Vous êtes sur la page 1sur 4

D.K. Satapathy et al.

, IJSID 2011, 1 (3), 55-58

ISSN:2249-5347

IJSID
International Journal of Science Innovations and Discoveries
Review Article
An International peer Review Journal for Science

Available online through www.ijsidonline.info

AN INTRODUCTION TO GEOGRAPHICALLY RARE AVAILABLE PLANT TEXAS YUCCA AND ITS CONSERVATIONISM D.K Satapathy, Katragadda Aneela*, Golusu.Balakrishna, Devathi Suman Kumar, Musunuri Ravi Kumar, Y.Emmanuel Prakash Sri Vasavi Institute of Pharmaceutical Sceinces, Tadepalli Gudem, West Godavari, AP, India

Received: Modified:

02.08.2011 06.10.2011

Published: 29.12.2011

ABSTRACT
Yucca is is available in United States of America. Physically there are so many types are there in Yucca plants family. The family of YUKKA is Asparagaceae, Sub family is Agavoideae. Depends on flowering and leaves, stems and plant height, Family it has so many changes in medicinal activity.

*Corresponding Author

Keywords:
Texas Yucca, U.S.A, Phytochemical Screening, Medicinal Activity. INTRODUCTION
Address: Name: Katragadda Aneela Place: West Godhavari, AP, India. E-mail: katragaddaaneela2011 @gmail.com

INTRODUCTION

International Journal of Science Innovations and Discoveries, Volume 1, Issue 3, November-December 2011

55

D.K. Satapathy et al., IJSID 2011, 1 (3), 55-58 INTRODUCTION


The yucca plant or soap weed is overlooked as a landscape plant in many parts of the United States and deserves far more by landscape designers. Lowers are on tall spikes and vary in color mostly from greenish-white to creamy-white. Heights vary a great deal with some forms no more than two feet tall to giants of fifteens feet and more. The genus Yucca is one of the most remarkable groups of flowering plants native to the New World. It includes about 40 species, most of which occur in the southwestern United States and Mexico. Although they are often associated with arid desert regions, some species are native to the southeastern United States and the Caribbean islands. What truly sets this genus apart from other flowering plants is their unique method of pollination: A specific moth that is genetically programmed for stuffing a little ball of pollen into the cup-shaped stigma of each flower. Like fig wasps and acacia ants, the relationship is mutually beneficial to both partners, and is vital for the survival of both plant and insect. In fact, yuccas cultivated in the Old World, where yucca moths are absent, will not produce seeds unless they are hand pollinated. Yucca is a genus of perennial shrubs and trees in the family Asparagaceae, subfamily Agavoideae.[2] Its 4050 species are notable for their rosettes of evergreen, tough, sword-shaped leaves and large terminal panicles of white or whitish flowers. They are native to the hot and dry (arid) parts of North America, Central America, South America, and the Caribbean. Early reports of the species were confused with the cassava (Manihot esculenta).[3] Consequently, Linnaeus mistakenly derived the generic name from the Carib word for the latter, yuca (spelt with a single "c").[4] It is also colloquially known in the midwest United States as "Ghosts in the graveyard", as it is commonly found growing in rural graveyards and when in bloom the flowers appear as an apparition floating. Several species of Yucca are cultivated in southern California, including the Baja California endemic Y. vallida, the Mojave Desert yucca (Y. schidigera), and the chaparral yucca (Y. whipplei). The latter species grows wild throughout the coastal mountains of southern California, decorating the chaparral each spring with huge, candlelike flower clusters that may reach 12 feet. In their native habitats, all these yucca species require pollination by a female moth of the genus Tegeticula (Pronuba). For example, the pollinator of Mojave yucca (Y. schidigera) in the Mojave Desert and Y. filamentosa in Missouri is a white moth named T. yuccasella, while the pollinator of joshua trees (Y. brevifolia) is a dark gray moth named T. paradoxa. According to J. Powell and R. Mackie (University of California Publications in Entomology Volume 42, 1966), yucca moths are not all host specific because T. yuccasella was collected from 19 different species of Yucca. Yuccas are widely grown as ornamental plants in gardens. Many species of yucca also bear edible parts, including fruits, seeds, flowers, flowering stems,[8] and more rarely roots. References to yucca root as food often stem from confusion with the similarly spelled but botanically unrelated yuca, also called cassava (Manihot esculenta). Roots of soaptree yucca (Yucca elata) are high in saponins and are used as a shampoo in Native American rituals. Dried yucca leaves and trunk fibers have a low ignition temperature, making the plant desirable for use in starting fires via friction.[9] In rural Appalachian areas, species such as Yucca

International Journal of Science Innovations and Discoveries, Volume 1, Issue 3, November-December 2011

56

D.K. Satapathy et al., IJSID 2011, 1 (3), 55-58


filamentosa are referred to as "meat hangers". The tough fibrous leaves with their sharp spined tips were used to puncture meat and knotted to form a loop with which to hang meat for salt curing or in smoking houses.

Yucca Rupicola Texas Yucca Conservationism Yuccas have a very specialized, mutualistic pollination system, being pollinated by yucca moths (family Prodoxidae); the insect purposefully transfers the pollen from the stamens of one plant to the stigma of another, and at the same time lays an egg in the flower; the moth larva then feeds on some of the developing seeds, always leaving enough seed to perpetuate the species. Yucca species are the host plants for the caterpillars of the Yucca Giant-Skipper (Megathymus yuccae),[5] Ursine Giant-Skipper (Megathymus ursus),[6] and Strecker's Giant-Skipper (Megathymus streckeri).[7]Yuccas are widely grown as ornamental plants in gardens. Many species of yucca also bear edible parts, including fruits, seeds, flowers, flowering stems,[8] and more rarely roots. References to yucca root as food often stem from confusion with the similarly spelled but botanically unrelated yuca, also called cassava (Manihot esculenta). Roots of soaptree yucca (Yucca elata) are high in saponins and are used as a shampoo in Native American rituals. Dried yucca leaves and trunk fibers have a low ignition temperature, making the plant desirable for use in starting fires via friction.[9] In rural Appalachian areas, species such as Yucca filamentosa are referred to as "meat hangers". The tough fibrous leaves with their sharp spined tips were used to puncture meat and knotted to form a loop with which to hang meat for salt curing or in smoking houses. Due to so many medicinal compounds we are planning to identification of Medicinal activity of YUCCA plant. CONCLUSION Based on the complete study, we have found some medicinal activity and the other studies are under progress. As per this study we have concluded that, we can use this plant as herbal drug without any side effects. REFERENCES 1. Germplasm Resources Information Network. United States Department of Agriculture. 2010-01-19. Retrieved 2010-06-07.
International Journal of Science Innovations and Discoveries, Volume 1, Issue 3, November-December 2011

57

D.K. Satapathy et al., IJSID 2011, 1 (3), 55-58


2. Daniels, Jaret C. "Yucca Giant-Skipper Butterfly, Megathymus yuccae (Boisduval & Leconte) (Insecta: Lepidoptera: Hesperiidae)". Electronic Data Information Source. University of Florida IFAS Extension. 3. Chase, M.W.; Reveal, J.L. & Fay, M.F. (2009), "A subfamilial classification for the expanded asparagalean families Amaryllidaceae, Asparagaceae and Xanthorrhoeaceae", Botanical Journal of the Linnean Society 161 (2): 132 136, 4. Irish, Gary (2000). Agaves, Yuccas, and Related Plants: a Gardener's Guide. Timber Press. p. 18. 5. Quattrocchi, Umberto (2000). CRC World Dictionary of Plant Names. 4 R-Z. Taylor & Francis US. p. 2862 6. "Ursine Giant-Skipper Megathymus ursus Poling, 1902". Butterflies and Moths of North America. 7. Fritz Hochsttter (Hrsg.): Yucca (Agavaceae). Band 3 Mexico , Selbst Verlag, 2004 8. "Strecker's Giant-Skipper Megathymus streckeri (Skinner, 1895)". Butterflies and Moths of North America. 9. Couplan, Franois (1998). The Encyclopedia of Edible Plants of North America. McGraw Hill Professional 10. Baugh, Dick (1999). "the Miracle of Fire by Friction". In David Wescott. Primitive Technology: A Book of Earth Skills (10 ed.). pp. 3233. 11. Fritz Hochsttter (Hrsg.): Yucca (Agavaceae). Band 1 Dehiscent-fruited species in the Southwest and Midwest of the USA, Canada and Baja California , Selbst Verlag, 2000. 12. Fritz Hochsttter (Hrsg.): Yucca (Agavaceae). Band 2 Indehiscent-fruited species in the Southwest, Midwest and East of the USA, Selbst Verlag. 2002.

International Journal of Science Innovations and Discoveries, Volume 1, Issue 3, November-December 2011

58