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Feb. 13th Mar.

12th

MCV4U / MPM1D

February 15

Wednesday
Learning Expectations
MCV4U MPM1D

C4.1 C4.1, 4.2 Flow:


CV 3D vectors to create a question

D3.2,3.3, 3.5

1D

Angles and properties of angles quiz

CV

Review and re-work questions 1D Review package

Concept Development:
Intr.

CV

Instruction Strategy: Inquiry Based Learning with Graphing techology

ASK: Using java applet similar to one at http://www.scienceshareware.com/3d_vector_ov.htm to brainstorm how to create an equation of a line in 3D. Investigation: INV_1_Vector Equation of a Line includes creating stage Discuss: Connection between 2D line and 3D to consolidate vector equation and create parametric equations from grade 9 slope-intercept form.

1D Instruction Strategy: Inquiry Based Learning Ask: Create questions regarding changing angles, perimeter and area of a polygon. Investigate: use Hinged closed polygons and 3D figures that allow for changing angles to investigate and calculate properties. Create: Create laws of any polygon/3D composite Discuss: Two group presentations on their finding (Perimeter & Angles. Area/Volume)

CV

ASK: Reform old questions and reflect on a better question for investigating the link between y=mx+b and vector form of a line.

Investigation: INV_1_Vector Equation of a Line includes creating stage Discuss: Connection between 2D line and 3D to consolidate vector equation and Cartesian equations

1D Instruction Strategy:

Reflect: Review package followed by unit review cloze/information gap activity

Assessment and Evaluation: Course A&E Task/Strategy For As Of Assessment Tool Reflect: Some HMRK questions but will occur in lessons 3 and 4 with other equations of lines MCV4U Minute Papers Pg. 433 #s 2, 3, 4, 5, 8, 9, 10, 11, 1 MPM1D Review homework MCV4U Homework questions Pg. 443 #s 1, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 10ab

Read & Review

x x x

CHECK -

MPM1D Test tomorrow

Inquiry Process
The inquiry process is a process that no single model can describe. Inquiry-based education should often lead to the creation of new student ideas whether the ideas may be correct or not. Constructively communicating these ideas within the context of the classroom is central to the whole inquiry process and what is hope will help ELL develop their English Mathematical Literacy. Below is an outline of the Inquiry process that will be used in a single lesson or over a group of lessons. In addition, the same method will provide an overarching structure for the unit staring with an essential question. The inquiry process is a circle:
Ask

Reflect

Investigate

Discuss

Create

Ask
A question or a problem comes into focus at this stage, and the learner begins to define or describe what it is. Of course, questions are redefined throughout the learning process. Questions naturally lead to the next stage in the process.

Investigate:
After motivating curiosity or attention in this stage the learner begins to gather information by using technology, crafting an experiment, observing or interviewing other students (ex. Jigsaw). The learner may need to recast their question or classes question, refine definitions or plunge down a new path that the original question did not or could not anticipate. The information gathering stage hopefully will become a self-motivated process that is wholly owned by the engaged and active learner.

Create:
As the information gathered in the investigation stage begins to come together the learner will attempt to or begin to make connections. The ability at this stage to synthesize meaning is the creative spark that forms all new knowledge. The learner now undertakes a creative task of shaping significant new thoughts, ideas, and theories outside of his/her prior experience.

Discuss:
At this point in the circle of inquiry, learners share their new ideas with others. The learner begins to ask others about their own experiences and investigations. Sharing knowledge will hopefully create a community-building process for ELLs to practice speaking English with those who struggle in English or those who are more apt with English speaking. The meaning of their investigation begins to take on greater relevance in the context of the learner's classroom and may help develop cognitive structures for English mathematics. Comparing notes, discussing conclusions, and sharing experiences are all examples of this process in action. At this point students will also have time to review the concepts learned and develop new questions that may be guided by the teacher toward the next connecting concept or lesson.

Reflect:
Reflection is taking the time to look back at the question, the investigation path, and the conclusions made. The learner takes time to consolidate information, makes observations, and possibly makes new decisions. Again, at this point students will also have time to review the concepts learned and develop new questions that may be guided by the teacher toward the next connecting concept or lesson.