people to enjoy food and take care of their homes, their clothes and themselves. In the late 19th century the businesses that would later become Unilever were among the most philanthropic of their time. They set up projects to improve the lot of their workers and created products with a positive social impact, making hygiene and personal care commonplace and improving nutrition through adding vitamins to foods that were already daily staples. Today, Unilever still believes that success means acting with 'the highest standards of corporate behavior towards our employees, consumers and the societies and world in which we live'. Over the years we've launched or participated in an ever-growing range of initiatives to source sustainable supplies of raw materials, protect environments, support local communities and much more. Through time dove has evolved. At the beginning of the 21st century, our Path to Growth strategy focused us on global high-potential brands and our Vitality mission has taken us into a new phase of development. Dove Unilevers Dove product line began in the United States in 1957 when the company launched a personal cleansing bar made from a pH-neutral cleanser and moisturizing component. Based on formula developed as a non-irritating skin cleanser for the treatment of burns and wounds during World War II, the introduction of the Dove Beauty Bar provided the first ever non-soap cleansing bar. Because it was not a soap, Unilever marketed Dove to women with the promise that it would not dry their skin According to

Dove, by the 1970s an independent clinical dermatological study recognized its Beauty Bar to be milder than 17 other leading bar soaps, and by the 1980s its Beauty Bar had become the number one physician-recommended cleansing bar. While Doves only product through 1995 was this cleansing bar, at this time the brand began launching more personal care products. Aimed at expanding its commitment to provide personal cleansing products less abrasive than soap, Doves new products included a moisturizing body wash, sensitive skin bar, facial care cleanser, facial cleansing scrub and facial care daily moisturizer. Additionally, an all-day moisturizing body wash was introduced in 1999, followed by a line of anti-per spirants and deodorants in 2001 and a hair-care line in 2003. Finally, in 2004, Dove launched its Campaign for Real Beauty in an effort to continue its mission of expanding the definition of beauty among women around the world. Drawing from its roots as a brand that provides mild yet effective beauty products, Dove says it continues to provide products that make a genuine difference to the condition and feel of your skin and hair. Doing so helps to accomplish its mission of expanding womens definition of beauty to include all ages, shapes and sizes, helping them to realize real beauty is not limited to how they look. Dove launched the Campaign for Real Beauty in September 2004 in response to the results of a study it commissioned, The Real Truth About Beauty: A Global Report. This report highlighted how 3,200 women from 10 countries feel about beauty and found only 2 percent describe themselves as beautiful, while 31 percent describe themselves as natural, 29 percent as average, 9 percent as attractive, 8 percent as feminine, 7 percent as good-looking and 7 percent as cute. Additionally, the study found 42 percent of women strongly agreed they felt uncomfortable describing themselves as beautiful and, while most women defined their beauty and attractiveness as average, they felt their body weight was too high, a more common perception among older respondents. In addition to its global report, Doves The Dove Report: Challenging Beauty focused specifically on how women in the United States define beauty, noting most do not measure it solely according to the dimension of physical appearance; in fact, 36 percent of women felt their looks were above average, but only 18 percent rated their beauty the same way. Other statistics from the study provide greater insight into how women in the United States view beauty. Seventy-five percent feel beauties is defined more by qualities such as spirit and love of life than physical appearance, but 79 percent still wish a woman could be considered beautiful if she is not physically perfect. Additionally, 71 percent expressed a desire for the media and advertising industry to expand their definition of beauty to include women of varying physical appearances. Overall, the study showed women feel their understanding of beauty is impacted heavily by societal influences, and it concludes: [the] findings clearly indicate women are ready for a new definition of beauty that celebrates real types of women rather than stereotypes. With the use of the report, Dove hopes to begin a process where a new definition of beauty will free women from self-doubt and encourage them to embrace their real beauty, a revolution whose viability Dove finds affirmed in the results of the report. Based on the findings revealed in this research, Doves Campaign for Real Beauty looks to extend Unilevers vitality mission by leading a change in the definition of beauty both in the United States and around the world. To do this, Dove began its campaign by asking viewers to judge the appearance of models, which it felt did not meet the stereotypical image of beauty, according to whether they were oversized, outstanding, wrinkled or wonderful. Next, in June 2005, Dove began the second phase of its campaign with ads featuring six women photographed in their underwear, though they were not professional models and their bodies differed in shape and size.

Encouraging women to Stand Firm to Celebrate Their Curves, these ads worked to change the definition of beauty by addressing body image. In addition to these print ads, Dove has also relied on discussions and fundraising to raise awareness of its Campaign. For example, to foster a greater connection among women from across the United States, Dove created opportunities on its website for them to comment about advertisements and discuss on bulletin boards different issues related to beauty. Additionally, Dove relied on panel events at the national and local levels, bringing together women from the American Women in Television and Radio to participate in the former and sponsoring local market panel events as part of the latter. Regarding fundraising, Dove created the Self-Esteem Fund to publicize the link between beauty and body-related self-esteem. Working through the Unilever Foundation, Dove uses money contributed to the Fund to support global projects that increase the selfesteem of girls and young women. Dove has also relied on several emotionally compelling videos to spread the Campaign for Real Beautys message. In Self-Esteem, pictures of young girls flash across the screen with captions intended to insinuate how the current understanding of beauty might taint its perception among these young girls. For instance, a red-headed girls picture would appear with the phrase Hates her freckles, while an Asian girls picture was tagged with the phrase Wishes she were blond. Doves Evolution video, which won both a Film Grand Prix and Cyber Lion (a Grand Prix for cyber-marketing) at the 2007 Cannes Lion International Advertising Festival, takes a different approach. By highlighting the extent to which pictures of models are often modified and retouched in advertisements, these video points out the unrealistic nature of many models appearances. Showing how much a models appearance can change from its natural state at the beginning of a photo shoot, thanks to make-up, stylists and computers, Evolution is intended to challenge women not to accept a type of beauty that is unrealistic and attainable only through the use of editing and retouching. Finally, Onslaught is another high-profile video from the Campaign released in October 2007. Opening with the image of a young girl crossing the street, it reveals a montage of images selected to depict the portrayal of beauty in pop culture. The first half of the images are advertisements depicting young and thin models in a variety of everyday places, while the second half show the plastic surgeries perhaps necessary to achieve the appearance of people in the first. The video then closes with another shot of the young girl and the line, Talk to your daughter before the beauty industry does. Doves Onslaught made the list of the top ten viral videos of 2007, ranked by YouTube impressions, according to GoViral, a viral marketing agency that seeds and tracks viral campaigns for creative agencies, media agencies and advertisers around the world. It clearly relied on viral marketing for their 2007 campaigns, neither are strangers to the viral marketing world. Doves Campaign for Real Beauty has utilized viral marketing in several ways since its 2004 launch. As previously mentioned, the Campaigns website includes several different types of interactive features, each of which offer an Invite a Friend link at the bottom of the page. Specifically, the section of the site devoted to Self-Esteem Fund offers opportunities for girls as well as moms and mentors to participate in online activities. The section designed for girls offers an interactive SelfEsteem Zone, which allows girls to measure and improve their self-image, post and respond to discussion boards and ask questions of an expert. The section designed for moms and mentors offers downloadable guides for developing self-esteem in differentaged girls, kits for holding a Real Beauty workshop and online training videos in

building self-esteem. Both of these sections include a link entitled Self-Esteem is Worth Sharing, which allows the content to be emailed or provides a link for code to the website so that it can be embedded easily in other sites. Additionally, there is also a link to make a donation to the Self-Esteem fund, and the Inside the Campaign section of the sight allows visitors to send Real Beauty e-cards to help develop the self-esteem of others. In addition to relying on viral marketing to popularize the interactive features of its site, Dove also relied heavily on it to spread the messages of its videos. The Selfesteem Fund section of the Campaign for Real Beauty site also contains a film gallery of videos produced by the campaign, including Onslaught, Evolution, Amy and Hair. With each video, there is a link allowing the viewer to share the film, in addition to the Invite a Friend link visible on every page Regarding their popularity, Evolution has been viewed on YouTube over 12 million times since its posting in Oct. 2006, and Onslaught was viewed more than 500,000 times in its first ten days, contributing to its over 1 million views by mid December 2007. After its launch, Evolution garnered over 1.7 millions views in its first month, making it the most viewed on YouTube for a day, week and month in October 2006; moreover, on Oct. 24, 2006, it was both ABC.coms lead story and CNN.coms most viewed story. Because of its popularity, the video enjoyed segments on ABCs The View, Good Morning America, Ellen, NBCs The Todays Show, CNN, Entertainment Tonight and Foxs Geraldo. This media exposure, according to Creativity, provided $150 million of free media time for Doves Campaign. Perhaps in response to the viral success of its campaign, Dove has also experienced a positive impact on its bottom line. Todd Tillemans, Unilevers VP for skin care, North America, notes that the Campaign for Real Beauty, assisted by the popularity of Evolution, has increased substantially consumers brand loyalty to the Dove name, evidenced in the number of brand sales generated by people buying more than one product. In Oct. 2006, these sales accounted for two-thirds of Doves total sales, up from one-third before the Campaign for Real Beauty began three years earlier. In addition to brand loyalty, Dove has benefited in other ways. At the end of 2006, Dove had gained market share in four of its five major product categories, including personal wash, hair care, and deodorant and hand-body lotion. Additionally, Dove sales increased 12.5 percent in 2005, the first year after the launch of the Campaign, and 10.1 percent in 2006. Sales for the 52 weeks leading up to August 2007, however, had risen only 1.2 percent, prompting Advertising Age to question whether the brand took its ProAge message too far, citing data showing Proctor and Gambles Olay Anti-Aging products outsold Doves line of Pro-Age products eightfold in the first six months of 2007. Evaluation Dove become known and boom by launching Evolution an advertising campaign launched by Unilever in 2006 as part of its Dove Campaign for Real Beauty, to promote the newly created Dove Self-Esteem Fund. The centre of the Unilever campaign is a 75-second spot produced by Ogilvy & Mather in Toronto, Canada. The piece was first displayed online on 6 October 2006, and was later broadcast as a television and cinema spot in the Netherlands and the Middle East. The ad was created from the budget left over from the earlier Daughters campaign, and was intended to be the first in a series of such online-focused spots by the company.

Later pieces include Onslaught and Amy. Evolution was directed by Canadian director Yael Staav and Tim Piper, with sound design handled by the Vapor Music Group, and post-production by SoHo. The advert was a critical, popular, and financial success. It won a number of awards in the advertising industry, including two Cannes Lions Grand Prix awards and an Epica D'Or. It has been discussed in many mainstream television programs and print publications, and the exposure generated by the spot has been estimated to be worth over $150M. Evolution has also spawned numerous unofficial alternate versions, including a title sequence to a BBCsketch show and the short parody Slob Evolution, which has gone on to itself be nominated for a Daytime Emmy Award. More than 6,000 scientists, engineers, chefs and technicians work in Unilever's R&D centers around the globe - inventing new products and improving existing products to delight consumers everywhere. However reducing waste in factories, sharing sustainable agriculture advice with farmers, and using knowledge of safe hygiene practices or fortified foods to benefit local communities through innovative marketing proves that through time, the dove able to stabilize and as well develop new products to be in line with the generation today. Recommendation Over the last few years, Dove has focused on delivering products that inspire women to enjoy their own beauty and individuality. As part of our Campaign for Real Beauty, the Dove Self-Esteem Fund (DSEF) demonstrates our commitment to the brand's mission 'to make more women feel beautiful everyday, by widening today's view of beauty and by inspiring women to take great care of them.' The DSEF aims to educate and inspire young girls through a series of tools and workshops which ultimately protects and nurtures their body-related self-esteem and enables them to become fully realized adults. Promote stability by their promise of remaining at the heart of the brand as well as extending to a number of other products, supported by the industry's longest-running medical programs. Perhaps this would help also: Target male customers Maintain better standards of quality Unified advertising throughout the globe Continuous innovation

CHAPTER 6 Evaluation and Recommendation of Promotions


Advertising Advertising helps inform people about the benefits of our products and innovations. It is also a way for us to engage with consumers on issues that matter to them. The Dove promotions have clearly seen objectives and goals that guide their promotions:
They committed to building trust through responsible practices and through

transparent communication both directly to consumers and indirectly through other key stakeholders and thought-leaders. They fully support a perception that beauty is how we view ourselves and how we handle our self-esteem. They use a combination of channels, which includes product labels, websites, Careline phone numbers and/or consumer leaflets to communicate openly with consumers. As a leading global consumer goods company, the Unilever promote the benefits of our products using many different channels of brand communication. Advertising can be a powerful force for behavior change. Advertising helps inform people about the benefits of our products and innovations. It is also a way for us to engage with consumers on issues that matter to them. For example, Dove's Campaign for Real Beauty challenges current stereotypes about beauty. Online advertising and communication is a growing trend. With people everywhere being able to access online material, internet marketing guidelines were published internally in 2008 to ensure that campaigns aimed at a particular market are sensitive to cultural differences in other parts of the world. Commercial Rating and Evaluation In 2004, Dove launched its Campaign for Real Beauty, featuring women of all shapes and sizes. Interestingly, our Dove 'real women' models may have a BMI typically in the range of 25 to 30, which is the upper level associated with good health. In 2007, Dove's short film 'Evolution' was one of the most downloaded clips on YouTube. The video shows a woman being transformed through make-up, lighting and airbrushing. A second Dove film, called 'Onslaught', showed a young girl being bombarded by advertising campaigns portraying unrealistic images of beauty. Both videos go on to promote self-esteem workshops. The Dove Commercial with the theme song True Colors comes the third. At the start, the commercial shows girls who are discontented or longing for something more in their personal appearance. As the advertisement continues, it portrays the girls who are now contented with what they are. The theme of the commercial is to promote the perception that beauty is in the persons point of view of him/herself and in his/her self-confidence.

The impact of the commercial in the social aspect is very much effective. It pushes peopleespecially the girls, their main target in the market segmentationto believe in themselves. This Dove Commercial also take its part of the Campaign for Real Beauty, the Dove Self-Esteem Fund (DSEF) demonstrates commitment to the brand's mission 'to make more women feel beautiful every day, by widening today's view of beauty and by inspiring women to take great care of themselves. The DSEF aims to educate and inspire young girls through a series of tools and workshops which ultimately protects and nurtures their body-related self-esteem and enables them to become fully realized adults. Practically wise, the television commercial also helps the product gain more share of the market as it obtains more and more sympathizers with the perception of their television advertisement. Message Execution Style The Dove advertisement stated above uses a combination of message execution styles and advertising strategy: Slice of Life and Mood or Image. The Slice of Life is used as its message execution style and advertising strategy. The situation in the commercial is always seen in the everyday life. Losing or lacking self-confidence is a usual feeling to people especially with women. The Mood or Image execution style is also used as an advertising strategy as it touches and triggers the viewers feelings as they sympathizes with the feelings and situations of the girls featured in the commercial. In connection with the everyday trends in our present society, the commercial also somewhat objects the practice of ending up with the extensive use of cosmetic products and supplements. It focuses on the idea that what makes a person beautiful is not what others think of what they look like but in their own perception of themselves and how they carry their selves across their daily lives with self-confidence. Sales Promotions The Dove Beauty Bar also uses short-term incentives to encourage the buyers to buy their product. They use BUNDLE PACKS ranging from two to four contents which sells with lesser prize to promote their sales. They also use SAMPLES and produce size versions smaller than the standard ones to make the product more affordable to more buyers and for the possible gain of more percentage in the market share.

Public Relation The management of that heads the Dove promotions is effective in its objective of building good relations with the society through various ways. First, it builds a good corporate image through their commercial and other advertisements. They use these tools of promotion wisely and very delicately that most of their commercials were to be seen and implores values. Second, they build relationship with their targeted market segment by obtaining favorable image through their workshops and seminars to young girls through their Dove Self-Esteem Fund (DSEF) demonstrates commitment to the brand's mission 'to make more women feel beautiful every day, by widening today's view of beauty and by inspiring women to take great care of themselves. The DSEF aims to educate and inspire young girls through a series of tools and workshops which ultimately protects and nurtures their body-related self-esteem and enables them to become fully realized adults. Advertising Objective The Doves advertising objective is to persuade the viewers to buy their products and also to their advocacyto widen the present view of beauty and inspiring women to take great care of themselves. They aim to persuade and educate and inspire young girls through a series of tools and workshops which ultimately protects and nurtures their body-related self-esteem and enables them to become fully realized adults.

Suggestions and Recommendations The dove soap was already known in the past years since it started to boom when the millennium comes. There is no other thing that the group could recommend on the brand itself, because it already proves its stability on the market for several years as stated earlier. However, the dove soap must improve their promotions especially their sales promotions. We recommend additional sales promotion to increase their sales and also increase patronage from a lot more customers. They may also have advertising specialty such as towels as it is related to the main product, yet, gives more satisfaction to the customers. They may also make commercials with different themes and genres and make use of all the media (TV, Radio, and Newspapers) with the suggestion to make their product more visible in the advertisements. Sometimes, it is also helpful to make the ads obvious as there is a saying, Out of Sight, Out of Mind, which is very applicable in the promotions and advertisement aspect of a certain product. Other than that, we find no other recommendations and suggestions regarding the Promotions aspect of our chosen product. In case of, it is expected to be of the least possible cost.