Vous êtes sur la page 1sur 18

 

   

2008 
The Basics Arc Flash Protection

“An arcing fault can be


defined as the flow of
current through a path where
Rob Vajko 
it is not intended to flow”   
12/15/2008 

 
www.nationalsafetyinc.com 
 
What is an Arc‐Flash? 
An arc flash starts with an arcing fault. An arcing fault can be defined as the flow of current 
through a path where it is not intended to flow. The current creates an electric arc plasma and 
releases dangerous amounts of energy 

An electric arc is the passage of substantial electrical current through ionized air and gases. 

Bad things can happen. 

An electric arc fault is a bad thing! 

  Page 2 
© National Safety, Inc. 
www.nationalsafetyinc.com 
 

The above photo is a still shot of a video clip of a arc flash that you can view online at 
http://205.243.100.155/frames/mpg/345kV_SWITCH.MPG 

  Page 3 
© National Safety, Inc. 
www.nationalsafetyinc.com 
 

The above photo is a still shot of a video clip of a arc flash that you can view online at: 
http://205.243.100.155/frames/mpg/500kV_Switch.mpg 

  Page 4 
© National Safety, Inc. 
www.nationalsafetyinc.com 
 

   

  Page 5 
© National Safety, Inc. 
www.nationalsafetyinc.com 
 
Clothed areas can be more severely burned than exposed skin! 

The Costs of Burn Injury 

Personal 
• Burns are one of the most painful injuries a human can experience 

• Burn victims often seek psychological care 

• Rehabilitation is a slow and difficult process 

Financial 
• Medical costs quickly accumulate due to years of treatment 

• Rehabilitation costs can exceed 1 million US$ per person 

   

  Page 6 
© National Safety, Inc. 
www.nationalsafetyinc.com 
 

Arc Blast Hazards 
z Up to 80% of all electrical injuries are burns resulting from an arc flash and ignition of FLAMABLE 
clothing 

z Approximately 1 person dies daily in the U.S. from arc blasts, and 6‐7 people are admitted to 
hospitals for associated injuries 

z Pressure waves associated with Arc Blasts can: 

z Vaporize copper, expanding it 67,000 times its initial volume 

z Create a sonic boom condition 

  Page 7 
© National Safety, Inc. 
www.nationalsafetyinc.com 
 
z There is a known case where a utility cabinet door was blown off the hinges and embedded in a 
concrete wall 1.5 inches 10 feet away from the utility cabinet. 

   

  Page 8 
© National Safety, Inc. 
www.nationalsafetyinc.com 
 
HOW TO PREVENT ARC FLASH 
Regulations and Standards 
Several industry standards concern the prevention of arc flash incidents:  

z OSHA 29 ‐ Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 1910 Subpart S.  

z NFPA 70‐2002 ‐ National Electrical Code.  

z NFPA 70E‐2000 ‐ Standard for Electrical Safety Requirements for Employee Workplaces.  

z IEEE Standard 1584‐2002 ‐ Guide for Performing Arc Flash Hazard Calculations.  

 
Regulations for the State of Washington (Check with your own state agencies) 
z WAC 295‐155 – Washington State Electrical Standards for Construction 

z WAC 296‐44 – Washington State Electrical Construction Code 

z WAC 296‐45 – Washington State Electrical Work Safety Rules 

WISHA 6 Point Plan 
Compliance with the latest OSHA standards involves adherence to a six‐point plan: 

z A facility must provide, and be able to demonstrate a safety program with defined 
responsibilities.  

z Calculations for the degree of arc flash hazard.  

z Correct personal protective equipment (PPE) for workers.  

z Training for workers on the hazards of arc flash.  

  Page 9 
© National Safety, Inc. 
www.nationalsafetyinc.com 
 
z Appropriate tools for safe working.  

z Warning labels on equipment.  

z Companies will be cited and fined for not complying with these standards.  

NFPA 70E promotes establishing electrically safe work conditions by... 

1. Identifying all power sources 

2. Interrupting the load and disconnecting power 

3. Visually verifying that a disconnect has opened the circuit 

4. Locking out and tagging the circuit 

5. Testing for voltage 

6. Grounding all power conductors 

How can we prevent arc flash when we have to work on or near energized parts? 

Special situations:  

z  Interruption of life support equipment 

z  Deactivation of emergency alarm systems 

z  Shutdown of hazardous location ventilation equipment  

z  Removal of illumination for an area 

A. Use written permit system for planning & conducting work in these situations 

B. Use the appropriate tools for voltage and current levels when performing all electrical work  

NFPA 70E ‐ Key PPE Steps 

  Page 10 
© National Safety, Inc. 
www.nationalsafetyinc.com 
 
1. Determine Arc Flash Protection Boundary  

2. Conduct Arc Flash Hazard Analysis 

3. Select Required “FR Clothing” & “PPE” Based on Specific Hazard Present Within Flash Protection 
Boundary 

   

  Page 11 
© National Safety, Inc. 
www.nationalsafetyinc.com 
 
Personal Protective Equipment 
Select Required “FR Clothing” & “PPE” Based on Specific Hazard Present Within Flash Protection 
Boundary 

 
Wear the appropriate protection when working on or around 
energized equipment! 

  Page 12 
© National Safety, Inc. 
www.nationalsafetyinc.com 
 
 

What Types Of Arc Protective Flame Resistant Garments Are Available? 

Basic FR Clothing Options 

z Shirts 

• Knit and Woven 

• Short and Long Sleeve 

z  Pants 

• Uniform 

• Dress 

• Jeans 

z  Coveralls 

Cold and Inclement Weather FR Clothing Options 

• Rain wear  

• Lined and Unlined Jackets 

• Fleece Sweatshirts and Sweatpants 

• Insulated Overalls and Coveralls 

• Insulated Parkas 

• Long Underwear and Socks 

• Hoods/Balaclavas 

• Vests 

   

  Page 13 
© National Safety, Inc. 
www.nationalsafetyinc.com 
 
FR Garment Examples  
 
                         Category 1                   Category 2                    Category 2 

         

Category 3 and 4 

   

  Page 14 
© National Safety, Inc. 
www.nationalsafetyinc.com 
 
FR Clothing Selection Criteria 
z Protection 

z  Wearer Comfort 

z  Durability  

• Flame Resistance Durability 

• Garment Wear Life 

z  Cost Effectiveness   

• Initial Cost 

• Life Cycle Cost     

z  Ease of Care / Appearance 

In Summary 

• Burn Injuries From Electric Arc Exposures Can Be Fatal or Can Severely Injure the Worker 

• Based on Known Electrical Parameters and Work Practices, Arc Exposure Intensity Can Be 
Estimated for the Hazard, hence job tasks listed and recommendations on PPE to wear. 

• Based On Estimated Arc Exposure Intensity, Appropriate Protective Clothing Selections  Can Be 
Made To Minimize Worker Burn Injury Levels In The Event Of An Electric Arc Accident 

• In Many Situations, Layering of FR Clothing Is Required to Match Electric Arc Hazard Energy 
Levels 

  Page 15 
© National Safety, Inc. 
www.nationalsafetyinc.com 
 

     Rain wear with Non‐Meltable Substrate               Rain wear with Meltable Substrate                   
                            (ASTM F‐1891) 
 
 Photo courtesy of Hugh Hoagland www.arcwear.com 

 
REMEMBER  
• The Outermost Garment Must Be Flame and Arc Resistant 
• Meltable Substrates Can Increase Worker Injury 

Other Considerations 
• Face Shields Rated for Arc Hazard 

• Hearing Protection Rated for Arc Hazard 

• Hand and Foot Protection Rated for Arc Hazard 

  Page 16 
© National Safety, Inc. 
www.nationalsafetyinc.com 
 
Exposure Energy Basics 
• Exposure Energy is Expressed in cal/cm2 

• Measured Using Thermal Sensors 

• 1 cal/cm2  » the Exposure on the Tip of a Finger by a Cigarette Lighter in 1 Second 

 
An Exposure Energy of 1 to 2 cal/cm2 Will Cause a 2nd Degree Burn on Human Skin 

Definitions 
z ARC RATING ‐ The maximum incident energy resistance demonstrated by a material PRIOR TO 
BREAKOPEN OR AT THE ONSET OF A SECOND DEGREE BURN.  A 1st Degree Burn or less is the 
goal during an electrical arc flash. 

z HRC ‐ Hazard Risk Category.  Current categories that apply to workers are Level 0‐4. Remember 
4, 8, 25, 40! 

z FLAT PANEL TESTING ‐ This is how our fabrics are tested and how the calorie rating is found 
(breakthrough threshold). 

z CALORIE/CM² ‐ This is a measurement of ENERGY.  A Cigarette lighter placed under your finger 
for 1 second equals roughly a 1 calorie burn. 

z What is a Calorie? 

• A Calorie is a measurement of energy, similar to labels on food products 

• A 100 cal/cm² blast can reach temperatures of up to 35,000 degrees Fahrenheit in the 
center, and 11,000 degrees on the perimeter  

Arc Hazard Exposure Levels 
z Category 0 –   N/A 

z Category 1 –   4 cal/cm²* 

z Category 2 –   8 cal/cm²* 

z Category 3 – 25 cal/cm²* 

  Page 17 
© National Safety, Inc. 
www.nationalsafetyinc.com 
 
z Category 4 – 40 cal/cm²* 

z Over 40 cal – Recommended to re‐engineer system to a lower rating.  

z  * Req'd minimum Rating of PPE. 

z 1.2 cal/cm² is the ONSET of a second degree burn 

z PPE Levels are the maximum at each exposure category 

  Page 18 
© National Safety, Inc.