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Diary

Date/May Event Venue Time Page

Sat 12

Royal Philharmonic Orchestra Blazin Fiddles

St Nicolas Church Corn Exchange

7.30pm 7.30pm

13 17

Sun 13

Sound Beginnings Morriston Orpheus Choir The Olympianist His Majestys Sagbutts & Cornetts

Sheepdrove Eco Conference Centre Corn Exchange Market Place Douai Abbey

10.30am/12.30pm 3.00pm 4.00pm 7.45pm

18 19 21 22

Mon 14

Fournier Piano Trio Lucinda Dickens Hawksley Innovation Chamber Ensemble with the Frith Piano Quartet

Corn Exchange Shaw House Corn Exchange

12.30pm 3.00pm 7.30pm

25 27 28

Tue 15

Lucy Parham & Petroc Trelawny Escher Quartet Ballet Central

The Vineyard St Michael and All Angels Church, Lambourn Corn Exchange

12.30pm 7.30pm 7.30pm

34 36 39

Wed 16

Emilia Martensson Quartet Zeffirellis Otello Kinsky Trio Prague

Corn Exchange Corn Exchange Long Gallery, Englefield House

12.30pm 7.30pm 7.30pm

40 42 43

Thu 17

David Starkey Tibetan Monks Mahan Esfahani

Long Gallery, Englefield House Corn Exchange St Marys Church, Kintbury

3.00pm 7.30pm 7.30pm

45 46 48

Fri 18

Piatti String Quartet Lighthouse Milo Karadagli c Sheepdrove Recital

Corn Exchange Corn Exchange St Georges Church, Wash Common Sheepdrove Eco Conference Centre

12.30pm 7.30pm 7.30pm 7.30pm

52 54 56 58

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Diary
Date/May Event Venue Time Page

Sat 19

Milo Karadagli Masterclass c Bollywood to Bhangra English Chamber Orchestra

Corn Exchange Corn Exchange St Nicolas Church

10.00am 7.30pm 7.30pm

60 62 64

Sun 20

Family Concert Sheepdrove Piano Competition Final Joyful Company of Singers

Corn Exchange Sheepdrove Eco Conference Centre St Martins Church, East Woodhay

3.00pm 3.00pm 7.30pm

70 71 75

Mon 21

Sheepdrove Piano Competition Winner Hugo Vickers Admission: One Shilling

Corn Exchange Combe Manor, Hungerford Corn Exchange

12.30pm 3.00pm 7.30pm

77 78 79

Tue 22

Julia McKenzie with Edward Seckerson Galliard Ensemble Mugenkyo Taiko Drummers

Sydmonton Court St Lawrences Church, Hungerford Corn Exchange

3.00pm 7.30pm 7.30pm

81 82 85

Wed 23

Consortium5 Romeo and Juliet Brodsky Quartet

Corn Exchange Corn Exchange St Marys Church, Shaw

12.30pm 7.30pm 7.30pm

86 89 90

Thu 24

Paul Moorhouse Stephen Hough Harry the Piano

Shaw House Corn Exchange Donnington Priory

11.00am/3.00pm 7.30pm 7.30pm

93 94 96

Fri 25

Vacarescu-Tsunakawa Duo Cantabile: The London Quartet The Tallis Scholars

Corn Exchange Corn Exchange Douai Abbey

12.30pm 7.30pm 7.45pm

97 99 101

Sat 26

Swinging at The Cotton Club Berlin Symphony Orchestra

Corn Exchange St Nicolas Church

7.30pm 7.30pm

108 110

www.newburyspringfestival.org.uk

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Festival Art Exhibition


The Long Gallery Englefield House Theale

Johan Andersson
After graduating from Central St. Martins in 2008 Johan Andersson became the youngest ever person to be shortlisted for the BP Portrait Award and named as The Independents top 20 Artists. His selected work was displayed at the National Portrait Gallery and in the same year he was also selected for the Jerwood Contemporary Painters prize. Since then Andersson has gone on to exhibit work alongside artists including Anish Kapoor, Tracy Emin, Sarah Lucas, Gavin Turk and Howard Hodgkin, and in 2010 was selected to exhibit work in support of BreakThrough Breast Cancer at The V&A Museum. He has exhibited and sold on the international art market including The Scope Art Fair in Basel, Cutlog in Paris, and most recently was invited to host a solo show at the Curio Gallery in Venice Los Angeles. His work has also been displayed in major London Underground stations including Bond Street, Baker Street and South Kensington. In 2010 Andersson was selected by SkyARTS as the one to watch young British Contemporary Artist to feature on a six part documentary called Art of Survival which was broadcast in summer 2011. In late July 2011 Andersson received a posthumous public commission to paint Amy Winehouse and during February 2012 featured on TED.com, working on his piece Jocelyn & Annie from his STOLEN FACES series.

who do not conform to the artificial and image conscious (attributes so often propagated by onscreen and printed hegemony). In recognising the capacity of the global media (in line with public receptiveness) to distort ontological perceptions, the paintings stand both in defiance and pride, celebrating diversity in the knowledge that we are all uniquely made. In the presence of STOLEN FACES one interacts with an expression that encourages intimacy, whilst challenging continually rising advertising milieus. In capturing both actuality and the elusive ethereal, the fusion of subtle technicolour has the effect of making ordinary details appear extraordinary. The subjects retain both an ephemeral and intense presence, provoking cognitive dissonance. The sheer scale of each piece encourages the viewer to confront their preconceptions of identity in a manner that is uniquely uncompromising. Andersson had toured with paintings mid-series but is particularly excited about having the opportunity to unveil the finalised STOLEN FACES series at the Long Gallery, Englefield House in May 2012. Eight paintings from the series, which represent individuals marginalised by contemporary society, will hang in place of family portraits of prominent 17 and 18th century earls and countesses. In bypassing the traditional London gallery circuit, Andersson is making an eye-catching statement about the conventions by which young artists are expected to adhere, making a personal contribution to help shake-up and redefine an industry. Opening times are 10.00am 1.00pm on the following dates: Saturday 12 May Sunday 13 May Monday 14 May Tuesday 15 May closed Wednesday Thursday 17 May Friday 18 May

STOLEN FACES
In December 2010 Andersson started work on his first formal series, which would become known as STOLEN FACES. The concept threaded through each piece is the endeavour to give representation and visibility to those

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www.johanandersson.com

www.newburyspringfestival.org.uk

Royal Philharmonic Orchestra


St Nicolas Church Newbury Saturday 12 May 7.30pm

Royal Philharmonic Orchestra


Owain Arwel Hughes Freddy Kempf Walton Beethoven Interval Brahms Symphony No 4 conductor piano Crown Imperial Piano Concerto No 5 Emperor

Freddy Kempf
Born in London in 1977, Freddy Kempf came to national prominence in 1992 when he won the BBC Young Musician of the Year competition. In 1998, his award of third, rather than first, prize in the Tchaikovsky International Piano Competition in Moscow provoked protests from the audience and an outcry in the Russian press, which proclaimed him the hero of the competition. His international career was rapidly established and his unprecedented popularity with Russian audiences has since been reflected in numerous sold-out concerts and television broadcasts. Many international dbuts followed, and Freddy Kempf has travelled all over the world to take up a wide range of invitations, from opening the Shanghai Concert Hall in October 2004 to recording Chopins Etudes for DVD in a chteau near Paris for BBC Television. The 2011-2012 season sees Freddy Kempf embarking on a major new project, in which he play/directs the Royal Philharmonic Orchestra in a complete cycle of Beethovens piano concertos in many of the UKs most important venues. Other highlights of the current season include concerts with the Bergen Philharmonic Orchestra under Andrew Litton and the RTVE Symphony Orchestra Madrid under Carlos Kalmar. Freddy Kempf also collaborates with the Australian Chamber Orchestra along with violinist/director Richard Tognetti and trumpeter Tine Thing Helseth in a performance at Birminghams Symphony Hall. Elsewhere, Freddy Kempf returns to the Tokyo Metropolitan Symphony Orchestra and the Vancouver Symphony Orchestra. Next season opens with a major UK tour with the St Petersburg Symphony Orchestra. Last season Freddy Kempf completed an extensive Japanese recital tour including Tokyos Suntory Hall; such was its success that he returns to Japan for another recital tour in June 2012. His other recital appearances this season include Manchesters Bridgewater Hall, Sociedad Filharmnica Bilbao and the Great Hall of the Moscow Conservatoire.

Sponsored by Greenham Common Trust Additional support from Mr and Mrs Roderick Chamberlain as part of the Contributors Scheme

Owain Arwel Hughes


In a career spanning 40 years, Owain Arwel Hughes has conducted and recorded many of the world's leading orchestras. In November 2007, he was appointed Principal Guest Conductor of the Cape Philharmonic Orchestra with whom he has recently conducted and recorded the world premiere of Schnittke's monumental choral work, Nagasaki. As Founder and Artistic Director, Owain Arwel Hughes is the driving force behind the success of the Cardiff Welsh Proms. Inaugurated in 1986, it has become one of the major UK music festivals attracting orchestras and leading artists from around the world. Committed to the highest level of music education for young people Owain Arwel Hughes accepted the position of Music Director of the National Youth Orchestra of Wales in 2003, the oldest such youth orchestra in the world. He has held the titles of Associate Conductor of the Philharmonia Orchestra, London, the BBC National Orchestra of Wales and Principal Associate Conductor of the Royal Philharmonic Orchestra. As Principal Conductor of the Aalborg Symphony Orchestra, Denmark, he raised the orchestra's profile with major recordings of Danish music. Acclaimed for his direction of large scale choral works Owain Arwel Hughes had a highly successful period as Conductor of the world famous Huddersfield Choral Society between 1980 and 1986. Owain Arwel Hughes enjoys a long-standing relationship with the recording label BIS for whom he has recorded the entire orchestral, concerto and choral output of Vagn Holmboe and all Rachmaninov's symphonies and concertos. Recent releases include Walton Symphony 1 and 2 with the Orchestre National de Lille and a CD of the music of Arwel Hughes with the Royal Philharmonic Orchestra.

www.owainarwelhughes.co.uk www.freddy-kempf.com www.rpo.co.uk

Neda Navaee

www.newburyspringfestival.org.uk

12 May
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Owain Arwel Hughes contribution to music has been marked with honorary doctorates and fellowships at nine universities and conservatoires. In 2004 in recognition of his services to music and charity he was awarded an OBE and in January 2009 he was the recipient of a CBE.

Royal Philharmonic Orchestra


Freddy Kempf records exclusively for BIS Records, his most recent release being a solo recital disc of Rachmaninov, Bach/Busoni, Ravel and Stravinsky, praised by BBC Music Magazine for its wonderful delicate playing and fine sense of style.

Programme Notes

Royal Philharmonic Orchestra


Acknowledged as one of the UKs most prestigious orchestras, the Royal Philharmonic Orchestra (RPO) enjoys an international reputation for bringing audiences worldwide first-class performances and the highest possible standards of music-making across a diverse range of musical repertoire. This was the vision of the Orchestras flamboyant founder Sir Thomas Beecham, whose legacy is maintained today as the Orchestra thrives under the exceptional direction of its Artistic Director and Principal Conductor, Maestro Charles Dutoit. The Royal Philharmonic Orchestra is London-based and performs a prestigious series of concerts each year at Southbank Centres Royal Festival Hall, featuring artists of the highest calibre. The Orchestras London home is at Cadogan Hall, just off Sloane Square, where concertgoers enjoy an intimate atmosphere in an idyllic location. Complementing the concert series at Cadogan Hall, the Orchestra regularly performs in the magnificent Royal Albert Hall, presenting works of great magnitude designed to suit the immensity of this historic and grand venue. Within the UK, the Orchestra is committed to offering an extensive regional touring programme, including established residencies in Croydon, Northampton, Lowestoft, Reading and Crawley. As an international orchestra, the RPO has toured more than thirty countries in the last five years. Recent tours have included performances in Egypt, Russia, Spain, Italy, Germany, Azerbaijan and China. The Orchestra is also recognised for its artistic work through a vibrant and innovative community and education programme, titled RPO resound. Specially trained members of the Orchestra, alongside accomplished project leaders, provide comprehensive workshops where music is used as a powerful and inspirational force. Frequently found in the recording studio, the Orchestra records extensively for film and television as well as for all the major commercial record companies. The Orchestra also owns its own record label and is proud to be the first UK orchestra to stream its entire series of concerts live from Cadogan Hall.

Walton's two marches were specifically written for the coronations of George VI in 1937 (Crown Imperial) and Elizabeth II in 1953 (Orb and Sceptre). They are similar in form, though Crown Imperial is the more musically direct. After the fashion of Elgar, both Walton marches have a memorable and noble melody as their contrasting second section, following a strongly rhythmic opening. This was the kind of committed melodic gesture which in his time, Walton alone seemed capable of inventing. One other feature is notable in Crown Imperial. This is the deployment of imposing brass chords, which precede the noble theme and then in due course form the basis of the impressive and emphatic conclusion. LUDWIG VAN BEETHOVEN (1770-1827) Piano Concerto No. 5 in E flat major, Opus 73 Emperor 1. Allegro 2. Adagio un poco mosso 3. Rondo: Allegro While the nickname 'Emperor' is thoroughly appropriate to this grand concerto, it was not Beethoven's own, since it was conceived by the publisher, composer and pianomaker Johann Cramer. The music was composed from 1809 and the first performance took place in Vienna in November 1811, when the pianist was Friedrich Schneider and not Beethoven himself, as had been the case in each of the four previous piano concertos. The reason was the composer's deafness, which by this time was so acute that he could no longer perform in public. Thereafter he wrote no more concertos, although he continued to compose in all the other important genres save opera. The first movement is constructed on the grand scale, and in fact is longer than the other movements combined. The opening gesture is immensely impressive: the pianist plays three short and explosive cadenzas against powerful orchestral chords, and only then does the orchestral exposition begin. This generates a tremendous momentum, with several distinctive themes which are so constructed that they provide rhythmic-melodic units which are eminently suited to development. The second subject group is well contrasted, and uses both the major and the minor keys in radiating its subtle personality. The return of the soloist soon generates a fortissimo statement of the first subject, but it is the various adaptations of the second which are more interesting, developing into a range of possibilities which the initial presentation had scarcely suggested. Then these ideas www.newburyspringfestival.org.uk

www.owainarwelhughes.co.uk www.freddy-kempf.com www.rpo.co.uk

12 May
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SIR WILLIAM WALTON (1902-1983) Coronation March: Crown Imperial

Royal Philharmonic Orchestra


are fully developed, until the orchestral tutti is recapitulated. Although there is no formal cadenza in the later stages of the movement, there is an extended coda which further treats the main ideas and ends in a magnificently heroic manner. The mood changes completely with the advent of the slow movement. This is constructed from two themes: a simple tune first heard on muted strings, and a series of slow descending piano phrases linked with fragments of the melody. The atmosphere is peaceful and provides a foil to the surrounding movements, as the piano elaborates and decorates the musical line, even taking a supporting role in accompanying several woodwind solos. When the piano begins the gradual upward tread of a new theme, the music soon 'bursts its skin' to become the energetic theme of the rondo finale. This is in fact a sonata-rondo design, since there is development of the material in the contrasting episodes. Thus the three most important statements of the theme herald the exposition, development and recapitulation. There is fine subsidiary material too, the contrasts imposing the effect of heroic gesture in the manner of the finale of the famous Symphony No. 5. Of this phenomenon there is no finer example than the conclusion. From quiet introspection the piano plays a series of rising scales, triumphantly releasing the full orchestra.
Terry Barfoot

The second subject group comprises several distinctive themes, the finest of them a rich cello melody which maintains unity as much as it brings contrast. The development begins with the outline of the opening theme, but soon finds room for mystery and relaxation too, before the tensions return. The closing stages are increasingly intense, culminating in a powerful statement with timpani to the fore. The beautiful slow movement is the perfect foil, the opening horn call giving way to a tender clarinet theme against pizzicato strings. As the music proceeds its line is sustained through subtle variations of orchestral colour, until the cellos present the lyrical second theme. This fine melody is at once memorable and ideally suited to symphonic development. The coda is especially eloquent, as was its counterpart in the preceding movement, the richly evocative return of the horn call bringing the music to a peaceful conclusion. The scherzo is abrupt in its rhythmic outline, unlike the more flowing movements Brahms had preferred in his other symphonies. The principal theme displays qualities of great energy and vigour, while for contrast the violins present a more graceful contour. The tranquil mood of the middle section does not linger, however. For the music of the scherzo makes a sudden reappearance, and the later stages of the movement become more vigorous still, culminating in a brightly lit fanfare. The passacaglia finale is one of Brahms's most astonishing achievements. He took his theme from Bach's Cantata No. 150, Nach dir, Herr, verlanget mich' ('To Thee, Lord, I lift my soul') and in the course of some ten minutes treated it to no fewer than thirty variations, with such integrity of design that the listener is more conscious of flowing musical development than of separate interludes. As in the First Symphony, Brahms holds back the sonority of the trombones for his finale, with the result that the music attains a new richness and power in order to conclude the drama. Thus the closing phase is truly tragic, with no concession to romance.
Terry Barfoot

12 May

JOHANNES BRAHMS (1770-1827) Symphony No. 4 in E minor, Opus 98 Allegro ma non troppo Andante moderato Allegro giocoso Allegro energico e passionate Of all the major 19th century composers, Brahms is the figure least concerned with the romantic programme, the figure most committed to the treatment of the classical ideal. Accordingly, his symphonies retain the orchestra of Beethoven and the classical four-movement plan. However, each of these magnificent compositions has its own distinct sound-world; and in the case of the Fourth, the tragic grandeur of the finale is the crucial feature, a passacaglia (a set of variations on a recurring theme in the bass) which he derived from his beloved Bach. Composed in 1884, the Symphony No. 4 was first performed at Meiningen on 25 October 1885 by the Court Orchestra conducted by Brahms. Although the theme of the symphony's first subject is long and expressive, its initial presentation is phrased in pairs of notes before it is allowed to expand to its full potential. 16

Sponsored by Greenham Common Trust Additional support from Mr and Mrs Roderick Chamberlain as part of the Contributors Scheme

Newbury Spring Festival would like to thank Yamaha for kindly supporting us with the supply of their Concert Grand Piano - The CFX

www.owainarwelhughes.co.uk www.freddy-kempf.com www.rpo.co.uk

Blazin Fiddles
Corn Exchange Newbury Saturday 12 May 7.30pm

Blazin Fiddles
Jenna Reid, Bruce Macgregor, Allan Henderson, Iain Macfarlane fiddles Anna Massie guitar/fiddle Ingrid Henderson keyboard

Blazin Fiddles
Take a group of the hottest contemporary fiddle players from the Highlands and Islands of Scotland and youve got the award winning Blazin Fiddles on your hands. In the past decade no other band has quite captured the excitement, passion and the sensitivity of Scottish music as Blazin Fiddles, having grown from a showcase tour of individual fiddlers highlighting the distinctive flavours of Highlands and Islands fiddle music. During a performance, the audience has the opportunity to hear pieces featuring the regional styles of each fiddler followed by all hands jumping in for a wonderful explosion of music. Fiddles and bows blaze away with guitar and piano for one of the most exciting and memorable fiddle ensembles ever to take the stage.

European festival appearances have included The Cambridge Folk Festival, The Sidmouth International Music Festival, Lorient, Tnder Festival, the Falun Festival and Scotlands premier event Celtic Connections. Past performances have included their own project With Strings Attached debuted at Celtic Connections 05 featuring singer songwriters Eddi Reader, Justin Currie (Del Amitri) and Colin MacIntyre (Mull Historical Society). In 2005 they made a welcomed return to Cambridge Folk Festival and also played the BBC Proms at the Royal Albert Hall following the release of their last album Magnificent Seven which picked up the Best Album Award at the Scots Trad Awards 2005. The band released their fourth album, Blazin Fiddles Live, in the lead up to their 10th year anniversary in 2008. Like rare single malts, each member of Blazin Fiddles draws the distinct flavour of music from their part of the highlands and islands. From solo to ensemble sets, they all come together in a fiery blend that raises the roof.

www.blazin-fiddles.co.uk

www.newburyspringfestival.org.uk

12 May
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Sound Beginnings
Sheepdrove Eco Conference Centre Lambourn Sunday 13 May 10.30am 12.30pm

Concert for babies and young children


A concert especially for young children given in the beautiful Oak Room of Sheepdrove ECO Conference Centre on the Berkshire Downs. A magical musical journey with song, music and movement will be presented by operatic baritone and actor Richard Morris and the acclaimed pianist Mikhail Kazakevich. This years theme Carnival of the Animals will give plenty of scope for children to participate in a selection of music by Saint-Sans and other composers. Bring your imagination, plus a cushion or blanket, and enjoy this opportunity to explore music with your children. Home baked organic nursery food will be served after each concert. Ticket holders are also welcome to picnic in the adjoining herb garden. Supported by The Sheepdrove Trust

Mikhail Kazakevich
Born in Gorky, Russia, Mikhail Kazakevichs performing career began with a sensational western debut at the International Schubert Competition in Dortmund, Germany in 1991. Since that time he has played solo and with orchestras at prestigious venues and festivals around the world and combines his intensive concert activity with teaching which he has enjoyed since his graduation when he was appointed Professor at the Gorky State Conservatoire. Mikhail will be returning to give an evening recital at the Sheepdrove Eco Conference Centre on Friday 18 May when his programme will include works by Dubussy, Ravel and Roussel. See page 58 for more details.

13 May

Richard Morris
Richard Morris, from South Wales, studied at the Guildhall School and then achieved a Scholarship to the Banff School of Fine Arts in Canada. He returned to sing the Celebrant in Bernsteins Mass, as part of the LSO's Bernstein Festival at the Barbican. Bernstein then asked him to repeat the role in Boston and he has since performed the role in Prague, Brno, Passau and the South Bank. In this country, he has worked at the Royal Opera House, Scottish Opera, Opera North, the Almeida, Holland Park Opera, London City Opera and many more. He was a company member of the National Theatre and performed in Euripidess Bacchai with music by Harrison Birtwhistle and directed by Peter Hall. He has recorded for Virgin Classics and Sony, and appeared on television and radio, both here and abroad. Supported by the Sheepdrove Trust

Newbury Spring Festival would like to thank Yamaha for kindly supporting us with the supply of their Concert Grand Piano - The CFX

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www.kazakevich.net

Morriston Orpheus Choir


Corn Exchange Newbury Sunday 13 May 3.00pm

Morriston Orpheus Choir


Joy Amman Davies Kathryn McAdam musical director mezzo soprano

Kathryn McAdam Harold Arlen

God Save The Queen (Choir only) Morriston Orpheus Choir Caradog Roberts arr Alwyn Humphreys Rachie Joseph Parry arr Alwyn Humphreys Aberystwyth Kathryn McAdam Rossini Una voce poco fa (from Il barbiere di Siviglia) Morriston Orpheus Choir Andrae Crouch arr Jack Schrader Soon and very soon Robat Arwyn Benedictus Middlebrooks/Belland arr Alwyn Humphreys What would I do without my music Kathryn McAdam Puccini Quando men vo (from La Boheme) Fernando Obradors El vito Morriston Orpheus Choir Marx/Thompson arr Alwyn Humphreys To where you are arr Joy Amman Davies Canwn Moliannwn Interval

Sponsored by Greenham Common Trust

Joy Amman Davies


Joy Amman Davies was born in Glanamman, Dyfed. Whilst still at school, she won a scholarship to have piano tuition at the Welsh College of Music and Drama, Cardiff, before entering the University of Wales, Bangor, where she studied with the Czech pianist, Jana Frenklova Joy is in constant demand as accompanist for soloists, vocal and instrumental, and has been guest accompanist with the Ardwyn and Polyphonic choirs in Cardiff. She has accompanied many famous Welsh singers, including Bryn Terfel, Rebecca Evans, Katherine Jenkins, Gwyn Hughes Jones, Rhys Meirion and Rhydian Roberts of X Factor. She has been one of the official accompanists at the Urdd National Eisteddfod and has performed as a concerto soloist with the Chamber Orchestra of Wales, performing Mozarts famous Elvira Madigan in the very popular candlelight concerts. She has also appeared several times on S4Cs Dechrau Canu, Dechrau Canmol series accompanying Elin Manahan Thomas, Leah Marian Jones and Adriano Graziani. She was appointed Accompanist to the Morriston Orpheus Choir in 1991 and her expertise in that role has

Morriston Orpheus Choir Pete St John arr Joy Amman Davies The fields of Athenry Kander/Nebb arr Joy Amman Davies Razzle Dazzle Kathryn McAdam Gershwin Summertime (from Porgy and Bess) Bernstein I feel pretty (from West Side Story) Morriston Orpheus Choir Ennio Morricone arr Joy Amman Davies Nella Fantasia Lyn Harry En Route

www.morristonorpheus.com

www.newburyspringfestival.org.uk

13 May
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Somewhere over the rainbow (from The Wizard of Oz) I could have danced all night Frederick Loewe Morriston Orpheus Choir Elvis Presley arr Alwyn Humphreys Stand by me Morriston Orpheus Choir & Kathryn McAdam Mascagni Easter Hymn (from Cavalleria Rusticana) Morriston Orpheus Choir arr Alwyn Humphreys American Trilogy John Hughes Cwm Rhondda Mae Hen Wlad Fy Nhadau

Morriston Orpheus Choir


been widely recognised. Beyond the United Kingdom, she has accompanied the Choir and its guest soloists in Australia, Canada, Eire, New Zealand, Oman, Poland, Spain, Taiwan, United Arab Emirates and the USA, including performances at the Sydney Opera House and Carnegie Hall, New York. For three years, Joy was in charge of choral activities at Elm Tree House School, Cardiff, during which time she conducted them to victory at the Bath and Mid-Somerset Music Festival on several occasions. In 2004, Joy was made a Life Member of the Morriston Orpheus Choir in recognition of her outstanding contribution and commitment. After 16 years as Accompanist, she was appointed Musical Director in June 2007 Kathryn gives regular recital, gala, and oratorio performances throughout the country having sung in venues such as St Johns Smith Square, LSO St. Lukes, Wigmore Hall, Royal Albert Hall, and the Barbican. Most recently, she was delighted to win the Morriston Orpheus Choir Supporters Assocation Young Welsh Singer of the Year 2011 competition. In May 2010 she was a finalist in the AESS Patricia Routledge competition, and reached the semi-finals of the Royal Overseas League Competition in February. Kathryn was also a finalist in the Guildhall Aria Competition, November 2009. Kathryn is the current recipient of the GSMD Silk Street award. She is also very grateful for the generous support of the Elizabeth Evans Trust, the Amar-Franses and Foster-Jenkins trust, and Serena Fenwick.

13 May

Kathryn McAdam
Kathryn McAdam was born and raised in Farnborough, Kent, and graduated from the University of Sheffield with a 1st class honours degree in music in 2006. She joined the Guildhall School of Music and Drama in 2008 and is now in her final year of postgraduate study, on the prestigious Opera Course, under the tuition of Janice Chapman. Aside from her contribution to productions staged by the GSMD, which include the roles of Hermia A Mid-Summer Nights Dream Britten, Frau Reich Die Lustigen Weiber von Windsor Nicolai, and Laura Jolanta Tchaikovsky, Kathryn has sung the role of Olga Eugene Onegin Tchaikovsky at the 2010 Endellion Summer Festival in Cornwall alongside renowned singers Mark Padmore, Roderick Williams, Susan Bickley, and Katherine Broderick. Just prior to this, she understudied the role of Suzuki Madama Butterfly Puccini for Grange Park Opera, and also formed part of the chorus for their production of Lamour des trois oranges Prokofiev. Other operatic experience to date includes: Cherubino Le nozze di Figaro Mozart (EMFEB), Carmen Carmen, Octavian Der Rosenkavalier, Rosina Il barbiere di Siviglia, Ramiro La finta giardiniera, Meg Falstaff, Charlotte Werther, Beppe Lamico Fritz, Tamerlano Tamerlano, Nancy Martha (GSMD opera scenes), Dorabella Cosi fan tutte (SU scenes), Public Opinion Orpheus in the Underworld, Sorceress Dido & Aeneas, Anne of Cleves Dearly Beheaded by Jamie Brown, and Mrs Anna and Lady Thiang The King & I at Buxton Opera House.

Morriston Orpheus Choir


Often called the unofficial ambassadors for Wales, the Choir is internationally-acclaimed as a leading exponent of male choral singing. Within the United Kingdom the Choir is in constant demand with around 25 engagements a year, including concerts, TV and afterdinner performances. Although itself a registered charity and financially self-supporting, much of its work is devoted to assisting local and national good causes, at home and overseas, such as Leukaemia Research, Action for Children, RNLI, Air Ambulance Wales, Royal National Eisteddfod, Urdd Gobaith Cymru and Save the Children Fund. The aims and values of the Choir, however, remain unchanged. During the whole of its existence it has striven to follow the advice, attributed to Sir Walford Davies in a speech in Swansea on that same April week in 1935 when the Choir was formed, to make music joyously. Sponsored by Greenham Common Trust

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www.morristonorpheus.com

The Olympianist
Market Place Newbury Sunday 13 May 4.00pm

The Olympianist Anthony Hewitt, his bike and a piano in tow


Internationally renowned pianist and avid cyclist Anthony Hewitt is The Olympianist. To celebrate the London Olympics 2012 he will cycle the length of Britain, in aid of charity, from Lands End to John OGroats, with his piano trailing in a van. His visit to Newbury is part of this epic voyage. Janacek Beethoven Schubert Chopin Chopin Rachmaninoff Liszt Sonata I:X:1905 From the Street Piano Sonata No 8 in C minor Op 13 Pathtique Impromptu in E flat Op 90 No 2 Fantasie - Impromptu Polonaise in A flat Op 53 Heroic Prelude in G minor Op 23 No 4 Hungarian Rhapsody No 2

Anthony Hewitt
Anthony Hewitts communicative and virtuosic pianism has won him many plaudits worldwide, and as a recitalist, concerto soloist and chamber musician he has performed to much critical acclaim. His diverse repertoire encompasses all styles ranging from Bach to Benjamin, and he champions contemporary composers with frequent new commissions. His enterprising projects include the founding of the Ulverston International Music Festival, now in its eighth year, which brings artists of international repute to a small Cumbrian market town. Career highlights to date include orchestral engagements with the National Symphony and Princeton Symphony Orchestras in the USA, and the Royal Philharmonic Orchestra and Northern Sinfonia in the UK. He has given four recitals at Wigmore Hall, and appeared across the USA including at Carnegie Weill Recital Hall. His discography includes 'Protg' (Divine Art Records), the first coupling on CD of the Liszt and Reubke Sonatas. This unique recording was described in International Record Review as "magisterial", and received a Gramophone recommendation. Highlights of upcoming concerts include an appearance with the English Chamber Orchestra at the Royal Festival Hall, Beethovens Triple concerto with the Brighton Philharmonic, and a solo recital at Wigmore Hall. His 'Olympianist' project has resulted in over thirty engagements - solo and orchestral - including with the Manchester Camerata, here at the Newbury Spring Festival and at the Swaledale festival. When he performs outdoors it is on a specially adapted van which he has coined Van BeethoVan. The Olympianist event is supported by West Berkshire Council and is part of West Berkshire Enjoy!, celebrating the year 2012 across the district with more opportunities for all to take part in cultural and sporting activities (www.westberksenjoy.org.uk).

The Olympianists Newbury visit is supported by West Berkshire Council

Anthony is undertaking this herculean endeavour in order to raise money for some of his favourite charities, supporting the Mayor's Fund for Young Musicians, Musequality, Get Kids Going!, the National Austistic Society and CLIC Sargent. He hopes that the scale and adventure of his Olympian effort will inspire, and aims to raise at least 20,000 for these charities. If you wish to make a donation please go to: www.classicfm.co.uk/charity/olympianist/

www.olympianist.com

www.newburyspringfestival.org.uk

13 May
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His Majestys Sagbutts and Cornetts


Douai Abbey Upper Woolhampton Sunday 13 May 7.45pm

His Majestys Sagbutts and Cornetts The Grand Tour


Jeremy West Jamie Savan Abigail Newman Adam Woolf Steve Saunders Bejamin Bayl cornett cornett alto & tenor sackbut alto & tenor sackbut bass sackbut continuo Suite for His Majestys Sagbutts & Cornetts Fantasia Pavane & Galliard Dolorosa Fantasia Faire Wether

Spain Giovanni Pierluigi da Vestiva i colli Palestrina (1525/6-1594) with divisions by Bartolom de Selma y Salaverde (fl 161338) and Adam Woolf Francisco Correa de ArauxoTiento (1584-1654) Jos Ximnez (1601-72) Italy Andrea Falconieri (1585-1656) Girolamo Alessandro Frescobaldi (1583-1643) Giovanni Gabrieli (c.1554-7 - 1612) Giovanni Gabrieli Andrea Gabrieli (?1532/3-1585) Batalla del sexto tono Passacaille a 2 Sonata a 4 Toccata Canzon Quarta a 4 (1608) O Sacrum Convivium

England Matthew Locke (1621-77)

13 May

William Byrd (1540-1623) Peter Phillips (1560-1628) arranged by Jamie Savan John Munday) (b c.1555; d 1630)

Germany Johann Schein (1586-1630) Padouana Johann Vierdanck (1605-46) Matthias Weckmann (1616-74) Samuel Scheidt (1587-1654) Interval Sonata 31 Als ich einmal Lust bekam Toccata Canzon a 5

Sponsored by The Sackler Foundation and Sir Hugh and Lady Stevenson

His Majestys Sagbutts and Cornetts


Having celebrated its first quarter century in 2007, His Majestys Sagbutts & Cornetts continues in the same spirit as always: aiming to bring the sound of its noble instruments, through pan-European repertoire from the 16th and 17th centuries, to new audiences via recordings, radio, television and live performance. The groups illustrious-sounding name is taken from Matthew Lockes five-part tthings for His Majestys Sagbutts and Cornetts that were probably played during the coronation celebrations for King Charles II in 1661. Essentially a recital group comprising two cornetts, three sackbutts and chamber organ / harpsichord, HMSC often joins with singers and string players, and is frequently asked to take part in projects with choirs: Sir John Eliot Gardiners Monteverdi Choir, the BBC Singers, Ex Cathedra, the choirs of Trinity, Kings and St Johns Colleges, Cambridge, as well as those of Westminster Abbey, St Paul's and Westminster Cathedrals, London. Recent highlights in the groups 25 year career have included two performances in Londons Royal Albert Hall at the BBC Proms. Here the group joined The Tallis Scholars and The BBC Singers in Striggios newly rediscovered Mass in 60 parts; and, for the BBCs unique and inspired brass day, HM appeared on stage with the Black Dyke and Grimethorpe Colliery brass bands. At the South Bank Festival, His Majestys joined The Kings Singers in the Queen Elizabeth Hall, a musical encounter

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His Majestys Sagbutts and Cornetts


which had been some five years in the planning. This year His Majestys Sagbutts & Cornetts will play in Girton, St Johns and Kings Colleges in Cambridge, at Wadham College Oxford, The Sage Gateshead, The Royal Albert Hall at the BBC Proms, St Pauls Cathedral, The Three Choirs Festival, Versailles, The Concertgebouw, Pisa Cathedral, Wrzburg, Regensburg, Granada, Washington and New York (amongst many others!). HMSCs first commission of a work from a living composer, Martyn Harry, made possible by a grant from the Performing Rights Society (UK) will be completed this year too. hand with such composers as Gabrieli and Monteverdi. Johann Hermann Schein was a predecessor of Bach at St Thomass in Leipzig; Samuel Scheidt worked as a composer and court organist in Halle. Both published substantial collections of idiomatic instrumental music suitable for performance on cornetts and sackbuts. Johann Vierdanck was himself a cornettist (as well as a violinist and organist) and published a collection of Capricci in 1641 (from which the Sonata Als ich einmal Lust bekam is taken), suited to performance by the Stadtpfeifer the professional town wind bands that would play daily from the church towers. Matthias Weckmann was arguably the most gifted of Schtzs pupils, and his compositions reflect a keen interest in developments in the Italian avant garde of the midseventeenth century. The second half of our Grand Tour itinerary commences in Spain with music by Bartolom de Selma y Salaverde, a virtuoso bassoonist (and Augustinian friar) who was himself extremely well-travelled: he was at the court of Archduke Leopold in Innsbruck during 1628-30. Vestiva i colli, one of the few secular madrigals of Palestrina was used as a basis for improvisatory settings by numerous performer-composers during the late-sixteenth and earlyseventeenth centuries. This five-voice madrigal is composed in two halves, the first half of which Selma set for soprano and bass instruments; we play the second half in a virtuosic setting for all five instruments by Adam Woolf, thus continuing the historical tradition of performers supplying their own ornamentation to such pieces. Francisco Correa de Arauxo had a colourful career as organist and priest in Seville, Madrid and Segovia, interspersed with various lawsuits and some time spent in prison. Andrea Falconieri was a Neapolitan lutenist who worked in Northern Italy, Spain and France before returning to Naples in 1639, where he published his only collection of instrumental music in 1650, from which this Passacaille is taken. We then head north to Rome, where the great organist Girolamo Frescobaldi had become something of a tourist attraction himself, such was the fame of his improvisatory performances. Then, as now, Frescobaldi was renowned as a composer of keyboard music, but his compositions for instrumental ensemble deserve to be better known. As we approach the city of Venice it seems appropriate to hand this narrative over to Thomas Coryate, an English courtier who undertook the Grand Tour in 1608:

Programme Notes
The Grand Tour The education of an English gentleman in the seventeenth century was not considered complete unless he had undertaken the Grand Tour: a journey of cultural discovery through continental Europe. We begin our own Grand Tour itinerary this evening in England before setting sail across the North Sea to Germany. After the interval we begin in Spain, and arrive in Italy via Naples (then a Spanish kingdom). We then continue our journey north to Venice, traditionally the final stop on the Grand Tour, and, fortuitously, the European centre of cornett and sackbut playing par excellence in the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries. Our programme commences with the music for His Majestys Sagbutts and Cornetts by Matthew Locke. Arguably the most famous composition for our instruments, this suite of dance movements was possibly composed for the coronation of King Charles II in 1660. William Byrd requires no introduction of course: he was the most celebrated English composer of his era. He is one of a number of composers whose music for keyboard is preserved in the Fitzwilliam Virginal Book. Peter Philipss Pavane and Galliard Dolorosa, originally written for a five-part instrumental consort, also appears as a keyboard arrangement in the Fitzwilliam Virginal Book, with the addition of florid and imaginative ornamentation. Not to be outdone, we have borrowed from this ornamentation in making our own arrangement of this piece for cornetts and sackbuts. Incidentally, Philips himself provides a link with continental Europe, as he spent most of his career working in the Low Countries. Also from the Fitzwilliam Virginal Book is John Mundays programmatic Fantasia, subtitled Faire Wether Lightening Thunder, which accompanies our journey across the North Sea in what could often (and still can!) be treacherous conditions. All the German composers represented here were profoundly influenced by the musical developments in Venice, the fruits of which were taken to Germany by such musicians as Heinrich Schtz who had studied firstwww.hmsc.co.uk

Such is the rarenesse of the situation of Venice, that it doth even amaze and drive into admiration all strangers that upon their first arrivall behold the same The fairest place of all the citie (which is indeed of that admirable and incomparable beauty, that I think no place whatsoever,
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13 May

His Majestys Sagbutts and Cornetts


eyther in Christendome or Paganisme may compare with it) is the Piazza, that is, the Market place of St. Marke. Truely such is the stupendious glory of it, that at my first entrance thereof it did even amaze or rather ravish my senses. For here is the greatest magnificence of architecture to be seene, that any place under the sunne doth yeelde.
Giovanni Gabrieli was organist and head of the instrumental ensemble at St Marks basilica, and as such he is perhaps the single most important figure in the history of the cornett and sackbut ensemble. Cornetts and sackbuts formed the nucleus of his orchestra, which became the model for the constitution of instrumental ensembles in European chapels for a generation. His uncle, Andrea Gabrieli, was Giovannis teacher and mentor, and also a wonderful composer in his own right. We hope you enjoy the auditory delights of our Grand Tour as much as Thomas Coryate, who, upon hearing the music of the Gabrielis in Venice, wrote:

I heard the best musicke that ever I did in all my life so good, so delectable, so rare, so admirable, so superexcellent, that it did even ravish and stupifie all those strangers that never heard the like. But how others were affected with it I know not; for mine owne part I can say this, that I was for the time even rapt up with Saint Paul into the third heaven.
Jamie Savan 2010

13 May

Sponsored by The Sackler Foundation and Sir Hugh and Lady Stevenson

nsf Wining & Dining


Morning Coffee : Lunch : Afternoon Tea Pre-Concert drinks Early evening meals : Late suppers

after page 96

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Fournier Piano Trio


Corn Exchange Newbury Monday 14 May 12.30pm

Young Artists Lunchtime Recital 1


Sulki Yu Pei-Jee Ng Chiao-Ying Chang Faur Bridge Ravel violin cello piano Trio in D minor Op 120 Miniatures for Piano Trio (selection) Trio in A minor

They have played in masterclasses for Ralph Kirshbaum, Martin Lovett, Gabor Takacs-Nagy, Leif Ove Andsnes, Daniel Hope, Susan Tomes and Menahem Pressler. The Trio was recently appointed as Artist-in-Residence at Wolfson College, University of Oxford.

Programme Notes
GABRIEL FAUR (1845-1924) Piano Trio in D minor, Opus 120 Allegro ma non troppo Andantino Allegro vivo Gabriel Faur was one of the most important French musicians of the later 19th and earlier 20th centuries. His best-known composition is probably his beautifully restrained setting of the Requiem, but he was also particularly inspired in chamber music and as a song writer. The Piano Trio is one of Faur's last compositions, written after his retirement from his illustrious teaching career. During his final years ill health and even money worries were affecting him, and for his benefit a special concert of his works was given at the Sorbonne in June 1922. Fired with renewed enthusiasm by this event, he returned to composition at the request of his publisher Jacques Durand, writing the Piano Trio during the autumn and winter, and it was first performed by Alfred Cortot, Jacques Thibaut and Pablo Casals in June 1923. The Piano Trio confirms that Faurs powers remained at their height, and its three movements reveal a conception of chamber music on the large scale. In keeping with what had become his preferred approach, Faur composed the inner movement first, before turning to the remainder. The trend of the first movement is from initial restraint towards intensity of expression. The music is skilfully developed along classical lines, with two important themes, an extended cantilena introduced by the cello, and a shorter oscillating phrase on the piano. The development is masterly in its controlled integration and sense of growth. The slow movement is the longest of the three, and is dominated by the beautiful cantabile theme which on its first appearance is presented in turn by the strings. This is music of eloquence and real tenderness, confirming that Faurs creative powers had not diminished with the passing years. There is a contrasting central section, featuring syncopated rhythms in the piano, the tune moving higher and higher until it is skillfully combined with the principal theme. The coda is extended and particularly serene in mood.

The Young Artists Lunchtime Recital series is sponsored by The Headley Trust

Fournier Piano Trio

Formed in 2009, the Fournier Piano Trio is rapidly emerging as one of the UK's leading young piano trios. Winners of both 2nd Prize and Audience Prize at the 6th Trondheim International Chamber Music Competition in 2011, the Trio continues its second year as Leverhulme Chamber Music Fellows at the Royal Academy of Music and is mentored by renowned pedagogues Christopher Elton, David Takeno, Thomas Brandis and Michael Dussek. They recently made their critically acclaimed Purcell Room debut as part of the 2011 PLG New Year Series and are winners of a Philharmonia Orchestra MMSF Recital Award and a Tunnell Trust Award. Recent performances include recitals at the Purcell Room, St James Piccadilly and Holywell Room in the UK and abroad in Germany, France and Holland. They also appeared at the Trondheim International Chamber Music Academy and Festival in Norway, performing Faur's Piano Quartet No.2 with Lawrence Power. In October 2011 the Fournier Piano Trio made its Wigmore Hall debut, under the auspices of the Kirckman Concert Society, when they performed the world premiere of a new work by acclaimed British composer Gary Carpenter. They will return later in 2012 for the Park Lane Group Monday Platform Series. Future highlights also include a tour of Scotland as part of their Tunnell Trust Award and their debut recording of British contemporary trios including Timothy Salter's Piano Trio for USK Recordings. www.fourniertrio.com

www.newburyspringfestival.org.uk

14 May
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Fournier Piano Trio


The urgency of the final movement, Allegro vivo, is intensified by its brevity. Faur was compelled to explain that the resemblance of the opening gesture to Leoncavallos Pagliacci was pure coincidence; and in any case he did not admire the verismo style. The piano takes the music forwards with answering phrases, to form a substantial introduction before the arrival of the principal theme after sixty bars. Once again the cello delivers the theme, which is soon worked in conjunction with a second subject, more motivic in character. Despite the relatively gentle nature of much of the Trio, the final stages are emphatic and resounding.
Terry Barfoot

The opening movement is a free sonata form with an unusual rhythmic metre of 8/8 time, and three unequal beats to the bar. The principal theme is introduced by the piano and echoed by the unison strings, while the second subject recalls the Pavane of Mother Goose and is given initially to the strings. The trend is for the piano right hand to be pitched between the violin and the cello, who are often separated at a distance of two octaves. The high-spirited second movement is entitled Pantoum, whose unusual title refers to a vocal declamation in Malay. There are three themes: first, a staccato rhythm with a virtuoso violin part, a more expressive section in which the piano has a chorale melody, and a third theme is derived from the first. Towards the end of the movement the roles of the piano and the strings are exchanged. The Passacaille is flexibly developed. The theme passes from the left hand of the piano to the cello and finally to the violin, at which point its contour begins to vary. With each statement the theme moves to a higher register, until at the centre of the movement it disappears altogether. The arch form is an ascent followed from the climax by a descent in which the theme gradually returns to its original low pitch. The finale is brilliant and is constructed as a free rondo. The effect is dazzling: for instance, while the violin and cello are trilling in a quasi-orchestral display, the piano proceeds independently. The conception is founded upon the subtle interplay of quintuple (5/4) and septuple (7/4) times, and typifies the intensity with which Ravel worked on this composition, as his letters reveal: 'I have never worked with more insane, more heroic intensity. In fact, I am working with the manic assurance and clarity of a madman.'
Terry Barfoot

FRANK BRIDGE (1879-1941) Miniatures for Piano Trio Valse Russe Hornpipe Marche Militaire Over the years Frank Bridge has probably been best known as the teacher of the young Benjamin Britten. In fact he was himself a hugely talented composer, as well as an excellent performer on the viola and a conductor of great talent, who was particularly admired by Sir Henry Wood. Bridge composed these miniatures during 1906-7. He was an experienced chamber music player as violist of the English String Quartet, and a particularly adept composer for smaller ensembles. His miniatures are delightful compositions, always imaginative. In this music which has neither the bravura of the concert hall, nor the elegance of the salon, there is no lack of challenge for the performers. Artur Schnabels famous advice, Too easy for students, too difficult for artists, certainly applies here.
Terry Barfoot

14 May

MAURICE RAVEL (1875-1937) Piano Trio in A minor 1. 2. 3. 4. Modr Pantoum: Assez vif Passacaille: Trs large Anim

The Young Artists Lunchtime Recital series is sponsored by The Headley Trust

Ravel completed his Piano Trio at the end of August 1914, complaining that he had done 'five months' work in five weeks, because I wanted to finish my trio before joining up'. In fact he had been planning to write such a piece for some while, and on one occasion had gone so far as to say that the composition was complete apart from its themes. Acknowledging the challenge of writing for this instrumental combination, he dedicated the score to his former counterpoint teacher at the Conservatoire, Andr Gdalge.

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www.fourniertrio.com

Lucinda Dickens Hawksley


Dickens at 200 An Illustrated Talk

Festival Talk 1

Shaw House Church Road Shaw Monday 14 May 3.00pm


in her family history. For the last decade she has been a Patron of the Charles Dickens Museum in London and more recently Lucinda has been made Patron of the Norwegian Pickwick Club!

Programme Note
Lucinda Dickens Hawksley was asked to write a book to commemorate the bicentenary of her great great great grandfathers birth. He was born on 7 February 1812; the year 2012 is a celebration not only of his life, but of the vast and exciting legacy he left behind him. A unique aspect of Lucindas new book is that there are a large number of removable documents which can be taken out of the book and examined. These include facsimiles of letters, manuscripts and even his will, as well as some of Charles Dickens visiting cards, family photographs and many other fascinating artefacts.

Lucinda Dickens Hawksley will talk about her new book Charles Dickens, a definitive illustrated guide to the man and his works which she has written to commemorate his bicentenary. Supported by the Englefield Charitable Trust

Charles Dickens is the definitive illustrated guide to the man and his works. It follows Dickens from early childhood, including his time spent as a child labourer, and looks at how he became the greatest celebrity of his age and how he still remains recognized as one of Englands greatest celebrities, even in the twenty-first century. The book also takes an intimate look at what he was like as a husband, a father, a friend and an employer; at his longing to be an actor, at his fascination with detective work and at his travels: across North America, during a year spent living in Italy and his regular trips to France. Alongside Dickens himself, you will meet his fascinating family and his astonishing circle of friends and will discover when and how life and real-life personalities were imitated in Dickens art. The cast of characters in this book embraces an incredible array of famous and occasionally infamous Victorians.
Charles Dickens was not only a superb novelist, he was also a brilliant campaigning journalist, a philanthropist and a social reformer. This book, which includes some stunning images, many of which have not been seen before outside the Charles Dickens Museums archives, shows the enormous changes Dickens helped to bring about, both in his local society and the world at large. Supported by the Englefield Charitable Trust

after Daniel Maclise

Lucinda Dickens Hawksley


Lucinda Dickens Hawksley is an author, art historian and public speaker, with a special interest in literature and art from the 19th and early 20th centuries and in the history of London. She is also an award-winning travel writer with a love of the environment: cetaceans are one of her passions and she is a volunteer speaker for the Whales & Dolphins Conservation Society. As a great great great granddaughter of Charles and Catherine Dickens, Lucinda has grown up with an interest www.lucindahawksley.com

Javier Hirschfeld Moreno

www.newburyspringfestival.org.uk

14 May
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Innovation Chamber Ensemble with the Frith Piano Quartet


Corn Exchange Newbury Monday 14 May 7.30pm

Innovation Chamber Ensemble with the Frith Piano Quartet


Richard Jenkinson Claire Prewer Debussy Wagner Interval Mahler Symphony No 4 conductor soprano Prelude laprs-midi dun faune Wesendonck Lieder

Claire Prewer
Claire Prewer won a Scholarship to the Guildhall School of Music & Drama where she studied on the A.G.S.M. performers course and subsequently on the Opera Course. Since leaving the Guildhall, Claire has sung in a wide range of styles and genres. Recent oratorio performances have included Elgar's Kingdom and David Fanshaw's African Sanctus in Worcester Cathedral, Orff's Carmina Burana, Handel's Messiah, Mendelssohn's Elijah, Bach's B Minor Mass and Brahms' German Requiem. Opera roles have included Prokofiev's War & Peace, Britten's Rape of Lucretia, Poulenc's Les Dialogues des Carmelites, Humperdick's Hansel & Gretel, Mozart's Die Entfuhrung aus dem Serail. She also appeared as Donna Elvira opposite Benjamin Luxon in Mozart's Don Giovanni. Recent concert performances with orchestra have included Richard Strauss' Four Last Songs and Dvorak's Song to the Moon (Exeter Cathedral), Chausson's Le Temps des Lilas, Puccini arias from La Boheme, Madame Butterfly, Turandot, Catalani's La Wally, Wagner's Liebestod and Shoenberg's Pierrot Lunaire. She has also performed Villa Lobos Bachianas Brasileiras no.5 with the City of Birmingham Symphony Orchestra 'cello section.

Sponsored by Dinks Ltd

Richard Jenkinson
Richard Jenkinson studied with Florence Hooton, Raphael Wallfisch and William Pleeth. In 1994 he was awarded the coveted Gold Medal by the Guildhall School of Music & Drama and followed this up with a top prize in Vittorio Gui Chamber Music Competition in Florence, Italy. In 1994 Richard left the Irish Chamber Orchestra to join Simon Rattle and the City of Birmingham Symphony Orchestra as principal cello. Richard has also been invited to guest lead the cello sections of the Philharmonia, Halle, Northern Sinfonia, BBC Scottish and Royal Liverpool Philharmonic orchestras. He plays regularly with the Birmingham Contemporary Music Group (BCMG). Since joining the CBSO, Richard has combined his commitments with the orchestra with solo and chamber music. These activities have included founding the Innovation Chamber Ensemble. Richard is also a member of the Frith Piano Quartet which plays around 25-30 concerts a season across the UK. Solo cello concerts have included many recitals across the UK and in Germany, Italy, Switzerland, Malta and China. He has made many radio and TV appearances and for ten years Richard was a professor at the Guildhall School of Music and Drama.

14 May

Frith Piano Quartet


The Frith Piano Quartet was formed in 2001 by a group of like-minded musicians who wanted to explore the wealth of wonderful music written for the piano quartet medium. The group comprises the pianist Benjamin Frith, violinist Robert Heard, violist Louise Williams and cellist Richard Jenkinson. The quartet's first concerts were at the CBSO's Centre Stage Series in Birmingham where they performed the complete piano Quartets of Brahms, Faur and Mozart. The Frith Piano Quartet has a keen interest in performing unjustly neglected works that are not so often heard in the concert hall. These have included the piano quartets of Weber, Mahler, Richard Strauss and Mendelssohn. British music is an important part of the Quartet's work and their repertoire includes quartets by Arthur Bliss, Frank Bridge, William Walton and Gordon Jacob, as well as those by living composers.

Innovation Chamber Ensemble


The Innovation Chamber Ensemble was formed in 2002 by the principal string players of the City of Birmingham Symphony Orchestra to make a unique ensemble who strive for performances of the highest calibre. This 'conductor less' group ranges in size to a maximum of sixteen string players and incorporates both enthusiasm and many years of experience from working with worldclass musicians such as Sir Simon Rattle, Sakari Oramo and indeed the CBSO's exciting new music director Andris Nelsons. I.C.E. was launched to the world in September 2002 with concerts firstly in its orchestral home of the West Midlands and then at the Wigmore Hall in London. The 28

Innovation Chamber Ensemble with the Frith Piano Quartet


concert in Birmingham created major press and radio coverage and prompted Blue Rhythm Records to approach I.C.E. about recording the event live for immediate release. The recording called ICE on Fire featured on Classic F.M. as CD of the week. The Innovation Chamber Ensemble has played live on BBC Radio 3 and ICE on Fire has also received air time on BBC Radio 3, BBC Radio 2, and many regional radio stations. The group has also appeared on BBC 4 and the Creative Channel Network television. RICHARD WAGNER (1813-1883) Wesendonck Lieder 1. Der Engel 2. Stehe still! 3. Im Treibhaus 4. Schmerzen 5. Trume Otto Wesendonck was a wealthy Zurich merchant, and he and his beautiful wife Mathilde were so impressed when they first heard Wagner's music that they invited the composer to visit them. One visit led to another, and the relationship grew closer. Wesendonck, and still more his wife, fell under Wagner's spell. For example, they paid off his debts and five years later, in 1857, Wagner was given lodging in a house called Asyl (Refuge), which was located in the grounds of Wesendonck's villa. It was at this time that Wagner turned his attention to a new and potent operatic project. The special character of Tristan und Isolde, beyond the impetus to compose it, sprang from the new influences in Wagner's life; and the most important of these was his relationship with Mathilde Wesendonck. She believed totally in his genius and, as work progressed, he played her his composition sketches for Tristan. He said of her: 'She will remain my first and only love; it was the summit of my life.' The five Wesendonck Lieder were composed on poems by Mathilde. Two of the songs have a deeper significance, as 'studies for Tristan und Isolde': Im Treibhaus (In the conservatory) anticipates the desolate intensity of the Act III Prelude, while Trume (Dreams) relates to the centrepiece of the opera, the Act II love duet.
Terry Barfoot

Programme Notes
CLAUDE DEBUSSY (1862-1918) Prlude l'aprs-midi d'un faune Debussy began to compose the Prlude l'aprs-midi d'un faune in 1892, but it was not completed for a further two years, by which time he had already commenced work on his opera Pellas et Mlisande. The premiere of the Prlude took place on 22nd December 1894, and brought the composer a considerable success, the performance being encored by popular demand. Stephane Mallarms poem was the inspiration behind the music, and initially the poet was doubtful about a musical evocation of his work. In the event, however, he was most impressed, writing to Debussy: 'Your music is not discordant with my text, except in that it goes even further into nostalgia and into light, with sensitivity, with disquiet and with richness.' This extract from the poem gives an indication of its nature: 'O nymphs, let us bring back to life those many different memories. My eye, piercing the reeds, fixed on each immortal figure as it slaked its burning in the cooling waters, crying in frustration to the forest sky.' The Prlude evokes 'the desires and dreams of the faune, in the heat of the afternoon'. The opening phase has four presentations of the somewhat oriental theme, which is so memorably introduced by the flute. This theme proves to be a recurring point of reference. At the centre, the music reaches to a rich-toned climax, until at length subsiding to a more intimate focus. The return of the initial flute theme creates a rarefied and dream-like atmosphere, and with this recapitulation, Debussy indulges in the further possibilities of the material. The coda is more magical still, encouraging Maurice Ravel to describe the work as 'the only music I know which is absolutely perfect'.
Terry Barfoot

1. Der Engel In der Kindheit frhen Tagen Hrt ich oft von Engeln sagen, Die des Himmels hehre Wonne Tauschen mit der Erdensonne, Da, wo bang ein Herz in Sorgen Schmachtet vor der Welt verborgen, Da, wo still es will verbluten, Und vergehn in Trnenfluten, Da, wo brnstig sein Gebet Einzig um Erlsung fleht, Da der Engel niederschwebt, Und es sanft gen Himmel hebt. Ja, es stieg auch mir ein Engel nieder, Und auf leuchtendem Gefieder Fhrt er, ferne jedem Schmerz, Meinen Geist nun himmelwrts!

www.newburyspringfestival.org.uk

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Innovation Chamber Ensemble with the Frith Piano Quartet


The Angel In childhood's early days, I often heard them speak of angels, Who would exchange Heaven's sublime bliss For the Earth's sun.

So that, when an anxious heart in dread Is full of longing, hidden from the world; So that, when it wishes silently to bleed And melt away in a trickle of tears, So that, when its prayer ardently Pleads only for release, Then the angel floats down And gently lifts it to Heaven. Yes, an angel has come down to me, And on glittering wings It leads, far away from every pain, My soul now heavenwards!

Cease, generative powers, The primal thoughts which you are ever creating! Slow your breathing, still your urge Silently, only for a second long! Swelling pulses, fetter your beating, End, o eternal day of willing! That in blessed, sweet forgetfulness, I may measure all my bliss! When one eye another drinks in bliss, And one soul into another sinks, One nature in another finds itself again, And when each hope's fulfillment is finished, When the lips are mute in astounded silence, And no wish more does the heart invent, Then man recognizes the sign of Eternity, And solves your riddle, holy Nature!
3. Im Treibhaus Hochgewlbte Bltterkronen, Baldachine von Smaragd, Kinder ihr aus fernen Zonen, Saget mir, warum ihr klagt? Schweigend neiget ihr die Zweige, Malet Zeichen in die Luft, Und der Leiden stummer Zeuge Steiget aufwrts, ser Duft. Weit in sehnendem Verlangen Breitet ihr die Arme aus, Und umschlinget wahnbefangen der Leere nicht'gen Graus. Wohl, ich wei es, arme Pflanze; Ein Geschicke teilen wir, Ob umstrahlt von Licht und Glanze, Unsre Heimat ist nicht hier! Und wie froh die Sonne scheidet Von des Tages leerem Schein, Hllet der, der wahrhaft leidet, Sich in Schweigens Dunkel ein. Stille wird's, ein suselnd Weben Fllet bang den dunklen Raum: Schwere Tropfen seh ich schweben An der Bltter grnem Saum. In the hothouse High-vaulted crowns of leaves, Canopies of emerald, You children of distant zones, Tell me, why do you lament?

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2. Stehe still! Sausendes, brausendes Rad der Zeit, Messer du der Ewigkeit; Leuchtende Sphren im weiten All, Die ihr umringt den Weltenball; Urewige Schpfung, halte doch ein, Genug des Werdens, la mich sein! Halte an dich, zeugende Kraft, Urgedanke, der ewig schafft! Hemmet den Atem, stillet den Drang, Schweiget nur eine Sekunde lang! Schwellende Pulse, fesselt den Schlag; Ende, des Wollens ew'ger Tag! Da in selig sem Vergessen Ich mg alle Wonnen ermessen! Wenn Aug' in Auge wonnig trinken, Seele ganz in Seele versinken; Wesen in Wesen sich wiederfindet, Und alles Hoffens Ende sich kndet, Die Lippe verstummt in staunendem Schweigen, Keinen Wunsch mehr will das Innre zeugen: Erkennt der Mensch des Ew'gen Spur, Und lst dein Rtsel, heil'ge Natur! Be quiet! Roaring and rushing wheel of time, You are the measurer of Eternity; Shining spheres in the wide universe, You who surround the world globe, Eternal creation, halt! Enough development, let me be!

Innovation Chamber Ensemble with the Frith Piano Quartet


Silently you bend your branches, Draw signs in the air, And the mute witness to your anguish A sweet fragrance - rises. In desirous longing, wide You open your arms, And embrace through insane predilection The desolate, empty, horrible void. I know well, poor plants, A fate that we share, Though we bathe in light and radiance, Our homeland is not here! And how gladly the sun departs From the empty gleam of the day, He veils himself, he who suffers truly, In the darkness of silence. It becomes quiet, a whispered stirring Fills uneasily the dark room: Heavy drops I see hovering On the green edge of the leaves.
4. Schmerzen Sonne, weinest jeden Abend Dir die schnen Augen rot, Wenn im Meeresspiegel badend Dich erreicht der frhe Tod; Doch erstehst in alter Pracht, Glorie der dstren Welt, Du am Morgen neu erwacht, Wie ein stolzer Siegesheld! Ach, wie sollte ich da klagen, Wie, mein Herz, so schwer dich sehn, Mu die Sonne selbst verzagen, Mu die Sonne untergehn? Und gebieret Tod nur Leben, Geben Schmerzen Wonne nur: O wie dank ich, da gegeben Solche Schmerzen mir Natur! Anguish Sun, each evening you weep Your pretty eyes red, When, bathing in the mirror of the sea You are seized by early death.

Ah, why should I then lament, Why, my heart, are you so heavy, If the sun itself must despair, If the sun must set? And if Death gives rise only to Life, And pain gives way only to bliss, O how thankful I am, that Nature gives me such anguish!
5. Trume Sag, welch wunderbare Trume Halten meinen Sinn umfangen, Da sie nicht wie leere Schum Sind in des Nichts vergangen? Trume, die in jeder Stunde, Jedem Tage schner blhn, Und mit ihrer Himmelskunde Selig durchs Gemte ziehn!

Trume, wie wenn Frhlingssonne Aus dem Schnee die Blten kt, Da zu nie geahnter Wonne Sie der neue Tag begrt, Da sie wachsen, da sie blhen, Trumed spenden ihren Duft, Sanft an deiner Brust verglhen, Und dann sinken in die Gruft. Dreams Tell me, what kind of wondrous dreams are embracing my senses, that have not, like sea-foam, vanished into desolate Nothingness?

Dreams, that with each passing hour, each passing day, bloom fairer, and with their heavenly tidings roam blissfully through my heart! Dreams which, like holy rays of light sink into the soul, there to paint an eternal image: forgiving all, thinking of only One. Dreams which, when the Spring sun kisses the blossoms from the snow, so that into unsuspected bliss they greet the new day,

Yet you rise in all your splendor, Glory of the gloomy world, Newly awakening in the morning Like a proud, victorious hero!

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Trume, die wie hehre Strahlen In die Seele sich versenken, Dort ein ewig Bild zu malen: Allvergessen, Eingedenken!

Innovation Chamber Ensemble with the Frith Piano Quartet


so that they grow, so that they bloom, and dreaming, bestow their fragrance, these dreams gently glow and fade on your breast, and then sink into the grave.
Translation: Emily Ezust

GUSTAV MAHLER (1860-1911) Symphony No. 4 in G major 1. Bedchtig. Nicht eilen (Deliberately. Do not hurry) 2. In gemchlicher Bewegung. Ohne hast (With easy movement. Without haste) 3. Ruhevoll (Calmly) 4. Sehr behaglich (Very leisurely) Mahler completed his Fourth Symphony in 1900, just three years after his appointment as Director at the Vienna Court Opera. The first four of Mahler's symphonies were all closely linked with songs: the First with the Lieder eines fahrenden gesellen (Songs of a Wayfarer), and the Second, Third and Fourth with the anthology based on the folk poems gathered under the collective title Des Knaben Wunderhorn (The Youth's Magic Horn). Therefore these compositions were linked both psychologically and spiritually; and the song-finale of the Fourth Symphony, the Wunderhorn song Das Himmlische Leben (The Heavenly Life), was originally conceived as the seventh and final movement of the huge Third Symphony. Even though Mahler rejected this initial plan, fragments of the song were quoted in the Third's fifth movement: 'What the Angels tell me'. It is the finale, the 'Child's view of Heaven', which must be regarded as the starting point for the Fourth Symphony, not only psychologically but also structurally, since its material pervades the remainder of the work. Mahler intended a lightness of sound in keeping with the musics pastoral vision, which relates to the naivety of the poem of the finale. The 'Child's view of Heaven' was an important image to Mahler, since it reflected a new approach to the essential question, and because it was so close to his own experience, as the second of fourteen children, of whom seven died in infancy or childhood. The symphony opens with the jingling rhythm which is also heard as the refrain of the finale. Austrian folklore associated the sound of sleigh-bells with a child's soul being transported to Heaven. This imagery rejects darkness, with cheerful and attractive tunes which develop in the open-ended classical manner. The second subject does bring a mood of greater intensity and yearning, but this does not persist and it is never developed. So fluent is the rate of invention in this movement the complexity of thought is conveyed with the utmost logic and clarity, the premonitions of the songfinale providing the subtle bond of unity for the symphony's whole outlook. 32

The second movement, a scherzo taken at a jogging pace, was at one stage to be called 'Friend Hein (the figure of Death in German folklore) strikes up'. It is therefore a typically dark Mahler scherzo, the symbol of Death represented through the prominent violin solo, which requires the leader of the orchestra to use another instrument tuned up a tone so as to give the effect of a rustic fiddle. The sinister atmosphere is emphasised by the contrast of the second theme's blissful purity. The trio is played twice, as in Beethoven's symphonies: it is a soft and untroubled lndler, a traditional Austrian country dance. The restatements are developed rather than regular, and this too contributes to the music's spectral quality. The slow movement opens in transfigured serenity. Mahler wrote that he was inspired by 'a vision of a tombstone on which was carved an image of the departed, with folded arms, in eternal sleep'. This is an example of double variation form, since there is a second theme which serves to deepen the mood, thereby achieving a wider range and bringing the expression of anguish as the movement proceeds. The glorious coda in E major, the key of the finale - suggests 'the opening of the Gates of Heaven'. The climax is heard in rich sonority, releasing the transfer to the song-finale. The words of the poem are typical of the freshness and innocence of Des Knaben Wunderhorn. The musical structure is based on the stanzas of the poem, with linking episodes in which the sleigh-bell imagery is prominent. The singer is instructed to adopt an unaffected childlike expression and to avoid caricature, the implication being that through innocence is achieved eternal peace. In the final stanza, the song returns to the mood with which the slow movement had begun. Thus does Mahler reach his Heaven, the beauty of the music transcending the simplicity of the poem. Wir geniessen die himmlischen Freuden, d'rum tun wir das lrdische meiden. Kein weltlich' Getummel hrt man nicht im Himmel! Lebt Alles in sanftester Ruh'! Wir fhren em englisches Leben! Sind dennoch ganz lustig daneben! Wir fhren em englisches Leben, wir tanzen und springen, wir hpfen und singen! Sanct Peter im Himmel sieht zu!

14 May

We enjoy the heavenly pleasures, so we avoid all earthly things. No worldly clamour is heard in Heaven! All live in gentle peace! We lead an angelic life,

Innovation Chamber Ensemble with the Frith Piano Quartet


yet we are quite merry withal! We lead an angelic life, we dance and leap, we skip and sing! Saint Peter in Heaven looks on!
Johannes das Lmmlein auslasset, der Metzger Herodes drauf passet! Wir fhren em geduldig's, unschuldig's, geduldig's, em liebliches Lmmlein zu Tod! Sanct Lucas den Ochsen tat schlachten ohn' emig's Bedenken und Achten, der Wein kost kein' Heller im himmlischen Keller; die Englein, die backen das Brot.

There Saint Peter comes running with his net and his bait along into the heavenly pond. Saint Martha must be the cook!
Kein Musik ist ja nicht auf Erden, die uns'rer verglichen kann werden. Elftausend Jungfrauen zu tanzen sich trauen! Sanct Ursula selbst dazu lacht! Kein Musik ist ja nicht auf Erden, die uns'rer verglichen kann werden. Ccilia mit ihren Verwandten sind treffliche Hofmusikanten! Die englischen Stimmen ermuntern die Sinnen, dass Alles fur Freuden erwacht.

John lets the little lamb loose, Herod the butcher lies in wait for it! We lead a meek, innocent, meek, sweet little lamb to its death! Saint Luke slaughters the ox without a thought or a care; the wine costs not a penny in the heavenly cellar, the angels bake the bread.
Gut' Kruter von allerhand Arten, die wachsen im himmlischen Garten! Gut' Spargel, Fisolen und was wir nur wollen! Ganze Schssein vol! sind uns bereit! Gut' Apfel, gut' Birn' und gut' Trauben! Die Gartner die Alles ertauben! Willst Rehbock, willst Hasen, auf offener Strassen sie lauten herbei! Sollt em Fasttag etwa kommen alle Fische gleich mit Freuden angeschwommen! Dort luft schon Sanct Peter mit Netz und mit Kder zum himmlischen Weiher hinein. Sanct Martha die Kchin muss sein!

There is no music on earth that can be compared to ours. Eleven thousand virgins throw themselves into the dance! Saint Ursula herself laughs at the sight! There is no music on earth that can be compared to ours. Cecilia and her relations are splendid court musicians! The angelic voices cheer the senses, so all awakens to joy.
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Fine herbs of many kinds grow in the heavenly garden! Fine asparagus, beans, and whatever we want! Whole platefuls are prepared for us! Fine apples, fine pears and fine grapes the gardeners let us have them all! If you want venison or hare, down the open streets they come running! If there's a fast-day, all the fish come happily swimming up!
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14 May

Lucy Parham and Petroc Trelawny


Lunch with Debussy to celebrate his 150th Anniversary
Lucy Parham Petroc Trelawny Lucy Parham, one of Britains finest pianists, together with Petroc Trelawny, the popular Radio 3 presenter, in an informative talk about Debussy punctuated with excerpts from some of his best loved piano music. Sponsored by The Vineyard at Stockcross

Festival Talk 2

The Music Room The Vineyard at Stockcross Tuesday 15 May 12.30pm


West, Martin Jarvis, Dominic West, Joanna David, Edward Fox, Henry Goodman, Timothy West, Juliet Stevenson, Alex Jennings, Rosamund Pike and Charles Dance. In 2006 she was the Director of the Schumann Anniversary Festival at Cadogan Hall and in 2010 she was the Director of Schumann 200 Festival at Kings Place. Lucy Parham is a frequent guest presenter and contributor for BBC Radio 3 and 4 including CD Review, Proms Plus, The Saturday Feature, The Essay, Building a Library and Composer of the Week. She was on the jury for the Final of BBC Young Musician of the Year in 2008 and 2010 and in 2006 and 2009 she commentated for the Leeds International Piano Competition on BBC TV.

Lucy Parham
Acknowledged as one of Britain's finest pianists, Lucy Parham first came to public attention when she became the Piano Winner of the 1984 BBC Young Musician of the Year. Since then, she has played throughout the UK as concerto soloist with most of the major British orchestras and is a frequent recitalist at the Wigmore Hall. She has also toured the USA with the BBC Concert Orchestra on their 50th anniversary, Mexico and Turkey with Royal Philharmonic Orchestra and abroad with Russian State Symphony, Sofia Philharmonic, Bergen Philharmonic, Polish National Radio SO and L'Orchestre National de Lille. Lucy Parham has made numerous recordings including Gershwins Rhapsody in Blue (RPO/EMI Gold), concertos by Ravel, Faur and Franck (RPO records) and a solo Schumann CD (ASV). Her CD of Clara and Robert Schumann Concertos (BBC CO/Sanctuary) won the BBC Music Magazine "Critics' Choice of the Year". Her life-long passion for the music of Schumann inspired the original concept of the words and music evening, Beloved Clara. The CD of Beloved Clara (ASV) was released to critical acclaim. Two further evenings, Liszt An Odyssey of Love and Nocturne - The Romantic Life of Frdric Chopin also premiered in the London Pianoforte Series at the Wigmore Hall. These have toured the UK and abroad, also making their US debut in Los Angeles and were subsequently broadcast on NPR across the USA. The CDs of Nocturne and Odyssey of Love will be released in 2012. Her most recent programme, Rverie the life and loves of Claude Debussy will also be performed at the Wigmore Hall London Piano Series in December 2102 with Dominic West. Actors who appear in these programmes include Dame Harriet Walter, Samuel www.lucyparham.com

Petroc Trelawny
Petroc regularly presents the classical magazine programme Music Matters, Radio 3's evening topical drive-time show In Tune and concerts in Radio 3 Live in Concert. Petroc Trelawny joined Radio 3 in 1998 and has been co-host of In Tune, the station's drive-time arts magazine, since 2002. Raised and educated in Cornwall, he started his career at BBC Radio Devon, as a reporter and presenter, at the age of nineteen hosting the station's major news programming, and soon after becoming one of the nation's youngest newsreaders, presenting bulletins for BBC Plymouth's Spotlight. Having read the news for British Forces Radio during the first Gulf War, he then joined the network as a presenter in Hong Kong, spending a year broadcasting to the military in what was then still a British colony. After a boardmember of Classic FM heard him at work in Hong Kong, Petroc was invited to return to London to join the nascent commercial network, where he presented the afternoon show from the station's first day on-air. In 1994 he was invited to join London News Radio, and hosted a daily three hour news talk magazine, where guests included cabinet ministers and senior businessmen alongside Dame Edna and Gore Vidal. In 1997, he co-presented (with R5 Lives Victoria Derbyshire) the BBC GMR Breakfast Show in Manchester, covering the city's recovery from the IRA Bombing, and its planning for the Commonwealth Games. While in Manchester he started anchoring live broadcasts of concerts for Radio 3, joining the station full time the following year, and returning to London. As well as presenting Breakfast, and subsequently In Tune, Petroc

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BBC

Lucy Parham and Petroc Trelawny


has introduced hundreds of broadcasts of chamber music and symphony concerts for Radio 3, many from the BBC Proms, as well as Cardiff Singer of the World, and Leeds International Piano Competition. Petroc has interviewed many of the world's leading conductors, composers, performers and singers. On Television Petroc has been seen extensively on BBC2 and BBC Four. As a writer Petroc has regularly contributed to The Spectator, The Irish Times, The Catholic Herald and BBC Music Magazine. Petroc is chairman of the Lennox Berkeley Society, a charitable trust whose aim is to promote performance of the English composers music.

Festival Talk 2

Debussy further humiliation and embarrassment, from which he never fully recovered. Debussy himself was wary of other peoples judgement of himself and his life. He wrote, Another mans soul is a thick forest in which one must walk with circumspection. Ironically, it was the very recognition he had so hungered after as a young man that became the source of his depression as he grew older. The only person who brought him true and deep happiness was his daughter, Claude Emma (or Chouchou as he affectionately called her). He spent endless hours with her in his beloved garden in the Bois de Boulonge with their dog, Xantho. He wrote Childrens Corner for her and as toy Golliwogs were then all the rage, her favourite piece was unsurprisingly, the Golliwogs Cakewalk. Also central to his compositions was his love of the art of the Far East. Japanese lacquers and the Javanese Gamelin music he first heard when he was a young man were to influence many of his compositions. His study was crammed with objects dart, paintings and books (including several English novels) all of which had their own specific effect on many of his works. The First World War had a profound effect on him and he was frustrated that his lengthy illness prevented him from any involvement. As he lay in bed listening to the nightly air-raids, he wryly noted French art need to take revenge as seriously as the French army does. Debussy died from rectal cancer in 1918 and with further tragedy, his beloved Chouchou died from diptheria only months later at the age of fourteen. Debussys legacy is immense. Todays talk concentrates on his piano works but it is his whole output, (including masterpieces such as the Violin and Cello Sonatas, the Quartet, numerous songs, Laprs midi dun faune, Pellas et Mlisande and La Mer) which set the course for the century which followed him. Discarding outworn rules, he forged a new and liberated future for classical music.
Notes: Lucy Parham 2012

Programme Notes
Claude Debussy and the piano When one thinks of Debussys piano works, the pieces that often spring to mind are the ever-popular and melodic gems such as Girl with the Flaxen Hair, Arabesques, Rverie, Clair de Lune and the Golliwogs Cakewalk. But there is much more to Claude Debussy than a charming miniaturist. His contribution to the piano repertoire and its development is immense and, consequently, Debussys significance as a turn of the 20th century composer is hard to overestimate. The two books of Prludes, Etudes and Images, Estampes and Lisle joyeuse all changed the harmonic structure and instrumental tone colour into a new idiom, creating colours, subtleties and complexities in composition never seen before. The use of the whole-tone scale, a new harmonic palette and judicious use of the pedal are just some of the aspects that make him unique. Born the eldest of five children into a humble family just outside Paris in 1862, Claude-Achille Debussy overlooked his prodigious pianistic talents in favour of becoming a composer. In 1885, whilst still a student at the Paris Conservatoire, he won the coveted Prix de Rome, enabling him to spend two years studying at the Villa Medici in Rome where he mixed with artists, architects, musicians and sculptors. But, feeling both artistically stifled and lonely, he was miserable for most of his time there and longed to return to Paris. This was the city that was to remain his home for the rest of his life and the place that was so central to his existence as a composer. He and his close friends Chausson and Dukas were at the heart of the Parisian musical scene. Notoriously complex in his personality, his relationships were complicated and numerous. He had several affairs and two marriages - the second of which was to Emma Bardac, with whom he temporarily eloped to Jersey to escape the scandal he caused. His first wife, Lily Texier, was so distraught by this that she tried to commit suicide by shooting herself with a revolver in the Place de la Concorde. Although she survived, the incident caused

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Escher String Quartet


St Michael and All Angels Church Lambourn Tuesday 15 May 7.30pm

Escher String Quartet


Adam Barnett-Hart Wu Jie Pierre Lapointe Dane Johansen Mendelssohn Brett Dean Interval Elgar Quartet in E minor Op 83 violin violin viola cello Quartet in F minor No 6 Op 80 Eclipse

they performed their first commissioned work by Pierre Jalbert. In 2012 they will perform the debut of Ryan Wigglesworths Piano Quintet with Francesco Piemontesi commissioned as part of their BBC New Generation Artists Scheme. The 2011-2012 season begins with a performance of Vivian Fungs Pizzicato for String Quartet, Mendelssohn and Bottesini at the opening night of The Chamber Music Society of the Lincoln Center; the first of multiple performances at the Lincoln Center this season. They will continue their successful collaboration with guitarist Jason Vieaux as well as being in residency at the Chamber Music Society of St. Cloud where celebrated mezzo-soprano Sasha Cooke joins them for Barbers Dover Beach. In the UK, the Quartet will continue making studio recordings with the BBC as well as having their debut concert at Wigmore Hall. The quartet continues to tour festivals in Europe and further afield, making both their Turkish and Australian debuts. Teaching and masterclasses continue as the quartet start a new collaboration with the Royal Academy of Music leading one of the institutions chamber music days. The Escher String Quartet takes its name from the Dutch graphic artist M.C. Escher, inspired by Eschers method of interplay between individual components working together to form a whole.

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Escher String Quartet

Henry Fair

The Escher String Quartet has received acclaim for its individual sound, inspired artistic decisions and unique cohesiveness. Championed by members of the Emerson String Quartet, the group are proud to have been appointed BBC New Generation Artists from 2010-2012. Having completed a three-year residency as artists of The Chamber Music Society of Lincoln Centers CMS Two programme, the ensemble has already performed at prestigious venues and festivals around the world including Alice Tully Hall, the 92nd Street Y and Symphony Space in New York, Kennedy Center, the Louvre, Ravinia and Caramoor Festivals, Music@Menlo, West Cork Chamber Music Festival, the City of London Festival and a tour of China including Beijing, Shanghai and Hangzhou. Within months of its inception in 2005, the Escher String Quartet was invited by both Pinchas Zukerman and Itzhak Perlman to be the quartet-in-residence at each artist's summer festival: The Young Artists Programme at Canadas National Arts Centre and The Perlman Chamber Music Program on Shelter Island, NY. The Eschers have collaborated with artists such as Andrs Diaz, Lawrence Dutton, Kurt Elling, Leon Fleisher, Anja Lechner, Vadim Gluzman, Angela Yoffe, Gary Hoffman, Joseph Kalichstein, Kurt Muroki, Joseph Silverstein, pop folk singer-songwriter Luke Temple, Khatia Buniatishvili and Pinchas Zukerman. The quartet has served as the Ernst Stiefel String Quartet-in-Residence in Caramoor where

Programme Notes
FELIX MENDELSSOHN (1809-1847) String Quartet No. 6 Op. 80 in F minor Allegro vivace assai Allegro assai Adagio Finale: Allegro molto Mendelssohn completed his last string quartet in September of 1847, four months after the sudden death of his sister, Fanny Mendelssohn Hensel. Her unexpected death, due to a cerebral haemorrhage while she was rehearsing for one of the familys famous Sunday Musicals, left Mendelssohn so distraught that upon receiving the sad news, he collapsed with a ruptured blood vessel in his head. After missing her funeral, Mendelssohn moved to Interlaken in Switzerland with his wife Cecile for the summer, but the change of location did not help his situation. Mendelssohn was emotionally drained and even described his altered state to his younger sister Rebecca in the following terms: "I force myself to be industrious in the hope that later on I may feel like working and enjoying it". Since the only thing calming him at this stage of his life was excessive walks in the country side, his wife Cecile got scared many times by his long absences. These facts probably explain why Mendelssohn's last major composition is undoubtedly the most romantic piece he ever wrote.

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www.escherquartet.com

Escher String Quartet


Throughout the years, Mendelssohn's classical tendencies somewhat prevented him from expressing uncontrolled painful emotions in his music, but the F minor quartet completely filled that breach and all its four movements express torrents of agitated states of despair and lamentation. Extreme anger is highly depicted in the first movement marked Allegro vivace assai. Next, the normally anticipated light and aerial "Mendelssohnian Scherzo" is here absent and replaced by a disturbed dance in three paired with a dark trio where the lower strings are in the foreground. The Adagio starts with a characteristic downward gesture in the first violin line but the rest of the movement gradually moves away from that desperate cry and even reaches A-flat Major in its end. Alas, the Finale slowly abandons that calmer feeling and returns to the initial mood of agitated despair by which the quartet ultimately concludes itself. BRETT DEAN (1961 - ) Eclipse which he describes with harrowing clarity the dangerous circumstances and desperate state of mind confronting someone fleeing a country such as Iraq". The third section, Epilogue, features much of the previously stated materials and concludes its course in a fashion mirroring the very beginning of the piece. EDWARD ELGAR (1857-1934) String Quartet Op. 83 in E minor Allegro moderato Piacevole (poco andante) Allegro molto Edward Elgar wrote his first and only satisfactory string quartet in 1918 after a few unsuccessful attempts in the genre. Prior to the quartet Op. 83, Elgar had written an earlier one bearing the opus number 8, but soon after its completion, the composer destroyed the manuscript. In February 1900, the cellist of the first Brodsky Quartet, Carl Fuchs, asked Elgar to write a piece for his quartet after attending a concert in Manchester featuring the orchestral piece Variations on an Original Theme (Enigma) Op. 36 written previously in 1899. Seventeen years went by. During war-time London, Elgar became ill and depressed, which prompted his wife to find a cottage near Fittleworth in Sussex for them to move to. Elgar benefited from the new surroundings and started to write the first theme of the String Quartet Op. 83 in a nursing home while recovering from having had his tonsils removed. Around that time, he also wrote the Violin Sonata in E minor and the Piano Quintet in A minor. Unfortunately, when the quartet was finished, the Brodsky Quartet was no longer in its prime and the premiere necessitated to be played by other musicians. The first public performance of the quartet took place on May 21st 1919 at the Wigmore Hall in London alongside the premiere of the Piano Quintet in A minor. The first movement is punctuated by unexpected rhythmical figures and sounds unusual for Elgar while the other two are more predictable and sound rather typical of his manner. Elgars wife was particularly fond of the second movements simplicity and qualified it by using the terms "captured sunshine". In 1920, the C Major second movement was consequently played at her funeral. The second movement is also where Elgar apparently claimed he had accomplished a novelty never been done before, though its pleasant tone does not directly suggest modernistic tendencies. Asked by the Malvern Troyt Griffith what he meant, Elgar replied:" Nothing you would understand, merely an arrangement of notes".
Pierre Lapointe 2012

Eclipse was premiered in Cologne by the Auryn Quartet in December of 2003. Even though the title Eclipse was not intended by composer Brett Dean to describe an astronomical event, its one uninterrupted movement comprising three clearly defined sections almost renders the three necessary phases of such an occurrence by implicitly suggesting a state before the event, the event itself, and another one following the event. However, what truly inspired Brett Dean to write this piece can rather be found in the political and social consequences of the Tampa crisis. In August of 2001, the Norwegian sea captain in command of the vessel named Tampa saved the lives of hundreds of refugees by rescuing them from their troubled boat in the waters between Indonesia and Australia. Following that heroic event, the Australian federal government shocked the world and especially Norway by refusing to give ground to those on board and even defied the United Nations by failing to meet obligations to distressed mariners under international regulations. The ensuing political discussion is precisely what prompted Brett Dean to write in the composer's notes prior to his music for the quartet that "the very humanity and the enormity of the refugee's own personal struggles and fates was entirely eclipsed by the power games of a bigger political agenda", thus explaining the title Eclipse for the work.
The first section, Slow and spacious, starts very softly and witnesses the cello leading the quartet towards a gradual ascension of sounds and activity. Unstable arpeggiated pizzicato gestures and mysterious fast notes rendered very quietly among the quartet are both contributing to end this first section in a downward manner. The second section, Unlikely Flight, features the viola at the very outset and constantly changes meters and accents in thunderous frenetic ways. Brett Dean explains that "the title refers to a quote from Tom Keneally's Tyrant's Novel in www.escherquartet.com

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Greenham Common Trust is very pleased to lend its support for Newbury Spring Festival (NSF), one of the most exciting events in the arts calendar. The Trust is committed to making the arts more accessible to the wider community and NSF is a brilliant opportunity for local people to see world class performances. Thanks to the commitment of a dedicated and hardworking NSF team and the generosity of local supporters, the community can experience the highest quality arts events at this years Festival. The Trust has pledged nearly 43,000 to support this years programme including:

Royal Philharmonic Orchestra with conductor Owain Arwel Hughes and soloist Freddie Kempf St Nicolas Church Newbury. Saturday May 12, 7.30pm Morriston Orpheus Choir Corn Exchange, Newbury. Sunday May 13, 3pm Ballet Central Corn Exchange, Newbury. Tuesday May 15, 7.30pm Family concert with Newbury Symphony Orchestra Corn Exchange, Newbury. Sunday May 20, 3pm The Sheepdrove Piano Competition (Trust donated the 2nd prize of 1,000) Sheepdrove Eco Conference Centre, Lambourn. Sunday May 20, 3pm

The Trust is once again supporting a free ticket scheme for young people to be inspired by diverse festival concerts covering a wide variety of genres. This will also include a Young Festival Critic Award. The Trust is one of the principal funders of the Festivals education and community programme which offers free workshops and childrens concerts benefitting some 1,500 local children.

The Festival fits very much into the Trusts dedicated programme of support for the arts which also includes:

A heavily subsidised Opera for All event Instrument loan scheme Funding West Berkshires Young Musician of the Year competition Underwriting venue hire costs Professional master classes for local schools Funding for music scores Dance, drama and music workshops

It is the fourth year that the Trust has worked in partnership with professional touring opera company Opera Brava, who will be putting on a magnificent performance of The Barber of Seville on Saturday June 30th at Newbury Racecourse tickets available from the Corn Exchange, Newbury. The company is also working with Winchcombe School to stage a junior operatic production of C S Lewis classic fairytale The Lion, The Witch and The Wardrobe at Newbury Racecourse on Friday, June 29th. The Trust has also launched an online grant application system called www.findmeagrant.org where applicants can attract donations, matched funding, Gift Aid and grants all with no administration fee.

Ballet Central
Corn Exchange Newbury Tuesday 15 May 7.30pm

Ballet Central
Sara Matthews William Glassman Philip Feeney director, Central School of Ballet artistic director, Ballet Central musical director, Ballet Central

Philip Feeney
Philip studied composition with Robin Holloway and Hugh Wood at Cambridge, then with Franco Donatoni in Rome where he worked with Teatro-Danza Contemporonea di Roma. His work has been performed throughout Italy and Britain and he has worked with Ballet Central since it began, composing music for more than twenty of the company's ballets. His scores for Northern Ballet Theatre include the jazz ballet Jazz Concerto, the hugely successful Cinderella and Dracula (available on the Naxos label) and The Hunchback of Notre Dame (available on the Black Box label) currently performed by Boston Ballet. Philip's work also includes collaboration with Didy Veldman for her piece Greymatter for Rambert Dance Company and for NBT's new production of A Streetcar named Desire.

Returning by popular demand to the Festival for the fourth consecutive year Ballet Centrals 2012 tour features new works from Mikaela Polley (Rambert Dance Company), Sharon Watson (Phoenix Dance Theatre) and Sara Matthews, as well as revivals by Matthew Hart, the late David Fielding, and Ballet Centrals founder, the late Christopher Gable. This exciting programme of ballet, contemporary, jazz and narrative dance features live accompaniment by Musical Director Philip Feeney. Sponsored by Greenham Common Trust

Sara Matthews
Sara has worked with Central for 12 years and is passionately committed to the artistic development and education of future generations of dancers through providing an inspiring environment that offers standards of excellence in teaching and student welfare. Before joining Central, Sara was a dancer with Rambert Dance Company for eleven years. During this time she performed in all of the Company's most famous repertoire working with, among others, Sir Frederick Ashton, Richard Alston, Christopher Bruce, Merce Cunningham, Siobhan Davies, Jiri Kylian and Ashley Page, as well as performing in works by Anthony Tudor and Glen Tetley. Sara's guest teaching credits include English National Ballet, Rambert Dance Company, The Royal Opera House, Richard Alston Dance Company, the Cuban National Ballet School and The Rambert School of Ballet and Contemporary Dance. Sara's choreographic credits include Rambert Dance Company, English National Ballet and Ballet Central.

Ballet Central

Patrick Baldwin

William Glassman
William was chosen by George Balanchine to receive one of the first Ford Foundation Scholarships in 1960 to study at The School of American Ballet. After graduating he danced in the Broadway musical Tovarich, starring Vivien Leigh, before joining American Ballet Theatre. As a soloist and guest artist he created roles in ballets by Jerome Robbins and Agnes DeMille, and also performed leading roles in ballets by Ashton, Lander, Loring and MacMillan. He was invited in 1979 to become the Graduate Boys Teacher at The Royal Ballet School. He was appointed Executive Director of the London Children's Ballet in 1999 and subsequently joined Elmhurst School for Dance as Senior Male Teacher/Head of Boys. In March of 2004 he joined The Rock School of the Pennsylvania Ballet (US) as Principal Teacher and Assistant Director and was appointed Artistic Director of Ballet Central in September 2005. www.centralschoolofballet.co.uk

The company is comprised of the Schools final year students as part of their BA (Hons) Degree course. Central School of Ballet is the only classical vocational school to offer an Honours Degree and pre-professional touring experience on such a scale. It has been a springboard for hundreds of dancers into the dance profession. Each year Ballet Central works with a mixture of highly acclaimed and emerging choreographers on newly commissioned works and much-loved revivals. Recent Ballet Central choreographers include: Richard Alston, David Bintley, Christopher Bruce, Jonzi D, Matthew Hart, Christopher Hampson, Christopher Marney, David Nixon, Michael Pink and Mikaela Polley. Sponsored by Greenham Common Trust

www.newburyspringfestival.org.uk

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Ballet Central has been Central School of Ballets touring company for twenty seven years. The tour is a regular fixture on the UKs touring calendar and the performances are much anticipated throughout the UK.

Emilia Martensson Quartet


Corn Exchange Newbury Wednesday 16 May 12.30pm

Young Artists Lunchtime Recital 2


Emilia Martensson Sam Lasserson Jon Scott Barry Green singer bass drums piano

group of local boys were playing music in her parents restaurant which Emilia would later turn into one of the regions most successful jazz clubs hosting some of the country's most acclaimed jazz acts. Fast forward 10 years and Emilia Mrtensson is a London based singer of considerable repute. Her critically acclaimed contributions (both as vocalist and lyricist) to jazzs newest stars, Kairos 4tet no doubt helped them bring home a 2011 MOBO Award, while her distinctive voice led the Observer to claim her 'The New Face of British Jazz 2012'.

Emilia Martensson has successfully forged a distinctive and unique niche for her vocal talents on the London jazz scene. Combining the influence of folk songs from her home land with some of the greatest jazz songs of the last century, Emilia has lent her critically acclaimed sound and lyric writing skills to a wide variety of collaborative projects, most notably to the 2011 MOBO Award Winning Kairos 4tet. She has performed at some of Londons most prestigious music venues, most recently with storming success at Ronnie Scotts Jazz Club, and has also performed live sets for the world renowned pianist Julian Josephs BBC Radio 3 show and another for Gilles Peterson on Radio 1. The Young Artists Lunchtime Recital series is sponsored by The Headley Trust

Sam Lasserson
Sam began playing the double bass aged 16, taking classical lessons and teaching himself jazz. After becoming section principal of two youth orchestras, he went to Trinity College of Music in 2001, where he studied both classical and jazz double bass with Corin Long and Steve Watts respectively. Whilst at college he began to perform professionally, with such diverse engagements as touring a double bass concerto to Spain and performing in Moscow with Bryan Ferry. He also began to perform with respected musicians on the British jazz scene, and since graduating last year he has been appearing regularly in jazz venues in and around London. He has performed with Martin Speake, Bobby Wellins, Anita Wardell, Trudy Kerr, Malcolm Earle-Smith and Gilad Atzmon among others. Sam is currently performing regularly with Martin Speake, the Jake Goss Quartet, Hannes Riepler, Richard Turner, and he is involved in a trio project with Mike Chillingworth and Josh Morrison.

Emilia Martensson
Unlike most of todays singer songwriters, Emilia Mrtensson's teenage years were not spent exploring the catalogues of Dylan, Waits, Young and Drake, rather, her evenings were spent listening to Ella Fitzgerald, Billie Holiday and Anita ODay in the depths of Southern Sweden's countryside where she lived. While her girlfriends listened to popular styles of the day, she and a

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Emilia Martensson Quartet


Jon Scott
Originally from Manchester, Jon has been based in London since late 2005. Since then he has developed a reputation as a creative and flexible player on the UK jazz scene, while building up his international connections, playing extensively throughout Europe. As Adam Waldmann of Kairos 4tet says, hes got a great sense of dynamic contour and narrative, and always knows where a tune is heading. Jon has performed with artists including Will Vinson, Byron Wallen, Alec Dankworth, Martin Speake, Nikki Iles, Yuri Goloubev, Mike Walker. As well as being a major force in the Kairos 4tet engine room, he holds the drum chair in a large number of original groups, including Candid Records artist Mishka Adams band, sax veteran Pete Hurts quartet, the Hannes Riepler Quartet, Carlos Lopez-Reals Mandorla and Anglo-German collaboration Paragon.

Barry Green
Like Emilia, Barry is a young player relatively new on the scene. Once described as one of the UKs best kept secrets his CV as accompanist is a Whos Who list of the upper echelons of UK jazz his 2011 debut, The Music of Chance, put paid to that notion earning him a raft of media plaudits. A cerebral swinger with a liking for unexpected harmonic turns said The Independent, while the Guardian cited him as one of the best mainstream-tobop musicians on the UK scene. Green is a sparkling player, versatile with oodles of imagination. So, as a lover of melody, yet occasionally edgy there is no surprise that the rapport between him and Emilia Martensson was instant, both sharing a deep love of the art of the song. The Young Artists Lunchtime Recital series is sponsored by The Headley Trust

It's simple. Come to a Festival event and write a review of your experience. Submit a written piece for the press or web, do a presentation, a radio interview, a blog, a Facebook comment or even a Tweet! The best, most well written, and interesting reviews will be eligible for a cash prize and featured in the media & online.

http://www.newburyspringfestival.org.uk/young_festival_critics.htm
Made possible by Greenham Common Trust
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16 May

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Zeffirellis Otello
Corn Exchange Newbury Wednesday 16 May 7.30pm

Zeffirellis Otello
Placido Domingo Otello Katia Ricciarelli Desdemona Justino Diaz Iago Petra Malakova Emilia Lorin Maazel conductor Orchestra of La Scala,Milan In the first evening of film celebrating legends of both opera and ballet the Festival presents Franco Zeffirellis acclaimed film Otello, starring Placido Domingo, which premiered in 1986. Ross Alley, lecturer on opera and ballet at the Royal Opera House, will introduce and talk about the film before the screening. Sponsored by an anonymous donor

During the 2011/12 season, Placido will conduct Romo et Juliette and sing the title role in Simon Boccanegra with LA Opera, and conduct Tosca at the Washington National Opera. Upcoming performances also include Neptune in The Enchanted Island at the Metropolitan Opera, where he will also conduct Madama Butterfly.

Franco Zeffirelli
Franco Zeffirelli (born 1923) is an Italian director and producer of films and television. He is also a director and designer of operas and a former senator (19942001) for the Italian center-right Forza Italia party. Zeffirelli is principally known for his 1968 version of Romeo and Juliet, for which he was nominated for an Academy Award, although his 1967 version of The Taming of the Shrew (with Elizabeth Taylor and Richard Burton) remains the most popular production of that play. His film Otello was a BAFTA winner in the foreign language film category. He was the first Italian national to receive an honorary knighthood from the British government when he was created a Knight Commander of the Order of the British Empire.

Placido Domingo
Placido Domingo is a world-renowned, multifaceted artist. Recognized as one of the finest and most influential singing actors in the history of opera, he is also a conductor and a major force as an opera administrator in his role as general director of two companies: LA Opera and Washington National Opera. As a singer, his repertoire encompasses 134 roles, a number unmatched by any other tenor in history, with more than 3500 career performances. He has made more than 100 recordings of complete operas, compilations of arias and duets, His work in the recording studio has earned him 12 Grammy Awards, three of which are Latin Grammys, and he has made more than 50 music videos. In addition to three feature opera films - Carmen, La Traviata and Otello - he voiced the role of Monte in Disneys Beverly Hills Chihuahua, played himself on The Simpsons, and his telecast of Tosca from the authentic settings in Rome was seen by more than one billion people in 117 different countries. His appearances around the world with his colleagues Jos Carreras and Luciano Pavarotti in the now legendary The Three Tenors concerts are one of the great musical success stories of the 1990s.

Ross Alley
Ross Alley is a native of New Zealand, he worked as a pianist and music teacher at the National School of Ballet and the Australian Ballet Company and School before moving to England. In London he was employed by the Royal Ballet School as a pianist, with responsibilities as a music tutor to develop the teachers training course and create the pianists training programme for aspiring ballet accompanists. He is closely associated with the Cecchetti Society, researching, editing and arranging music for the syllabi. Ross Alley lectures on classical music at the Royal Opera House, organized by the Royal Opera House Education Department with the University of London and Friends of Covent Garden.

Otello
Legendary Italian director Franco Zeffirelli and renowned tenor Placido Domingo unite their mighty talents for this lavish production of composer Guiseppe Verdi's classic opera based on Shakespeare's timeless, tragic masterpiece Othello. Victorious general Otello returns in triumph to his adopted city of Venice after vanquishing its foes at sea. But not everyone is poised to give him a hero's welcome. Even as his beautiful wife Desdemona lavishes him with affection, Iago, a disgruntled ensign, plots his downfall. And when Iago uses Otello's own jealous nature against him, he drives a wedge between husband and wife ... with devastating consequences! Sponsored by an anonymous donor

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Kinsky Trio Prague


Long Gallery Englefield House Theale Wednesday 16 May 7.30pm

Kinsky Trio Prague


Slvka Pchoov Lucie Sedlkov Hlov Martin Sedlk Haydn Debussy Interval Dvorak Trio in E minor Op 90 Dumky piano violin cello Trio in G major Gypsy Trio in G major

Since 2009 the Kinsky Trio Prague have recorded CDs for the French label Praga Digitals (distributed by Harmonia Mundi). Their recording of complete piano trios by Bohuslav Martin has been warmly recommended by international music critics (Diapason, Gramophone, Classica, Harmonie, etc.). Their other CDs include compositions by Czech composers Foerster, Novak, Janaek and Fibich, and less known Russian trios by Borodin, Rimsky Korsakov and Arensky.

Programme Notes
JOSEPH HAYDN (1732-1809) Piano Trio in G major, Hob.XV/25 1. Andante 2. Poco adagio 3. Rondo all'Ongarese: Presto Haydn composed piano trios at every stage of his creative life, beginning during his years with Count Morzin in the 1750s, when both the piano and the composer were in their first stages of development. The present Trio in G major, known as the Gypsy Trio on account of its Hungarian-style finale, dates from 1795. This was the year of his second visit to London, when he also composed his final symphonies. The first movement is based upon a song-like theme, which is presented in two distinct and carefully balanced halves. The theme is developed in a sequence of four richly imaginative variations. In the central Poco adagio movement the lyrical line of the violin creates a special focus. However, it is the finale that accounts for the fact that this is the most popular of all Haydn's trios. It has gained the name Gypsy Rondo because of its rondo finale in the Hungarian style. At once subtle and direct, this represents an ideal fusion of folk music and art music.

Sponsored by Sir Mark and Lady Waller In the presence of the Newbury Spring Festivals Patron HRH The Duke of Kent KG

Kinsky Trio Prague


Founded in 1998, the Kinsky Trio Prague is one of the outstanding Czech chamber ensembles. Since 2004 the Trio has had the honour of bearing the name Kinsky by kind permission of the aristocratic Czech family from Kostelec nad Orlici. The Trio studied at the Academy of Music in Prague under Vaclav Bernaek, cellist of the Kocian Quartet, and has taken part in several master classes including with the Guarneri Trio and the Florestan Trio, and regularly consults with the famous Czech pianist Ivan Moravec and with Pavel Hla, first violinist of the Praak Quartet. The Kinskys international career has taken them all over Europe (Austria, Germany, Spain, Belgium, England, France), the U.S., Canada, Mexico and also the Seychelles. They regularly record for Czech Radio, and their concerts have also been broadcast in Mexico and the U.S. From 2007 to 2009 the Kinsky Trio Prague organized its own series of chamber concerts at the Stone Bell House, an historic inn on the Old Town Square in their home city of Prague.

www.newburyspringfestival.org.uk

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Kinsky Trio Prague


CLAUDE DEBUSSY (1862-1918) Piano Trio in G major 1. Andantino con moto allegro Allegro appassionato Tempo primo 2. Scherzo. Intermezzo: Moderato con allegro 3. Andante espressivo 4. Finale: Appassionato Nadejda von Meck, the famous patroness of Tchaikovsky, was a wealthy widow who travelled throughout Europe, and when she approached the Paris Conservatoire asking if they could recommend a student who could join her resident piano trio, Debussys name was put forward. Thus it was that he accompanied her and her children on their travels, joining them at Interlaken in July 1880. They travelled via Paris, Nice, Genoa and Naples to Florence, where they arrived on 19th September. From there Mme von Meck sent Tchaikovsky a Danse bohmienne by the young composer, which the Russian master found a nice piece, but too short, with themes that never get anywhere. The resident trio was expected to perform on a daily basis, and it was in this context that Debussy composed his Piano Trio in G major. While the music does not reveal the individuality and personality of the mature artist, it is certainly an accomplished piece of work, developing its musical ideas while giving each player the opportunity to make a special contribution. It is salon music in the best sense of the word, at once sophisticated and refined. The second movement, for example, is notable for its rhythmic clarity, and the influence of the ballet music of Lo Delibes looms large (Tchaikovsky, incidentally, thought Delibes the greatest living composer, though Debussy would not have known this.) However, it was the classical masters Haydn, Mozart, Beethoven, Schubert whose works formed the staple repertoire of Mme von Mecks private piano trio, and the nature of this beautifully written composition by the young Debussy is a reflection of this. ANTONN DVORK (1841-1904) Piano Trio in E minor, Opus 9 Dumky 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. Lento maestoso Allegro vivace Poco adagio Vivace non troppo Andante Andante moderato Allegretto scherzando Allegro Lento maestoso national style and the Viennese classical inheritance. In fact these were the twin influences which in equal measure had always been the crucial features of his artistic development. Dvork was always willing to incorporate idiomatic dance elements into concert and chamber music; and so it was that he chose to adopt the dumka here. This generally slow dance had Ukranian origins, and Dvork used it frequently, for example in his Slavonic Dances. Its nature is reflected in the fact that the word dumka is a diminutive of duma, meaning a meditation. The Dumky Trio is a particularly interesting blend of melancholy expressiveness and joyful release. This effect is created in some measure by the musics unusual structure, containing six contrasted movements. It is therefore to the credit of Dvorks technique and experience that he achieves such a strong sense of unity across the whole sequence. The moods tend to alternate in order to make their impression, always using the dance characteristic with the utmost imagination. Dvork himself chose this piece to feature at the centre of the chamber music concerts over which he presided during 1891. This was immediately before he left his homeland in order to take up the position of Director of the New England Conservatory in the United States. Sponsored by Sir Mark and Lady Waller This evenings concert forms part of a Royal Gala event to raise funds for the Newbury Spring Festival and the Charlie Waller Memorial Trust.

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Dvork composed his fourth Piano Trio towards the end of 1890. By this time he was a celebrated artist at the height of his powers, who in his major instrumental works often preferred to combine the music of the Czech

David Starkey
The First Elizabeth

Festival Talk 3

Long Gallery Englefield House Theale Thursday 17 May 3.00pm


David Starkey
Dr David Starkey is widely regarded as one of the world's most eminent historians. He is the UK's leading constitutional and monarchy expert and a colourful media personality. He has written diary columns for The Sunday Times and The Spectator and appears frequently on television and radio, often invited onto such programmes as BBC's Question Time and Newsnight. In October 2006 he started hosting the second series of The Last Word now known as Starkey's Last Word. He is perhaps best known for his Channel 4 television documentary series which include Henry VIII of England, Elizabeth I of England and The Six Wives of Henry VIII. In 2004 he began a new Channel 4 multi-year series Monarchy, which chronicles the history of English Kings and Queens from the Anglo-Saxon kingdoms onward. In addition to his media profile, Dr Starkey is a respected academic who lectured in international history at the London School of Economics from 1972 until 1998. He is currently an Honorary Fellow at Fitzwilliam College, Cambridge. Dr Starkey has written several books, including Rivals in Power, The Reign of Henry VIII; Elizabeth: Apprenticeship, The Six Wives of Henry VIII, The Monarchy of England Volume 1: The Beginnings and the most recent Monarchy: From the Middle Ages to Modernity. Dr Starkey was appointed a CBE in the Queen's birthday honours list of 2007 for services to history. Sponsored by Mr and Mrs Robin Aird

The story of Englefield House - visited by Elizabeth I, prised from the grasp of an old Catholic family and granted to the Protestant descendant of a man executed as one of Anne Boleyn's lovers - is the history of Elizabethan England in a nutshell. David Starkey, author of the international best-seller Elizabeth: Apprenticeship, sets the reign in the context of Elizabeth's own tumultuous life and complex personality. Sponsored by Mr and Mrs Robin Aird

www.newburyspringfestival.org.uk

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The Power of Compassion


Corn Exchange Newbury Thursday 17 May 7.30pm

Tibetan Monks from Tashi Lhunpo Monastery


Phep Su Khandro Thensuk Khabdro Semkye Sha-Ma Choed Dur Dak Kunrik Interval Bakshi Kangso Trueso Taksel Sha Nak Shijoe Lords of Death Thanksgiving Purification The Art of Debate Black Hat Dance Prayers of Dedication Welcome Long Life Prayer Generating Compassion Deer and Buffalo Dance Cutting Lords of the Cemetery All Knowing

monasteries of the Gelugpa (or Yellow Hat) tradition, and is renowned for its scholarship in Mahayana Buddhist Philosophy and the Tantric tradition of Tibetan Buddhism. By the time of the Fourth Panchen Lama, Lobsang Choekyi Gyaltsen, there were more than 3,000 monks in the Monastery. By 1959, their numbers had grown to 5,000, with another 2,000 monks affiliated to the monastery outside Tibet. The Chinese occupation of Tibet in 1959 and the Cultural Revolution from 1966-80 wreaked destruction on the great monastic institutions, including Tashi Lhunpo, which lost many of the precious scriptures, statues and images. Of the 5,000 monks in the monastery, only 250 were able to follow the Dalai Lama into exile. In 1972, under the patronage of the present (Fourteenth) Dalai Lama, Tashi Lhunpo Monastery was re-established in the Southern Indian state of Karnataka. Occupying a central position in the Tibetan settlement of Bylakuppe, the Monastery is now home to 250 monks, and has once again regained its reputation as an important centre for learning and the preservation of their unique culture and traditions.

Tashi Lhunpo Monastery


Tashi Lhunpo Monastery is the seat of the lineage of the Panchen Lamas - second only in importance as spiritual leaders of Tibet to the Dalai Lama. The monastery was founded by the First Dalai Lama in 1447 in Shigatse, Tibet's second largest city. It is one of the four great

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Georgina Cranston

www.tashi-lhunpo.org.uk

The Power of Compassion


The Tenth Panchen Rinpoche was born in 1938 in Eastern Tibet. He was recognised by the Dalai Lama in 1952, when he joined Tashi Lhunpo Monastery in Shigatse. His outspoken comments about the Communist Chinese policies in Tibet led to his imprisonment for nearly 10 years during the Cultural Revolution. On his release, he was able to begin the restoration of the Monastery, but in 1989 he died suddenly, bringing to an end the life of one of the most misunderstood lamas in Tibet's culture - and one of the most courageous critics of Mao's regime. According to the Tibetan tradition of reincarnation, the search began for the Eleventh Panchen Rinpoche. In January 1995, all the signs confirmed that the true reincarnation had been born, and was living in Tibet. In April 1995, the Dalai Lama confirmed the news officially but on 17th May the six-year-old child, Gedun Choekyi Nyima, and his family disappeared from their home, apparently being held in police custody. In his place, the Chinese authorities selected their own Panchen Lama, by drawing lots from a golden urn, and he was enthroned in December 1995. The whereabouts of Gedun Choekyi Nyima are still unknown. The Tibetan Monastic dance tradition - known as Cham originated with the earliest Buddhist practice, and the great Masters passed their vision of deities in movement to their students through the great Buddhist lineages. The Great Fifth Dalai Lama codified many of the dances in his 'Cham Yig' (Sacred Dance Text), and so ensured their survival - each according to the traditions of the individual monasteries - handed down by the Dance Masters to their students. Tashi Lhunpo's Cham is unique in its detailed movements and costumes. The traditional chants heard tonight are shortened versions of the prayers used in the Monastery from day to day. Tashi Lhunpo Monastery UK Trust was founded in September 2003. His Holiness the Dalai Lama kindly agreed to become Patron of the Trust, which has five Trustees. The Trust aims to develop awareness and facilitate access to the unique culture of Tibet, especially of Tashi Lhunpo Monastery, by organising artistic tours, educational workshops and cultural exchanges. The Trust works to improve the living conditions of the monks inside the Monastery both by assisting with construction and technical projects as well as to help by improving the educational and health facilities. There are also associated projects within linked monasteries and nunneries in Ladakh. Recent fund-raising projects undertaken within the Monastery include the provision of irrigation equipment, enabling the best use to be made of farmland surrounding the monastery campus, and the second stage of the school building project, where over 140 students now study. In Ladakh, the Trust has funded the building of a school in a remote nunnery in Zangskar, and has sent an English teacher to work in Thiksey Monastery School near Leh. The current major project is the construction of a new Main Prayer Hall (Dukhang), to accommodate the growing number of monks. The Trust also runs a sponsorship programme and is appealing for contributions towards the Food Fund. The Trust organises biennial cultural tours of the Masked Dances and Sacred Chant of the Monastery to the UK and Europe, during which they carry out workshops in schools and for mixed ages in order to inform audiences about Tibetan monastic culture and undertake sand mandala exhibitions. As part of the Newbury Spring Festivals Education and Community programme the monks will give a performance this afternoon in the Corn Exchange to some 500 local children.

WOODWIND INSTRUMENT REPAIRER


Flutes, Clarinets and Saxophones servicing/repairs
Efficient, Reliable and Cost Effective!
Contact: Jane Pickering on Newbury (01635) 35881 or email: jane-pickering@sky.com
A Member of N.A.M.I.R.

www.tashi-lhunpo.org.uk

www.newburyspringfestival.org.uk

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Mahan Esfahani harpsichord


St Marys Church Kintbury Thursday 17 May 7.30pm

Mahan Esfahani
Jacquet de la Guerre Pices en r-mineur (1687) J S Bach From the Well-Tempered Clavier, Book I Partita V in G, BWV 829 Interval Buxtehude Rameau Toccata in G minor, BuxWV 163 Suite en la-mineur, from the Pices de Clavecin

Last season, he also gave his solo debut at the Wigmore Hall (broadcast on BBC Radio 3) and appeared at the City of London and York Early Music Festivals. In addition, his recording of the Poulenc concert was selected as a CD of the month for the May 2010 issue of BBC Music Magazine, and he has been featured as a Hot Property by Classic FM magazine. Recent engagements include an appearance at the Wigmore Hall with the countertenor James Bowman, and directing the Manchester Camerata, the Arion Baroque Orchestra (Montreal), and The English Concert at the 2011 Lufthansa Festival. Furthermore, he returned to the United States for solo recitals and made his concerto debut in the Far East with the Malaysian Philharmonic Orchestra in March 2011. As a soloist and guest director Esfahani has appeared with The English Concert, the Manchester Camerata, and the Seattle Baroque Orchestra; his series and festival appearances include the BBC Proms, Tage Alter Musik Regensburg, the Goettingen Handel Festival, the Settimana Mozart of Milan, New Yorks Metropolitan Museum of Art and the San Francisco Early Music Society. Esfahani studied as a Presidents Scholar at Stanford University where his principal mentor was the musicologist George Houle; he went on to pursue his performance studies under the supervision of the Australian harpsichordist Peter Watchorn (Boston) and the Italian organist Lorenzo Ghielmi (Milan) before settling in the United Kingdom as Artist-in-Residence at New College, Oxford. In the autumn of 2010 he was further elected an honourary member of Keble College, Oxford.

Supported by the Miss W E Lawrence 1973 Charitable Settlement

Mahan Esfahani
Praised by The Times as exceptionally gifted and by Early Music Today for his sensitivity and vibrance, the Iranian born Mahan Esfahani (b. 1984) is quickly establishing himself as the leading concert harpsichordist of his generation. He was the first harpsichordist to be named a BBC New Generation Artist and to be awarded a fellowship prize by the Borletti-Buitoni Trust. Recent highlights have included performances of Kalabis Concerto for Harpsichord and Orchestra (1975) with the BBC Concert Orchestra, Martinus Concerto for Harpsichord and Orchestra (1935) with the BBC Symphony Orchestra under Jiri Belohlavek, and Poulencs Concert Champetre (1928) with the BBC National Orchestra of Wales.

Programme Notes
ELISABETH JACQUET DE LA GUERRE (1665-1729) Pices en r-mineur (1687) Prlude - Allemande - 1e Courante - 2e Courante Sarabande - Gigue - Canaris - Chaconne - Menuet The Premier Livre (1687) of harpsichord pieces by Elisabeth Jacquet de la Guerre followed on the footsteps of one of the greatest collections of harpsichord pieces of the period, the Pices de Clavecin of Jacques Champion de Chambonnires (1670), and came to the attention of the French public right before the equally important collection of the same name by Jean-Henry d'Anglebert (1689). Thus it stands with the two giants of French harpsichord playing of the period, and it certainly does not suffer in any comparisons. The fact that an important engraver in Paris would take the time and the financial risk to undertake the publication of a work by a woman says a great deal about the position of women in seventeenth-century music. Jacquet de la Guerre, only 22 at the time, was one of many in the period who made a www.mahanesfahani.com

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Marco Borggreve

Mahan Esfahani harpsichord


mark as a serious, independent composer - Italy's Barbara Strozzi and Francesca Caccini also come to mind. Favoured by Louis XIV from an early age, Jacquet de la Guerre first made her mark at the French Court as an improviser at the harpsichord and organ, and in 1694 (just short of the age of thirty!) was the first woman to conduct - her own work, no less - at the Opra in Paris. Indeed, perhaps the success of many a woman in music at this time is a direct result of the nature of Court patronage which from time to time could bypass societal 'norms.' The opening prelude in particular exemplifies the sort of ambiguity that defines so much of the seventeenth century before the age of, shall we say, 'standardisation.' This 'unmeasured' prelude (called as such because of the notation of its free sections in semibreves, thus leaving the rhythmic execution to the taste of the performer) is essentially a French translation of an Italian toccata, in which the improvisatory style exploiting the ever-changing colours of harmonic groups is combined with a brief fugal section in a ternary dance rhythm. The typical dances of a Baroque suite - an Allemande, a couple of Courantes, Sarabandes, a capricious 'Cannaris' (called so because of its origins in the Canary Islands), a solemn Chaconne are transformed by Jacquet de la Guerre into miniature dramas with the most subtle shadings. This music is indeed like a moving mirror, in which various colours are formed by the changing angle with respect to light. JOHANN SEBASTIAN BACH (1685-1750) From the Well-Tempered Clavier, Book I (1722) Praeludium & Fuga in A, BWV 864 Praeludium & Fuga in B, BWV 866 Praeludium & Fuga in H, BWV, 869 The title of the 'Well-Tempered Clavier' of Johann Sebastian Bach has long been misunderstood. It does not indicate our modern, 'equal' temperament in which all twelve semitones in the octave are spaced equally. While certainly theorists of the period had been discussing equal temperament, at least on a hypothetical level, it is clear that the composers of the Baroque (and, indeed, later on until the twentieth century!) were absolutely not interested in abandoning the variation between different key colours. Thus, in contrast to equal temperament, 'well' temperament purposefully divides the semitones in unequal ways so as to cause keys to sound differently from one another. Throughout the first book (compiled in 1722) of the Well-Tempered Clavier, Bach exploits the characters of different keys with preludes and fugues of widely varying styles. By presenting a prelude and fugue in each key (24 in total), Bach in fact celebrates the rich diversity of intervallic relationships amongst the various keys. In a selection of three preludes and fugues, we see Bach stretching the capabilities of the harpsichord as he calls upon the instrument to imitate the singing style in three or four independent parts. I would go so far as to say that in tandem with the aim to exemplify the variety of keys, Bach also uses the opportunity afforded by this work to show the incredible variety of fugal subjects that can be constructed. The subject of the A-Major fugue is a case in point. A subject that begins with a lone note followed by an uncomfortable silence before the conclusion of the theme - who on Earth could have created this, and have seen the idea through in perfect counterpoint, but Bach? And as if to test the effectiveness of well-temperament, the last fugue in b-minor is based on a chromatic subject which actually manages to fit in all twelve notes of the scale, as if to say that a temperament that could fit in the sweet intervals of thirds and sixths could also handle the most thorny intervals as well. Especially when compared to the second book of the Well-Tempered Clavier (compiled in 1744), the first book clearly shows Bach looking backwards to the seventeenth century, not only in the construction of his fugues but also in the forms used to construct his preludes - thus, the prelude in B-flat major is essentially a toccata in the stylus phantasticus, whereas the prelude in b-minor is reminiscent of the opening movement of a trio sonata by Legrenzi or Corelli. JOHANN SEBASTIAN BACH Partita V in G, BWV 829 (1731) Praeambulum - Allemande - Corrente - Sarabande - Tempo di Minuetta - Passepied - Gigue In contrast to the composer's homage to the seventeenth century as exemplified in the first book of the WellTempered Clavier, Bach's later Six Partitas (BWV 825-830) show a man very much in tune with the artistic trends of his time. Running contrary to the usual view of J.S. Bach as a musical conservative, the music of the Partitas contains much in common with the relatively straightforward, 'modern' musical language of Telemann and the Dresden court composer Johann Adolf Hasse. The almost relentless sound of close counterpoint is replaced by a greater emphasis on the flutey upper register of the keyboard; as a result, the music is much more vocal and natural in character compared to, say, the earlier English Suites (BWV 806-811), written about two decades or so before the Partitas. It comes as no surprise, then, that the Partitas were amongst the handful of works that Bach decided to have published in his lifetime, and it seems that public consumption - as far as the milieu of northern Germany was concerned - was fairly enthusiastic. Here, as the title page of the publication promised, 'connoisseurs' (Liebhabern) could expect a variety of dance movements including 'Galanterien' (an obvious nod to modernity), the playing and listening to of which would provide 'spiritual www.newburyspringfestival.org.uk

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Mahan Esfahani harpsichord


refreshment' (Gemueths-Ergotzung). Of course, let us discard our nineteenth-century obsession linking artistic heaviness with depth of thought (and thus linking lightness with superficiality!) - rather, none of this sense of the composer trying to please the public would have anything to do with lessening the impact of Bach's unique genius. The Fifth Partita in G (BWV 829) is, along with the third in a-minor (BWV 827), the most 'galant' of them all. From the impetuous Praeambulum to the graceful Sarabande to a Passepied that is infectious in its mirth and call to dance, the Partita is all light and happiness. This is Bach at his most fetching. But, after all, Bach is Bach, and in the gigue, we see that he is up to his old devilish tricks. This is no mere jig, but rather a fugue masquerading as a dance. And as if a fugue in three voices on a rather difficult subject weren't hard enough on the hands and brain alike, he opens the second half of the movement with an answer to the original subject, this time in reverse form, and starting in the lowest voice. After developing that for a while, he surreptitiously introduces the original theme once again in a panoply of ideas and sounds. The man just cannot help himself! DIETRICH BUXTEHUDE (c1637-1707) Toccata in G minor, BuxWV 163 Opening the second half is a Toccata in g-minor by the famous organist of Lubeck, Dietrich Buxtehude. The listener will hopefully note that I have quite consciously sought to separate his music in the programme from that of Bach, so as to not present Buxtehude as a mere 'predecessor' of the great Thuringian. Buxtehude, of Danish origin, was the most prolific of the church composers of latter seventeenth-century Lutheran Germany. As a keyboardist in particular (though he also produced a large number of cantatas and a wealth of chamber works for strings), Buxtehude achieved a synthesis of the earthy and the cerebral that was not lost on J.S. Bach or his equally imaginative sons. This is indeed the musical representative of the dialectic of mysticism and rational thought that typifies preEnlightenment Germany. His presence and influence as a master of keyboard technique were so widely admired that the young Bach absented himself for four weeks from his position at Muehlhausen in 1705 and walked - yes, walked! - some 260 miles to Lubeck to hear and to study with Buxtehude. Apparently, he also investigated the possibility of succeeding Buxtehude at his position at Lubeck's Marienkirche, but was unable to accept the condition that the successor marry Buxtehude's daughter (a common practise of the period for many professions). Interestingly, Handel and Mattheson also made the same journey two years before, and both were put off by the conditions of succession, so we may assume that Buxtehude la www.mahanesfahani.com

fille was in possession of somewhat modest charms. Bach did, after all, sire 21 children, so he probably was not indifferent to more earthly pleasures.
Buxtehude's music is indeed Italianate in that it draws inspiration from the fantastical toccatas and canzonas of the mighty Girolamo Frescobaldi (1583-1643), the organist of St. Peter's whose achievements as a performer and composer virtually set the standard for keyboardists from London to Vienna to Hamburg. The basic form of the Buxtehudian prelude or toccata is centred around the alternation of free, rhetorically-driven sections with contrapuntal episodes focused on the manipulation of one or more themes. This alternation may be likened to a back-and-forth between 'free' prosody and organised or 'strict' poetry. The same sort of alternation, in essence, is observed in the prelude of Jacquet de la Guerre which is heard earlier in the programme. JEAN-PHILLIPPE RAMEAU (1683-1764) Suite en la-mineur, from the Pices de Clavecin (1724) Allemande - Courante - Sarabande - Les Trois Mains - La Fanfarinette - La Triomphante - Gavotte et Six Doubles Following Buxtehude's massive Toccata, the celebrated 'great' suite in a-minor of Jean-Phillippe Rameau brashly enters our stage. This immense and overpowering suite is indeed the crowning achievement of the French clavecin school. In contrast to the dark stained wood and carved ivory of Jacquet de la Guerre's musical language, Rameau's artistic voice is characterised by broad brushstrokes in colours that are sometimes vivid and shocking, sometimes faded and distilling the shadows of past glories. The fantastic style of the French Baroque gives way to a refinement that typifies so much of the artistic thought of the reign of Louis XV. A grand Allemande, so sweeping and bursting at the seams with invention that even its cadences introduce new thematic material, opens the set, moving with a noble gait and majesty that obviates the need for any prelude to the set. A capricious Courante follows, and then we come to the emotional centre of the suite, a Sarabande providing a major-key counterpart to the grandeur of the opening Allemande. In this piece, Rameau has specified the speed and manner of rolling of each chord, providing a fascinating peek at the performance practises of the period. The sarabande's origins as a quick, lascivious dance are masked in the slow and graceful steps of Rameau's take on the form. The fascinating character piece 'Les Trois Mains' is a kind of French variant on the Spanish Fandango - here, Rameau evokes the sense of three hands at the keyboard, which means for the keyboardist a great deal of crossing hands and jumping about. Following this there is 'La Fanfarinette' (a 'fanfarinette' being a young ingenue - meant to be an evocation, perhaps, of Rameau's young bride), and then its companion piece 'La Triomphante.' The celebrated

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gavotte and six 'doubles' or variations, a popular encore piece throughout the modern age, closes the suite. Here the ancient steps of the gavotte give way to a set of variations that are so simple in their structure and mannerisms and yet so truly touching in their sincerity. The work moves with an urgency that sweeps everything away in its path, concluding with a fiendish countermelody to the left hand which underlines a chorale-like statement of the original theme. It is only natural that after Rameau, French harpsichord music essentially enters a period of the worst kind of decadence. As with the legacy of any great man, his successors - perhaps Jacques Duphly (1715-89) the best amongst them - imitated his mannerisms with varying levels of success, but none had the range of intellect and understanding for sonic colours that set the great man apart from his contemporaries. As with J.S. Bach, when Rameau says something, he has the last word.
Mahan Esfahani 2012

Supported by the Miss W E Lawrence 1973 Charitable Settlement

John Lewis is proud to continue its 33-year partnership with the Newbury Spring Festival by supporting a range of concerts featuring the brightest musical stars. We wish the Festival every success.

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Piatti String Quartet


Corn Exchange Newbury Friday 18 May 12.30pm

Young Artists Lunchtime Recital 3

18 May

Charlotte Scott Michael Trainor David Wigram Jessie Ann Richardson Haydn Smetana

violin violin viola cello

Quartet Op 76 No 3 Emperor Quartet No 1 From my life

The Young Artists Lunchtime Recital series is sponsored by The Headley Trust

Piatti String Quartet

The Quartet has gained much musical inspiration from many great quartet musicians and particular influences include members of the Amadeus Quartet, Alban Berg Quartet, Artis Quartet, Alisdair Tait and Jon Thorne. In 2009 they received the MBF Ensemble Award to attend the International Sommerakademie Prague/Vienna/Budapest where they performed throughout Austria. 2011/12 will see the Quartet return to Madrid, studying on a full Scholarship with Gunter Pichler of the Alban Berg Quartet at the International Institute of Chamber Music of Madrid and study with Johannes Meissl of the Artis Quartet Vienna, with the support of the Hattori Foundation. The Piatti Quartet is extremely grateful for the generosity and support of Ian Ellis, the Nicolas Boas Charitable Trust, the Musicians Benevolent Fund, the Hattori Foundation, the Concordia Foundation and the Park Lane Group.

Programme Notes
FRANZ JOSEPH HAYDN (17321809) Quartet No. 62 in C Major, Opus 76 No. 3 Emperor Allegro Poco adagio cantabile Minuetto. Allegro Finale. Presto Winners of the St. Martins in the Fields Chamber Music Competition and the Martin Musical/Philharmonia Scholarship Fund 2010 the Piatti Quartet are fast emerging as one of the UKs leading young string quartets. Previous recipients of the Tunnell Trust Award and selected as Park Lane Group Young Artists in 2009/2010, more recent news includes a second year as Leverhulme Chamber Music Fellows at the Royal Academy of Music and winning the St Peters Eaton Square Prize 2011 and being the only British string quartet to have been selected as one of the twelve to participate in the prestigious Wigmore Hall International String Quartet Competition 2012. Since 2009 they have performed at the Purcell Room, Southbank, and live on BBC Radio 3 numerous times. Over the last year, they have enjoyed several very exciting collaboration projects with Austrian pianist Gottlieb Wallisch and clarinetists Emma Johnson and Sarah Williamson as well as a successful second year of their very own Piatti Chamber Music Festival at Kingsland. The Piatti Quartet had their Wigmore Hall debut in February 2011 and are looking forward to returning there in April 2012. Also returning to the Conway Hall, 2011/2012 will see the quartet extensively touring the British music scene as part of both the prestigious Countess of Munster and the Making Music recital schemes and taking part in both the Melbourne and Geneva International String Quartet Competitions. Joseph Haydn's string quartets, Op. 76, composed in 1796 and 1797, were written by Joseph Haydn and dedicated to Hungarian Count Joseph Erddy. The six quartets are the last complete set that Haydn composed. At the time of the commission, Haydn was employed at the court of Prince Nicolaus Esterhzy II; around the same time he composed his annual mass for Princess Maria Hermenegild Esterhzy and the oratorio The Creation. Although the quartets were completed by 1797, shown by accounts of visitors hearing them performed in early 1797, because of an exclusivity agreement with Count Erddy, they were not published until 1799. Correspondence between Haydn and his publishers reveal that there was confusion regarding the release of his quartets; the composer promised the London publishing house of Messrs. Longman Clementi & Co. first publishing rights, but a lack of communication with the firm led Haydn to worry that a Vienna publication might accidentally release the complete set of quartets first, causing him to lose money from London. Indeed, they were published almost simultaneously by Clementi in London and Artaria in Vienna in 1799. These quartets are among Haydn's most ambitious chamber works, deviating more than previous quartets from the expected sonata form, and emphasizing thematic continuity, seamlessly and continually passing motives from one instrument to another.

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Piatti String Quartet


The Quartet No. 62 in C major, also known as Op. 76, no. 3, boasts the nickname Emperor because, in the second movement, Haydn quotes the melody from Gott erhalte Franz den Kaiser ("God Save Emperor Francis"), an anthem he wrote for Emperor Francis II. This same melody is known to modern listeners for its later use in the German national anthem, Deutschlandlied. BEDRICH SMETANA (1824-1884) Quartet No. 1 in E minor From my life (composed 1876) Allegro vivo appassionato Allegro moderato la polka Largo sostenuto Vivace Written in 1876, this autobiographical work is a musical depiction of Smetanas life. By this time in his life, Smetana had been totally deaf for over a year and could work for no more than an hour at a time due to a loud high-pitched sound in his ears. The piece opens with what Smetana described as the call of fate and the listener is immediately thrust into foreshadowed tragedy with this dramatic opening viola solo. This is then followed by Smetanas portrayal of his youthfully romantic attitudes toward life, music, and love. The second movement is a depiction of his happiest memories with one particularly recognisable musical reference to his years spent in Prague composing dances for his aristocratic friends. The slow movement is a tender tribute to his first wife, who died prematurely of tuberculosis in 1859. The Finale begins by celebrating his musical successes and achievements as a Czech national composer, but the tragedy of his deafness becomes manifest towards the end when a high-pitched E, played by the first violin (symbolising the ringing in his ears), intrudes over an agitated accompaniment. The piece finally comes to a resigned and forlorn end as all hope fades away with the death tolls of the concluding pizzicato chords. The Young Artists Lunchtime Recital series is sponsored by The Headley Trust

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Lighthouse
Corn Exchange Newbury Friday 18 May 7.30pm

Lighthouse

18 May

Tim Garland Gwilym Simcock Asaf Sirkis

reeds piano drums and percussion

success with a number of groups under his own name, the Dean Street Underground Orchestra, Storms/Nocturnes, Acoustic Triangle and his award winning Lighthouse Project. In 2009 he won a Grammy for his part in creating The New Crystal Silence which celebrated Chick Corea and Gary Burton's famous partnership. He orchestrated five of Chick's famous pieces for the Sydney Symphony Orchestra. He was voted "Musician of the Year" by the 2006 All Party Parliamentary Jazz Appreciation Group. Garland has also contributed to various pieces for Audio Network PLC and is involved in writing music for film and television.

Grammy winner Tim Garland and Barclaycard Mercury nominated pianist Gwilym Simcock are two of the most outstanding composers of our time in both jazz and classical genres and are regarded as among the very best in the world on their respective instruments. With Asaf Sirkis playing a custom built percussion set of frame drums, bass Udu, Hang drum and more, Lighthouse exude a very special energy and excitement in performance.

Tim Garland
Tim Garland, born in 1966, is a British jazz saxophonist, composer and band-leader. He is also known for his innovative bass clarinet playing and for his prolific output as composer, blurring the boundaries between modern jazz and classical concert music. As a performer, he has worked widely both in Britain and elsewhere in the world, with particular highlights being a continuing collaboration with Chick Corea and his four year association with Bill Bruford. As composer, he has fulfilled commissions from the LSO, the Northern Sinfonia, BBC Concert Orchestra and Westminster Abbey Choir, as well as countless small and large jazz-based ensembles. As a band-leader, he first achieved wide recognition with the jazz/folk crossover group Lammas (which included Don Paterson and Christine Tobin), going on to further

Gwilym Simcock
Gwilym Simcock was born in Wales in 1981 and is one of the most gifted pianists and imaginative composers on the British scene. Gwilyms influences include jazz legends Keith Jarrett, Chick Corea and John Taylor and classical composers Maurice Ravel, Igor Stravinsky and Mark-Anthony Turnage. Although principally a jazz artist, Gwilym is breaking new ground between genres and often uses classical reference points in his composed work. Aside from his renowned solo piano work, Gwilym has worked extensively throughout Europe with the cream of British and international jazz artists including Dave Holland, Kenny Wheeler, Lee Konitz, Bill Bruford's Earthworks, Bob Mintzer, Bobby McFerrin, Steve Swallow and Adam Nussbaum. His own groups as leader range

Eric Richmond

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Lighthouse
from trio to big band. His debut album Perception featuring his sextet with Stan Sulzmann (saxophones), John Parricelli (guitar), Phil Donkin (bass), Martin France (drums) and Ben Bryant (percussion) was nominated for Best Album in the BBC Jazz Awards 2008 and has been critically acclaimed at home and abroad. His 2009 release Blues Vignette featured both solo piano and work with his new trio with Yuri Goloubev (bass) and James Maddren (drums). The album has been universally praised as "sublime", "flawless", "impressive" "a marker that few others are likely to equal". His most recent solo album Good Days at Schloss Elmau on the prestigious ACT label was nominated for the Barclaycard Mercury Prize 2011 and has been lauded as "dazzlingly fresh", "world class", "stupendous", "phenomenal", "a cause for huge celebration". His new collaborative band The Impossible Gentlemen with Mike Walker (guitar), Steve Swallow (bass) and Adam Nussbaum (drums) whose album was released in June 2011 has been described as "nothing short of sensational" . Winner of the Perrier Award, BBC Jazz Awards 2005 Gwilym was the first BBC Radio 3 New Generation jazz Artist. He was voted "Jazz Musician of the Year" at the 2007 Parliamentary Jazz Awards (and nominated again in 2010), and nominated for the 2008 BBC Jazz Awards as Best Instrumentalist. His impressive formal education includes Trinity College of Music (London), Chethams School of Music (Manchester) where he studied classical piano, French horn and composition and the Royal Academy of Music (London) where he graduated from the jazz course with first class honours and the coveted 'Principal's Prize' for outstanding achievement. He teaches at the Royal Academy of Music where he was recently given the honour of Associate. In 2006 Asaf started a unique collaboration with highly acclaimed saxophonist/composer Tim Garland and has enjoyed making four albums with him so far; If The Sea Replied (The Lighthouse Trio), Due North (Northern Underground Orchestra), The Mystery (featuring Chick Corea and the Northern Sinfonia Orchestra), and Libra (Lighthouse project). While developing his own compositions, Asaf formed the Asaf Sirkis Trio in 2007 which features Greek guitarist Tassos Spiliotopoulos and Israeli bassist Yaron Stavi. Asaf is currently touring extensively with his Trio and with his Inner Noise band, and is gaining in reputation as a composer and band leader. He also works with the Larry Coryells Power Trio (featuring Larry Coryell on guitar and Jeff Berlin on bass), Nicolas Meier Group, a group that combines Jazz with Middle Eastern music, and with John Laws Art Of Sound trio as well as working with other artists such as: Chick Corea, Jeff Berlin, John Abercrombie, Bob Sheppard, Mark Egan, Dave Liebman, David Binney, Gary Husband, John Taylor, Norma Winstone, Kenny Wheeler, Gwilym Simcock, Andy Sheppard, Lenny Stern, Paul Bollenback (NY), Julian Siegel, Dan Stern, Peter King, Stan Sulzmann, Barbaros Erkose (Turkey), Ari Brown (Chicago), Bela SzakcsiLokatos (Hungary),Glauco Venier (Italy), Yuri Goloubev (Russia), Klaus Gesing (Austria), Eyal Maoz (NY), Carlos Barretto (Portugal), Simon Fisher Turner, Phil Robson, Martin Speake, Mark Latimer, Reem Kelani, Christine Tobin, Tom Arthurs, John Etheridge and more.

Asaf Sirkis
Asaf Sirkis was born in 1969 in Petah-Tikva, Israel, but later moved to the town of Rehovot, where he spent his teens and early twenties. This was an influential move for Asaf, as it was here amongst the diverse cultural influences he found in Rehovot that Asaf began to show an interest in music and rhythm. Asaf left Israel and eventually settled in London in April 1999. He soon become part of the UK Jazz and world music scene, and started working with Adel Salameh, a Palestinian aud player/composer with whom he recorded the album Nuzha which featured Asafs Middle Eastern frame drum playing. In 2000 Asaf met Gilad Atzmon, which was the start of a major creative collaboration. With Atzmon they formed The Orient House Ensemble, and this band went on to record 7 albums with Exile winning the Best CD of the Year category at the BBC Jazz Award 2003 and nominated for the Best Band category in 2004.

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Milo Karadagli guitar c


St Georges Church Wash Common Friday 18 May 7.30pm

Milo Karadagli

18 May

Sor Bach Villa Lobos

Grand Solo Prelude and Fugue BWV 997 Prelude no 1 Etude no 11 Valsa Choro Etude no 12

and concerto debuts with the London Philharmonic Orchestra and English Chamber Orchestra. Other appearances have included the Cheltenham and Spitalfields Festivals, the Menuhin Festival in Gstaad, and the 2010 iTunes Festival in London the first time the festival had staged a classical event. Upcoming engagements include recitals at Wigmore Hall, Brighton Festival, and BOCA Festival of the Arts. Milo has been the recipient of many prizes, including the Julian Bream Prize, the Princes Prize, the Ivor Mariants Guitar Award, and the Silver Medal of the Worshipful Company of Musicians. He has taken part in several young artists programmes including at the Wigmore Hall, and at the Southbank Centres Purcell Room as part of the Park Lane Groups New Year Series. Throughout his studies, Milo was generously supported by the John Hosier Music Trust, Musicians Benevolent Fund and the Hattori Foundation. In turn he himself now works to support young talent as Patron of the charity Awards for Young Musicians. Milo uses D'Addario J 46 strings and a 2007 guitar by Greg Smallman, kindly lent to him by Paul and Jenny Gillham.

Interval Albeniz Asturias Granada Sevilla Koyunbaba

Domeniconi

Sponsored by Ms Anne Wolff and Mr Pieter Knook and the Wash Common Consortium Additional financial support from Greenham Common Trust's Find Me a Grant Scheme

Milo Karadagli
Born in Montenegro in 1983 and a multiple prize-winner, including two Gramophone awards in 2011 for Young Artist of the Year and the Specialist Classical Chart Award, Milo Karadagli has established himself as one of todays most gifted young guitar virtuosos. In July 2010 he signed an exclusive recording contract with Deutsche Grammophon, and his first recording was released in spring 2011. Growing up during the time of the Balkan civil war, Milo began playing the guitar at the age of 8 and very quickly won national recognition for his performances. At 16 he was awarded a scholarship to study at the Royal Academy of Music where, after graduating with First Class Honours, he went on to complete a Masters degree in Performance and was subsequently made a Meaker Junior Fellow the first guitarist to be given this accolade at the Royal Academy. Milos engagements have included solo recital debuts at the Wigmore Hall in London and the Lucerne Festival,

Programme Notes
FERNANDO SOR (1778-1839) Grand Solo The composer and guitarist Fernando Sor enjoyed a successful international career. After leaving Spain in 1813, he lived in Paris for two years before moving on to London. He returned to Paris after 1826, having travelled to perform at the Russian court in 1823. He was a celebrated instrumentalist, and for this reason he composed around sixty solo works for the guitar, and published an influential treatise on performance technique. His other compositions include songs, chamber music, ballet music and an opera. Sor extended the possibilities of the guitar's repertoire, and his complex yet clear textures are both remarkable in themselves and extremely influential on the music of his successors. He composed the Grand Solo in 1810 but revised it some ten years later. There is a slow introduction in siciliano rhythm with an insistent pulse in the bass. The main material is lively, however, moving at a rapid pace and including a stormy development section. JOHANN SEBASTIAN BACH (1685-1750) Prelude and Fugue in C minor, BWV 997 Bach composed his C minor Lute Partita, from which this Prelude and Fugue derive, in around 1737. The intimate style of this music links it stylistically with companion pieces for the harpsichord, though the music was conceived directly for the lute, and in particular the Dresden lute virtuosos Silvius Leopold Wei and Johann Kropffganss.

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Milo Karadagli guitar c


HEITOR VILLA-LOBOS (1887-1959) Prelude No. 1 Etude No. 11 Valsa Choro Etude No. 12 In his compositions Villa-Lobos related both to the traditions of Brazilian music and the great European inheritance. The Prelude No. 1 bears the subtitle Lyric Melody, and is a homage to the sertanejo, the most popular musical style of Brazil. The first performance of the Preludes was given by Abel Carlevaro, in Montevideo, Uruguay, in 1943. Written in Paris in 1929, the twelve Etudes were dedicated to Andres Segovia, and explore the range of the instruments possibilities for a talented performer. No. 11, Lent - Pi mosso - Anim, has a slow introduction which releases a lively continuation, whereas No. 12, Anim - Pi Mosso - Un peu plus anim, is more insistently lively and makes a true finale. The word Choro derives from the Portuguese chorar (to weep) and became associated with a spontaneous popular music that appeared in Rio de Janeiro in the later 19th century, performed by chores, serenading ensembles that always included guitars. In 1912 Villa-Lobos composed his Suite Popolar Brasilienne, which featured the Valsa Choro. ISAAC ALBENIZ (1860-1909) Asturias (Leyenda) Granada (Serenata) from Suite espaola (1887) arr. Michael Lewin Sevilla (Sevillanas) from Suite espaola During the nineteenth century, Spanish dances such as the Bolero and Fandango had become sensations across Europe. Yet it was only later that Spanish composers such as Albniz began truly to exploit the musical tradition of Spanish dance. In this movement of his Suite Espaola, Albniz uses elements of the flamenco dance native to Seville: called the Sevillanas. The dance is always in triple time, often with the weight on the first and third beats of the bar, as can be clearly heard in the opening and closing sections. The harmony shifts between the major and minor, lending the music a captivatingly mysterious air.

Sevilla is so incredibly exciting that it always makes me want to dance. Milo Karadagli
CARLO DOMENICONI (1947 -) Koyunbaba Suite, Op. 19 (1985) Carlo Domeniconi is an Italian guitarist and composer known as a concert artist in both the classical and jazz idioms. Born in Cesena, Italy, Domeniconi left for West Berlin in 1966, where he studied composition at The Berlin University of Arts. He then worked for 20 years as a professor there. Later, Domeniconi visited Turkey and became enamoured with its people and culture. He started the department for guitar studies at the conservatory in Istanbul and developed a compositional style that reflected the regional folk influence. Domeniconi is most well-known for his 1985 piece Koyunbaba. The name literally translates as sheepfather or shepherd, but it is also a name of the small bay in south-west Turkey. The source of inspiration for this magical work is the Mediterranean sea overlooked from the cliffs above the bay of Koyunbaba. By using unusual techniques Domeniconi managed vividly to paint the scenery of this enchanting landscape. He requests that the guitar be tuned in C-sharp minor, totally at variance with the instruments standard tuning, and the resulting sound is rich and exotic. Based on fantasy and variation, the music gradually builds through the works four continuous sections, using the special tuning to hypnotic effect in creating intensity and excitement.

Asturias is perhaps the quintessential Spanish guitar piece. A favourite of Andrs Segovia, and virtually every guitarist who followed him, the piece has become so widely identified with the guitar that those who do not know otherwise would probably be astonished to discover that the work was originally written for the piano. Isaac Albniz composed Asturias in the 1890s. The piece was published in 1912 by the German editor Hofmeister as an addition to a three-movement work entitled Suite Espaola, (which had been published in Barcelona some twenty years previously). Somewhat ironically, the piece does not seem particularly influenced by the folk music of the Asturias region of northern Spain, taking its inspiration instead from the flamenco traditions of Andalucia. Granada is the first movement of the Suite Espaola and is based on the pensive, yearning folk songs of southern Spain. Hearing Segovia playing Asturias, when I was a boy, on one of my fathers LPs, is a reason why I became so enamoured with the classical guitar. I adore playing this piece because it is a rollercoaster of emotion. And whenever I play Granada, right from the first phrase I feel the butterflies in my stomach. It reminds me of the heat and salt of the Mediterranean. Milo Karadagli

I heard it for the first time when I had just arrived in London. With its Turkish folksong theme, and magical sound-world, it brought back all those memories and places I had left behind. Whenever I play it, it is always different, like the sea itself, sometimes calm, sometimes a storm... Milo Karadagli
Sponsored by Ms Anne Wolff and Mr Pieter Knook and the Wash Common Consortium Additional financial support from Greenham Common Trust's Find Me a Grant Scheme

www.milosguitar.com

www.newburyspringfestival.org.uk

18 May
57

The Sheepdrove Recital


Sheepdrove Eco Conference Centre Lambourn Friday 18 May 7.30pm

Mikhail Kazakevich piano


Debussy Images (book II) Prludes Book 1 Voiles Minstrels Les Collines dAnacapri Arabesque No 1 Lisle joyeuse Sonatine Sonatine

Programme Notes
CLAUDE DEBUSSY (1862-1918) Images, Series 2 1 .Cloches travers les feuilles 2. Et la lune descend sur le temple qui ft 3. Poissons d'or Composed around 1906, Debussys second set of Images comprises three pieces of imaginative yet contrasting character. Cloches travers les feuilles (Bells through the leaves) evokes the sound of bells while reflecting also the influence of the exotic gamelan percussion orchestras of Bali.

18 May
Ravel Roussel

Supported by the Sheepdrove Trust

Mikhail Kazakevich
Born in Gorky (Russia), Mikhail Kazakevich made his western debut at the International Schubert Competition in Dortmund, Germany, in 1991. As a result of his success there, he was engaged to play with the Dortmund Philharmonic Orchestra and also gave numerous solo recitals in Germany and France, where he was awarded a Special Prize of SACEM (France) for the performance of 20th-century music. In 1992, he came to London, where he made his debut at the Wigmore Hall. Soon afterwards, Kazakevich was signed exclusively by the BMG/Conifer recording label, for which he has made numerous recordings. He has played solo and with orchestras at prestigious venues and festivals in Austria, Germany, France, Russia, Switzerland, Denmark, South Korea and the Middle East. In the United Kingdom, he has given numerous recitals at Londons Wigmore Hall, St Johns Smith Square, the South Bank Centre, and has made many live broadcasts for BBC Radio 3. He regularly performs at the Brighton Festival and the Newbury Spring Festival. Other projects include a performance and recording of Bachs 48 Preludes and Fugues (Well Tempered Klavier) at St Georges, Bristol. He has played with the European Chamber Orchestra and made his return concert tours to Denmark and Russia, where he performed Mozart concertos No 20 and No 25 with the Philharmonic Orchestras. Mikhail Kazakevich is a regular jury member at the Sheepdrove Piano Competition, the final of which takes place on Sunday 20 May (see page 71)

Et la lune descend sur le temple qui fut (The descent of the moon upon the temple which used to be) was suggested by its dedicatee, Louis Laloy. The music creates an impression of oriental stillness and the utmost serenity, and again the influence of the gamelan can be discerned. Poissons d'or was inspired by an engraving featuring a pair of goldfish. Debussy brings them to life by using the whole range of the keyboard with extraordinary imagination, including a notable and sonorous climax.
Prludes, Book 1 Voiles Minstrels Les collines d'Anacapri The first of Debussys two sets of Prludes was composed in 1910. These evocative compositions vary considerably in size and character, and it is not always possible to link them with clear visual images. In fact Debussy hinted as much when he stated that the titles should really be placed at the end, rather than at the beginning, of each piece.

Voiles is famous for its use of the whole-tone scale. The word 'voiles' can mean 'sails or, alternatively, 'veils'. Either interpretation will fit. Minstrels: Inspired by a visit to the music-hall, this Prlude combines sentimentality with high spirits. Les collines d'Anacapri fuses a tarantella rhythm with elements of Neapolitan folksong, since Anacapri is a small town in the Bay of Naples. The sound of bells is important too.
Arabesque No. 1 Debussy wrote his two Arabesques around 1890. No. 1 has an appealing warmth of expression that derives particularly from its opening arpeggio. This is one of the

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www.kazakevich.net

The Sheepdrove Recital


first of his compositions to show the full originality of his genius, and therefore is a milestone in the impressionist movement, despite its relative simplicity. In the middle of the recapitulation of the A section, the music moves to a higher register and descends, followed by a large pentatonic scale ascending and descending, becoming a V7 chord (B7), and resolving back to E major, before the descending right hand E major pentatonic progression is played an octave up. Both hands rise up the keyboard with a progressions of 4ths and closes with gentle E major chords. Lisle joyeuse Debussy composed nothing finer than L'isle joyeuse, which he composed in the summer of 1904. The imagery is associated with another journey: that depicted in Watteau's painting L'embarquement pour Cythre. From this source the music derives its atmosphere of Mediterranean warmth and gaiety. Beginning with a virtuoso cadenza with cascading runs, the music moves on to a dance-like phase. This in turn gives way to the brilliant rhythms of Debussy's toccata style and recalls the delicacy of his water pieces, before a magnificent, heroic melody forms the structural and expressive climax. This has real power, and confirms that this is in many respects his most ambitious piano composition. At any rate, it is certainly one that contains all those elements that combine to make Debussy the master he is. MAURICE RAVEL (1875-1937) Sonatine 1. Modr 2. Mouvement de menuet 3. Anim Ravel was obsessively fond of the forms and stylistic features of 18th century music, and the Sonatine is one of several compositions in which he used earlier music as the basis for his own creations. The melodic outlines have much in common with two contemporary pieces, also composed in 1905: the Introduction and Allegro and the String Quartet. A particular strength of the Sonatine is the music's closely cohesive structure. This derives in large measure from thematic relationships which are shared between all three movements, but which are developed with the utmost subtlety. The first movement is an economical sonata form, the initial falling fourth serving as the motto for not only the movement but the whole composition. The central minuet is perfectly judged; moreover it is typical of Ravel's ideal of formal perfection that the music is not a moment too long. The finale is perhaps the most romantic of the three www.kazakevich.net www.newburyspringfestival.org.uk 59 Newbury Spring Festival would like to thank Yamaha for kindly supporting us with the supply of their Concert Grand Piano - The CFX movements. There is a more extended development, whose most subtle feature is the second theme, which is a rhythmic transformation of the idea with which the whole work began. ALBERT ROUSSEL (1866-1937) Sonatine 1. Modr 2. Trs lent Roussel is one of the most important composers of his generation, and a hugely significant figure in French music. Although he is widely known for only a small number of pieces, it is clear on close acquaintance with any of these (such as the magnificent ballet score, Bacchus et Ariane) that he is an artist of the first rank. Composed in 1912, the Sonatine has two movements and occupies a duration of ten minutes. As such this is Roussels only extended composition for solo piano, with a typically clear sense of form which relates to the concise scale of the work. The themes have a classical slant and there is little distortion of their outlines in development. Thus the first movement begins at a moderate tempo but moves ahead purposefully to include aspects of scherzo which are always light and delicate. The second movement begins at a slow pulse with a gracefully swaying rhythm, and at one point an accelerando even suggests the possibility of the scherzos return, However, this comes to nothing and instead the music moves ahead to a purposeful conclusion. Supported by the Sheepdrove Trust

18 May

Milo Karadagli masterclass c


Corn Exchange Newbury Saturday 19 May 10.00am

Milo Karadagli Guitar Masterclass


The Festival is delighted to welcome Milo Karadagli to c the Corn Exchange, following his Festival recital at St Georges Church last night, to give a Masterclass with guitarists from Berkshire Maestros. This is an exceptional opportunity for these young musicians to participate with Milo, the young prize-winning master of the guitar. Supported by The Headley Trust

19 May

Milo Karadagli
If you were asked to name classical musics most legendary guitar players, youd probably come up with Andres Segovia, Julian Bream and John Williams. Milo Karadagli, who is already being hailed by fans and critics c for his brilliant technique and transcendent musicality, may well be on his way to joining them. With his first recording for Deutsche Grammophon, he aims to start bringing a new sense of excitement, and new waves of listeners, to the classical guitar. When he was 8 Milos passed the audition to go to music school and even though he liked the piano he chose the guitar as it was the most practical choice. I liked the piano very much but my parents said it was too expensiveto have one. Then I liked the violin too, but they said oh, that would be really painful for us! Milos playing developed at a stunning speed. He had never been afraid to perform in public, and as his skills improved he was quick to display them in front of audiences. He had begun making appearances in major concert halls by the time he was 14.

Determined to get himself to London and the Royal Academy of Music, Milo applied himself single-mindedly to improving his technique and building up his repertoire, winning every available competition in Yugoslavia and taking additional lessons in Belgrade. He had gone as far as he could go in his homeland of Montenegro. I decided I would send my material to London. I chose five of my best pieces and recorded a tape of them, and sent it to the Royal Academy. After two months I hadnt heard anything. My mother said youre only 16, you can try again next year, but I refused to accept it. He was accepted and, just turned 17, Milos found himself starting a new life in a strange city being taught by Professor Michael Lewin. Despite his undoubted gifts, Milo quickly discovered that he didnt know everything about the classical guitar after all. His teachers in Montenegro hadnt been true guitar specialists, and various imperfections had crept into his technique. Michael Lewin gave me a little study by Fernando Sor, and the Sor studies were pieces I had digested in my first year of guitar playing. Then we had the lesson, and I realised that actually I could not do everything that he asked me to. I had to start again and listen and work. Often Michael had to slowly adjust my hand positions, while still preserving the spirit of the music. For the next four years at the Academy I worked and practised so many levels, so many different concerts, deadlines and preparations. It was very intense and I didnt do anything apart from practising and sleeping. Eventually, Milo graduated with First Class honours in June 2004. Then he continued his studies with a two-year Masters degree in Performance, in which he achieved a Distinction. Following that, he became the first guitarist ever to be made a Meaker Junior Fellow of the RAM, which gave him a further two years breathing space to study and perform. Emerging into the world of professional musicianship, he notched up prestigious appearances at the Lucerne Festival, the Wigmore Hall and the Purcell Room. He had also brought his prize-winning ways to London, collecting the Ivor Mairants Award in 2002 and the Julian Bream Prize (awarded by Bream himself) in 2005. He was also the first guitarist to win the Prince of Wales Princes Prize. Most recently he won two Gramophone awards in 2011 for Young Artist of the Year and the Specialist Classical Chart Award.

Berkshire Maestros
Berkshire Maestros is a charitable trust providing music education opportunities to children and young people in Berkshire. Regarded as one of the finest youth music organisations in the country, thousands of children have music lessons with Maestros every week. The emphasis in the sessions is on learning through fun and the teaching staff are amongst the best in the country. 60 www.milosguitar.com www.berkshiremaestros.org.uk

Milo Karadagli masterclass c


Berkshire Maestros run hundreds of bands, choirs and orchestras to allow children to build on their lesson experience. These take place at music centres based in Bracknell, Newbury, Reading and Windsor. Maestros also provides a world class awards scheme to gifted and talented young musicians. Berkshire Maestros is constantly developing and implementing new projects with schools, community groups and other arts organisations. In addition, they work closely with national conservatoires and university departments. With the support of five of the Berkshire Unitary Authorities, Maestros offer reduced rates for beginners, a special 20 introductory offer on the first term in beginner ensembles and 25% off membership of every band, choir or orchestra for all students having lessons with Maestros so that every child can discover the wonderful world of music. Supported by The Headley Trust

www.milosguitar.com www.berkshiremaestros.org.uk

www.newburyspringfestival.org.uk

19 May
61

Bollywood to Bhangra
Corn Exchange Newbury Saturday 19 May 7.30pm

Kuljit Bhamra presents Bollywood to Bhangra


Kuljit Bhamra Sangeeta Shahid Khan Raj Suthar Bollywood Dreams Dancers Two legendary names from the British Asian music scene, Kuljit Bhamra and Sangeeta, come together in a new theatre show created especially for the Newbury Spring Festival.

acknowledged community in Southall to arts, music, poetry and literature. The Southall Story exhibition was launched at the Royal Festival Hall in April 2010 and will be toured internationally. Kuljit has won many awards and has over 15 years experience performing and presenting concerts to audiences in the UK, Europe, USA, Canada and around the world.

Sangeeta
Sangeeta is the most popular and successful female singer in the British Asian music scene, with a vast repertoire of songs with a Bhangra/Bollywood feel. Sangeeta was only 12 when she won the BBC Radio Leicester competition, the award being judged and handed out by none other than Lata Mangeshkar. The following year she also won an award at the National Indian Song Contest in Birmingham. Her hit album Flower In The Wind broke all sales records in the UK, reaching the number one position in both the Bhangra Charts and Hindi Charts simultaneously. Sangeetas awards have included Asian Pop Award 1991 - Best Newcomer; UK Asian Pop Award 1992 - Best Female Singer; Music Industry Accolade Bhangra Award 1993 - Most Recognised Female Vocalist; Asian Music Poll Award 1994 - Best Female Singer and UK Asian Pop & Dance Award 1995 - Best Female Singer & Favourite Female Artist Industry Choice & Peoples Choice. In a male-dominated Asian music industry, Sangeeta has opened the door for all other female artists.

19 May

Kuljit Bhamra
One of the most inspiring musicians in the British Asian music scene, Kuljit has composed and produced over 2000 songs and is responsible for the rise to fame of numerous Bhangra and Bollywood stars. He has worked, both independently and collaboratively, on film scores for over ten years, including the soundtrack for the award winning Bhaji on the Beach, A Winter of Love, Bend it Like Beckham and appearances on The Guru, The Four Feathers and more recently Alexander, Brick Lane and Charlie & The Chocolate Factory. Kuljit also worked on Andrew Lloyd Webbers hit musical Bombay Dreams as on-stage percussionist, and then went on to write the Indian music for the West End musical The Far Pavilions. Other theatre productions include Deranged Marriage, Lion of Punjab, Hansel & Gretel, The Snow Queen, The Ramayana, Laila Majnun and King Cotton. He was the last Artistic Director of The Society For The Promotion of New Music before its merger and renaming to Sound & Music - the first British Asian to hold this post in its 60 year history. Kuljit spearheaded innovative projects such as Bhangra Latina and a new tabla notation system which allows students to learn the tabla without having to follow the traditional Indian Guru teaching system. His cutting-edge work earned him the prestigious award of MBE in the Queen's birthday honours list 2009. The citation reads For Services To Bhangra & British Asian Music and is the first time that these genres have been acknowledged in this way. His brainchild The Southall Story is a research and archiving project celebrating the contribution of the under

Shahid Khan
British Asian singer Shahid Khan released his debut album Heartfelt in 2011. The first track to be released from the album, Oh Kuri, is a Bhangra Latina inspired track, coproduced by the acclaimed salsa producer Alex Wilson and has proven a big hit with Salsa clubbers and Bhangra lovers everywhere. The album also features a great Bollywood remix of the legendary song Aint No Sunshine by Bill Withers. It was influential, award-winning

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Bollywood to Bhangra
British Asian musician, composer and producer Kuljit Bhamra who first spotted Southall based Shahid in a local Asian Starsearch Talent Competition over eight years ago. Kuljit who has worked with My Hips Dont Lie Columbian singer Shakira and popular British girl band Sugarbabes, recognised Shahids talent from an early age and has since gone on to mentor Shahid and produce his debut album Heartfelt. Kuljit says: Shahid Khan is one of the UKs hottest new talents and is most importantly offering something different and undeniably unique to listeners. He represents a new breed of a young classic singer voice whose sound is closest to Nusrat Fateh Ali Khan and Adnan Sani. It is great that we have a new British Asian sound to develop that appeals to first and second generation Asian communities as well as mainstream audiences.

Bollywood Dreams Dancers


The Bollywood Dreams Dancers were formed following the closure of Andrew Lloyd Webbers hit musical Bombay Dreams, which stormed Londons West End for two years from 2002 to 2004, when the show transferred to Broadway. The mostly British (or Anglo-British) performers who remained in the UK formed the group in order to continue to offer Bollywood type dance spectacles to audiences, old and new.

Raj Suther
Raj is one of the few (if not only) western trained piano accordion players from the British Asian community. As a child he appeared on ITV's Opportunity Knocks and has accompanied many well-known singers and bands from both the UK and Indian sub-continent over the past 40 years. Playing a wide variety of styles ranging from Folk, Classical and Avant Garde, Raj went on to represent the UK in two consecutive world championships. He is now much sought after as an excellent band member.

www.newburyspringfestival.org.uk

19 May
63

English Chamber Orchestra


St Nicolas Church Newbury Saturday 19 May 7.30pm

English Chamber Orchestra with Newbury Spring Festival Chorus


conductor David Parry April Fredrick soprano Marcus Farnsworth baritone Vaughan Williams Elgar Interval Vaughan Williams Dona Nobis Pacem Old Hundredth Jerusalem Te Deum in G Enigma Variations

premieres have included Stephen Oliver's Mario and the Magician at the Batignano Festival, and Jonathan Doves Tobias and the Angel in 2006 and his oratorio There was a Child at the Norfolk and Norwich Festival in 2009. In the UK he has conducted frequently at both ENO and Opera North in repertoire ranging through Mozart, Rossini, Verdi and Britten, and at Garsington Opera where he is particularly noted for his Rossini. Much in demand from ensembles both in the UK and further afield, David is regularly at the helm of orchestras including the London Philharmonic, Philharmonia, Royal Philharmonic, City of Birmingham, Hall, Academy of St Martin in the Fields and English Chamber Orchestra. He has an extensive discography for Chandos and Opera Rara. His recent recording of Rossini Ermione won a Gramophone Award for best opera 2011.

19 May

Parry

Sponsored by the Vaughan Williams Charitable Trust, Woolton Construction and the Kilfinan Trust This concert is dedicated to the memory of Charles Brown, loyal sponsor and friend of the Festival

April Fredrick
April Fredrick began her musical training as a violinist, going on to earn a Bachelor of Music in Vocal Performance at Northwestern College in Minnesota, where she studied voice with Catherine McCord-Larsen. Her interest in literature led her to pursue a secondary study in English, and this love of language permeates her performances. She went on to complete both an MMus in Vocal Studies and a PhD in Performance Practice at the Royal Academy of Music, where she studied with Jane Highfield and Dominic Wheeler. During her time at the Academy, she sang regularly with the RAM Lyric Song Salon, was a RAM representative for the first Europaisches Liedforum in Berlin, and sang with conductor Laurence Cummings and the RAM Historical Performance department, also appearing as part of the 2008 Young Songmakers Almanac. April has performed widely as a soloist in recital and oratorio venues in the UK, including St. Johns Smith Square, Queen Elizabeth Hall and the Holywell Music Room. She was a semi-finalist in the 2009 Kathleen Ferrier Awards and the 2009 Wigmore Hall International Song Competition, and with duo partner Amy de Sybel, she was named Young Outstanding Musician of the Year at the 2010 Brighton Festival. April, accompanied by Amy de Sybel, participated in the Young Artists Lunchtime Recital series in the 2011 Newbury Spring Festival. Recent performances have included Mahlers Symphony 4, Villa Lobos Bachianas Brasilieras no. 5 as part of the CBSOs Centre Stage series, and her first commercial recording on the Somm label singing Barbers Knoxville:

David Parry
David Parry is acknowledged as an inspirational champion of operatic, concert and symphonic repertoire across a vast range. He is known both for the reappraisal of important lesser-known compositions and for a consistently fresh approach to established repertoire. Recent engagements include Lucia di Lammermoor for Opera Murcia, Il turco in Italia for Garsington Opera, Il barbiere di Siviglia for Staatsoper Stuttgart, concert appearances with the Philharmonia Orchestra featuring Sir John Tomlinson and Carmen Giannattasio, and a new production of Petrushka for Geneva Opera. Significant credits include the world premiere of Jonathan Doves The Adventures of Pinocchio (in separate productions for Opera North and Staatstheater Stuttgart), Der Fliegender Hollnder (for Portland Opera), Madama Butterfly (in Anthony Minghellas production for ENO which earned him an Olivier Award), Cos fan tutte and the premiere of Doves Flight (both for Glyndebourne Festival Opera) and Maria Stuarda (for Stockholm Royal Opera). David Parry made his operatic debut with La cenerentola for English Music Theatre and subsequently joined the conducting staff first at Dortmund then at Opera North. He was Music Director of Opera 80, and founding Music Director of Almeida Opera, with whom he gave the world premieres of works by Nigel Osborne, Kevin Volans, Elena Firsova, and Param Vir. Other significant world 64 www.englishchamberorchestra.co.uk

English Chamber Orchestra


Summer of 1915 and Coplands Eight Songs of Emily Dickinson with the Orchestra of the Swan. Future projects include a recording of John Ireland songs on the Somm label with pianist Mark Bebbington and Les Nuits dt with the Cheltenham Symphony.

English Chamber Orchestra


The English Chamber Orchestra is the most recorded chamber orchestra in the world, its discography containing 857 recordings of over 1,500 works by more than 400 composers. The ECO has also performed in more countries than any other orchestra, and played with many of the worlds greatest musicians. The American radio network CPRN has selected ECO as one of the worlds greatest living orchestras. The illustrious history of the orchestra features many major musical figures. Benjamin Britten was the orchestras first Patron and a significant musical influence. The ECOs long relationship with Daniel Barenboim led to an acclaimed complete cycle of Mozart piano concertos as live performances and recordings, followed later by two further recordings of the complete cycle, with Murray Perahia and Mitsuko Uchida. Paul Watkins has been the ECOs Music Director and Principal Conductor since 2009, and Sir Colin Davis was appointed Conductor Emeritus in 2010. The ECO is resident orchestra for Grange Park Operas summer season. Other regular activities include the ECOs London concert series and an annual music cruise where it is joined by a host of international guest artists. The Orchestra made a very successful debut in Moscow (with Stephanie Gonley as director and Sergej Krylov as soloist), as well as enjoying tours to Istanbul and Spain. Future plans include tours with Ann-Sophie Mutter and Yuri Bashmet, Lisa Batiashvili and Daniel Muller-Schott, and a major celebration of the music of Benjamin Britten in 2013 (his centenary year). The ECO has been chosen to record many successful film soundtracks (including several scores by John Barry and Dario Marianellis prizewinning soundtracks for Pride and Prejudice and Atonement) and has taken part in a variety of film and television projects.

Marcus Farnsworth
Marcus Farnsworth was awarded first prize in the 2009 Wigmore Hall International Song Competition, and the Song Prize at the 2011 Kathleen Ferrier Competition. He completed his studies at the Royal Academy of Music in July 2011, where roles included Guglielmo Cos fan tutte; Sid Albert Herring; Oreste in Cavalli Giasone and Meredith in Peter Maxwell Davies Kommilitonen! Opera plans include Eddy in Mark-Anthony Turnage Greek for Music Theatre Wales; Novices Friend in a new production of Britten Billy Budd for English National Opera; the title role in Britten Owen Wingrave as part of the International Chamber Music Festival in Nuremberg, and, in concert, Kilian Der Freischtz with the London Symphony Orchestra and Sir Colin Davis; Aeneas in Purcell Dido and Aeneas for the Early Opera Company and Christian Curnyn at the Wigmore Hall, and a recording of Mozart Apollo and Hyacinth with the Classical Opera Company. Future recitals include Schubert Die Schne Mllerin for the Oxford Lieder Festival; a Schubertiade with The Prince Consort in Perth and Britten Tit for Tat with Malcolm Martineau and Canticles with Julius Drake and Mark Padmore, both as part of Wigmore Hall Britten Festival in 2012. Other recent highlights have included a recital with James Baillieu at Wigmore Hall and further recitals with Simon Lepper, Iain Burnside, Julius Drake and Graham Johnson. On the concert platform plans include Nielsen Symphony No 3 with the LSO and Sir Colin Davis; St Matthew Passion (arias) in Lausanne with the Gabrieli Consort and Paul McCreesh and Peter Maxwell Davies Eight Songs for a Mad King with the Wermlands Opera Orchestra, Karlstad, Sweden. Marcus will sing with the BBC Symphony Orchestra in the 2012/13 and 2013/14 seasons. Marcus was a chorister at Southwell Minster and went on to study at Chethams School of Music before going on to read music at the University of Manchester, graduating with a first class honours degree. www.englishchamberorchestra.co.uk

Benjamin Ealovega

Newbury Spring Festival Chorus


The Festival Chorus is an auditioned choir, first formed in 1999 by the Spring Festival and Lady Knill as part of the Festivals expanding community programme. In that time the Chorus has worked with such illustrious artists as the Philharmonia Orchestra, the City of London Sinfonia, John Lubbock, Alexander Lazarev and Jane Glover, and soloists such as Susan Bullock, Mark Padmore, Stephen Roberts and Elizabeth Watts. In 2003 the Chorus was privileged to be invited to perform the world premire of Geoffrey Burgons Alleluia Psallat which was commissioned for the 25th anniversary and written especially for the Festival chorus, and performed in the presence of Her Majesty the Queen. The Festival chorus attracts singers from all walks of life with a shared love of music. Under the expert direction of Janet Linc the chorus develops a strong bond and enjoys being part of and funded by the Spring Festival.

www.newburyspringfestival.org.uk

19 May
65

English Chamber Orchestra


Programme Notes
RALPH VAUGHAN WILLIAMS (1872-1958) Te Deum in G Although Vaughan Williams was born the son of a clergyman, at Down Ampney near Cirencester, his attitude to religion was always equivocal: he claimed he drifted towards a cheerful agnosticism. Despite this, he composed some of the 20th centurys finest music on religious themes. The Te Deum in G major dates from 1928 and was commissioned to be performed on the occasion of the enthronement of Cosmo Lang as Archbishop of Canterbury on 4th December that year. The music begins confidently with a unison declamation, before engaging in an antiphonal dialogue with an angelic chorus. In the closing stages the initial material returns, now transformed towards prayer. We praise thee, O God: we acknowledge thee to be the Lord. All the earth doth worship thee: the Father everlasting. To thee all Angels cry aloud: the heavens and all the powers therein. To thee Cherubin and Seraphin: continually do cry, Holy, Holy, Holy: Lord God of Sabaoth; Heaven and earth are full of the Majesty: of thy glory. The glorious company of the Apostles: praise thee. The goodly fellowship of the Prophets: praise thee. The noble army of Martyrs: praise thee. The holy Church throughout all the world: doth acknowledge thee; The Father: of an infinite Majesty; Thine honourable, true: and only Son; Also the Holy Ghost: the Comforter. Thou art the King of glory: O Christ. Thou art the everlasting Son: of the Father. When thou tookest upon thee to deliver man: thou didst not abhor the Virgins womb. When thou hadst overcome the sharpness of death: thou didst open the kingdom of heaven to all believers. Thou sittest at the right hand of God: in the glory of the Father. We believe that thou shalt come: to be our Judge. We therefore pray thee, help thy servants: whom thou hast redeemed with thy precious blood. Make them to be numbered with thy Saints: in glory everlasting. O Lord, save thy people: and bless thine heritage. Govern them: and lift them up for ever. Day by day: we magnify thee; And we worship thy Name: ever world without end. Vouchsafe, O Lord: to keep us this day without sin. O Lord, have mercy upon us: have mercy upon us. O Lord, let thy mercy lighten upon us: as our trust is in thee. O Lord, in thee have I trusted: let me never be confounded. 66 www.englishchamberorchestra.co.uk SIR EDWARD ELGAR (1857-1934) Variations on an original theme, Opus 36 Enigma 'I have sketched a set of Variations on an original theme, Elgar wrote to his friend August Jaeger, 'The Variations have amused me because Ive labeled em with the names of my particular friends - you are Nimrod. That is to say, Ive written each one to represent the mood of the party - Ive liked to imagine the party writing the variation him or herself and have written what I think they would have written - if they were asses enough to compose. The first performance brought immediate success and established Elgar as a major figure in national life. Elgar stated that the enigma was twofold: the source of the theme itself, and through and over the whole set another and larger theme goes, but is not played. The first enigma seems easy to solve: the theme is the composer himself, its opening probably based upon the rhythm of his own name. But the second enigma must retain its mystery, though suggestions include Auld Land Syne and God Save the King. More important is the musics stature; for here Elgar fuses his success as a composer of small-scale salon music with an imaginative and skillful larger view.

19 May

Theme (Enigma), Andante The theme is heard immediately: there are two strains, major and minor. 1. C.A.E., Andante Caroline Alice Elgar: an appropriate choice, since it was Elgars wife who encouraged him in his task. Therefore the theme grows in confidence and becomes more fulltextured. 2. H.D.S-P., Allegro This pokes fun at Hew Stewart-Powell, who played chamber music with Elgar and practised his keyboard runs beforehand. Accordingly the music scampers along. 3. R.B.T., Allegretto R.B. Townshend was a keen amateur actor and this variation shows him portraying an old man. The theme seems short of breath and often becomes falsetto. 4. W.M.B., Allegro di molto The bluff country gentleman William Meath Baker had a forceful personality, and this brings the first deployment of the full orchestra, replete with virtuoso bluster. 5. R.P.A., Moderato Richard Penrose Arnold, son of the poet Matthew. His serious disposition inspired a wonderful new string tune above a bass line consisting of the opening part of the theme, while the woodwind reveal that he had wit too. 6. Ysobel, Andantino Elgar described Isobel Fitton as a charming and romantic woman. She played the viola, and that instrument is therefore rewarded with a solo.

English Chamber Orchestra


7. Troyte, Presto The Malvern architect Arthur Troyte Griffith was an amateur pianist, and the timpani depict what Elgar called his maladroit essays on the instrument. The brass try to bring order out of chaos, but the timpani always dominate. 8. W.N., Allegretto This is a tranquil variation inspired by the eighteenth century house owned by Winifred Norbury. 9. Nimrod, Adagio This great slow movement is a tribute to the composers close friend August Jaeger: jaeger is the German for hunter and Nimrod was the mighty hunter Elgar valued Jaegers musical opinions and wrote that the variation is the record of a long summer evening talk, when my friend discoursed eloquently on the slow movements of Beethoven. The opening bars are made to suggest the Pathtique Sonata. The Nimrod theme is heard three times, the third in full orchestra, though at the end the tone quickly declines to pianissimo in order to relax the tension. 10. Dorabella, Intermezzo: Allegretto Dora Pennys nickname came from the character in Mozarts Cos fan tutte. The music is inventive and delicate. 11. G.R.S., Allegro di molto Elgar recalled that George Robertson Sinclair, the Hereford Cathedral organist, owned a bulldog named Dan who fell into the River Wye and paddled upstream to find a landing place, giving out a rejoicing bark on landing. G.R.S. said I should set it to music. I did; here it is. 12. B.G.N., Andante Basil Nevinson was an amateur cellist of distinction and a serious and devoted friend. His variation therefore opens with a cello solo on an expressive theme, which is soon joined by the richer strains of the full cello section. 13. *** Romanza: Moderato This wonderfully atmospheric seascape has been linked with Lady Mary Lygons departure for Australia, the timpani evoking the throb of the liners engines and the clarinet quoting from Mendelssohns Calm Sea and Prosperous Voyage. But since Lady Mary was still in England at the time of composition, the inspiration may have been another emigr, Helen Weaver, to whom Elgar had been engaged sixteen years previously. 14. E.D.U., Allegro 'Edu was his wifes pet name for Elgar. This imposing finale, complete with references to C.A.E. and Nimrod, is more wide-ranging and symphonic than anything heard before. Elgar wrote: At a time when friends were somewhat discouraging, I was determined to show what E.D.U. intended to do.
RALPH VAUGHAN WILLIAMS (1872-1958) Dona Nobis Pacem: Cantata for soprano & baritone soloists, chorus & orchestra 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. Agnus Dei: Lento Beat! Beat! Drums: Allegro moderato Reconciliation: Andantino Dirge for Two Veterans: Moderato alla marcia The Angel of Death has been abroad: Listesso tempo 6. O man greatly beloved The distinctive verse of Walt Whitman, notable for its powerful use of language and equally potent alliterative rhythms, proved to be an inspiration to Vaughan Williams throughout the composers life. He wrote his cantata Dona Nobis Pacem in 1936, and in what proved to be an anticipation of Benjamin Brittens War Requiem (1960), he opted to mix the potent poetry of war with texts from the Latin Mass, along with other extracts beyond. The points of reference are at once bold and original: three contrasting poems by Whitman are framed by words taken from the Latin Mass, the Old Testament prophets, and the famous House of Commons speech that John Bright made at the time of the Crimean War. An important musical influence for Vaughan Williams was Verdis Requiem, a work he admired very much. For the music of Verdis Kyrie movement is echoed at several points in the opening section of Dona Nobis Pacem. The link can be made, for example, in the setting of the word Dona. Similar parallels can be found in the treatment of Beat! Beat! Drums!, which Vaughan Williams employs as an equivalent to the convention of the Dies Irae. At this point he makes full and effective use both of the jagged alliterative potential of the text, and of the powerful percussion battery among the large orchestra. Thus he creates with the utmost immediacy the intense noise and pervasive disruption of warfare. That Vaughan Williams should feel able to depict such sonic intensity with conviction is no surprise. It is conceivable that the artillery barrages of the Western Front returned to haunt him via the medium of Whitmans beating drums. The cantata also contains music composed some twenty years earlier, in the form of the Dirge for Two Veterans, but this proves to be less stylistically problematic than it might have been. Perhaps in unconscious mourning for the friends, and the way of life, that were lost in the trenches, in Reconciliation as well as during the other 1930s portions of the work, Vaughan Williams returns to the style of his pre-war music. The particular point of reference is the London Symphony, a masterpiece that was first performed just a few months before hostilities began. Moreover, the imposing march of the Dirge is linked to Beat! Beat! Drums! by the appearance of similar rhythmic motifs. www.newburyspringfestival.org.uk 67

www.englishchamberorchestra.co.uk

19 May

English Chamber Orchestra


These central movements confirm that the work has the characteristics of a Requiem. However, Dona nobis pacem is also concerned with the living and their future aspirations. Thus John Brights memorable words, The Angel of Death has been abroad throughout the land; you may almost hear the beating of his wings, constitute an explicit reference to the growing fears of the mid-1930s. At this stage it was still possible to express optimism, however; so with the aid of bells, glockenspiel and organ, Vaughan Williams sounds out a joyful Gloria in the closing bars. Yet even now there remains a certain supplication, since the soprano continues to sing Dona nobis pacem. The recognition that these prophetic visions had not yet come to pass was shortly to be driven home with a ferocity no-one could have anticipated. This is no period piece, however, and the prayer which concludes this visionary masterpiece retains its urgency to this day. I. Agnus Dei, qui tollis peccata mundi, dona nobis pacem. (Lamb of God, that taketh away the sin of the world, grant us peace.) II. (Walt Whitman) Beat! beat! drums! blow! bugles! blow! Through the windows through the doors burst like a ruthless force, Into the solemn church, and scatter the congregation, Into the school where the scholar is studying; Leave not the bridegroom quiet no happiness must he have now with his bride, Nor the peaceful farmer any peace, ploughing his field, or gathering in his grain, So fierce you whirr and pound you drums so shrill you bugles blow. III. Reconciliation (Walt Whitman) Word over all, beautiful as the sky, Beautiful that war and all its deeds of carnage must in time be utterly lost, That the hands of the sisters Death and Night incessantly, softly, wash again and ever again this soiled world; For my enemy is dead, a man divine as myself is dead, I look where he lies white-faced and still in the coffin I draw near, Bend down and touch lightly with my lips the white face in the coffin. IV. Dirge for Two Veterans (Walt Whitman) The last sunbeam Lightly falls from the finished Sabbath, On the pavement here, and there beyond it is looking Down a new-made double grave. Lo, the moon ascending, Up from the east the silvery round moon, 68 www.englishchamberorchestra.co.uk Beautiful over the house-tops, ghastly, phantom moon, Immense and silent moon. I see a sad procession, And I hear the sound of coming full-keyed bugles, All the channels of the city streets theyre flooding As with voices and with tears. I hear the great drums pounding, And the small drums steady whirring, And every blow of the great convulsive drums Strikes me through and through. For the son is brought with the father, In the foremost ranks of the fierce assault they fell, Two veterans, son and father, dropped together, And the double grave awaits them. Now nearer blow the bugles, And the drums strike more convulsive, And the daylight over the pavement quite has faded, And the strong dead-march enwraps me. In the eastern sky up-buoying, The sorrowful vast phantom moves illumined, Tis some mothers large transparent face, In heaven brighter growing. O strong dead-march you please me! O moon immense with your silvery face you soothe me! O my soldiers twain! O my veterans passing to burial. What I have I also give you. The moon gives you light, And the bugles and the drums give you music, And my heart, O my soldiers, my veterans, My heart gives you love. V. (John Bright) The Angel of Death has been abroad throughout the land; you may almost hear the beating of his wings. There is no one as of old ... to sprinkle with blood the lintel and the two side-posts of our doors, that he may spare and pass on. Dona nobis pacem. (Jeremiah 8:15-22) We looked for peace, but no good came; and for a time of health, and behold trouble! The snorting of his horses was heard from Dan; the whole land trembled at the sound of the neighing of his strong ones; for they are come, and have devoured the land ... and those that dwell therein ... The harvest is past, the summer is ended, and we are not saved ... Is there no balm in Gilead?; is there no physician there? Why then is not the health of the daughter of my people recovered?

19 May

English Chamber Orchestra


VI. (Daniel 10:19) O man greatly beloved, fear not, peace be unto thee, be strong, yea, be strong. (Haggai 2:9) The glory of this latter house shall be greater than of the former ... and in this place will I give peace. (Adapted from Micah 4:3, Leviticus 26:6, Psalms 85:10 and 118:19, Isaiah 43:9 and 56:18-22, Luke 2:14) Nation shall not lift up a sword against nation, neither shall they learn war any more. And none shall make them afraid, neither shall the sword go through their land. Mercy and truth are met together; righteousness and peace have kissed each other. Truth shall spring out of the earth, and righteousness shall look down from heaven. Open to me the gates of righteousness, I will go into them. Let all the nations be gathered together, and let the people be assembled; and let them hear and say, it is the truth. And it shall come, that I will gather all nations and tongues. And they shall come and see my glory. And I will set a sign among them, and they shall declare my glory among the nations. For as the new heavens and the new earth, which I will make, shall remain before me, so shall your seed and your name remain for ever. Glory to God in the highest, and on earth peace, goodwill toward men. Dona nobis pacem. CHARLES HUBERT PARRY (1848-1918) Jerusalem (orchestrated Sir Edward Elgar) Like Land of Hope and Glory and Rule Britannia, Parrys setting of William Blakes magnificent poem Jerusalem might well be regarded as an alternative national anthem. Parry, born in Bournemouth, was a major figure in British musical life, both through his lasting influence as an educator and as a composer of great skill, whose works are currently undergoing a revival. Jerusalem was first performed at a Votes for Women concert in 1916; Elgar made his orchestrated version six years later.
Terry Barfoot

And did those feet in ancient time Walk upon Englands mountains green: And was the holy Lamb of God On Englands pleasant pastures seen! And did the Countenance Divine, Shine forth upon our clouded hills? And was Jerusalem builded here, Among these dark Satanic Mills? Bring me my Bow of burning gold; Bring me my Arrows of desire: Bring me my Spear: O clouds unfold! Bring me my Chariot of fire! I will not cease from Mental Fight, Nor shall my Sword sleep in my hand: Till we have built Jerusalem, In Englands green and pleasant Land Beneath this poem Blake inscribed an excerpt from the Bible: Would to God that all the Lords people were Prophets, Numbers XI.Ch 29.v Sponsored by the Vaughan Williams Charitable Trust, Woolton Construction and the KilfinanTrust

RALPH VAUGHAN WILLIAMS Fantasia on The Old Hundredth For fifty years Vaughan Williams was a leading figure in British musical life. This gave him the opportunity and the responsibility to provide the music for many public occasions, including coronations, for example. Thus it was that he composed this Fantasia on the Old Hundredth Psalm Tune in 1953, for the Coronation of Elizabeth II at Westminster Abbey. Scored for the combination of mixed chorus, organ, and orchestra, the music reflects the composers social idealism through the inclusion of a section that invites the participation of the congregation. All people that on earth do dwell, Sing to the Lord with cheerful voice. Him serve with fear, His praise forth tell; Come ye before Him and rejoice. Praise God, from Whom all blessings flow; Praise Him, all creatures here below; Praise Him above, ye heavenly host; Praise Father, Son, and Holy Ghost. www.englishchamberorchestra.co.uk

www.newburyspringfestival.org.uk

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Family Concert with Newbury Symphony Orchestra


Corn Exchange Newbury Sunday 20 May 3.00pm

Newbury Symphony Orchestra


John Traill Chris de Souza Jerome Moross Strauss Bernard Hughes Fucik Rimsky-Korsakov Bernard Hughes Sousa conductor narrator The Big Country Radetsky March Not now Bernard The Entry Of The Gladiators Dance Of The Tumblers from The Snow Maiden Suite Isabels Noisy Tummy Liberty Bell March

Wells/ENO), a music producer and presenter (Radio 3, BBC TV), composer and teacher. Chris is familiar to many concert audiences as a presenter as well as giving preconcert talks at venues all over Britain.

Newbury Symphony Orchestra


Newbury Symphony Orchestra is an ambitious, community orchestra with a long history of quality musicmaking in Newbury. It provides an opportunity for both players and audience to experience live, large-scale, symphonic repertoire, making it both accessible and affordable.

Programme Notes
Sponsored by Greenham Common Trust

John Traill
John Traill has been hailed one of the most promising conductors of his generation, and is known for his strong interpretative instinct (Guardian, 2008). He has performed internationally with orchestras in the UK, Bulgaria, Russia, the Ukraine, Brazil, the USA, and won major prizes at the Leeds Conductors Competition (2005), and the Vakhtang Jordania International Conducting Competition (2006). John recently conducted the premiere of his work Oxonia for massed choir, symphony orchestra and solo cello at the Royal Albert Hall at the last night of the Music for Youth Schools Proms. As director of Ensemble ISIS, the Oxford University Faculty of Music contemporary music group, John has led residencies with Sir Peter Maxwell Davies, Sir Harrison Birtwistle, the London Sinfonietta, and many leading international composers. He is Director of Music at St Annes College, Oxford and a lecturer at St Catherines College. and, at 26, became the youngest person to have received a DPhil in composition at the University of Oxford.

Not Now, Bernard and Isabels Noisy Tummy stories by legendary childrens author David McKee set to music by Bernard Hughes. This pair of works for narrator and orchestra was first performed at Symphony Hall in Birmingham in December 2011. Not Now, Bernard tells the story of a young boy who is ignored by his busy, busy parents, even after a dramatic encounter with a monster in the garden. In Isabels Noisy Tummy, a girls grumbling stomach gets her into trouble at school, but comes to the rescue on a visit to the zoo. Bernard Hughes music has been performed at major concert venues in Britain and received a number of broadcasts on BBC Radio 3. Recent projects include The Death of Balder, a major choral work based on a Norsk myth, for the BBC Singers. Bernard Hughes has written a childrens opera Chincha-Chancha Cooroo and a chamber opera, Dumbfounded. Forthcoming commissions include a new work for the Seattle Pro Music choir and a community choir work for the 2012 Three Choirs Festival. Bernard appeared as a conductor in the recent Channel 4 series Howard Goodalls Twentieth Century Greats and he writes regularly in the new music periodical Tempo. Other musical items include The Liberty Bell March by the American composer Sousa which achieved fame in 1960s Great Britain when it was used to introduce the television comedy show Monty Pythons Flying Circus. The circus theme continues with the inclusion of RimskyKorsakovs Dance of the Tumblers from his opera The Snow Maiden The entry of the Gladiators by Fucik and Strauss Radetsky March also feature in this hour-long programme. Sponsored by Greenham Common Trust

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Chris de Souza
Narrator Chris de Souza was a graduate of Bristol University and Bristol Old Vic Theatre School. He is a freelance theatre and opera director (including Sadlers

www.newburysymphonyorchestra.wetpaint.com

The Sheepdrove Piano Competition Final


Sheepdrove Eco Conference Centre Lambourn Sunday 20 May 3.00pm

The Sheepdrove Piano Competition


Presented by The Sheepdrove Trust This important piano competition, under the patronage of Sir Roger Norrington and funded by the Sheepdrove Trust, is open to candidates aged 28 and under from the 8 major UK music colleges and attracts young pianists of the highest standard from around the world. The competition final, which will have an emphasis on Debussy in his 150th Anniversary year, takes place in the tranquil setting of the Sheepdrove Eco Conference Centre where you will be invited to cast your vote for the Audience Prize.

Iain Burnside
Iain Burnside enjoys a unique reputation as pianist and broadcaster, forged through his commitment to the song repertoire and his collaborations with leading international singers. In recent seasons such artists have included Rebecca Evans, Ailish Tynan, Susan Bickley and Ann Murray; John Mark Ainsley, Andrew Kennedy, Mark Padmore, Roderick Williams, William Dazeley and Bryn Terfel. His extensive recording portfolio reflects Iain's passion for British music: the complete songs of Gerald Finzi, together with Butterworth, Gurney, Ireland and Vaughan Williams on Naxos; Britten, Tippett, Herbert Hughes, FG Scott and Judith Weir on Signum; Richard Rodney Bennett on NMC; contemporary Scottish repertoire on Delphian. The NMC Songbook received a Gramophone Award. In 2012 Albion Records will issue a solo disc of Vaughan Williams and Gurney. Iains broadcasting career covers both radio and TV and has been honoured with a Sony Radio Award. Acclaimed as a programmer, Iain has devised innovative recitals combining music and poetry, presented with huge success in Brussels and Barcelona with actors Simon Russell Beale, Fiona Shaw and Harriet Walter. He is Research Associate at the Guildhall School of Music and Drama. His first play, A Soldier and a Maker, will premiere at the Barbican Centre in April 2012.

Jury
Iain Burnside, international pianist and broadcaster and Research Associate at the Guildhall School of Music Mark Eynon, Director of Newbury Spring Festival Gordon Fergus-Thompson, international pianist and Professor at the Royal College of Music Mikhail Kazakevich, distinguished Russian pianist and Professor at Trinity College of Music Barry Millington, Chief Music Critic, London Evening Standard Lucy Parham, international pianist and judge of BBC Young Musician of the Year David Whelton, Managing Director, Philharmonia Orchestra

Prizes
Four cash prizes will be decided by the jury and the audience will vote for its favourite artist and award the Audience Prize. 1st Prize The Kindersley Prize of 2,000 plus an invitation to play a recital the next day at the Corn Exchange for a fee of 500 provided by the Festival 1,000 donated by Greenham Common Trust 500 donated by the Friends of NSF 250 donated by an anonymous donor 250 donated by an anonymous donor

Mark Eynon
Mark Eynon graduated from Cambridge University in 1978 with a degree in English, and after working as an assistant on various opera productions, his festival career began in 1983 when he was invited to create the first Henley Festival, which he ran for nine seasons. He became director of Salisbury Festival in 1987, establishing a cycle of annual festivals based on the four elements, and in 1992 he was appointed artistic associate of the European Arts Festival, a national celebration to mark Britains presidency of the EEC. Mark became Director of Newbury Spring Festival in 1999 and established the associated Sheepdrove Piano Competition in 2009.

2nd Prize 3rd Prize 4th Prize Audience Prize

www.newburyspringfestival.org.uk

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The Sheepdrove Piano Competition Final


Marks passion for opera has been realised through his long-standing association with Covent Garden which began in 1989 when he was appointed Assistant to the General Director of the Royal Opera House. In 1993 he became director of the first BOC Covent Garden Festival, a new festival of opera and musical theatre, under the patronage of Diana, Princess of Wales. As part of the festival, he publically opened the Freemasons Hall for a performance of The Magic Flute, which was attended by Princess Diana and the equally legendary Birgit Nilsson. As a consultant he worked on two major opera galas at the Royal Opera House: in 1991, the Mozart Bi-Centenary Gala, and in 2006, the Mozart 250th Anniversary Gala, both conducted by Sir John Eliot Gardiner. Since 2008 he has been the British representative on the jury of the annual Medoc International Singing Competition of Bordeaux, a celebration of French Opera and Melodie. As a freelance producer, Mark has produced many events including the revived Chelsea Arts Balls at the Royal Albert Hall, and Britains largest nativity play, the Wintershall Nativity. As a response to his deep interest in the spiritual and psychological effects of music, Mark founded a new festival, Healing Sounds, an international celebration of the healing powers of music, which took place in Brighton from 19972002 and was part of the national Millennium Festival. successive years, in the first instance for his outstanding complete works of Debussy, and in the second, for Volume 1 of the complete works of Scriabin. Gordon Fergus-Thompson is a professor of Piano at the Royal College of Music, London. He is much in demand as a lecture recitalist and has given masterclasses throughout the UK, USA, Australia and the Far East.

Mikhail Kazakevich
Born in Gorky (Russia), Mikhail Kazakevich studied there at the State Conservatoire, opened as a division of Moscow Conservatoire, from 198086, with the well-known pianist and teacher Isaak Katz, who was a pupil of the legendary professor Alexander Goldenweiser. After graduating with highest honours, he taught as a Professor at the conservatoire until 1992. His burgeoning performing career led him to a sensational western debut at the International Schubert Competition in Dortmund, Germany, in 1991. As a result of his success there, he was engaged to play with the Dortmund Philharmonic Orchestra and also gave numerous solo recitals in Germany and France. In 1992, he received a Special Award from the Schubert Society (Germany) and came to London, where he made his debut at the Wigmore Hall. Soon afterwards, Kazakevich was signed exclusively by the BMG/Conifer recording label, for which he has made numerous recordings. Mikhail has combined his intensive concert activity with teaching. In the UK, he taught at the Welsh College of Music and Drama (Cardiff) from 1994-96. Currently, he is a Professor of Piano at the Trinity College of Music (London). He frequently gives Master Classes and adjudicates at the London Guildhall School of Music and Drama, the Royal Academy of Music, the Royal College of Music and the Atlantic College of Wales. His Master Classes at St Georges Brandon Hill (Bristol) are an annual event.

20 May

Gordon Fergus-Thompson
Following a sensational debut at the Wigmore Hall in 1976 Gordon FergusThompson firmly established himself as a major recitalist and concerto player, appearing as soloist with the Philharmonia, English Chamber Orchestra, Goteborg Symphony, Residente Orchestra of the Hague, CBSO, Halle, RLPO, Bournemouth and all the BBC Symphony Orchestras, with such conductors as Evgenii Svetlanov, Jacek Kaspszyk, Sir Edward Downes, Helmut Muller-Bruhl, Mosche Atzmon, David Atherton and Sir Charles Groves. He has appeared in all the major halls in London and Paris and has given over two hundred broadcast recitals on BBC Radio 3. Gordon Fergus-Thompson has toured extensively in the UK, France, Austria, Switzerland, Italy, Czech Republic, Australia and the Far East. Gordon Fergus-Thompson has recorded the complete works of Debussy and Ravel, the two Rachmaninoff sonatas and complete Etudes-Tableaux, the Balakirev Sonata, Bach transcriptions and to date, three quarters of the complete works of Scriabin. He won the prestigious MRA Best Instrumental Recording of the Year award in 72

Barry Millington
Barry Millington is Chief Music Critic for the London Evening Standard and editor of The Wagner Journal. He is the author and editor or co-editor of seven books on Wagner, including Wagner, The Wagner Compendium, The Ring of the Nibelung: A

The Sheepdrove Piano Competition Final


Companion and Selected Letters of Richard Wagner, and also contributed the articles on Wagner and his operas to The New Grove Dictionary of Music and Musicians and The New Grove Dictionary of Opera. He was the founder and artistic director of the Hampstead & Highgate Festival (19992003), has acted as dramaturgical adviser on Lohengrin at the Bayreuth Festival and the Ring in Tokyo and recently co-founded the ensemble Counterpoise.

David Whelton
David Whelton was born in 1954 and trained as a pianist and organist. Following an early career in education, David joined Yorkshire Arts Association and subsequently Leeds City Council, prior to moving to the Arts Council of Great Britain. In 1988, David joined the Philharmonia Orchestra as Managing Director. During his tenure at the Philharmonia, the Orchestra has established long term relationships with the worlds foremost conductors, including Riccardo Muti, Lorin Maazel, Vladimir Ashkenazy, and Sir Charles Mackkeras. David was responsible for bringing Christoph von Dohnnyi to the Orchestra as Principal Conductor in 1996, and Esa-Pekka Salonen as his successor in 2008. David initiated and developed an extensive UK touring programme, at the heart of which are orchestral residencies in Bedford, Leicester, Canterbury, and the Three Choirs Festival. During this time, the Philharmonia pioneered the concept of multidisciplinary festivals which travelled the world. Themes included Clocks and Clouds: the music of Gyrogy Ligeti and Related Rocks, featuring the music of Magnus Lindberg, both led by Esa-Pekka Salonen. Recent series include The City of Dreams: the music of Vienna, 1900 1935 and Infernal Dance: Inside the world of Bla Bartk, also conducted by Esa-Pekka Salonen. In parallel with this, David launched the awardwinning Music of Today series, featuring the music of the younger generations of composers. The Philharmonia maintains an active touring programme and in the course of this year will travel extensively in Europe, China, Korea, Japan, and North America. David was a member of the jury of the 2001 Besanon Conducting Competition, Chairman of the 2005 and 2009 Leeds Conducting competitions, and is a trustee of IMS Prussia Cove, Presented by the Sheepdrove Trust

Lucy Parham
Acknowledged as one of Britain's finest pianists, Lucy Parham first came to public attention when she became the Piano Winner of the 1984 BBC Young Musician of the Year. Since then, she has played throughout the UK as concerto soloist with most of the major British orchestras and is a frequent recitalist at the Wigmore Hall. She has also toured the USA with the BBC Concert Orchestra on their 50th anniversary, Mexico and Turkey with Royal Philharmonic Orchestra and abroad with Russian State Symphony, Sofia Philharmonic, Bergen Philharmonic, Polish National Radio SO and L'Orchestre National de Lille. Her life-long passion for the music of Schumann inspired the original concept of the words and music evening, Beloved Clara. The CD of Beloved Clara (ASV) was released to critical acclaim. Two further evenings, Liszt An Odyssey of Love and Nocturne - The Romantic Life of Frdric Chopin also premiered in the London Pianoforte Series at the Wigmore Hall. These have toured the UK and abroad, also making their US debut in Los Angeles and were subsequently broadcast on NPR across the USA. In 2006 she was the Director of the Schumann Anniversary Festival at Cadogan Hall and in 2010 she was the Director of Schumann 200 Festival at Kings Place. Lucy Parham is a frequent guest presenter and contributor for BBC Radio 3 and 4 including CD Review, Proms Plus, The Saturday Feature, The Essay, Building a Library and Composer of the Week. She was on the jury for the Final of BBC Young Musician of the Year in 2008 and 2010, and in 2006 and 2009 she was the commentator for the Leeds International Piano Competition on BBC TV.

Newbury Spring Festival would like to thank Yamaha for kindly supporting us with the supply of their Concert Grand Piano - The CFX www.newburyspringfestival.org.uk 73

20 May

Joyful Company of Singers


St Martins Church East Woodhay Sunday 20 May 7.30pm

Joyful Company of Singers Garlands for the Two Elizabeths


Peter Broadbent conductor Allegra, Anglia! Hard by a Crystal Fountain Arnold Bax (1883-1953) What is it like to be young and fair? (Clifford Bax) John Bennet (c.1575-after 1614) Weep, O mine eyes John Bennet All creatures now are merry minded Michael Tippet (1905-1998) Dance, clarion air (Christopher Fry) Orlando Gibbons (1583-1625) Dainty fine bird Thomas Morley April is in my Mistress face Herbert Howells (1892-1983) Inheritance (Walter de la Mare) Michael East (c. 1580 1648) Hence, stars, too dim of light Alan Rawsthorne (1905-1971) Canzonet (Louis MacNeice) John Wilbye (1574-1638) The Lady Oriana Edmund Rubbra (1901-1986) Salutation (Christopher Hassall) Interval Ralph Vaughan Williams Silence & Music (1872-1958) (Ursula Wood) Thomas Weelkes (c.1575-1623) As Vesta was from Latmos Hill descending Arthur Bliss (1891-1975) Aubade for Coronation Morning (Henry Reed) John Farmer (c.1565-c.1605) Fair nymphs, I heard one telling Lennox Berkeley (1903-1989) Spring at this hour (Paul Dehn) Thomas Tomkins (1572-1656) The Fauns and Satyrs tripping John Ireland (1879-1962) The Hills (James Kirkup) Thomas Morley Leave, alas this tormenting Gerald Finzi (1901-1956) White-Flowering Days (Edmund Blunden) Sponsored by Mr and Mrs Patrick Hungerford and Mr and Mrs Toby Ward Additional support from Hampshire County Council Anon (1559) Thomas Morley (1558-1603)

Peter Broadbent and the Joyful Company of Singers

One of Europes most prominent chamber choirs, the JCS is renowned for its virtuosity and intensity of spirit, as well as for an astoundingly wide repertoire, ranging from the 16th Century to the present day. An important element of the choirs raison dtre is its commitment to contemporary and new music, including a high proportion of first performances, and supported by several highlysuccessful Educational Projects. Many composers have written music for JCS, including David Bedford, Michael Berkeley, Judith Bingham, Jonathan Harvey, Alun Hoddinott, Roxanna Panufnik, Kaija Saariaho and Malcolm Williamson. Formed in 1988, by conductor Peter Broadbent, the choir first came to prominence when it won the Sainsburys Choir of the Year competition in 1990. Since then it has maintained its profile in the music world, winning an impressive list of national and international competitions leading to many invitations. JCS regularly appears at all the UKs major music festivals, including Bath, Aldeburgh, Cheltenham, City of London, Presteigne, Spitalfields, Three Choirs, Huddersfield Contemporary Music and the BBC Proms. Equally prominent in Europe, JCS has performed at festivals in France, Germany, Denmark, Hungary, Italy, Poland and Russia, broadcasting in many countries as well as on BBC and Classic FM. The choir and Peter Broadbent were honoured to receive the Guidoneum Award from the Fondazione Guido dArezzo in recognition of its achievements and promotion of choral music. In the USA, JCS has given concerts at Stanford University, in Los Angeles and San Diego, and appeared at the National Convention of the American Choral Directors Association, in Texas. Performances with orchestras include many with the City of London Sinfonia with the late Richard Hickox, CBE, and with Mark Elder, Nicholas Kraemer and Stuart Bedford, the Royal Philharmonic Orchestra (Sir Andrew Davies), the Southern Sinfonia, the Britten Sinfonia (Alec Roth), the BBC Concert Orchestra, the BBC National Orchestra of Wales, the Northern Sinfonia and the Orchestra of the Age of Enlightenment (Sir Roger Norrington). Soloists have included Dame Felicity Lott, www.newburyspringfestival.org.uk

www.jcos.co.uk

20 May
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Joyful Company of Singers


Carolyn Sampson, Patricia Rozario, Sarah Fox, Mark Padmore, James Gilchrist, Roderick Williams and Stephen Varcoe as well as instrumentalists Philippa Davies, Paul Watkins, Madeleine Mitchell and Robert Cohen. To date, the JCS has a discography of some 22 recordings. On the ASV label are discs of music by Jonathan Harvey, Francis Poulenc and Samuel Barber, and for EMI Classics, Garland for Linda. Other releases include A Plum Pudding with Dame Felicity Lott and Gabriel Woolf (White Line), Angels Sing! - choral music by Roxanna Panufnik (Warner Classics), Malcolm Williamson, (Naxos), and by Cecilia McDowall (Dutton Epoch) and of Christmas music by Roderick Elms with the RPO (Naxos). growth under a young new Queen. It is an intriguing thought that we will probably never know whether composers like, Arnold, Britten, Armstrong Gibbs, Gardner, Maconchy, Musgrave or Walton (to mention only a few) were omitted from the invitation or turned down the opportunity. However the distinguished composers included were free to choose their own poets to provide the texts, some of which have no direct connection with the young Queen. The musical settings inevitably incorporate a range of styles some quite large-scale in approach as in Bliss Aubade, whose text and textural contrasts are appropriately celebratory, others much more intimate in scale, as in Baxs setting of his brothers poem. This diversity of tone may to some extent account for the relative neglect of the Garland as a whole, although several of the pieces have successfully entered the chamber choir repertoire. All are well worth a place, and to hear them in conjunction with the music of an earlier age reminds one of the marvellous heritage of choral writing this country enjoys.
Peter Broadbent 2012

Programme Notes
It seems suitable to celebrate the Diamond Jubilee of the accession of our present Queen to combine music written for her, with music dedicated to her illustrious namesake. The anonymous round which opens the programme was composed for the coronation in January 1559, but the rest of the music comes from later in her reign. The Elizabethan period was particularly noted for the rise of the English Madrigal School, which was largely inspired by the publication in 1588 of Musica Transalpina, a collection of Italian madrigals mostly by Marenzio and Ferrabosco, many of which were subsequently translated and adapted by English composers. In The Triumphs of Oriana Thomas Morley Gentlemen of the Chapel Royal and outstanding madrigalist, sought to flatter Elizabeth I, who had previously granted him a monopoly to print music, by collecting together 25 madrigals written by some of the master musicians of the age in praise of the Virgin Queen. In doing so, Morley was inspired by Il Trionfo di Dori (1598), a collection of 29 madrigals by different composers written in honour of Leonardo Sanudo's Venetian bride. Each madrigal in that collection ends in "Viva la bella Dori; each in Morley's, published three years later, ends "Long live fair Oriana!" Morleys Hard by a crystal fountain is a skilful reworking of one of the Trionfo madrigals by Croce, and Weelkes As Vesta was is probably the most frequently quoted example of word-painting in the madrigal. The madrigals in the programme which are not from the collection are included for their beauty and their contrast Bennets Weep, O mine eyes deservedly as well-known as the lively All creatures now.

20 May

Sponsored by Mr and Mrs Patrick Hungerford and Mr and Mrs Toby Ward Additional support from Hampshire County Council

A Garland for the Queen was commissioned by the Arts Council of Great Britain in imitation of the Triumphs and first performed on the eve of the coronation in the new Royal Festival Hall, with the Golden Age Singers and the Cambridge University Madrigal Society conducted by Boris Ord. The ten songs for mixed voices look both back to a pre-war golden age of British Song, and forward to a hoped-for post-war golden age of prosperity and artistic
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The Sheepdrove Piano Competition Winner


Corn Exchange Newbury Monday 21 May 12.30pm

Young Artists Lunchtime Recital 4


The Young Artists Lunchtime Recital series is sponsored by The Headley Trust The Festival is delighted to welcome the winner of the fourth Sheepdrove Piano Competition to the Corn Exchange to give a recital as part of the Festivals well established Young Artists Lunchtime Series. The competition, which is open to students from all the major UK conservatoires, was founded in 2009 by the Sheepdrove Trust, under the patronage of Sir Roger Norrington. The winning pianist will perform a varied programme including works by Debussy whose 150th anniversary we are celebrating this year. Todays recital is an opportunity to hear more of the winning pianist following the competition final held at Sheepdrove Eco Conference Centre on Sunday 20 May (see page 71). The Young Artists Lunchtime Recital series is sponsored by The Headley Trust
Achille-Claude Debussy (1862-1918)

11th Newbury Christmas Cancer Concert


Carols sung by

Pro Musica

Seasonal Readings presented by Distinguished People

7pm Saturday 1st December 2012 St Nicolas Church Newbury


in support of Macmillan Cancer Support
Regd. Charity No. 261017

and The Newbury & District Cancer Care Trust


Regd. Charity No. 291795

Tickets available in October.

Information 01635 32167


www.newburyspringfestival.org.uk 77

21 May

Hugo Vickers

Festival Talk 4

Combe Manor Hungerford Monday 21 May 3.00pm

The Queen & The Coronation

Hugo Vickers
Hugo Vickers is a writer and broadcaster, who has written biographies of many twentieth century figures, including the Queen Mother, the Baron de Rede, Gladys, Duchess of Marlborough, Cecil Beaton, Vivien Leigh, a study of Greta Garbo, and Alice, Princess Andrew of Greece. The biography of Princess Andrew of Greece was authorised by the Duke of Edinburgh, and for this book he interviewed many members of the Royal Family. His book, The Private World of The Duke and Duchess of Windsor was illustrated with pictures from their own collection. The Kiss - The Story of an Obsession won the 1996 Stern Silver Pen Award for Non-Fiction. Elizabeth, The Queen Mother, was the first major biography since her death, and was published in October 2005. His most recent book is Behind Closed Doors, The Tragic, Untold Story of the Duchess of Windsor.

Victoria and Albert Museum, London

21 May

In celebration of the Diamond Jubilee, Hugo Vickers, one of Britains most distinguished royal historians, will speak about The Queen and the Coronation, celebrating the life and reign of a much-loved monarch and looking back to the great ceremony of 2 June 1953 which affirmed her role as Sovereign. Hugo Vickers has been observing the Queen since childhood and has written several important royal biographies. His talk promises to be illuminating and will be lavishly illustrated not only with images of the Queen but also of the Coronation in all its glory. The talk takes place at Combe Manor, the home of Lady Mary Russell who was a Maid-of-Honour and Train Bearer at the Coronation carrying Her Majestys train of purple velvet. Lady Marys robes will be on display during the talk. By kind permission of Lady Mary and Mr David Russell

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www.hugovickers.co.uk

Elizabeth Vickers

Hugo Vickers is a frequent broadcaster, and is much in demand for royal occasions. He was an ITN studio guest for the Royal Wedding of 1981, and for the funeral of Diana, Princess of Wales in 1997. He commentated with John Suchet at ITN for the wedding of Prince Edward (1999), for the Queen Mothers 100th Birthday (2000) and for the Queen Mothers funeral (2002). He appears regularly on CNNs Larry King Live, and has also appeared on Fox TV, NSNBC, a great number of programmes in Canada, Australia, and New Zealand. He was a guest of Jane Pauley (talking about the Royal Wedding) on the Today show in New York in July 1981. Hugo Vickers was appointed Chairman of the Jubilee Walkway Trust in October 2002. The Trust was founded in 1977 as a permanent memorial to The Queens Silver Jubilee and lately restored and updated for the Golden Jubilee. As such he welcomed The Queen and The Duke of Edinburgh to the Mall on the 50th anniversary of the Coronation in 2003, when Her Majesty unveiled the Mall panoramic panel: and again welcomed The Queen and The Duke of Edinburgh when they jointly unveiled the Diamond Wedding panoramic panel in Parliament Square on 19 November 2007. Hugo Vickers is married and lives in London and in a moated manor house in Hampshire (seen in Shekhar Kapurs 2002 film, The Four Feathers), with his wife, who is a photographer, and his three children. By kind permission of Lady Mary and Mr David Russell

Admission: One Shilling


Corn Exchange Newbury Monday 21 May 7.30pm

Admission: One Shilling Patricia Routledge and Piers Lane


Devised by Nigel Hess Christopher Luscombe director Philip Gault company manager Gussie Welch stage manager Patricia Routledge and pianist Piers Lane tell the inspiring story of Dame Myra Hess and the National Gallery Concerts. Schubert German Dances D783 No 1 in A major No 2 in D major No 3 in Bb major Intermezzo in C major Op 119 No 3 Eusebius from Carnaval Nocturne in Db major Op 27 No 2 Prelude in Bb minor from Well-Tempered Clavier Book 1 Allegro Molto from Sonata in Ab major Op 110 Bb minor variation from Impromptu in Bb major D935 No 3 Waltz in Ab major Op 39 No 15 Sonata in G major L 387 Jesu, Joy of Mans Desiring - Chorale from Cantata No 147

Known to millions throughout the world as the indomitable Hyacinth in Keeping Up Appearances and as the elderly sleuth in Hetty Wainthropp Investigates, Patricia is one of Britains most distinguished actresses, regarded for her work in theatre, film, television and radio. She is closely associated with the work of Alan Bennett who wrote the three monologues A Woman Of No Importance (Broadcasting Press Guild Award 1982), A Lady of Letters (BAFTA Nomination 1988) and Mrs Fozzard Finds Her Feet (1998) especially for her. The recipient of the 1967 Tony Award for her Broadway performance in Darling of the Day; the 1989 Laurence Olivier Award for her performance in Leonard Bernsteins Candide; Top TV Comedy Actress and Personality of the Year Awards (1991 and 1993); she was further honoured in 1996 in the BBC 60th Anniversary Awards. In 1993 Patricia was awarded the OBE for services to the Performing Arts and created a CBE in 2004 for services to Drama. Piers Lane feels close to Dame Myra Hess. He studied with Yonty Solomon, one of Hesss few students, and he has directed the Myra Hess Day at the National Gallery commemorating the wartime concert series, since its inception in 2006. Patricia Routledge was in the audience on that first occasion and a friend commented on her similarity to the great pianist. That sparked the thought in Piers mind of Patricia portraying Dame Myra in some way. Nigel Hesss Admission: One Shilling is the result, commissioned by the National Gallery in 2009. Piers Lane has performed in over forty countries. Recent highlights have included a sold-out performance with the LPO at the Royal Festival Hall and concerto performances at Lincoln Center in New York, recitals at the Wigmore Hall, and many overseas concerts. Last year he performed the monumental Piano Concerto by Busoni at Carnegie Hall. Piers is Artistic Director of the Australian Festival of Chamber Music and has written and presented over 100 programmes for BBC Radio 3. Five times soloist at the Proms, Piers Lanes concerto repertoire exceeds eighty works.

Brahms Schumann Chopin Bach Beethoven Schubert Brahms Scarlatti Bach/Hess

Sponsored by the Friends of Newbury Spring Festival

Gussie Welch

Nigel Hess
One of the most abiding memories of Patricia Routledges wartime schooldays is that of attending a series of Saturday afternoon piano recitals at the Liverpool Philharmonic Hall. Among the distinguished visiting artists, the performances of Myra Hess away briefly from London and her National Gallery commitment are, she says, etched in her mind. It was therefore with very little difficulty that she agreed to tell the story, together with Piers Lane, of Myra Hesss artistic achievement and generosity, and her inspired contribution to the war effort. Nigel Hess works extensively as a composer and conductor in television, theatre and film. He has composed numerous scores for both American and British television productions including A Woman of Substance, Vanity Fair, Campion, Maigret, Dangerfield, Just William, Wycliffe, Ballykissangel and New Tricks. He has received the Ivor Novello award twice for Best TV Theme (Hetty Wainthropp Investigates and Testament). Nigel was awarded the New York Drama Desk Award for Outstanding Music in a Play for Much Ado About Nothing and Cyrano de Bergerac on Broadway.

www.pierslane.com

www.newburyspringfestival.org.uk

21 May
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Patricia Routledge and Piers Lane

Admission: One Shilling


Christopher Luscombe
Christopher Luscombes directing credits include The Shakespeare Revue (Vaudeville), Star Quality (Apollo), Home and Beauty (Lyric), Fascinating Aida: One Last Flutter (Comedy Olivier Award nomination for Best Entertainment), A Midsummer Nights Dream (Regents Park), Enjoy (Gielgud), Alphabetical Order (Hampstead), When We Are Married (Garrick Oliver Award nomination for Best Revival), Little Shop of Horrors and The History Boys (West Yorkshire Playhouse). CBE in 1936. She makes a brief appearance performing at one of her lunchtime concerts in the classic 1942 wartime documentary Listen to Britain. Dame Myra was renowned for her interpretations of the works of Mozart, Beethoven and Schumann, but had a wide repertoire ranging from Domenico Scarlatti to contemporary works. Her signature piece, and the one which became most associated with her, was her own arrangement of Bachs Chorale prelude Jesu, Joy of Mans Desiring. Admission: One Shilling was first performed by Patricia Routledge and Piers Lane in 2009 as part of the annual Dame Myra Hess Day at Londons National Gallery, and tells the extraordinary and inspiring story of the famous lunchtime concerts which took place at the Gallery throughout the Second World War. Myra never wrote her autobiography, and her letters and other articles are particularly sparse during those war years, all her time being taken up playing, practising, and organising the concerts. The script for this performance has, therefore, been compiled from Myras press and radio interviews during that time, as well as a few BBC broadcasts where she said a few words before playing. Redoubtable, courageous, inspiring, and always with a twinkle in the eye this is the Myra I would be very proud to call my great-aunt!
Nigel Hess

Programme Notes
Dame Myra Hess (1890-1965) was a British pianist. She was born in London as Julia Myra Hess, but was bestknown by her middle name. At the age of five she began to study the piano and two years later entered the Guildhall School of Music, where she graduated as winner of the Gold Medal. She studied at the Royal Academy of Music under Tobias Matthay. Her debut came in 1907 when she played Beethovens Piano Concerto No 4 with Sir Thomas Beecham conducting. She went on to tour throughout Britain, the Netherlands and France, and, after her American debut (New York 1922) she became a favourite in the United States. She garnered greater fame during World War II when, with all concert halls closed, she organised a series of lunchtime concerts at the National Gallery, playing in many herself. For this contribution to maintaining the morale of Londoners she was created a Dame Commander of the British Empire in 1941, having previously been created a

Sponsored by the Friends of Newbury Spring Festival

21 May

Join the Friends of newburyspringfestival


from only 25
As a Friend, you benefit from: minimum of 2 weeks priority booking Subscription to 'Festival Focus' the Friends in-house magazine Invitations to Friends events Newsletters and a membership card

Telephone Jane Pickering (Festival Secretary) on 01635 528766 for more details or log on at www.newburyspringfestival.org.uk

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80 www.pierslane.com

Julia McKenzie with Edward Seckerson


Julia McKenzie with Edward Seckerson My Life in Musical Theatre
Sponsored by Mr Pierre Lagrange Additional support from Hampshire County Council By kind permission of Lord and Lady Lloyd Webber

Festival Talk 5

The Chapel Sydmonton Court Ecchinswell Tuesday 22 May 3.00pm


Huston. Recent theatre credits include Gertie in Angus Jackson's production of Fuddy Meers at the Arts theatre for Sam Mendes' company Scamp Productions and The Philadelphia Story at the Old Vic co-starring with Kevin Spacey. In the Autumn of 1999, Julia directed at the National Theatre. The musical Honk! The Ugly Duckling by George Stiles and Anthony Drewe had first appeared at the Stephen Joseph Theatre in Scarborough in 1997 also under her direction but now it came to London into the repertoire of the National. The production won the Olivier Award for the best new musical in 2000 and Julia has gone on to direct further productions - one in America and a national tour in the UK. Julia has worked with the BBC concert orchestra both as a performer and director on musicals staged at the Royal Festival Hall in London. Firstly, co-narrating Bernstein's On the Town, followed by directing the concert version of Peter Pan, and as both director and narrator in Loesser's Guys and Dolls and Berlin's Call Me Madam.

Julia McKenzie
Julia McKenzie is known as one of Britain's leading interpreters of the work of Stephen Sondheim. Her first association was in 1972 when she joined the production of Company at Her Majesty's Theatre. The next step brought international recognition in Side by Side by Sondheim and Julia was one of the original creative team starring in both London and New York. Her third Sondheim was Follies at the Shaftesbury Theatre playing Sally, and followed by The Witch in Into the Woods at the Phoenix Theatre. But undoubtedly her most memorable has been as Mrs Lovett in the highly acclaimed production of Sweeney Todd at the Royal National Theatre. Directed by Declan Donnellan, Julia won an Olivier Award for Best Actress in a Musical for this role. This was the second time she won this award - the first was also with the National Theatre as Miss Adelaide in Richard Eyre's revival of Frank Loesser's Guys and Dolls adding the Variety Club Award and the Society of West End Theatres (SWET) too for her performance. The other dramatist who has featured in her career is Alan Ayckbourn. Julia appeared in earlier plays such as The Norman Conquests and Ten Times Table and most recently in Communicating Doors but his most demanding role for her was as Susan in Woman in Mind. For this she won the London Evening Standard Award and the London Critics Circle Award. In 2011 Julia played Mrs Crisparkle in The Mystery of Edwin Drood, directed by Diamuid Lawrence. In 2008, Julia took on the mantle of the iconic role of Miss Marple which she has been shooting for the last two years. This follows a much loved appearance in two series of The Cranford Chronicles alongside Dame Judi Dench for the BBC. Recent features include Marjorie in Notes on a Scandal, directed by Richard Eyre, Lottie Crump in Bright Young Things directed by Stephen Fry and The Foolish Things in which she plays Mrs Abermathy alongside Anjelica www.edwardseckerson.biz

Edward Seckerson
Writer and broadcaster Edward Seckerson is Chief Classical Music Critic of The Independent newspaper and a founder member of The Arts Desk.Com. He wrote and presented the long-running BBC Radio 3 show Stage and Screen where he interviewed many of the biggest names in the business among them Julie Andrews, Angela Lansbury, Liza Minnelli, Stephen Sondheim, and Andrew Lloyd Webber. During his journalistic career he has written for most major music publications and is still on the review panel of Gramophone magazine. He has published two books: a biography of Gustav Mahler and Conversations with the American conductor/composer Michael Tilson Thomas; and for TV has been a commentator at the Cardiff Singer of the Year Competition on several occasions. In 2007 he presented BBC Radio 4s musical quiz programme Counterpoint. Edward is proud to have conducted one of the last major interviews with Leonard Bernstein and his audio podcast Sondheim In Good Company proved a significant contribution to Sondheims 80th birthday year. Sponsored by Mr Pierre Lagrange Additional support from Hampshire County Council By kind permission of Lord and Lady Lloyd Webber

www.newburyspringfestival.org.uk

22 May
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Galliard Ensemble
St Lawrences Church Hungerford Tuesday 22 May 7.30pm

Galliard Ensemble
Kathryn Thomas Katherine Spencer Helen Simons Owen Dennis Richard Bayliss Mozart Bozza Interval Barber Grainger Arnold Patterson Summer Music Walking Tune Three Shanties Westerly Winds flute clarinet bassoon oboe horn Overture to Magic Flute Quintet in C minor Scherzo Op 48

Beethoven to Berio and Schoenberg. Soon to celebrate their 20th anniversary, they play regularly in many of Britain's prestigious venues such as the Wigmore Hall, South Bank Centre and Bridgewater Hall, at festivals throughout Europe, with appearances at the BBC Proms, also at the Huddersfield Contemporary Music Festival and the Bath, Brighton and Harrogate festivals, the MAFRA Festival for the British Council and the Castello Branco and Porto Festivals in Portugal. They regularly give master classes and lectures to the top British music academies. The Galliard Ensemble has a lively, entertaining and distinctive performance style that has thrilled audiences in Britain and abroad. The ensembles CDs have been selected by the Sunday Times, BBC Music Magazine, Gramophone, and BBC Radio 3 in their critics choices of outstanding releases. Committed to bringing music to a wider audience, the Galliard Ensemble has undertaken educational concerts with Live Music Now! and has enjoyed performing in many schools, family concerts, workshops and demonstrations. With a strong interest in contemporary composition, in addition to working with Paul Patterson, Gyorgy Ligeti and Richard Rodney Bennett, the Galliard Ensemble has worked with Sir Harrison Birtwistle on his quintet Five Distances for their performance at the BBC Proms.

Sponsored by Doves Farm Foods and the Hungerford Consortium Additional financial support from Greenham Common Trust's Find Me a Grant Scheme

Galliard Ensemble
As former BBC New Generation Artists, the Galliard Ensemble has become one of Britain's leading chamber groups, with repertoire running from Mozart and

Programme Notes
WOLFGANG AMADEUS MOZART (1756-1791) Overture: The Magic Flute, K620 Arranged by Joachim Linckelmann

Die Zauberflte (The Magic Flute) was first performed at Emanuel Schikaneders suburban Freihaus theatre on 30th September 1791. It contains the widest range of musical styles that Mozart ever put into a single opera, and he employed a large orchestra, including trombones, to add solemnity in connection with the solemn quasiMasonic rites of Sarastro and his priests. As committed freemasons, Mozart and his librettist Schikaneder filled the opera with masonic symbols: one such is the recurring stress on the number three. The characters include three boys and three ladies, the serpent is cut into three pieces, there are three doors on which the aspiring Prince Tamino must knock. The Overture, moreover, begins with three loud chords, representing, perhaps, the three knocks by which new members are admitted to the Masonic initiation ceremony. Thereafter music develops with close attention to fugal textures, preparing the way for that earnestness which is an important aspect of the opera to follow.

22 May
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Galliard Ensemble
Serenade in C minor, K388/K406 Arranged by Mordechai Rechtman 1. 2. 3. 4. Allegro Andante Menuetto in canone Allegro Particularly noted for his wind writing, Bozza understood the capabilities of the various instruments, often demanding of his players a high level of technical skill, while maintaining an expressive melodic style. This attractive Scherzo for wind quintet has abundant Gallic charm. SAMUEL BARBER (1910-1981) Summer Music for Wind Quintet, Opus 31 Samuel Barber's musical language reveals a strong affinity with the European tradition. He composed in all the important forms and genres, and several of his compositions have become firmly established in the international repertory. The best known of these is undoubtedly the eloquent Adagio for Strings, but in recent years his beautifully lyrical Violin Concerto has found acknowledgement as a major achievement. Its combination of Barber's naturally romantic melodic inventiveness with a capacity for generating considerable brilliance confirms the range of his style. Chamber music played only a small part in Barbers creative priorities, though he did produce masterpieces for both string quartet and wind ensemble. The latter work is the single-movement Summer Music , his only excursion into the realm of the wind quintet, which was composed in 1956. The opening section is particularly evocative; cast as a duo for high bassoon and muted horn, the music is described in the score as slow and indolent. This summer mood sets the tone for the whole piece, particularly in the way that the individual personality of each instrument is brought out to maximum effect. PERCY GRAINGER (1882-1961) Walking Tune The Australian composer Percy Grainger came to Europe to study at the Frankfurt Conservatoire, where he made the acquaintance of several English composers: Norman O'Neill, Cyril Scott, Roger Quilter and Henry Balfour Gardiner. It was with their encouragement that he settled in England when he graduated, whereupon he plunged headlong into the folk-song movement. And it is for his folk-song arrangements and related compositions that Grainger's reputation most surely rests, though as a musician he had wide-ranging interests: both Stephen Foster and Duke Ellington were firm favourites, for instance. Of Walking Tune Grainger wrote: I composed this little tune as a whistling accompaniment to my tramping feet, while on a three-day walk in Western Argyllshire during the summer of 1900.

One of the attractions of living and working in Vienna was the number of excellent musicians with whom Mozart was in regular contact. This was particularly true of wind players, which is surely why the operas and concert works contain so many fine solo opportunities. Although the exact provenance of the C minor Serenade is not known, it seems most likely to have been composed during the winter of 1782-3. Originally written for wind octet, Mozart rescored it for string quintet. The present arrangement is for wind quintet. The most distinctive feature of the work is that it is cast in the minor mode. After a formal opening gesture, a falling phrase is heard, which will pervade not only the first movement but the whole Serenade. The distinctive personalities of the instruments add an extra dimension to the emotional ambiguity of the music, the abrupt changes of dynamic intensifying the rich melodic invention. The Andante is altogether less dramatic, and certainly more in keeping with the convention of a serenade as 'outdoor entertainment music'. The Menuetto in canone offers another example of Mozart's ability to take an academic exercise - in this case strict imitations around the ensemble - to create music of supreme imaginative and emotional value. The melody initiated by the oboes is soon taken over in imitation by the bassoons, while the construction is more intellectual still in the central trio section, which is a double mirror canon (the same notes in reverse). The final movement is a theme followed by eight freeranging variations. Mozart was a master of this type of composition, for the effect is such that the whole is far more than the sum of the parts. And the essentially tragic tone of the whole composition is confirmed by the final gesture, moving the music back into C major. EUGNE BOZZA (1905-1991) Scherzo, Opus 48 Bozza is known chiefly for his chamber music, but he also composed five symphonies, plus operas and ballet scores. His larger works are rarely performed outside his native France. He had a successful career as an academic, becoming Director of the cole Nationale de Musique at Valenciennes, where he worked from 1951 until his retirement in 1975.

www.galliardensemble.com

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22 May
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Galliard Ensemble
SIR MALCOLM ARNOLD (1921-2006) Three Shanties, Opus 4 1. Allegro con brio 2. Allegretto semplice 3. Vivace Malcolm Arnold was a central figure in British musical life for more than fifty years. In 1940 he joined the London Philharmonic Orchestra, returning to it five years later, after war service, to become principal trumpet. But soon his priority changed to composition, following the award of the Mendelssohn Scholarship and a year of study in Italy. His output was considerable, with highly successful music for films, including Bridge over the River Kwai and The Inn of the Sixth Happiness, while for the concert hall there are nine symphonies and numerous shorter works, including nearly twenty concertos. The Three Shanties were written in 1943 for the wind quintet of the London Philharmonic Orchestra. The first performance that August was unusual, since it took place during the lunch break in an aircraft hangar at Filton, near Bristol. The music is high spirited, making virtuoso demands on the performers, and using a shanty as the basis of each movement in turn: What shall we do with drunken sailor?, Boney was a warrior and Johnny come down to Hilo. These are far more than arrangements, however, since the original material is ingeniously recomposed and given a new lease of life, which is at once infectious and appealing.
Terry Barfoot

Lea. The calm opening portion of the movement is offset by a more agitated central section which briefly disturbs the peaceful atmosphere. Eventually, Linden Lea restores everything to order with a grand, dignified statement before fading away to a quiet close.
The concluding movement, The Looe Bar Lady, turns its gaze towards Cornwall, with the Heston Floral Dance taking centre stage. Its dominance, however, is not uncontested, since another West Country tune, The British Grenadiers, soon aided and abetted by Farmer Giles and Linden Lea, repeatedly barges in and threatens to hog the limelight. However, the Floral Dance succeeds in having the last say as the music makes a frantic dash for the finishing line.

Westerly Winds was written for the Galliard Ensemble, and premiered by them at the Purcell Room on 7th December 1999.
Paul Patterson

Sponsored by Doves Farm Foods and the Hungerford Consortium Additional financial support from Greenham Common Trust's Find Me a Grant Scheme

PAUL PATTERSON (b. 1947) Westerly Winds 1. Scrumpy Giles (Somerset) 2. Widecombe Jan (Devon) 3. Lazy Lawrence (Dorset) - To the tune Linden Lea 4. The Looe Bar Lady (Cornwall) - To the tune Helston Floral Dance

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Westerly Winds, a recasting by the composer for wind quintet of the orchestral Four Rustic Sketches, is a suite of short fantasias based on West Country folktunes. The opening Scrumpy Giles is based on the Somerset tune Farmer Giles, leading off with a formal unison statement of the tune before setting off upon its even-tempered course. Before long, though, the tempo speeds up and the tune finds itself been accorded a far less deferential treatment before a final upward flourish brings matters to a forceful end.
The Devon tune Widecombe Fair is the subject of the second movement, Widecombe Jan, and its unruffled manner imparts the music the character of an Intermezzo. The third movement, Lazy Lawrence, is the slow movement proper, and it uses the Dorset folk tune Linden www.galliardensemble.com

Mugenkyo Taiko Drummers


Corn Exchange Newbury Tuesday 22 May 7.30pm

Mugenkyo Taiko Drummers


Mugenkyo Taiko Drummers are the UKs longest established taiko ensemble and Europes only professional touring company of this thrilling and energetic performing art who live up to the meaning of their name limitless reverberation! Sponsored by Strutt & Parker

to gorgeous earthy silks. The concert is extremely musically varied; powerful rhythms, huge taiko drums, delicate shinobue bamboo flute, expressive percussion, and dance. Through their years of rigorous touring, Mugenkyo have developed a style that is uniquely their own. Retaining the traditional spirit of taiko, yet creating a thoroughly contemporary sound, Mugenkyo are forging a new path with their innovative approach. Mugenkyo push the boundaries of Taiko with their various artistic collaborations. In 2004 Mugenkyo presented the show Rinnetensho with Tokyo-based contemporary dance group Company East on the theme of reincarnation, a multi-media presentation using taiko, dance and projected visuals. In 2005 Mugenkyo collaborated with bagpiper and Scottish Musician of the Year, Stuart Cassells, which was broadcast live worldwide on BBC Last Night of the Proms. More recently Mugenkyo have toured with Hanayui from Sado Island, from the worldfamous Kodo Drummers, appeared with electronic dance artist Kenji Williams at the Glastonbury Festival, toured with Japanese bellydance artist Lale Sayoko and co-wrote and performed Yatra a collaboration of South Asian and Scottish traditional music for the 2008 & 2009 Mela Festivals. In 2010 & 2011 the group collaborated on a joint tour with saxophonist Tommy Smith and the Scottish National Jazz Orchestra. Mugenkyo perform in Japan regularly: on invitation by the Japanese government to open the 2005 EU-Japan Year of Exchange, their 10th Anniversary Concert in 2004, and for the prince and princess at the British Embassy in Tokyo. To continue their ongoing training at the highest level, and further develop their strong foundations in technique, Mugenkyo return to Japan regularly, where founders of the group Neil Mackie and Miyuki Williams lived and trained intensively in 1992 - 1994 with Master Drummer Masaaki Kurumaya Sensei. In 2002 the group established the Mugen Taiko Dojo: Centre for Taiko Drumming in the UK - the first purposebuilt taiko dojo in Britain, based in rural Central Scotland, and a dedicated training centre for players from all over the UK. Under the umbrella of the Mugen Taiko Dojo, members of the group tour an award-winning educational concert at schools, undertake educational outreach projects with local authorities all over the UK, and run indepth courses for adults and weekend residential workshops at the dojo. Sponsored by Strutt & Parker

Mugenkyo Taiko Drummers


Mugenkyo Taiko Drummers are the UKs first and only professional touring taiko group, and Europes most established performing company in this fast-expanding field. Through performing over 100 concerts a year, the group have built a solid reputation for their hard-hitting and energetic performances since their establishment in 1994. Mugenkyos main work is touring a full-length concert at theatres and concert halls, including London Queen Elizabeth Hall, Nottingham Royal Concert Hall, Cambridge Corn Exchange, Gateshead Sage, Reading Hexagon, Bristol Colston Hall, Edinburgh Usher Hall, amongst others. The group has appeared on numerous television and radio programmes worldwide, including the Brit Awards, BBC Last Night of the Proms, the Generation Game and has even featured in a Bollywood film. Mugenkyo present taiko in a modern and theatrical style with precise choreography, dramatic lighting, and a variety of costumes ranging from the post-apocalyptic industrial

www.taiko.co.uk

www.newburyspringfestival.org.uk

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Consortium5
Corn Exchange Newbury Wednesday 23 May 12.30pm

Young Artists Lunchtime Recital 5


Oonagh Lee Roselyn Maynard Gail MacLeod Kathryn Corrigan Emily Bloom During its long and varied history as an instrument played at Royal Courts as well as in popular domestic music making, the recorder has been associated with the characteristics of all of the above. In this provocative programme, The Recorder: Europes Richman, Poorman, Beggarman or Thief?, Consortium5 displays the wealth, colour and diversity of music that the recorder either 'owns' or has claimed and appropriated for this performance on an impressive range of renaissance, baroque and modern instruments. Clemens Thieme Isaac Posch Kim Ashton Richard Lannoy Georg Philipp Telemann Francesco Guerrero Sonata a 5 viole in D Minor Paduana and Gagliarda Dots (2010) Tangled Pipes (2010) Concerto in G Major (arr. Viola Concerto TW 59:G9) Ave Virgo Sanctissima En tanto que de Rosa y acucena Variations and Cadenzas (2008) Galliard

Anthony Holborne William Brade

Alman: The Honeysuckle Galliard Coranta

The Young Artists Lunchtime Recital series is sponsored by The Headley Trust

Consortium5
Consortium5 formed in 2005 when its founding members were students at the Royal Academy of Music. They have since established themselves as one of the foremost recorder consorts of their generation, and an ensemble of unique appeal to a wide range of audiences. Founded out of a shared love of consort music and recorders, Consortium5 have performed in Europe and the UK at major festivals and concert series. In 2010 they recorded their debut album on the Nonclassical Label, voted among the top ten best classical albums of the year by Chicago Time Out. Working with composers has formed a central part of Consortium5's activity over the past four years, and this album features works commissioned especially for and by the group. A recent review from the influential blog Sequenza21 concludes that the album suggests a new frontier for chamber ensembles. Winners of numerous prizes and awards, Consortium5 made their Purcell Room debut in 2009 as part of the Park Lane Group Young Artists Series. In 2007-2009 they were Joan Greenfield Junior Fellows at Trinity College of Music and in 2006 they were awarded the Deutsche Bank Pyramid Award for performance, a prize that allowed them to invest in a set of 10 matching consort instruments. Equally committed to performance on the concert platform and in the community, Consortium5 spent several years resident on the Live Music Now scheme, and have performed numerous concerts for London based music services, reaching over 7000 children, many of whom had never attended a professional music concert before. Since forming, Consortium5 have combined historically informed and contemporary performance to great effect in both concerts and educational work. Consortium5 enjoy working closely with composers throughout the composition process and it has been their great delight to discover the fascination these instruments hold for composers and the richness and variety with which their language speaks through the consort. Consortium5 are particularly interested in the bridges that these compositions build; new consorts from the archaic consort form, new works for ancient instruments, a contemporary dimension to the recorder that concentrates without compromise on both its simplicity and its myriad complexities.

David Bedford Augustine Bassano

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Consortium5
Programme Notes
CLEMENS THIEME (1631-1668) Sonata a 5 viole in D Minor The German composer Clemens Thieme was born in the year 1631 near Dresden. In 1642, after completing his first musical training in Dresden, Heinrich Schtz arranged for him to be sent to Copenhagen as a choir boy. After his return to Dresden he received training on several instruments, and later a position at the Dresden Cappella. Thanks to a recommendation by Heinrich Schtz he was then transferred to the court cappella in Zeitz, becoming first concertmaster and director of the cappella. He died in 1668, at the age of 37. Thieme's instrumental sonatas alternate between lively homophony and fugue-like episodes over a decided bass. They are a succession of short movements that vary thematically and in character, speed and meter. ISAAC POSCH (?-1623) Paduana and Gagliarda Isaac Posch was an Austrian composer of the early baroque, working in Carinthia from approximately 1614, where he was employed as an organist and organ builder. Posch is seen as an important composer in the development of the variation suite and dance music. His Musicalische Tafelfreudt of 1621 features a selection of unique works, including the lively five part Paduana and Gagliarda that we are playing today. KIM ASHTON Dots (2010) Composer - conductor - teacher - gardener - in Kim's music the sounds of nature meet Schoenberg, Bach meets Jung, and zen calm meets spirited assertiveness. Dots is a fast-moving journey through different textural and harmonic regions, invaded by an exotic songbird, and ending with dancing. (Or in the form of a haiku: Leaves rustle to start/ A low, exotic songbird/ Dancing to finish) RICHARD LANNOY Tangled Pipes (2010) Though largely modelled on Bach's Fugue no.2 Book 1 from the Well Tempered Clavier, Tangled Pipes embraces contemporary extended instrumental techniques with a modern urban toughness reflecting dual interests as a 'serious composer and DJ/turntablist whilst extending the Bach model from 3 to 5 voices. Marked Tough & Punchy in the score, Tangled Pipes' kicks-off in typical fugue tradition with a short, pithy opening subject yet extending analogy to a bass line derived from a dancefloor drum'n'bass remix, the overall result being rhythmically, sonically and characteristically immersed in a similar vibe. www.consortium5.com GEORG PHILIPP TELEMANN (1681-1767) Concerto in G Major (arr. Viola Concerto TW 59:G9) Largo - Allegro - Andante - Presto Telemanns Concerto in G major, originally for viola, was composed sometime between 1716 and 1721 during a particularly fruitful period in which Telemann began publishing collections of his own instrumental works. The concerto follows a common baroque structure alternating slow and fast movements in which the first and third present the soloist in elegant and curvaceous phrases supported by the ensemble through a simple homophonic accompaniment and movements two and four are based on a ritornello structure where the music swiftly alternates between brief sections for the ensemble and the soloist. Telemann was highly regarded amongst his contemporaries for both the quality of his compositions and his exceptional output. He was a close friend of J.S. Bach and became Godfather and namesake of Carl Philipp Emanuel. FRANCESCO GUERRERO (1528-1599) Ave Virgo Sanctissima En tanto que de Rosa y acucena Francesco Guerrero was a composer of the Spanish Renaissance. A native of Seville, his output notably includes sacred and secular works unlike the better known Victoria. He was able in several instruments including the harp, cornett and organ but alongside composition it was as a singer that he most distinguished himself. The motet Ave Virgo Sanctissima is one of his most popular pieces both then and now. Although structurally a tightly bound canon this constraint does not prevent the music reflecting the deeply devotional text in honour of the Virgin Mary. Rich chromatic lines weave across the ensemble describing Mary first as the star of the ocean most clear, then comparing her to a lily and finally ending with her as the rose. We remain with flowers for our second piece by Guerrero which is a madrigal setting text by the Spanish poet Garcilaso De La Vega. In this sonnet the author celebrates the beauty of youth through the vibrancy of the rose and lily and golden seams of hair and yet he mourns that this will inevitably fade and this is natures way. DAVID BEDFORD (1937-2011) Variations and Cadenzas (2008) (on a theme from Susatos Danserye) Bedfords composition Variations and Cadenzas is a triumphant fusion of two musical styles that are ideally suited to the recorder. Bedford used as his inspiration a piece by Susato that was written in the Renaissance period: a time when the recorder was in its heyday and when it showed its strength through consort playing. Bedford took this strength in part-writing and brought www.newburyspringfestival.org.uk

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Consortium5
Susato's piece right up to date, giving it a new lease of life. Written in five equal parts this exciting work uses five different sizes of recorder with each player using several different sizes throughout the piece and four of the five players occasionally playing two recorders simultaneously. Bedford has incorporated extended techniques that further explore the expressive potential of the recorder, such as flutter-tonguing and pitch bending to great effect. This piece was commissioned for the Park Lane Group Young Artists Series 2009 and was written as a response to hearing the extreme skill and virtuosity of the performers, so has some very challenging moments. AUGUSTINE BASSANO (? - 1604) Galliard ANTHONY HOLBORNE (1545 - 1602) Alman: The Honeysuckle Galliard WILLIAM BRADE (1560 - 1630) Coranta A brisk Galliard by Bassano opens this suite of dances. Composed using plenty of sparkly cross-rhythms, Bassano wrote this piece whilst he was a member of the recorder consort in the English court. Holborne's Alman and Galliard are full of innocent charm, with slow moving homophonic parts and more cross-rhythms offering plenty of variety. Rounding off this selection, we have a swift energetic Coranta by William Brade, who spent much of his life abroad working at courts in Denmark and Northern Germany. All of these dances were composed for unbroken consort and so would have been performed together with other dances on viols or recorders. The Young Artists Lunchtime Recital series is sponsored by The Headley Trust

SHACKELL PIANOS

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23 May

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www.consortium5.com

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Romeo and Juliet


Corn Exchange Newbury Wednesday 23 May 7.30pm

Romeo and Juliet


Rudolf Nureyev Margot Fonteyn The Royal Ballet, Covent Garden In the second film celebrating legends of both opera and ballet the Festival presents Romeo and Juliet, the 1966 film of Kenneth MacMillans ballet to Prokofievs passionate score. Ross Alley, lecturer on opera and ballet at the Royal Opera House, will introduce and talk about the film before the screening. Sponsored by an anonymous donor

Kenneth MacMillan (1929-1992)


Kenneth MacMillan was the leading ballet choreographer of his generation. Born of a poor Scottish family, he had a burning sense that ballet theatre should reflect contemporary realities and the complicated truths of peoples lives. He became director of The Royal Ballet and created some of the outstanding dance works of the twentieth century.

Ross Alley
Ross Alley is a native of New Zealand, he worked as a pianist and music teacher at the National School of Ballet and the Australian Ballet Company and School before moving to England. In London he was employed by the Royal Ballet School as a pianist, with responsibilities as a music tutor to develop the teachers training course and create the pianists training programme for aspiring ballet accompanists. He is closely associated with the Cecchetti Society, researching, editing and arranging music for the syllabi. Ross Alley lectures on classical music at the Royal Opera House, organized by the Royal Opera House Education Department with the University of London and Friends of Covent Garden.

Rudolf Nureyev (1938-93)


No male dancer ever had more influence on the history, style and public perception of ballet than Rudolf Nureyev. He changed peoples expectations. Starting out from inauspicious beginnings in a remote town in the Urals, he ended up changing the whole face of the art. By indefatigably performing a uniquely wide repertoire night after night, year after year, all over the world he reached a wider audience than any rival. The dramatic circumstances of his arrival in the West, his so-called leap to freedom put him immediately on the front pages of the worlds newspapers but it was his personality that kept him there.

Romeo and Juliet


Even though the only version of Prokofievs Romeo and Juliet choreographed by Leonid Lavrovski was part of the Kirovs repertoire when Rudolf Nurevey danced there, he did not get the chance to perform it. It was only in 1965 that he danced the part in a choreography by MacMillan. In fact, the British choreographer designed the ballet for his favourite ballerina, Lynn Seymour (Juliet) and for Christopher Gable (Romeo). But just a few days before the premiere, the management of the Royal Ballet imposed the most famous couple of the time! Margot Fonteyn and Rudolf Nureyev, whom everyone wanted to see dancing and who guaranteed a ballets success. The first performance of MacMillans Romeo and Juliet on February 9th 1965 was applauded by the audience for 40 minutes in spite of the fact the Nureyev was recovering from an injury and danced with a bandaged leg. Even with one leg, Mr Rudolf Nureyev dances better than others with two legs! wrote the enthusiastic critic at The Times. MacMillans production was accepted as one of the repertoires great classics and the couple continued to star both in London and in New York. The performance was magnificently filmed by Paul Czinner in 1966. Sponsored by an anonymous donor

Margot Fonteyn (1919-91)


Margot Fonteyn was born in Reigate, Surrey. In 1933, she joined the Vic-Wells Ballet School, the predecessor of today's Royal Ballet School. She made quick progress and in 1939 had already danced Giselle, Odette-Odile and Aurora. She became the world's greatest ballerina and could have retired as such when she was 40. But her meeting with Rudolf Nureyev in 1962 gave the world the magic of their great partnership and her career continued until she was 58.

www.newburyspringfestival.org.uk

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Brodsky Quartet
St Marys Church Shaw Wednesday 23 May 7.30pm

Brodsky Quartet 40th Anniversary Concert


Ian Belton Daniel Rowland Paul Cassidy Jacqueline Thomas Purcell Tanaka Respighi Interval Schubert Puccini Debussy Quartettstz D703 Crisantemi Quartet violin violin viola cello Chaconne in G minor At the grave of Beethoven String Quartet Dorico

von Otter, Dawn Upshaw and Bjrk, instrumentalists Michael Collins, Joan Lluna, Martin Roscoe, Alexander Baillie, Tunde Jegede, Complicite Theatre Company and Icelandic poet Sjon, while their many collaborations with distinguished composers, including John Tavener, Witold Lutoslawski, Peter Sculthorpe, Django Bates, Sally Beamish, Dave Brubeck and Peter Maxwell Davies, have given them an unrivalled opportunity to influence and inspire some of the newest work for string quartet. Their passion to embrace all good music has been the driving force behind their success and has kept their approach fresh and their enthusiasm high over the years. They have a huge and diverse discography, having worked with many major labels, finally forming their own label, Brodsky Records, in 2005. Recent awards include the Diapason D'Or for their recordings of string quartets by Britten, Beethoven and Janacek, whilst for their outstanding contribution to innovation in programming the Brodsky Quartet has received a Royal Philharmonic Society Award. They have taught at many international chamber music courses and held residencies in several music institutes. They currently hold the International Chair of Chamber Music at the Royal Scottish Academy of Music and Drama. The quartet is named after the great Russian violinist Adolf Brodsky, dedicatee of Tchaikovsky's violin concerto and passionate chamber musician, who played an important role in musical life in 1920s Manchester and at the Royal Northern College of Music where the quartet studied.

Sponsored by Fairhurst Estates

Brodsky Quartet
The Brodsky Quartet are at the forefront of the international chamber music scene. Their love and mastery of the traditional string quartet repertoire is evident from their highly acclaimed performances of composers ranging from Haydn, Beethoven, Schubert and Tchaikovsky to Shostakovich, Bartok, Britten and Respighi, as well as from their extensive, award-winning discography. At the same time, the Quartet are known for their pioneering work with a diverse range of performing artists, including singers Elvis Costello, Sting, Anne Sofie

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Benjamin Ealovega

www.brodskyquartet.co.uk

Brodsky Quartet
Programme Notes
HENRY PURCELL (1659-1695) Chaconne in G minor Although Purcell's reputation rests mainly on his vocal music, both sacred and secular, he did consistently write instrumental pieces of high quality. In most cases these were designed for inclusion in larger scale works, such as the semi-operas, with significant vocal parts, but in other compositions his own private satisfaction seems to have been of paramount concern. The four-part Chaconne in G minor is among the few instrumental works by Purcell to have secured a permanent place in the orchestral or chamber music repertories. Its popularity owes much to the enthusiasm of Benjamin Britten, who made his performing arrangement for string quartet or string orchestra in 1965. Whatever its source or realisation, the Chaconne is a glorious example of music whose slow pulse unfolds an expressive line above a recurring theme in the bass, of that natural expression of grave nobility which is unique to Purcell.
Terry Barfoot

accepted him as a student, and he played at Les Vendredis, the Friday evening chamber music gatherings hosted by the millionaire publisher, Belaiev. Respighis String Quartet in D major was composed a few years later, from the time when the composer was a member of the Mugellini Quartet in Bologna. All his chamber music compositions were all written between 1892 and 1910. Thereafter he concentrated on larger works; operas, ballets, symphonic poems, concertos. Only his final quartet, the Dorico (1924), was written later. The Quartetto Dorico was one of several compositions by Respighi to be inspired by Gergorian chant. It owes its name, of course, to the Dorian mode, which is best defined as the church mode represented on the white keys of the piano by an ascending scale from D to D. The principal theme is derived from this mode. Although cast in a single unbroken movement, the work can easily be understood in terms of four sections corresponding to the movements of a classical quartet, with the scherzo placed second and the slow movement third. The theme in the Dorian mode is the mainspring for the entire composition, and this was probably why the composer opted to have a single unified entity across a single span of more than twenty minutes. FRANZ SCHUBERT (1797-1828) String Quartet in C minor, D.703 'Quartettstz' Schubert composed his String Quartet movement in C minor, known to the world by its German title Quartettstz, in 1820. It represents one of the clearest indications that at this time he was entering a new phase of his creative life. His musical style was becoming more powerful and expressive, generating more emotional and less classically inclined compositions. Whether this single movement was originally intended to form part of a conventional four-movement quartet is not known, and the work therefore assumes a position as the equivalent in chamber music of the celebrated Unfinished Symphony. What is beyond doubt, however, is its extraordinary intensity of vision, the quality which has most surely maintained its position at the heart of the repertory. The opening phase of the Quartettstz is restless indeed, with overlapping entries serving to intensify the mood still further. At the centre of the piece, however, lies an episode which achieves a stillness which emotionally lies at the opposite remove. In the concluding section the intensity returns, with new treatments of the familiar material, eventually resolving on to an emphatic final chord.

KAREN TANAKA (1961-) At the grave of Beethoven Karen Tanaka is acclaimed as one of the leading living composers from Japan. She has been invited as a composer in residence at many important festivals, and her music has been widely performed throughout the world.

At the grave of Beethoven was commissioned by the Brodsky Quartet, on the occasion of the bicentenary anniversary of Beethoven's Opus 18. The title suggests admiration and a tribute towards Beethoven, and this work is based on Beethoven's string quartet Opus 18 No. 3, perhaps the most gentle and lyrical in the set. I feel the pure spirit and ardent hope of young Beethoven in it.
The first movement of At the grave of Beethoven was inspired by the first four bars of Opus 18 No. 3. These were developed and interpreted in a contemporary manner, reflecting the tension and anxiety of our life today. The second movement is made by chains of modulations. When I was writing this movement in the spring of 1999, the news from Kosovo was reported on TV every day. I was shocked and horrified by this civil war, and it influenced my writing unconsciously. Along with each modulation, I had images that lotus flowers grow and bloom, in the hope of serenity and peace.
Karen Tanaka

OTTORINO RESPIGHI (1879-1936) Quartetto Dorico After graduating from the academy in 1899, Respighi gained the position of principal violist in the orchestra of the St Petersburg Opera Theatre. Rimsky-Korsakov www.brodskyquartet.co.uk

www.newburyspringfestival.org.uk

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Brodsky Quartet
GIACOMO PUCCINI (1858-1924) Crisantemi Puccini wrote his Crisantemi for string quartet in 1890, as an elegy for a friend: 'in memory of Amedeo of Savoy, Duke of Aosta.' The music has that same delicate sadness he often created in operatic scenes; in fact he went on to use the material in the finale act of Manon Lescaut. There is a mood of real pathos, and the sincerity and tenderness derive principally from the sophisticated harmonic textures. Had Puccini chosen to become a composer of instrumental music rather than operas, what might he have achieved? The title Crisantemi holds a special significance, since in Italy chrysanthemums are traditionally associated with mourning. CLAUDE DEBUSSY (1862-1918) String Quartet in G minor, Opus 10 1. 2. 3. 4. Anim et trs dcid Assez vif et bien rythm Andantino, doucement expressif Trs modr There is no question that the slow movement forms the emotional heart of the Quartet, since it is a deeply moving soliloquy of devotional character. The finale sets out slowly, but soon the music becomes more animated, until it is played 'with full movement and passion', allowing the work to conclude with a brilliant affirmation.
Terry Barfoot

Sponsored by Fairhurst Estates

In some respects the String Quartet, which Debussy composed in 1893, stands out among his compositions. For example, it is the only music to which he ascribed an opus number and a key. Moreover, the title is a reminder that it is far removed from the nature of his impressionist compositions. Within a year of completing the Quartet, he abandoned plans for a second, and embarked instead upon the composition of the Prlude l'aprs-midi d'un faune, which explores a quite different world in another, and stylistically newer, musical language. This might suggest that Debussy turned his back on classicism for good; but towards the end of his life he returned to the classical forms in his three chamber music sonatas. It was from Csar Franck that Debussy inherited the cyclic form which is such an important feature of the Quartet. The descending motif which is heard at the outset returns in a different guise, marked 'gentle and expressive', in order to become the second theme. In due course it yields further material besides, such as the viola's theme at the start of the scherzo, and the slow introduction and subsequent faster music in the finale.

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However, the noteable characteristics of the Quartet also include a remarkable intensity of feeling and flexibility of tempi. Thus the second subject of the first movement must be played 'a little slower', while in the closing pages the music becomes increasingly faster and wilder. The scherzo makes great play with pizzicati and a subtle two against three rhythm, while the middle section moves along more peacefully. www.brodskyquartet.co.uk

Paul Moorhouse

Festival Talk 6

Shaw House Church Road Shaw Thursday 24 May 11.00am 3.00pm

The Queen Art and Image


Lightness of Being, 2007 by Chris Levine Chris Levine Courtesy of Mr Kevin P .Burke and the Burke Children. Private Collection.

Recent exhibitions he has organised include: The Queen Art and Image (touring exhibition, including the National Portrait Gallery, 2011-12), Warhol/Icon (Byzantine and Christian Museum, Athens 2009), Gerhard Richter Portraits (NPG, 2009), Pop Art Portraits (NPG 2007-8), John Latham (Tate Britain, 2006), Anthony Caro (Tate Britain 2005), Bridget Riley (Tate Britain, 2003), Michael Andrews (Tate Gallery, 2001), John Hoyland (Royal Academy of Arts (1999), Francis Bacon (Millenium Galleries, Sheffield 1996), Leon Kossoff (Tate Gallery, 1995), and The Transformation of Appearance - Auerbach, Andrews, Bacon, Freud and Kossoff (Sainsbury Centre, 1990). On joining the National Portrait Gallery he devised the Interventions series, a programme of special monographic exhibitions which explores innovatory approaches to portraiture by major 20th Century artists. Within that series the artists he has featured include Andy Warhol, Francis Bacon, Jim Dine, Anthony Caro, Bridget Riley, Frank Auerbach and Tony Bevan, among others. Recent publications include the books The Queen - Art and Image (2011), Anthony Caro: Presence (2010); Bridget Riley - From Life ( 2010); Gerhard Richter Portraits (2009); Pop Art Portraits (2007); Interpreting Caro (2005); John Virtue - Paintings of London (2005); Richard Long Walking the Line (2003); and Albert Irvin - Life to Painting (1998) as well as many exhibition catalogues and essays. Forthcoming publications include a book on Cindy Sherman and essays for a major history of the Royal Academy of Art. Recent lectures and talks include the 2010 Peter Fuller Memorial Lecture - In conversation with Anthony Caro, at Tate Britain; In conversation with Bridget Riley at St Johns College, Cambridge; and The Queen, at Cheltenham Literature Festival. He is currently organizing the exhibitions The Great War in Portraits and Giacometti Portraits to be held at the National Portrait Gallery in 2014 and 2015.

Since her accession in 1952, Queen Elizabeth II has been the subject of relentless visual scrutiny. Paul Moorhouse, curator of the exhibition The Queen - Art and Image which opens at the National Portrait Gallery on 17 May, explores the development of the Queens image during the course of her reign. He considers the role of formal painted portraits, studio photographs, the mass-media and contemporary artists in influencing the way the Queen has been perceived. He argues that such images are much more than a fascinating biographical record: they provide vital insights into radical changes in social attitudes and artistic values.

Paul Moorhouse
Paul Moorhouse is Twentieth Century Curator at the National Portrait Gallery, a post he has held since 2005. From 1985 to 2005 he was Curator, Modern Collection, latterly Senior Curator of Contemporary Art, at Tate. A specialist in international twentieth century art, he has curated numerous exhibitions at major venues within Great Britain and abroad and has published and lectured extensively.

www.npg.org.uk

www.newburyspringfestival.org.uk

24 May
93

Stephen Hough piano


Corn Exchange Newbury Thursday 24 May 7.30pm

Stephen Hough
Beethoven

24 May

Hough Scriabin Interval Liszt

Sonata in C sharp minor Op 27 No 2 Moonlight Sonata for Piano Broken branches Sonata No 5

Sonata in B minor

Sponsored by Thomas Eggar LLP and Mr Leopold de Rothschild CBE

Proms, where he has made over 15 concerto appearances. Recent engagements include performances with the New York and London Philharmonics, the London and San Francisco Symphonies, a US tour with the Russian National Orchestra led by Vladimir Jurowski, and a worldwide televised performance with the Berlin Philharmonic under Sir Simon Rattle. In 2009 Hough played recitals in the Royal Festival Hall as well as becoming the first British instrumentalist to give a solo recital on the main stage of Carnegie Hall in nearly 20 years. An exclusive Hyperion recording artist, many of Stephen Houghs catalogue of over 50 CDs have garnered international prizes. His most recent releases are the Complete Works for Piano and Orchestra by Tchaikovsky with the Minnesota Orchestra led by Osmo Vnsk, and a Chopin recital: Late Masterpieces. Stephen Hough is also an avid writer and composer. In addition to scholarly and critically-acclaimed CD liner notes and articles for music publications, he has written for The Guardian, The Times, and was invited by the Telegraph Media Group in December 2008 to start a cultural blog. Hough has written extensively about theology for the print media and has been interviewed on two special guest-edited episodes of BBC Radio 4s The Today Programme by Cardinal Cormac Murphy-OConnor and Baroness Shirley Williams. Houghs book, The Bible as Prayer, was published by Continuum and Paulist Press in 2007.

This concert will be broadcast in Radio 3 Sunday Concert on BBC Radio 3 on Sunday 3 June 2012 at 2:00pm

Stephen Hough
With a singular artistic vision that transcends musical fashions and trends, Stephen Hough is widely regarded as one of the most important and distinctive pianists of his generation. In recognition of his achievements, he was awarded a prestigious MacArthur Fellowship in 2001, joining prominent scientists, writers and others who have made unique contributions to contemporary life. Stephen Hough has appeared with most of the major European and American orchestras and plays recitals regularly in the major halls and concert series around the world. He is a guest at international festivals and the BBC

Hiroyuki Ito

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www.stephenhough.com

Stephen Hough piano


Earlier in 2007, Houghs cello concerto The Loneliest Wilderness was premiered by Steven Isserlis and the Royal Liverpool Philharmonic and two choral works Mass of Innocence and Experience and Missa Mirabilis were performed at Londons Westminster Abbey and Westminster Cathedral respectively. In January 2009, Houghs trio, Was mit den Trnen geschieht, commissioned by members of the Berlin Philharmonic, received its world premiere at the Berlin Philharmonie. A string sextet, Requiem Aeternum: after Victoria, was commissioned by the National Gallery for their major autumn 2009 exhibition, The Sacred Made Real: Spanish Painting and Sculpture 1600-1700. Hough has also published numerous compositions with Josef Weinberger Ltd. A resident of London, Stephen Hough is a visiting professor at the Royal Academy of Music in London and holds the International Chair of Piano Studies at his alma mater, the Royal Northern College in Manchester. cycle On an Overgrown Path; and finally a spiritual dimension: I am the vine, you are the branches. Cut off from me you can do nothing, said Christ to his disciples in St. Johns Gospel. The climax of this Sonata is a section called non credo, based on material from the Credo of my Missa Mirabilis which explores issues of doubt and despair in the context of the concrete affirmations of the Nicene Creed. The penultimate section, a wordless but metrically exact setting of the 6th century text Crux Fidelis, reveals another branch - the wood of the Cross. The Sonata begins with a Prelude (Autumn) and ends with a Postlude (Spring). The music is identical in both except that the anguish of the formers G sharp minor is blanched into G major at the end of the piece. Branches begin their lives anew in the Spring, and nothing is so broken that it cannot be healed. ALEXANDER SCRIABIN (1872-1915) Sonata No 5 FRANZ LISZT (1811-86) Sonata in B minor The Scriabin 5th sonata and the Liszt B minor sonata have much in common. They are both in one movement, developing their thematic material with great economy and ingenuity; they share a similar circular form, beginning and ending with the same gesture - the Scriabin with a ferocious scream to the top of the keyboard, the Liszt sinking in sombre, twisted scales to the deepest bass. Both sonatas take us on spiritual journeys yet to totally different destinations. The Liszt is an epic, symphonic portrayal of the struggle between good and evil, the Scriabin a high-octane, concentrated, ecstatic trip to a place where those traditional moral terms have ceased to exist.
c. Stephen Hough

Programme Notes
Strange sonatas is the theme behind this programme. Sonata was originally a term used to denote a piece sounding rather than singing - for instruments rather than voices. It has had a rich history from the singlemovement forms of Scarlatti through the classical centre point of the Viennese classics to the outer boundaries of Boulez and Cage. For all its multiplicity, the term itself has kept meaning in its wordlessness and its seriousness: a sonata, regardless of form, is a statement - of unity if not of uniformity. LUDVIG VAN BEETHOVEN (1770-1827) Sonata in C sharp minor Op 27 No 2 Moonlight Beethovens astonishing Moonlight sonata is perhaps the most famous example of the genre in history. The first movement is an improvisation, a tuneless wash of colour with gentle triplets blurred into mystery through long pedals and bass textures. After a short, lilting minuet and trio, the C sharp minor arpeggios return in the final movement, but now with ferocity and velocity, and punching accents on the final beats of the bar. This movement shares with the later Appassionata sonata Finale an unwillingness to let any light brighten the mood. It is turbulent without respite. STEPHEN HOUGH (1961-) Sonata for Piano Broken branches My sonata is constructed of sixteen small, inconclusive sections, but I wanted a title which would pull these fragments together. The work is not a collection of album leaves of saplings existing comfortably in their own space but branches from a single tree. Broken branches in three senses: fragments of fragility, related in theme but incomplete and damaged; an oblique tribute to Janeks www.stephenhough.com

Sponsored by Thomas Eggar LLP and Mr Leopold de Rothschild CBE

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Harry the Piano


Donnington Priory Oxford Road Newbury Thursday 24 May 7.30pm

Harry the Piano

24 May

Sponsored by Dreweatts

was asked to perform, the international star concert pianist Martin Roscoe noted You practise all your life and you think you can play the piano and then you hear Harry. Harry's career began in earnest as resident pianist in Soho's Groucho Club where he was quickly spotted and given his own show on BBC Radio 2, he moved on to become the resident pianist on Channel 4's Big Breakfast for 5 years and to run the nine-piece band on Johnny Vaughan Tonight on BBC1 for three series. He put together his one-man show along with the release of an album In the Wrong Key in the mid-nineties and was lauded by the British Press as 'The New Victor Borge' and by Jonathan Ross as The best damn pianist in the civilised world. Another album All The Way Through followed - the show went on to be seen in all six continents, and was recently chosen to headline on the Maiden voyage of the Queen Mary 2 alongside Dame Shirley Bassey and has sold out venues everywhere from Londons famous Pizza on the Park (five times) and the 2000 seater Portsmouth Guildhall to the Holders theatre Barbados, the Hong Kong fringe club, the Adelaide festival as well as countless venues all over Europe. Another recent highlight was stealing the show in front of a packed Albert Hall when in a charity Gala evening with Julian Lloyd Webber, G4, Amici and the RPO, host Aled Jones asked him to play In an English Country Garden in the style of Wagner interspersed with some Kylie! The result was a standing ovation. Sponsored by Dreweatts

Harry
Since starting to play at the age of four Harry has set about proving that he can do absolutely anything on piano. Quite simply, he does things with the instrument that you've never heard before, moving seamlessly between jazz, cabaret and classical in a manner that hasnt been seen in the UK since the heyday of Dudley Moore. Very few artists can command respect in such differing fields, but Harry has such an extraordinary talent that as well as running a 20 piece dance band by the age of nineteen and appearing with a who's who of British jazz musicians culminating with a night at Ronnie Scotts last year, he has also accompanied just about everybody in the business from Englebert Humperdinck and Charlotte Church to David Bowie and James Belushi via Elvis Costello and opera star Sir Willard White as well as being musical director for top of the bill acts at the Moulin Rouge in his early twenties and subsequently going on to direct performers as diverse as Alexander Armstrong, Phill Jupitus, Rick Astley, The Opera Babes, Fay Presto and literally scores of others. He has also appeared on BBC Radio 3 taking requests from a live audience to play any tune in the style of the composer of their choice to rapturous acclaim and prompted the comment from astonished presenter Brian Kay How does he do it? After a recent sell out concert celebrating the best of British pianistic talent where Harry

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Vacarescu-Tsunakawa Duo
Corn Exchange Newbury Friday 25 May 12.30pm

Young Artists Lunchtime Recital 6


Horia Vacarescu Chiho Tsunakawa Brahms Debussy Enescu Schubert de Falla violin piano Sonata No 3 in D minor Violin Sonata in G minor Aubade Ave Maria Suite Populaire Espagnole

Vacarescu-Tsunakawa Duo
The Vacarescu-Tsunakawa Duo was formed at the beginning of 2010, while the two musicians were studying at the Royal College of Music in London. In the UK they have made appearances at major venues, reaching as far as Wales and Scotland. They also toured Japan and Romania, and their performance at the Great Hall of the Bucharest Athenaeum was received to standing ovations. Combining a high mastery of the instrument that evokes a past era with an intense and emotional approach, Horia Vacarescus performances are a delight and always received with enthusiasm by his audience. Critics called him a great talent and describe his performance as exhilarating. Born in Romania in a musical family, Horia started playing the violin at the age of three. Three years later he made his first public appearance and at 15 he performed for the first time in the company of a symphony orchestra. He studied both at the National Music University in Bucharest and Royal College of Music in London.

Chiho Tsunakawa was born in Japan and began learning piano at the age of 3. When Chiho was only 12, she came to London to study piano as a pupil of Noretta ConciLeech, a great pupil of Arturo Benedetti Michelangeli. Chiho then became a student of Tessa Nicholson at the junior department of the Royal Academy of Music, where she also took violin lessons. She attended the Arts Educational School, London, before she joined the Purcell School of Music where she represented the Piano department and gave many performances. Chiho then received a scholarship to study at the Royal Academy of Music under Tessa Nicholson and Rustem Hayroudinoff, gaining both an undergraduate and a postgraduate degree. Chiho has since gained her Master's degree at the Royal College of Music, under the guidance of Gordon Fergus-Thompson. Chiho has given solo performances on NHK Radio in Japan and her Schuberts Trout Quintet performance at the Wigmore Hall was also broadcasted on radio in London. Chiho has been a prizewinner in over 25 competitions.

Programme Notes
JOHANNES BRAHMS (1833-1897) Violin Sonata No. 3 in D minor, Opus 108 1. 2. 3. 4. Allegro Adagio Un poco presto e con sentimento Presto agitato

Brahms completed the D minor Violin Sonata in 1888, with a dedication to the pianist and conductor Hans von Blow. The work is somewhat larger in scale than its two predecessors, since it contains an additional movement, and the music has a natural lyricism which is a reflection of the nature of the violin. Moreover the balance between the two instruments is particularly successful. The sonata opens with a sotto voce (whispered) passage, whose very restraint invites the release of more tempestuous emotions. As ever with Brahms, the first movement has a tightly knit structure, built around the two clear subject groups of a classical sonata design.

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The Young Artists Lunchtime Recital series is sponsored by The Headley Trust Additional support for this concert from the Romanian Cultural Institute

Presently, Horia is enjoying an international career as a soloist and a chamber musician. Concert engagements have taken him on three continents, from Europe to the USA and the Far East. He has performed at various music festivals in Great Britain, France, Switzerland and Romania. Although now based in London, Horia returns regularly to perform in his native Romania, where he collaborated with some of the most prestigious orchestras, including the Radio and the National Philharmonic Orchestras of Bucharest. Horia plays a superb 18th century Italian violin, kindly loaned by a private collection.

Vacarescu-Tsunakawa Duo
The lyrical line of the violin's song remains virtually unbroken throughout the five minutes of the Adagio, a movement which recalls the Violin Concerto written ten years before. Then as the third movement proceeds, so the expression becomes more forceful, until in the later stages the initial lightness returns, almost apologetically. The finale has abundant vitality and fervour, a veritable tour-de-force whose powerful opening gesture is unequivocal indeed. As the music continues the sweep of momentum proves irresistible, generating a climax that is at once compelling and comprehensive. FRANZ SCHUBERT (1797-1828) Arr August Wilhelmj Ave Maria Inspired by a passage in Sir Walter Scotts The Lady of the Lake, Schuberts Ave Maria is one of the most wellloved among his 600 songs. In order to bring these songs to a wider public and take advantage of their evident beauties, many musicians over the years made instrumental arrangements, the most celebrated being Franz Liszt. This version of Ave Maria is the work of the German violin virtuoso August Wilhelmj (1845-1908). MANUEL DE FALLA (1876-1946) Arr Paul Kochansky Suite Populaire Espagole 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. El pao moruno Nana Cancin Polo Asturiana Jota

25 May

Terry Barfoot

CLAUDE DEBUSSY (1862-1918) Sonata for violin and piano 1. Allegro vivo 2. Intermde: Fantasque et lger 3. Trs anim 'It is the music of a Debussy I no longer know. It is terribly melancholy and I don't know whether one should laugh or cry - perhaps both?' These are the words of Debussy himself, and they speak of his Sonata for violin and piano, written during 1917 and his last completed work. During the war years Debussy embarked upon a series of six chamber compositions, which he described as the work of 'un musicien Franais'. By this he meant that the music was an act of homage to his predecessors and the traditions they created; these are his most classical compositions. His other description - 'an example of what may be produced by a sick man in time of war' - reveals his own state of mind, and becomes a poignant comment in the context of his living to complete only three of the projected series, the others being the Sonatas for flute, viola and harp, and for cello and piano. The Sonata for violin and piano has a committed emotional language, often guided by its animated combination of fantasy and elegance. Debussy spoke of 'the simple play of an idea turning upon itself, like a snake biting its own tail', and the craftsmanship is typically refined. GEORGE ENESCU (1881-1955) Aubade From the time he made a sensational recital debut at the age of just seven, Enesco was a major figure in the world of music, and he ranks as the most important Rumanian musician of the 20th century. He studied with Hellmesberger in Vienna, and then at the Paris Conservatoire, where his teachers included Faur and Massenet. As a student Enesco's precocity was such that in 1897 these famous musicians promoted a concert of his music. This Aubade the name signifies music for the morning was a product of this period, dating from 1898.

Having gained the highest recommendation from the Madrid Conservatory, Falla persuaded the leading composer of the older generation, Felipe Pedrell, to give him private tuition, and as a result he developed a deep interest in indigenous folk music. However, Fallas chosen method was to assimilate the folk influence within his own style, rather than to quote original tunes, saying, I think that in popular song the spirit is more important than the letter. The Suite Populaire Espagole is derived from the Seven Popular Spanish Songs, which Falla wrote shortly before the outbreak of war in 1914. The present arrangement is the work of the Polish violinist Paul Koncnsky (1887-1934). The approach is typical of Fallas attitude in these matters, with some numbers directly folk-like in character, others altogether more sophisticated. Falla was always one to follow his own muse. For example, El pao moruno (The Moorish Cloth) is little more than a transcription of the original song, whereas the Nana is an Andalusian lullaby, and in Asturiana the sophisticated accompaniment adds an extra dimension to the lamenting effect made by the popular tune. The Cancin and Polo are more assertive, both deriving from images of a lover's determination, while the Jota, one of the most celebrated of the Spanish dance-song forms, has strong contrasts between voice and accompaniment. The Young Artists Lunchtime Recital series is sponsored by The Headley Trust Additional support for this concert from the Romanian Cultural Institute

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Cantabile: The London Quartet


Corn Exchange Newbury Friday 25 May 7.30pm

Cantabile: The London Quartet On the Funny Side of the Street


Richard Bryan Steven Brooks Mark Fleming Michael Steffan counter-tenor tenor tenor baritone

Sponsored by Mr and Mrs David Male

Cantabile
Cantabile - known increasingly as The London Quartet have long been recognised to be one of Britains great vocal groups. They were founded in Cambridge as a purely a cappella student group, whose members sang in the University and Chapel Choirs. Despite such classical roots, one of the groups early performances was at Cambridges ADC Theatre in pantomime for the celebrated Footlights Comedy Club (contemporary alumni including Clive Anderson, Griff Rhys Jones and Rory McGrath) and the quartet has continued to combine vocal virtuosity with harmonious hilarity. Connections made at this early stage were to be renewed later on; reunited with Griff Rhys Jones they provided musical items for Alas Smith and Jones. Their original song Orpheus in the Underground, with words by John Hudson, was first performed in the Footlights Revue Tag (which also featured the current Artistic Director of the National Theatre, Sir Nicholas Hytner). In the nineties it reappeared in the movie Peters Friends, sung and danced to by Stephen Fry and Hugh Laurie (not forgetting Kenneth Branagh, Emma Thompson and Imelda Staunton). The soundtrack won a BAFTA.

The London Quartet have pursued a policy of constant and dynamic renewal, pushing back musical frontiers, exploring ever-new territories and attracting a substantial following right across the musical spectrum, both in Europe and further afield. They have appeared in a huge variety of venues, singing programmes encompassing early polyphony through to jazz and contemporary music. They have toured extensively - from the United States to South Africa to Southeast Asia and the Far East. They have sung in the most prestigious venues for the most prestigious clientle, including Buckingham Palace for Her Majesty the Queen. Their itinerary has taken them to such distant places as Fiji, New Zealand, Australia, Singapore, Malaysia, Hong Kong, Estonia, Russia, Barbados, Hawaii and Tahiti. They have presented their programme in a wide range of languages. The London Quartets schedule over recent years bears witness to the extraordinary variety of their activities. They have toured Canada repeatedly from Niagara Falls to Prince Rupert near Alaska; they gave a concert for five thousand people on the beach at the Torrent de Pareis in Majorca; at the other end of the scale they have been in demand at intimate exclusive private events, including two for top Formula 1 teams. They sang in the presence of the Queen of the Netherlands and appeared on a bill at an exclusive private event in England with the legendary Diana Ross. Following a run at Offenbachs theatre in Paris, the celebrated Bouffes Parisiens, their tour in France and Belgium of their all French-language show was sold out. They are the first Artists in Residence at the Bridewell Theatre in London, where they have presented several shows. Cantabile have had countless high spots, not least guesting on several radio programmes with Kenneth Williams, being accompanied at the piano by Donald Swann and singing along with Richard Stilgoe. They have performed regularly for Richards Orpheus Centre, dedicated to providing opportunities to young disabled people with a passion for the performing arts. Richard

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Cantabile came to wider prominence in Londons West End as the hilarious Monks narrating the story in Tim Rice and Stephen Olivers musical Blondel which reopened the Old Vic Theatre, and then ran for over a year at the Aldwych Theatre. During this time they met Ned Sherrin, leading to numerous appearances on his radio show Loose Ends, and in a variety of West End galas including his Young England at the Adelphi Theatre alongside Ronnie Barker, Millicent Martin and Simon Callow. They soon met up again with Simon Callow in the awardwinning Radio 4 series, The Wordsmiths at Gorsemere; he would later direct them at the Covent Garden Festival in a trilogy of works by Stephen Oliver, including Commuting, a wordless comedy romp in which they played no fewer than twelve characters.

Cantabile: The London Quartet


also makes a number of appearances on Cantabile's new CD, Songs of Cricket, including a rousing rendition of his timeless anthem to the underdog, Barmy Army. Rory Bremner adds some sidesplitting insights from famous commentators. In December, in aid of UNICEF, they joined the star-studded line-up for a gala performance at the Royal Albert Hall of Captain Beaky and His Band, sharing the stage with Sir Roger Moore, Vanessa Redgrave and Joanna Lumley. Highlights of 2012 this far include appearing as guests of the Brandenburg State Symphony Orchestra, touring Estonia for the first time and giving a special one-off concert in St. Petersburg.

Chris Hatt
Chris Hatt is a musical director and composer of long and distinguished pedigree. He is currently Musical Director of Billy Elliot - The Musical in the West End and has been involved in the productions in New York and Chicago. He is also Musical Supervisor, fixer and arranger for First Family Entertainment, a new pantomime company headed by the Ambassadors Theatre Group. His music has been heard on BBC Television, and his musical Destiny is regularly performed throughout the UK. Chris and The London Quartet first worked together in 2008 in the Tim Rice/ABBA musical Chess in Concert at the Royal Albert Hall (also released as a Warner Bros DVD) starring Josh Groban and Idina Menzel. They were delighted that since then he has been able to join them for all their major shows in London, as well as a number of special appearances overseas. Sponsored by Mr and Mrs David Male

25 May

Barry Cryer
Barry Cryer is a truly great comedy writer and performer who has contributed to our national well-being for over fifty years. With such a range of musical and comic styles from which to draw, Cantabile are delighted to have persuaded Britain's comedy Godfather to help prepare and stage tonight's programme, which brings together some of The London Quartets own comedy highlights in an evening celebrating eighty years of Great British Comedy Song.

Douai Abbey, Upper Woolhampton Saturday 30 June, 2012, 7.45pm

MONTEVERDI 1610 VESPERS

English Cornett and Sackbut Ensemble Monteverdi String Band Tenebrae Choros Conductor, Janet Linc

Tickets: 18, 14 concessions Box Office: www.cornexchangenew.com 01635 522733 www.choros.org

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The Tallis Scholars


Douai Abbey Upper Woolhampton Friday 25 May 7.45pm

The Tallis Scholars The Field of the Cloth of Gold


Peter Phillips Jean Mouton William Cornysh Mouton Mouton Browne Interval Mouton Mouton Cornysh Cornysh Cornysh Kyrie and Agnus dei from the Missa Dictes moy toutes vos penses Salva nos Ah Robin Woefully arrayed Magnificat conductor Nesciens mater Ave Maria Ave Maria Quaeramus cum pastoribus Salve regina

Sponsored by Horsey Lightly and the Friends of Newbury Spring Festival The Tallis Scholars The Tallis Scholars were founded in 1973 by their director, Peter Phillips. Through their recordings and concert performances they have established themselves as the leading exponents of Renaissance sacred music throughout the world. Peter Phillips has worked with the ensemble to create, through good tuning and blend, the purity and clarity of sound which he feels best serve the Renaissance repertoire, allowing every detail of the musical lines to be heard. It is the resulting beauty of sound for which the Tallis Scholars have become so widely renowned. The Tallis Scholars perform in both sacred and secular venues, giving around 70 concerts each year across the

The Tallis Scholars' career highlights have included a tour of China in 1999, including two concerts in Beijing; and the privilege of performing in the Sistine Chapel in April 1994 to mark the final stage of the complete restoration of the Michelangelo frescoes, broadcast simultaneously on Italian and Japanese television. The ensemble have commissioned many contemporary composers during their history: in 1998 they celebrated their 25th Anniversary with a special concert in London's National Gallery, premiering a Sir John Tavener work written for the group and narrated by Sting. A further performance was given with Sir Paul McCartney in New York in 2000. The Tallis Scholars are broadcast regularly on radio (including performances from the BBC Proms at the Royal Albert Hall in 2007, 2008 and 2011) and have also been featured on the acclaimed ITV programme The Southbank Show. Much of The Tallis Scholars reputation for their pioneering work has come from their association with Gimell Records, set up by Peter Phillips and Steve Smith in 1980 solely to record the group and recordings by the Tallis Scholars have attracted many awards throughout the world.

Eric Richmond

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globe. In 2011-2012 the group will visit the USA three times and appear at festivals and venues across the UK and Europe including in their own Choral Series at Cadogan Hall. In 2012 The Tallis Scholars team up with the National Centre for Early Music and the BBC for the bi-annual nationwide composition competition, designed to encourage young people to write for unaccompanied voices. The winning entries will be performed by The Tallis Scholars in a concert recorded and broadcast by BBC Radio 3. In 2013 the group celebrates their 40th anniversary with some exciting new projects, commissions from Gabriel Jackson and Eric Whitacre and extensive touring.

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The Tallis Scholars


Programme Notes
The Field of the Cloth of Gold is aptly expressed in Moutons treatment, its hard not to feel the text is secondary to the composers enjoyment in his own polyphonic invention. As with Moutons Nesciens Mater, the Marian imagery of the Ave Maria draws the smoothest of polyphony from the composer. Two simple motives (one rising, the other falling) form the melodic basis of this five-part work, giving it a characteristically organic sense of wholeness. Upper and lower voices suffice to create textural contrast within the imitative flow until the texts climax in a threefold address of the Virgin O Maria Dulcissima/O Maria Piissima/O Maria Sanctissima where sudden homophony interrupts the flow with an appeal to Mary, all the more touching for its sudden plainness. Although celebrated primarily as a composer of motets, some fifteen masses by Mouton also survive. The Missa dictes moy toutes voz pensees is based on a popular chanson by Loyset Compere, and Mouton subjects his source music to characteristically playful treatment. The original tenor line is retained most clearly, its opening melodic gambit functioning as the head motif for various sections of the mass, and its distinctive close (with a descending sequence) often emerging to signal the end of an episode. This tenor also appears complete and unaltered in the third (and final) section of the Agnus Dei an elegant structural climax to the work. The contrast between Moutons Marian antiphons and William Cornyshs (1465-1523) Ave Maria is striking. The career of Cornysh the Younger (there is still some confusion between works by this Cornysh, Master of the Children of the Chapel Royal, and those of an elder Corynsh, thought to be his father) spans a period of flux in English music. The florid counterpoint beloved of the composers of the Eton Choirbook is the preferred style for many of Cornyshs works, yet others seem to seek a contrasting, simpler solution to the English tradition of self-regarding virtuosity that was moving daily further from the spiritual texts it served. While Moutons motets draw the ear to the vertical, harmonic sonorities, Cornyshs Ave Maria is driven by horizontal melodic forces. Eschewing a cantus firmus or similar structural framework, Cornyshs parts weave freely and without imitation, propelled by complex rhythmic convulsions. Duets and trios punctuate the texture, with the full four voices reserved for moments of climax such as the intricate ornamental flourishes of the Amen. Yet this complexity is as nothing compared to the composers Magnificat. Of the many Magnificats found in the Eton Choirbook and manuscripts of the period, Cornyshs is among the most splendid. The scope of this five-part setting, with its athletic vocal lines, dense polyphony and rhythmic www.newburyspringfestival.org.uk 103

the Tower was set with compassed images of auncient Princes, as Hercules, Alexander and others richly limned with gold and Albyn colours.
The meeting between Francis I of France and Henry VIII of England in June 1520 may have yielded no lasting political outcome, but the encounter between these two greatest of Renaissance monarchs at the Field of The Cloth of Gold will remain forever gilded in historical memory. Fountains flowed with red wine, tents glittered with gold thread, and among the feasting, jousting and revelry, two political strategists sought to redraw the map of European alliances. Men of learning and culture as well as warfare, each delegation strove to outdo the other in no sphere more spectacularly than in their music. At the head of the French musicians was composer Jean Mouton; leading the English entertainments was courtier, dramatist and composer William Cornysh. Although he never became head of the chapelle royale, Jean Mouton (c1459-1522) served at the French court for most of his adult life, employed by three successive monarchs. Described by a contemporary as the most humble man that one could find, Moutons reputation has latterly been obscured by his pupil Adrian Willaert, who would go on to shape the Venetian style of the High Renaissance. Few works offer more substantial testimony to Moutons own compositional legacy however than his Nesciens mater. Blending supreme technical accomplishment with sensitivity to text, the motet is characterised by a calm that even Moutons contemporary musicians recognised as distinctive. The popular antiphon depicts the Virgin feeding her baby son with milk given by the angels. While the intimacy of this tender scene is captured in the gentle harmonic waves that pulse and shift through the work, animated by the most delicate of scalic embellishment, the stature of these divine figures is expressed in the works polyphony. The motets eight voices are divided in two, with four providing the strict canonic echo of their fellows. A tenor line based on a traditional paraphrase of the antiphons plainchant melody further complicates this masterful structural scaffolding, an edifice all the more impressive for being barely perceptible and certainly never intrusive to the ear. In similar fashion the measured intensity of Moutons Compline antiphon Salva nos, Domine conceals within its six-part texture a canon between alto and second tenor based on the original plainchant. This rigid structure provides the fixed point around which the other four parts embroider their counterpoint. While this prayer for peace www.thetallisscholars.co.uk

25 May

The Tallis Scholars


invention, represents a bold treatment of the traditional alternatim structure. Verses of plainchant alternate with the polyphony, cleaning the aural palate between each virtuosic onslaught. Listen particularly for the rhythmic contortions of the et divites section for male voices and melodic feats for the women at et in saeculorum. The consummate courtier, Cornysh also produced music for the secular life of the English monarch and his court. Found in Henry VIIIs own book, Ah Robin is a three-part canon, no less lovely for its simplicity. Cornysh treats his text seemingly a dialogue on romance between two friends in the manner of medieval carol, complete with repeating burden. Woefully Arrayed preserves a similar structure of verse and burden, but perhaps in echo of the texts painful contemplation of the crucified Christ (possibly written by Englands first poet laureate John Skelton) sustains a far starker harmonic landscape, shaped by the bleakness of the opening burden. In the French court Moutons music also displayed the influence of the popular carol form, and nowhere more attractively than his Christmas motet Quaeramus cum pastoribus. Later used as the basis for mass-settings by Morales and Willaert, the motet is far lighter in texture than the composers Marian works, favouring a more declamatory, almost rustic approach to word-setting. Dominating the texture is the exultant refrain Noe, noe a popular trope that pervaded even English works of the period. While much of the music performed at The Field of The Cloth of Gold may have been Cornyshs own, it is likely that other works from the Eton Choirbook also featured. John Browne, a contemporary of Cornyshs, is striking among these composers for the sheer diversity of his works. While Cornyshs technical facility turned outwards, to display and embellishment, Brownes is a more understated skill. His Salve Regina sustains its five voices in lively, non-imitative counterpoint, but is most striking for its harmony. While at its most comfortable Brownes harmonies sit far closer to conventional tridiac tonality than Cornysh, this only serves to make their modal swervings and chromatic departures all the more unnerving to a contemporary ear.
Alexandra Coghlan

William Cornysh (1465-1523) Ave Maria Ave Maria, mater Dei, regina, caeli domina, mundi imperatrix inferni. Miserere mei et totius populi Christiani; et ne permittas nos mortaliter peccare, sed tuam sanctissimam voluntatem adimplere. Amen.

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Hail Mary, mother of God, queen, lady of heaven and empress of the world below. Have mercy on me and on all Christian people; and let us not fall into mortal sin, but let us perfectly fulfil your most holy will. Amen.
Jean Mouton Ave Maria Ave Maria, gratia plena, Dominus tecum, virgo serena, Tu parvi et magni, leonis et agni, Salvatoris Christi, templum extitisti, sed virgo intacta. Tu floris et roris, panis et pastoris, virginum et regina, rosa sine spina, genitrix es facta. Tu civitas regis justitiae, Tu mater es misericordiae, de lacu faecis et miseriae, Theophilum reformans gratiae. Te collaudat caelestis curia, tu mater es regis et filia. O Maria dulcissima, per te reis donatur venia. O Maria piissima, per te reis donatur venia. O Maria mitissima, per te jusits confertur gratia. Pro nobis semper Christum exora. Amen.

Texts and Translations Jean Mouton (1459-1522) Nesciens Mater Nesciens mater virgo virum peperit sine dolore salvatorem saeculorum. Ipsum regem angelorum, Sola virgo lactabat ubere de caelo pleno.

A mother though she had no knowledge of man, gave birth without travail to the Saviour of the world. She alone suckled the very king of the angels with heavenly plenty.
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Hail Mary, full of grace, the Lord is with you, serene virgin. For lowly and great, lion and lamb, our saviour Christ: you have been his temple, while still a virgin. For the flower and rose, the bread and the shepherd: you queen of virgins, a rose without a thorn, you became their mother. You are the royal seat of justice, you are the mother of mercy, from out of the depths of dregs and misery

The Tallis Scholars


hast seen Theophilus to grace. The heavenly court praises you, you the kings mother and daughter; O sweetest Mary, through you the accused is forgiven. O most pious Mary, through you the accused is forgiven. O most gentle Mary, through you favor comes to the just. For us always entreat Christ. Amen
Jean Mouton Quaeramus cum pastoribus Prima pars Quaeramus cum past oribus Verbum incarnatum; cantemus cum hominibus regem saeculorum. Noe. Quod tu vides in stabulo? Jesum natum de Virgine. Quid audis in praesepio? Angelos cum carmine et pastores dicentes: Noe. Secunda pars Ubi pascas, ubi cubes? Dic, si ploras, aut si redes: Te rogamus, Rex Christe. Noe. Cibus et lac virgineum, lectus durum praesepium, carmina sunt lacrimae. Noe. Misericordes oculos ad nos converte Et Iesum benedictum fructum ventris tui Nobis post hoc exsilium ostende: Virgo mater ecclesiae, Aeterna porta gloriae, Esto nobis refugium Apud Patrem et Filium, O clemens! Virgo clemens, virgo pia, Virgo dulcis, O Maria, Exaudi preces omnium Ad te pie clamantium, O pia! Funde preces tuo nato, Crucifixo, vulnerato, Et pro nobis flagellato, Spinis puncto, felle potato. O dulcis Maria, salve.

First Part Let us seek with the shepherds the Word incarnate; let us sing with all mankind for the King of the ages. Noel. What do you see in the stable? Jesus, born of the Virgin. What do you hear in the manger? Angels with a song and shepherds saying: Noel. Second part Where do you eat, where do you lie? Say, whether you weep or laugh: we ask you, Christ the King. Noel. My food is milk of the Virgin, my bed a hard manger, my songs are tears. Noel.
John Browne (fl. ca. 1480-1505) Salve regina Salve regina, mater misericordiae: vita, dulcedo, et spes nostra, salve. Ad te clamamus, exsules filii Hevae, Ad te suspiramus, gementes et flentes In hac lacrimarum valle. Eia ergo, advocata nostra, illos tuos www.thetallisscholars.co.uk

Hail, queen of mercy, Our life, our sweetness and our hope, hail! To you we cry, exiled children of Eve, To you we sigh, groaning and weeping In this vale of tears. Therefore as our advocate Turn your merciful eyes towards us And after this exile show us Jesus, The blessed fruit of your womb. Virgin mother of the church, Eternal gate of glory, Be for us a refuge Before the Father and the son, O clement! Clement, holy virgin, Sweet virgin, O Mary, Hear the prayers of all Who piously cry to you, O holy! Pour out your prayers to your Son, Crucified, wounded, And scourged for us, By thorns pierced, with gall for drink. O sweet Mary, hail! Interval

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Jean Mouton Kyrie and Agnus Dei from Missa Dictes moy toutes vos penses Kyrie Kyrie, eleison. Christe, eleison. Kyrie, eleison. William Cornysh Woefully arrayed Woefully arrayed My blood, man for thee ran, it may not be nayed; My body, blo and wan; Woefully arrayed. Behold me, I pray thee with all thy whole reason and be not hard-hearted, and for this encheason, sith I for thy soul sake was slain in good season, Beguiled and betrayed by Judas false treason, unkindly entreated, with sharp cord sore freted, the Jews me threated, they mowed, they grinned, they scorned me, condemd to death as thou mayst see; Woefully arrayed. Thus naked am I nailed. O man, for thy sake; I love thee, then love me, why sleepst thou, awake, remember my tender heartroot for thee brake; with pains my veins constrained to crake; thus tugged to and fro, thus wrapped all in woe, whereas never man was so entreated, thus in most cruel wise was like a lamb offerd in sacrifice; Woefully arrayed. Of sharp thorn I have worn a crown on my head. So pained, so strained, so rueful, so red, thus bobbed, thus robbed, thus for thy love dead; unfeigned, not deigned, my blood for to shed, my feet and handes sore the sturdy nailes bore; what might I suffer more, than I have done, O man, for thee? Come when thou list, welcome to me! Woefully arrayed.

Lord, have mercy upon us. Christ, have mercy upon us. Lord, have mercy upon us.

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Agnus Dei Agnus Dei, qui tollis peccata mundi, miserere nobis. Agnus Dei, qui tollis peccata mundi, miserere nobis. Agnus Dei, qui tollis peccata mundi, dona nobis pacem.

Lamb of God, that takest away the sins of the world, have mercy upon us. Lamb of God, that takest away the sins of the world, have mercy upon us. Lamb of God, that takest away the sins of the world, grant us peace.
Jean Mouton Salva nos Salva nos domine vigilantes, custodi nos dormientes, ut vigilemus cum Christo, et requiescamus in pace.

Save us, O Lord, waking, and guard us sleeping, that we may watch with Christ, and rest in peace.
William Cornysh Ah Robyn Ah, Robin, gentle, Robin, tell me how thy leman doth and thou shalt know of mine. My lady is unkind I wis, alack why is she so? She lov'th another better than me, and yet she will say no. Ah, Robin, gentle, Robin, tell me how thy leman doth and thou shalt know of mine. I cannot think such doubleness for I find women true; in faith my lady lov'th me well; she will change for no new. Ah, Robin, gentle, Robin, tell me how thy leman doth and thou shalt know of mine.

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The Tallis Scholars


William Cornysh Magnificat Magnificat anima mea Dominum. Et exultavit spiritus meus in Deo salutari meo. Quia respexit humilitatem ancillae suae: Ecce enim ex hoc beatam me dicent omnes generationes. Quia fecit mihi magna qui potens est: et sanctum nomens eius. Et misericordia eius a progenie in progenies timentibus eum. Fecit potentiam in brachio suo: dispersit superbos mente cordis sui. Deposuit potentes de sede; et exaltavit humiles. Esurientes implevit bonis: et divites dimisit inanes. Suscepit Israel, puerum suum, recordatus misericordiae suae. Sicut locutus est ad patres nostros, Abraham et semini eius in saecula. Magnificat anima mea Dominum.

Sponsored by Horsey Lightly and the Friends of Newbury Spring Festival

My soul doth magnify the Lord and my spirit hath rejoiced in God my Saviour. For he hath regarded: the lowliness of his handmaiden. For behold, from henceforth: all generations shall call me blessed.

The Benedictine community of Douai Abbey is delighted to welcome the 2012 Newbury Spring Festival.
The Abbey is the home of a community of Benedictine monks who lead the Christian life in the monastic tradition and welcome others to share their life as guests. Concerts are held in the Abbey Church throughout the year. Advance Notice: Friday 14 December Gabrieli Consort
Details on our website: www.douaiabbey.org.uk
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For he that is mighty hath magnified me: and holy is his Name. And his mercy is on them that fear him: throughout all generations. He hath showed strength with his arm: he hath scattered the proud in the imagination of their hearts. He hath put down the mighty from their seat: and hath exalted the humble and meek. He hath filled the hungry with good things: and the rich he hath sent empty away. He remembering his mercy hath holpen his servant Israel: as he promised to our forefathers, Abraham and his seed, forever. My soul doth magnify the Lord

Swinging at The Cotton Club


Corn Exchange Newbury Saturday 26 May 7.30pm

Swinging at The Cotton Club The Jiving Lindy Hoppers & Harry Strutters Hot Rhythm Orchestra
Take a step back into 1920s New York and through the doors of Harlems hottest nightclub, The Cotton Club, with a programme of great jazz chosen from the following:Jubilee Stomp That Lindy Hop Ive got my fingers crossed It dont mean a thing if it aint got that swing Swannee Shuffle C Jam Blues Charleston Exactly like you Black Beauty Everybody loves my baby Eeney Meeney Miney Mo Wherever theres love Old Man River

Miss Jennys Ball I must have that man Jungle Jamboree Goody Goody Drum Crazy Am I blue? Just a mood I want a little gal Dinah I cant give you anything but love Sponsored by Maxx Design

Jiving Lindy Hoppers


The Jiving Lindy Hoppers are Europes first and finest authentic jazz dance company. Perhaps they are best known for their spectacular and breathtaking performances of the Lindy Hop - the original form of jive dancing that developed in Harlem in the late 1920s. However, their talent and versatility is also expressed in the range of dances they perform all influenced by the authentic jazz dance tradition. Hundreds of performances and workshops have followed since their first public performance at Londons 1984 Notting Hill Carnival. They have won numerous awards for both their education and performance work and regularly appear both here and abroad in venues ranging from community centres, jazz and arts festivals, corporate entertainment events and major concert halls and theatres, in addition to making numerous TV and film appearances. The energy, excitement and enthusiasm of this highly talented and professional company of young dancers continues to create a huge demand for performances and workshops throughout the world.

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Harry Strutters Hot Rhythm Orchestra


Harry Strutters Hot Rhythm Orchestra specialises in recreating the jazz and hot dance music of the 1920s and 1930s with characteristic drive and visual appeal. The Orchestra has toured extensively in Britain, Europe and Scandinavia, and claims the title of Europe's Hottest Jazz Orchestra. Using its own special arrangements of familiar as well as the less well hackneyed numbers from the repertoires of the famous English and American bands of the period, the Orchestra has extensive experience of a wide variety of venues and events, appearing at numerous festivals, concerts and in TV programmes across Europe. It is the collective capacity to communicate the exuberance of the music and humour of the Jazz Age that gives Harry Strutters Hot Rhythm Orchestra such unique strength.

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The Cotton Club
Although the entertainers and waiters were black, the clientele was white, with only a few black stars ever admitted. This was not an uncommon practice at the time, and though it is clearly racism by todays standards, it helped pave the way to integration. Temporarily at least, the Cotton Club provided a place for whites to experience black culture where black artists and entertainers were seen favourably - handsome, accomplished, talented, and elegant. Yet bigotry remained the norm of the day, and the Cotton Club closed its doors on February 16, 1936 after riots in Harlem in 1935. It was reopened in September 1936 at a new location and operated until June 1940. Today, the Cotton Club retains its aura of exotic mystique, and conjures up images of a great jazz age gone by. Sponsored by Maxx Design The Cotton Club was the most glamorous and glitzy of Harlems night clubs during the prohibition era of the 1920s and 1930s. Located upstairs on 142nd Street in Harlem, it opened in 1920 as the Club Deluxe by former heavyweight boxing champion Jack Johnson. It became the Cotton Club in 1923, when it was bought by mobster Owney Madden. The club was a magnificent ensemble of vast dance floor, stage, and opulent dcor. The entrance was in log cabin style, but the bandstand was done in a Southern plantation mansion motif. From the ceiling hung enormous chandeliers. The club seated some 500 people. It is little wonder the Cotton Club was dubbed the aristocrat of Harlem by a British visitor. The $5 entrance charge bought the most spectacular show in town. The main visual attraction at the club were the 30 to 50 chorus girls, advertised as the most beautiful Creoles. They had to be at least 5 11 tall and very good looking. The club opened at 10 p.m. with swinging dance music. Two shows followed at midnight and 2 a.m., and the club closed at 3 a.m. The house band when the venue first opened was Andy Preer's Cotton Club Syncopators; after Preer's death in 1927, Duke Ellington's orchestra was engaged and its residency became the most celebrated in the club's history, lasting until 1931. Cab Calloway and his Missourians, who had first appeared with great success in 1931, then took over, and Calloway's time as the Cotton Club's bandleader (which extended to 1934, when Jimmie Lunceford succeeded him) was to make his reputation. Most of the principal jazz musicians, singers, and dancers of the period appeared at the Cotton Club at some stage, including Louis Armstrong, Ethel Waters, Ivie Anderson, Bill Robinson, and the Nicholas Brothers. The heyday of the club's existence was re-created in Francis Ford Coppola's film The Cotton Club (1984).

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Berlin Symphony Orchestra


St Nicolas Church Newbury Saturday 26 May 7.30pm

Berlin Symphony Orchestra


Mario Venzago conductor Agata Szymczewska violin Weber Prokofiev Interval
Archive of the Ludwig van Beethoven Association

Overture to Der Freischtz Violin Concerto No 1

Beethoven

Symphony No 3 Eroica

the Finnish Radio, Tapiola Sinfonietta, Bergen Philharmonic Orchestra, Malm Symphony Orchestra and with his old orchestra, the Goteborg SO, where he returns regularly. Mr Venzago performs with many renowned artists of the worlds concert stage including Argerich, Bell, Freire, Josefowicz, Kremer, Lang Lang, Levin, Lupu, Maisky, Mutter, Nicolet, Ohlsson, Pletnev, Shaham, Steuerman, Tetzlaff, Vengerow, Zehetmair, K. Zimerman, F.P Zimmermann and many of the worlds finest singers. .

Agata Szymczewska
Winner of the 2006 Henryk Wieniawski International Violin Competition in Pozna, Agata Szymczewska was awarded the Prize of the Audience and special prizes, including major orchestra and recital engagements. She also received the London Music Masters Award given for the first time by a committee composed of members of the London Philharmonic Orchestra, Wigmore Hall and the Royal College of Music. In October 2009 Agata made her debut at Wigmore Hall, following which she received an invitation to play at the Royal Festival Hall with the London Philharmonic Orchestra conducted by Osmo Vanska in autumn 2010. She graduated from the Academy of Music in Pozna, and since 2004 has studied with Professor Krzysztof Wegrzyn at the Hochschule fr Musik und Theater in Hannover. Since October 2010 Agata has been a faculty member of the Music Academy in Pozna. She has performed in numerous European countries as well as in Israel, Russia, Canada, China, Korea and Japan, appearing with orchestras including Sinfonia Varsovia, Warsaw Philharmonic (the National Philharmonic Orchestra of Poland), National Polish Radio Symphony Orchestra, Lahti Symphony Orchestra, Vilnius State Symphony Orchestra, and Russian Philharmonic. She has collaborated with outstanding conductors including Krzysztof Penderecki, Andrey Boreyko, Moshe Atzmon, Dmitri Liss, Saulius Sondeckis, Antoni Wit, Maxim Vengerov and Jerzy Maksymiuk. Besides these, Agata is a very active chamber musician. Every year since 2005 she has taken part in the prestigious International Music Academy Switzerland founded by Maestro Seiji Ozawa. In 2005 she toured Japan and China with Maestro Seiji Ozawa as the youngest member and concertmaster of Ongaku-juku Orchestra. In 2010 she took part in the Kronberg Academys Chamber Music Connects the World

Sponsored by Weatherby Holdings, Thomas Eggar LLP , the Sheepdrove Trust and the Contributors Scheme

Mario Venzago
Swiss-born conductor Mario Venzago holds the position of Conductor Laureate of the Basel Symphony Orchestra and is Chief Conductor of the Bern Symphony Orchestra, Principal Conductor at the Northern Sinfonia and Principal Guest Conductor of the Staatsphilharmonie Rheinland Pfalz in Ludwigshafen. He is also Schumann Guest Conductor of the Dsseldorfer Symphoniker, was Principal Conductor of the Gothenburg Symphony Orchestra from 2004-2007 and until August 2009, was the Music Director of the Indianapolis Symphony Orchestra. Mario Venzago's distinguished conducting career has included engagements with the Berlin Philharmonic, Leipzig Gewandhaus Orchestra, Munich Philharmonic, London Philharmonic, BBC Symphony Orchestra, City of Birmingham Symphony Orchestra, Vienna Symphony, La Scala di Milano, Melbourne Symphony Orchestra and the NHK Symphony in Tokyo. In North America he has appeared with the Boston Symphony, Philadelphia Orchestra, Toronto Symphony, and the Baltimore Symphony. He has also conducted, among other prestigious festivals, at the Salzburg and Lucerne Festivals. Maestro Venzago has recorded widely and his varied discography has earned him several major awards, including the Diapason dOr, two Grand Prix du Disque, and the Edison Prize. With the Basel Symphony he has recorded the complete symphonic works of Schumann, Ravel and Nono, with the choir and orchestra of the MDR Leipzig the whole choral works by Othmar Schoeck, and with the Gothenburg Symphony Orchestra all orchestral works of Alban Berg. Mr. Venzago continues to maintain a high profile in Scandinavia and has established strong relationships with 110

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Festival, where she had the chance to play with Gidon Kremer, Yuri Bashmet and Franz Helmerson. Agatas recent and forthcoming concert highlights include appearances at the Thatre des Champs-lyses in Paris, Concertgebouw in Amsterdam, Konzerthaus Berlin, Victoria Hall in Geneva, the Bolshoi Theatre in Moscow, Schleswig-Holstein Music Festival in Germany and Beethoven Easter Festival in Warsaw. She plays an Antonio Stradivarius violin (Cremona, ca. 1680) on loan from Deutsche Stiftung Musikleben.

Programme Notes
CARL MARIA VON WEBER (1786-1826) Der Freischtz: Overture The operas of Carl Maria von Weber are not greatly favoured in this day and age, and apart from Der Freischtz, undoubtedly the most popular, his typically romantic stage works are only very rarely to be seen, even in Germany. This is due to a large extent to the weaknesses of the various libretti, and these failings on the dramatic side have resulted in the neglect of a wealth of nobly expressive music. Nonetheless the overtures that Weber wrote for these works have retained their popularity. They carry all before them with their brilliant use of the instrumental forces and their gripping dramatic qualities. They serve more than one purpose: as absolute music they are noteworthy symphonic structures, and as stage music they lead directly to the psychological climaxes of the action, combining the principal musical themes into a self-contained tonal picture of the drama. Beethoven, in his third Leonora Overture was the first to present the content of the drama in purely orchestral form. Weber, too, preserved the essentials of sonata form in his overtures, drawing his themes from significant points in the unfolding of the operas plot. He, like Beethoven, was not content to string together a number of the operas most tuneful melodies to form a kind of musical potpourri, being far more deeply concerned with portraying the essential nature of the dramatic work for which the overture was to set the scene. The Overture to the opera Der Freischtz (meaning in English The Marksman with charmed bullets), which was first performed in 1821, begins with a short, evocative string introduction. Then the horns transport the listener to the enchanted depths of the German forests, with a highly expressive, atmospheric melody. The Allegro conjures up the sinister world of the fiendish huntsman, the villainous Samiel, with its disturbing knocking in the bass, string tremolandi, and deep clarinet passages. The second theme is the love song of the heroine Agathe for the operas hero, the marksman Max, and Webers brilliant treatment of it brings the overture to a close on a note of noble exultation.

Berlin Symphony Orchestra


The Konzerthausorchester Berlin has been delighting audiences for more than 50 years. Founded in 1952, the Berlin Symphony Orchestra (BSO) gained international recognition under Chief Conductor Kurt Sanderling (19601977). Numerous stars from the music world such as David Oistrach and Emil Gilels performed regularly with the orchestra. Sanderling also succeeded in building up a strong core of regulars for his subscription series even though the BSO moved between several different locations. In 1977, Gnter Herbig was appointed Chief Conductor, followed by Claus Peter Flor who took over in 1984. In the same year, Karl Friedrich Schinkel's famous Schauspielhaus was reopened as a concert hall. The BSO thus got its first permanent residency on the city's most beautiful square, the Gendarmenmarkt. Under the baton of Flor, the orchestra made numerous world tours. In 1988, they toured Great Britain, the U.S.A. and Japan for seven weeks. During Michael Schnwandt's term (1992 to 1998), the BSO officially merged with the Konzerthaus, becoming the house's own orchestra. From 2001, the year of the orchestra's 50th anniversary, Eliahu Inbal led the BSO into the next generation, engaging young musicians from around the world. In 2001 the BSO successfully toured Japan, playing 15 concerts in 13 cities. In 2004 Inbal and the orchestra made a two-week tour in Spain, and in 2005 the BSO were invited to perform in China, Japan and Korea. In 2006 the orchestra toured Spain and Germany. A new chapter began in August 2006 with Lothar Zagrosek as new Chief Conductor and a new name for the orchestra: the former Berliner Sinfonie-Orchester was renamed Konzerthausorchester Berlin. The name reflects the bond between orchestra and house, shaping the Konzerthaus programme with nearly 100 concerts per season.

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Berlin Symphony Orchestra


SERGEY PROKOFIEV (1891-1953) Violin Concerto No. 1 in D Op. 19 Andantino Scherzo Vivacissmo Moderato The beautiful opening theme of Prokofievs First Violin Concerto was written in 1915. Work on the opera The Gambler intervened, and to Prokofievs regret, prevented him from returning to this pensive initial melody and to continue composing the Concerto. The Revolution of 1917 had a direct effect upon everyone living in Russia, even though some artists sought to assert the independence of art in the face of it. While Prokofiev himself was immediately concerned about the fate of The Gambler, which was removed from the repertory of the Maryinsky Theatre in St. Petersburg by the provisional government, his feverish activity as a composer during the year of revolution suggests that he was not unaffected by it. Not only did he return to and complete the First Violin Concerto during 1917, he also composed his First Symphony, known as The Classical, the Visions Fugitives and Third and Fourth Sonatas for solo piano, and the powerful Chaldean Invocation: Seven, They Are Seven. The premire of the Violin Concerto was planned for November 1917, and in anticipation of this Prokofiev sought advice from the Polish violinist Paul Kochanski, who was then teaching at the St. Petersburg Conservatory, on a number of technical details. With the political situation worsening, the concert was cancelled, and the Concerto had to wait another five years before it was finally to receive its first performance. Prokofiev had offered it to several distinguished violinists, including Bronislav Hubermann, before eventually asking the leader of Serge Koussevitskys orchestra in Paris, Marcel Darrieux, to play it as part of the series of premires of music by Prokofiev which Koussevitsky presented in Paris during the 1923-1924 season. Prokofievs magical lyricism by then seemed oldfashioned and the Concerto came in for some criticism from the French modernists. Georges Auric dubbed it Mendelssohnian. The Concerto was redeemed by the Hungarian violinist Joseph Szigeti, who played it at a festival of new music in Prague in 1924 to great acclaim, and subsequently performed it with success throughout Europe. By the time of the following season, 1924-1925, it had already been taken up by a number of violinists in Soviet Russia. The music of 1917 represents a distinctive shift by Prokofiev away from the grotesqueries of some of his earlier works, such as the First and Second Piano Concertos. In place of musical extremes he now sought greater simplicity and clarity. Both the Classical 112 Symphony and the First Violin Concerto are straightforward and uncomplicated in structure, harmony and rhythm. In addition they have wit and transparency, and stand free of the literary, visual or ideological baggage that at times weighed down works of Prokofievs youth. The opening of the first movement, marked Andantino, is contemplative, with the lyrical theme first sketched in 1915. A bravura passage full of runs and trills acts as a bridge to the second theme. As the development progresses, the opening theme is increasingly modified, and at the climax of the development loses its original character as it is transferred to the orchestra, accompanied by plucked chords on the solo violin. This gives way in turn to a calm passage taken from material heard at the end of the earlier exposition, which is played by the orchestra dolce while the soloist plays con sordino in the violins highest register. The recapitulation is short, with both the second theme and usual concluding section omitted. The second movement by contrast is a sparkling and virtuoso Vivacissimo filled with scherzo-like moods and images. It is in the form of a five-part rondo. The first theme, based on an ascending chromatic figure with a pronounced and sharply accented rhythm, is filled with youthful zest. The joyful mood of the opening gives way in the two middle episodes to music of a more sinister character. In the first episode the violin playing becomes harsh with marked staccatos. In the second the mood becomes even darker. With the arrival of the coda the violin moves to its higher register, with a sequence of trills played pianissimo, followed by an unexpected fortissimo conclusion. Lyricism returns in the finale, marked Moderato, the main theme of which has a similar character to the introductory theme of the first movement. In the middle section the mechanical action of rapid runs looks back as well to the sardonic music of the second movement, but this is soon relegated to the background. After a statement of the opening theme, the climax of the movement, an extended coda, is reached. Here Prokofiev masterfully combines the two lyrical themes of the Concerto. The orchestra plays the theme of the finale, and the solo violin and a group from the first violins reiterate the first movements opening theme. To quote Nesteyev, Prokofievs biographer: The result is a wonderful tonal effect, evoking in the listeners imagination the picture of a joyous spring landscape bathed in sunshine.

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Berlin Symphony Orchestra


LUDWIG VAN BEETHOVEN (1770-1827) Symphony No. 3 in E flat major (Eroica) Op. 55 Allegro con brio Marcia funebre (Adagio assai) Scherzo (Allegro vivace) Finale (Allegro molto) Beethovens notebooks indicate that work on the Eroica Symphony commenced in 1803. It was completed in May of the following year, and first performed privately at the house of Prince Lobkowitz. The first public performance took place a year later, on 7th April 1805, at the Theater an der Wien, in one of Franz Clements concerts, with Beethoven himself conducting. It was for Clement that Beethoven was to compose the Violin Concerto Op. 61 in 1806. The orchestral parts only of the Symphony were published in Vienna in 1806, as was then the custom. The full score was eventually published by Simrock in 1820. Ries, Beethovens contemporary, suggested that the Symphony was inspired by Beethovens admiration of Napoleon Bonaparte as the First Consul of France, in whom he initially saw the champion of liberty, equal to the great consuls of Ancient Rome. However when Beethoven learned that Napoleon had proclaimed himself Emperor, he was enraged, declaring his hero to be no better than other men. He destroyed the manuscripts title page, which according to Ries, simply bore the inscription Buonaparte Luigi van Beethoven. The printed inscription on the 1820 published score was to read Sinfonia Eroica, composed to celebrate the memory of a great man. This account of Ries of the genesis of the purpose and dedication of the Symphony has encouraged the idea prevalent during the nineteenth century that the Symphony had a programme, closely following the various episodes of the Napoleonic drama. Berlioz certainly maintained this view. More sustainable is Wagners interpretation of the Symphony. He saw in Beethovens hero an archetype of man, capable of experiencing all the human emotions of love, sorrow and strength. Certainly with the Eroica Beethoven introduced into the form of the symphony a range and intensity of emotion not previously experienced. The first movement, marked Allegro con brio, starts after two brisk staccato chords with a simple theme directly quoted from the Overture to Mozarts youthful opera Bastien and Bastienne. The enunciation of this theme is followed by a bridge passage characterised by the contrasting orchestral timbres of oboe, clarinet, flute and strings. The second subject is essentially melodic and features a similar sequence to the bridge passage played by clarinet, oboe and flute. After the traditional repeat of the exposition, a highly dramatic development section commences, during the course of which a third theme appears which, with its fluid orchestration, provides an element of contrast to what has gone before. The recapitulation opens with a passage in which the second horn, anticipating the return to the home key, plays the common chord of E flat under the harmony of the dominant seventh. At the time of the Symphonys first performance this passage was seen as highly unorthodox and aroused much comment. An extensive coda of 120 bars, in scale matching the development section, brings the movement to an end. The second movement, the famous Funeral March, has been the subject of several interpretations. According to Schindler, Beethoven, on hearing of Napoleons death, commented that he had composed his funeral march seventeen years earlier. Marked Adagio, the movement is in the form of a long song, the main theme of which is divided in to three parts, A-B-A, with the third section repeating and developing the first. A second theme in the major key, which has been variously interpreted as representing serenity and an after-life, and played by the oboe, alternates with the first theme. The last appearance of the principal theme is veiled and disrupted by syncopations in a way that recalls the ending of the Overture to Coriolan, but in an even more sombre mood. The third movement, the Symphonys scherzo, is marked Allegro vivace, and is an enlarged replica of the old Minuet form, with a trio and repeats. The main theme is given out by the oboe over a muttered and staccato string accompaniment, played pianissimo. The trio is entrusted to the horns, whose theme has a pronounced open-air character. The finale, Allegro molto, consisted of free variations on a theme previously employed by Beethoven in the incidental music to The Creatures of Prometheus, Op. 43, and prior to that in the Fifteen Variations in E flat, Op. 35 for solo piano. This initial theme is enriched by a melody superimposed upon it from the third variation, and played by the oboe. This secondary theme gives rise to a series of twelve variations. The climax is the penultimate andante variation, richly harmonised and of great power. The final variation, marked Presto, provides a peroration to the work of brilliance entirely in keeping with the Symphonys title Heroic.
David Patmore

Sponsored by Weatherby Holdings, Thomas Eggar LLP , the Sheepdrove Trust and the Contributors Scheme

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