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MSc Human Rights Handbook 2011-12

Significant Dates Introduction Human Rights at LSE Sociology at LSE Academic Advisers Requesting written references Facilities at the London School of Economics The LSE Library The Shaw Library Student Services Centre Financial Support Regulations IT Support International Student Immigration Service (ISIS) Fees Certificate of Registration Course Registration English Language Support Public Events The Students Union Welfare Services Deans Services for Disabled Students and Students with Dyslexia The Chaplaincy Careers Service Volunteering Student Study Support LSE Student Counselling Service Alumni Association Administrative Information Contact Information Email and Moodle LSEforYou Change of address Sociology Departmental Meetings Teaching and Learning Committee (TLC) MSc Human Rights Student Committee Sociology Department Staff/Student Committee

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The Centre for the Study of Human Rights Introduction Meeting and study room Human rights library Small grants for research costs Public events Internships Students published human rights work Organising photocopying pools Teaching Timetables Teaching Methods Feedback MSc Human Rights Degree Structure Part-time students A. SO424: Approaches to Human Rights B. SO499: Dissertation C. Optional courses Auditing courses Assessment Guidelines Word counts Plagiarism Presentation and submission Late submission Format and style of assessed work Results and Assessment Criteria Formative assessment Sociology Policy on Feedback Results and Transcripts of results Assessment criteria Sociology Postgraduate Mark Frame Scheme for the Award of a Taught Masters Degree Quality Assurance Student Teaching Surveys Department Prizes Regulations on Assessment Offences: Plagiarism Human Rights Staff Appendix A: Optional Courses Appendix B: Word processing notes for students Appendix C: Human Rights staff directory

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MSc Human Rights Significant Dates for 2011/2012


Start of Michaelmas Term Start of teaching Deadline for module options to be chosen Candidate examination numbers allocated End of Michaelmas Term Thursday 29 September 2011 Monday 3 October 2011 Monday 17 October 2011* early December 2011 Friday 9 December 2011

Start of Lent Term Submission date for practice essay # 1 Submission date for practice essay # 2 Introduction to Dissertation Session Submission date for dissertation bibliography and provisional topic Deadline for application for a Small Research Grant Submission date for dissertation title and abstract Announcement of examination timetable End of Lent Term

Monday 9 January 2012 4pm, Tuesday 8 November 2011 4pm, Tuesday 14 February 2012 Start of LT date to be confirmed 12noon, Tuesday 17 January 2012

4pm, Friday 9 March 2012 4pm, Friday 9 March 2012 By Friday 16 March 2012 Friday 16 March 2012

Start of Summer Term Submission date for assessed essay Examination period End of Summer Term

Monday 23 April 2012 4pm, Tuesday 24 April 2012 Late May-June 2012 Friday 29 June 2012

Submission date for dissertation MSc Human Rights Examination Board Graduation ceremony

4pm, Thursday 23 August 2012 Late October 2012 December 2012

* Different deadlines for courses with restricted access (see page 36)

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INTRODUCTION Welcome to the MSc in Human Rights. Congratulations on your success in gaining the opportunity to study at the most exciting specialist University institution for the social sciences in the world. We are delighted that you are joining us this year and hope that you will enjoy your course. This handbook is intended to help you both to settle into the LSE environment and also to understand the requirements of this programme. It provides key information about the course, your option choices, important dates and staff contact details. If you have any queries about the MSc Human Rights programme, that you cannot resolve by reading the information contained in this handbook, on Moodle (explained later), on the LSE website, or the Graduate Handbook, then you should, as a first point of call, contact the MSc Human Rights Administrator. All contact details are included at the end of this handbook. Human Rights at LSE The MSc in Human Rights is a programme of the Department of Sociology and based at, coordinated and administered by the Centre for the Study of Human Rights. A genuinely multidisciplinary programme, it provides a unique opportunity to study a range of perspectives and aspects of human rights by drawing on courses from around the School. The core course, Approaches to Human Rights (SO424), is a multidisciplinary course that provides students with a rigorous and focused engagement with three central disciplinary perspectives on the subject of human rights: philosophy, sociology and law (international and domestic). The convener of the MSc Human Rights programme is the Director of the Centre for the Study of Human Rights, Professor Chetan Bhatt. The Conveners of the core course, Approaches to Human Rights (SO424), are Dr Claire Moon and Dr Margot Salomon. Information about members of the Centres teaching team is available on pages 48-50. Sociology at LSE The MSc Human Rights is a multidisciplinary programme based in the LSE Sociology department. LSE Sociology is strongly committed to rigorous intellectual and empirical work, building upon the traditions of the discipline and developing research that is responsive to both local and global challenges. LSE Sociology embraces a theoretically and methodologically diverse range of approaches, focussing upon the following key areas: Human Rights, Citizenship and Social Justice: Dimensions of inequality and injustice, nationally and internationally, gender and sexual divisions, the political implications of emerging "human rights regimes", issues of human rights in a global context, human rights in transitional justice and post-conflict reconciliation, human rights in the context of biotechnology and bio-ethics, in new forms of legal regulation, and

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associated with security, war and terror. Cities and Urbanism: Cities and society in a rapidly urbanising world, with a focus on how the design of cities is shaped by and impacts on society, culture and the environment. Economy and Society: Members of this cluster firstly share a concern with the nature of contemporary economic knowledges, including a critical engagement with both economics and economic sociology, the role of economic knowledges in economic life, and the reconstruction of economic categories from within social research. Secondly, there is a strong concern with transnationalism, development and globalization, engaged through clear empirical focuses (for example, development discourses and practices, creative industries policy, corporations and regulatory bodies). Finally, the cluster has a strong track record in several substantive areas that group members in diverse ways, above all: work and employment, risk and regulation, money and value, consumption and market society, technology and economy. Politics and Society: The social, economic, institutional and ideological bases of politics, and the interaction of states and societies. Social and political movements, especially the comparative, historical and contemporary study of labour movements and the left. Political power and ideas. Political and economic democracy. International regulation and risk. Fundamental social and political change. Race, Racism and Ethnicity: The social, cultural and governmental aspects of colonial and postcolonial societies. Nationalism, challenges and transformations in geo-politics, governance and citizenship in an era characterized by migration, flight, asylum, multiculture, cultural hybridity, cosmopolitanism and supposed 'civilisational' conflict. Gender: Work in this cluster involves not only colleagues in the Gender Institute, but also those within core Sociology. The research is informed by the belief that all social processes are gendered, and that understanding gender relations is a crucial component in any social science research. Research on gender is varied in form and content with an emphasis on inter-disciplinary: the RAE Womens Studies sub-panel has been set up specifically to acknowledge this aspect of work on gender. Thus the work on gender in the Department is not necessarily only the sociology of gender, feminist or reliant only upon feminist theory but provides a diverse range of perspectives for thinking about contemporary gender issues. Biomedicine, Bioscience, Biotechnology: The new social, political, legal and ethical challenges facing individuals and society in the era of biotechnology, biomedicine and genomics. The cluster is linked with the associated BIOS Centre for the Study of Biomedicine, Biotechnology, Bioscience and Society, and its programmes of publication, research, outreach and consultancy. BIOS also has links with cognate research centres across UK, Europe and North America. Researchers work closely with regulators and policy makers in the UK, across Europe and in the United States and Canada. Key research themes: social, political, ethical and legal aspects of neuroscience, psychiatry and mental health, social aspects of genomic medicine and pharmaco-genomics; social, legal and ethical issues in synthetics biology and bioengineering; stem cells, regenerative medicine and embryo research; bioeconomics and biocapital; global biopolitics, regulation and governance of science and
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technological innovation; transformations of identity in relation to biomedicine and biotechnology; emergence of novel forms of life; intellectual property, benefit sharing, biopiracy. The cluster also researches bioweapons and biosecurity: agricultural biotech (GM) and Public perceptions of risk. It has particular interest in comparative research, especially on China and SE Asia. Our teaching is informed by these commitments and by our active research in these areas. LSE Sociology aims to provide a learning environment in which students are encouraged to think critically and independently. Many of the key issues in the discipline worldwide are the subject of contestation, and our teaching aims to equip students to understand and evaluate these disputes and adopt a position in relation to them. Rigorous, critical, independent thought is the most transferable skill of all, and the overarching objective of what we seek to provide to our students. Equality and Diversity at LSE The School is committed to ensuring equal access, treatment and opportunity for all students irrespective of their age, gender, disability, race, nationality, ethnic or national origin, religion, sexual orientation or personal circumstances. The Equality Act 2010 which came into force in October 2010, imposes duty on all public bodies, including Higher Education Institutions (HEIs), in respect of the need to: eliminate discrimination, harassment and victimisation, advance equality of opportunity and foster good relations between diverse groups

In response to the duty, the School has developed an overarching Single Equality Scheme as the main School strategy on Equality and Diversity. The scheme sets out a commitment over the next three years to ensure policies and procedures comply with the law, and that services reflect the diverse needs of staff, students and visitors. In practice, this means we will expect students and staff to: Actively oppose all forms of discrimination and harassment; Reflect on prejudices, including examining the use of inappropriate language and behaviour; Strive to create an environment in which student goals may be pursued without fear or intimidation; Not victimise any student who has complained, or who has given information in connection with such a complaint; Challenge and/or report unacceptable behaviour which is contrary to equality legislation and principles; Treat all peers fairly and with respect; Foster an inclusive environment for all students to access opportunities, and participate fully in the learning process;

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Equip students with the skills, concepts and values which enable them to challenge inequality and injustice in their future work; Ensure that learning or any other materials do not discriminate against any individuals or groups; Ensure that learning resources are equally accessible by all students.

For further advice or information on Equality and Diversity, please visit the Schools Equality and Diversity website where we have detailed information on school policies, resources and news related to equality and diversity. You can also contact The Schools Diversity Adviser, Carolyn Solomon-Pryce on Ext 6171/email c.solomon-pryce@lse.ac.uk A year is a short time A one-year Master's programme can be quite intense, and it is recommended that you begin serious study at the outset of the programme. Previous students have gained the most from the Masters programme by starting their reading and writing as soon as courses begin. The LSE environment The School is located in a complex of buildings situated in the centre of London (off the Aldwych). It is close to the Royal Courts of Justice, the BBC World Service and the City of London. West End theatres are all close by, along with the shops and markets of Covent Garden. The National Gallery is a short walk down the Strand, while the South Bank Arts complex (containing the Royal Festival Hall, the Hayward Gallery, the National Theatre and the National Film Theatre) and Tate Modern are located on the opposite bank of the river. Within the School there is a mix of students from all over the world and this generates a great deal of intellectual energy and excitement. The geography of the School can seem complicated at first, but you will find direction signs spread around the buildings, and maps and diagrams in various School publications. Academic Advisers Academic Advisers will be allocated by Tuesday 4 October, at which time a list of tutors and tutees will be posted on Moodle (see page 21). As soon as you know the name of your Academic Adviser, please go and see him or her during their office hours. It is important to meet with them early in the term, particularly if you are uncertain about the optional courses that you wish to take (see page 36). All staff have allocated weekly advice and feedback sessions (also called office hours during term time which are posted on Moodle (some may require you to sign up for a time slot on LSEforYou, and some on a sheet on their door). If these times clash with your timetabled commitments, please contact your Academic Adviser to arrange another, mutually convenient, time. You can contact staff via email, telephone or for Centre-based staff by leaving a note in their post tray outside TW2.V510. You should feel that you can discuss anything, in confidence, with your Academic Adviser that affects your ability to benefit academically from your year at LSE. It is important to keep him or her informed of any medical difficulties or illness that may prevent you from studying or

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may affect your academic performance. If you have difficulties of a personal nature that you do not wish to discuss with your Academic Adviser, you may wish to make use of the School Medical Centre's counselling services (see page 15). You are strongly encouraged to come and see the MSc Human Rights Administrator, Sara Ulfsparre, if you are experiencing any personal difficulties or have concerns relating to your studies. Her contact details are on page 94. You will be allocated a Dissertation Supervisor (from the core Centre teaching team) at the beginning of the Lent term. For more information about the Dissertation Supervisor, see page 33. Your Academic Adviser is not necessarily your Dissertation Supervisor. Requesting written references Requests for written references must be made to your Dissertation Supervisor. You should be aware of the following guidelines while making these requests: Please give your supervisor at least three weeks notice before the reference is due. Your Dissertation Supervisor may well be asked to write scores of references every term. Often each reference requires updating or adaptation to a specific job or scholarship. It is in your own interest to give your supervisor enough time to do it justice. You should not normally name your Dissertation Supervisor as a referee for a job unless you have first discussed the matter with him or her, although a general discussion may result in a blanket permission to use his or her name as a referee if you are applying for a number of jobs. Provide all the information needed to write the reference. Make sure that you have filled out your part of any form you submit. It is helpful if you include all the information your Dissertation Supervisor will need in a single email, with a clear subject line. You might, for example, wish to remind your Dissertation Supervisor of scholarships awarded or internships undertaken. Sometimes an application requires a reference from the programme convener. If so, the usual practice is for your Dissertation Supervisor to produce a draft which the Centre Director will then sign. Once your supervisor agrees to be a referee, he or she has the obligation to do the job on time. Inevitably, busy people writing scores of references sometimes forget so gentle reminders are worthwhile. By putting your CV on the CV builder on LSEforYou, your Dissertation Supervisor will be able to see your work experience and extra curricular activities, so enabling them to write a fuller reference for you.

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FACILITIES AT THE LONDON SCHOOL OF ECONOMICS The Library http://www.lse.ac.uk/library Your LSE student card is also your Library card. No additional registration with the Library is required. Were here to help you make the most of the Library: Visit the Library Welcome Point at the beginning of term for general information, your student guide, and other freebies. Staff are available to answer your questions. You can download a podcast and get started with all the information you need on the Library website at: http://www.lse.ac.uk/library/orientation/ Use our Library Catalogue to locate books and journals. Locations are illustrated on an electronic map: http://catalogue.lse.ac.uk Sign up to a course about how to find items from your reading list, and other training events from across the School, at http://training.lse.ac.uk/. Staff at the Help Desk on the first floor are available for any enquiries about using our collections and electronic resources. When inside the Library building, please remember: Respect the zone you are in and keep noise to a minimum in Quiet and Silent zones. You can eat in the Escape area (before the turnstiles) but drinks can be brought into the Library Fully vacate your study place for others when taking a break. Do not leave your bags unattended. Follow us at www.twitter.com\LSELibrary www.facebook.com\LSELibrary You can also contact the Library with the online enquiry form: http://www2.lse.ac.uk/library/enquiriesandfeedback/email.aspx The Shaw Library This is a small lending collection of general literature, daily newspapers and magazines, and a substantial collection of recorded music. It is housed in the Founders Room on the sixth floor of the Old Building, serving as a quiet room where lunchtime concerts are held on Thursdays in the Michaelmas and Lent terms. Student Services Centre - http://www.lse.ac.uk/SSC The Student Services Centre provides advice and information on the following services Admissions (drop-in service) Certificates of Registration Course choice and class changes

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Examinations and results Fees process fee payments and distribute cheques (drop-in service) Financial Support Advice on scholarships, awards, prizes, emergency funding and studentships Information for new arrivals Programme Registration Presentation of Awards Ceremonies Transcripts and Degree certificates Visa and immigration advice

The SSC provides a counter service for students at the following times: 10am5pm every weekday during term time (except 10am-4pm on Wednesday) 10am-4pm every weekday during vacation.

You can also contact us by telephone. Details of who to contact and more information on advice can be found on our website: www.lse.ac.uk/ssc Financial Support The Financial Support Office is responsible for the administration and awarding of scholarships, bursaries, studentships and School prizes. It is located within LSE's Student Services Centre with a daily drop in session during term time between 1pm and 2pm (Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays during vacations). No appointment is necessary. Student Support Fund For students who register with sufficient funding but who subsequently experience unforeseen financial difficulties. In all cases applicants need to provide supporting documentation. PhD students who are in the final stages of completing their thesis are also eligible to apply. Access to Learning Fund To assist Home UK students with their living costs. Funds are limited and priority is given to undergraduates, students with children, disabled students, and final year students. Short Term Loan facility For students experiencing acute cash flow difficulties whilst awaiting a guaranteed source of funds (e.g. a loan or salary payment). Students may borrow up to 500, repayable within 4 weeks. Short Term Loans normally take between 24 and 48 hours to process. Postgraduate Travel Fund For postgraduate research students attending a conference at which they have been invited to give a paper. Full details and application forms are available from www.lse.ac.uk/financialSupport.

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Interruption / Deferral / Withdrawal If you experience any difficulties during your time at LSE then you should make sure that you keep in regular contact with your Academic Adviser. He/she will be able to help signpost you to appropriate services within the School so that you receive the necessary support to hopefully enable you to continue studying successfully. However, should this not be the case, you may wish to consider the following options: Interruption: with approval from your department you can interrupt your programme by taking an authorised break in your studies, normally from the end of one term and for one calendar year. Deferral: if you complete the teaching year but have difficulties during the examination period then in exceptional circumstances you can apply to defer an examination(s) to the following year. Withdrawal: withdrawing means that you are permanently leaving the programme. Before withdrawing you may want to consider interruption so that you have some time to consider your options. For more information, please see lse.ac.uk/registration General School and Programme Regulations The School has Regulations and Codes of Conduct covering many aspects of student life and it is a good idea to familiarise yourself with the policies which exist. Some of the regulations explain the organisation and conduct of your academic study and you are advised to refer to the General Academic Regulations and Programme Regulations. These include information about the structure of programmes, assessment, graduation and what to do if illness affects your studies. The following web link details the General Academic Regulations: http://www.lse.ac.uk/resources/calendar/academicRegulations/generalAcademicRegulation. htm The following web links detail the Schools Programme Regulations: Regulations for Taught Masters degrees (before 2009/10) for those who started their degree before 2009/10 and took time out: http://www.lse.ac.uk/resources/calendar/academicRegulations/regulationsForTaughtMa stersDegreesPre200910.htm Regulations for Taught Masters degrees (entering in or after 2009/10) for those who started their degree in 2009/10 after:

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http://www.lse.ac.uk/resources/calendar/academicRegulations/regulationsForTaughtMaster sDegrees.htm Regulations on assessment offences: other than plagiarism: http://www.lse.ac.uk/resources/calendar/academicRegulations/RegulationsOnAssessme ntOffencesOtherThanPlagiarism.htm A-Z of regulatory documents: http://www.lse.ac.uk/resources/schoolRegulations/atoz.htm IT Support Student IT Help Desk first floor, Library Contact the IT Help Desk for support regarding School-owned hardware and software on the LSE network, network and email account issues, and general IT queries. VITA (Virtual IT Assistance) Double click on the Virtual IT Assistance icon on the desktop of a campus PC to get real-time assistance from an IT Help Desk Advisor during opening hours. Laptop Surgery S198, St Clements Building Visit the Laptop Surgery for free advice and hands on assistance with problems connecting to LSE resources from personally-owned laptops and mobile devices. IT Support for disabled students IT Services is committed to providing facilities and support for disabled students, to ensure equality of access to services. Additional PCs and printing facilities for disabled students are provided in the public computer areas in the Library. Other facilities are available in three dedicated PC rooms in the Library (R25, 26) and St Clements Building (STC.S073). We also provide one-to-one support for disabled students who wish to become familiar with adaptive technologies and software. For further contact details and further information about our support services visit: lse.ac.uk/itservices International Student Immigration Service (ISIS) http://www2.lse.ac.uk/intranet/students/ISIS/Home.aspx We provide detailed advice on our website which is updated whenever the immigration rules change and you can also come to our drop-in service in the Student Services Centre reception. We run workshops to advise students applying to extend their stay in the UK and in complex cases we can also arrange an individual appointment for you. We can advise you on the following: Applying to extend your stay in the UK Applying to come to the UK to study from overseas
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Switching immigration categories Immigration implications if you need to interrupt your studies or retake your exams Correcting the end date of your visa if there has been a mistake What to do if your visa application is returned as invalid or is refused Registering with the police What to do if your passport is lost or stolen Travelling in and out of the UK

For more information including drop in times and dates of workshops go to: http://www2.lse.ac.uk/intranet/students/ISIS/Home.aspx Fees The School offers two options for payment of fees. They can either be paid in full in September/October or by Personal Payment Plan using http://www.lse.ac.uk/collections/financeDivision/forms/personalPaymentPlan.htm, or as one third at the start of each term. If you do not know the cost of your fees, please see the Table of Fees at http://www2.lse.ac.uk/intranet/students/moneyMatters/tableOfFees/2011-12.aspx How to pay your Fees You can pay by cheque either by posting your cheque to the Fees Office or by using the dropbox in the Student Service Centre. You can pay by credit/debit card either after you have registered by using the fees page on LSEforYou; or you can pay on-line using the following link http://reports.lse.ac.uk/internetbuilder/UIB.asp?goto=WEB_PAY_01 You can pay by Bank Transfer; the full details of our bank account are at http://www2.lse.ac.uk/intranet/LSEServices/financeDivision/feesAndStudentFinance/Paying %20fees/How_to_Pay.aspx Penalties for Late Payment There are penalties for late payment. These may include loss of library rights, de-registration, referral to Credit Control or fines. You will be warned by email if your payments are late and/or if sanctions are going to be imposed on you. At this time you are able to contact the Fees Office directly. Please visit the Fees Office website for more information at http://www.lse.ac.uk/collections/financeDivision/FeesandStudentFinance/FeesandStudentFi nance.htm Certificate of Registration A certificate of registration provides proof to organisations, such as the Home Office, council tax offices and banks, that you are registered as a current student at the School.

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It details your full name, date of birth, term time and permanent home addresses, student number, the title, subject, start and end dates of your programme, registration status and expected date of graduation. Once you are formally registered with the School you can print out your certificate instantly via LSEforYou (LFY) under the Certificate of Registration option. Should you experience difficulties using the LFY system, or require a certificate with additional information, please email registry@lse.ac.uk. Your certificate should then be available within three working days, although it may take up to five working days during busy periods. Additionally, should you require an LFY-produced certificate to be signed and stamped, staff at the Student Services Centre will be happy to do this for you. For more information please see lse.ac.uk/certificateofregistration Course Registration The deadline for course choices for postgraduate students is Monday 17 October 2011. Many courses will have restricted access or limited places and for these you will need to successfully apply to the teaching department for permission to take the course before it can be selected. If such an application is required it will be indicated on the LFY course choice system. All course choices are subject to the approval of your home department. If you wish to amend your course choice after the online system has been switched off, you will need to request this via a late course change form (available from the Student Services Centre). For more information please see lse.ac.uk/registration English Language Support and Foreign Language Courses - www.lse.ac.uk/languages If English is not your first language the Language Centre is on hand to give you advice and support throughout your time at LSE. The support is free and starts as soon as your main course starts. There are specific classes for academic units and information sessions are held during the first days of term to advise you on the most appropriate classes to take. Classes begin in week 2 of the Michaelmas Term. Please see www.lse.ac.uk/languages for information on the English for Academic Purposes (EAP) In-sessional Support Programme. The LSE Language Centre also offers an extra-curricular programme in a range of modern foreign languages which is open to all LSE members. To help you choose the most appropriate course there are a series of information sessions and individual appointments held during the first weeks of term. Courses start in week 5 of the Michaelmas Term and the cost of a standard course in 2010-11 is 215.00. Please see www.lse.ac.uk/languages for information on the Modern Foreign Language (MFL) Certificate Course Programme. Public events http://www.lse.ac.uk/events

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Throughout the year there are special events, open to everyone, usually held in the Old Theatre. Upcoming lectures are advertised on the large computer screens around the School and on the School homepage under Events. You can also keep up to date with the latest information through the LSE Events email information service which enables you to receive email notification of new events and public lectures at LSE when they are announced. LSE Students Union - http://www.lsesu.com/ The Students Union is led by students, for students and exists to make your time at the School the best it can be. It helps students out when they get into trouble, gets students together who have similar interests and supports students to change the world around them. Student activities the Union funds and supports over 200 societies, sports clubs, Media Group societies and Raising and Giving charitable fundraising Campaigns and democracy getting students together to take action on and influence the issues they care about within the School and wider society Welfare and student support the Student Support Unit of legally-trained advice workers offers free, confidential advice when things go wrong or you need help Commercial services the Union runs the Three Tuns Pub, the Underground Bar, two Shops and the LSE Gym which fund everything the Union is able to do

Executive Committee Team (2011-2012) Alex Peters-Day General Secretary Amena Amer Education Officer Lukas Slothuus Community & Welfare Officer Stanley Ellerby-English Activities & Development Officer Hannah Geis International Students Officer Lois Clifton Ethical & Environmental Officer Benedict Butterwoth LGBT Students Officer Sherelle Davids Anti Racism Officer Polly McKinlay Disabled Students Officer Lucy Mcfadzean Womens Officer Brendan Mycock Athletics Union President To be elected in Michaelmas Postgraduate Students Officer To be elected in Michaelmas Mature & Part-Time Students Officer su.info@lse.ac.uk www.lsesu.com Welfare Services (see also individual entries in this handbook) The Student Counselling Service offers you the opportunity to talk confidentially about any issues that are causing you concern. lse.ac.uk/counselling The Disability and Well-being Service can set up an Individual Student Support Arrangement for any students with a disability, including dyslexia. This support can cover issues such as

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travelling to LSE, getting around campus, course-work deadlines, class materials, and examination arrangements. lse.ac.uk/disability The Students' Union has an Advice and Support Centre which provides legal advice on housing, immigration, visa extensions, employment problems, welfare benefits, grants, fee status and disability rights. http://www.lsesu.com/support/ The Chaplaincy is available to all students of any faith, or none, to confidentially discuss anything and everything. http://www.lse.ac.uk/collections/chaplaincy/ Nightline is a free and confidential listening service run by students for students from 6pm to 8am. http://nightline.org.uk/ St Philips Medical Centre is an on campus NHS medical practice available to students living locally to the School. http://www.lse.ac.uk/collections/medicalCentre/Default.htm Deans of Undergraduate and Graduate Studies The Deans have a wide range of duties relating to both academic and pastoral aspects of student life. They are available to any student who wishes to discuss a personal or academic matter and they support students who experience difficulties during their studies. The Deans are responsible for student disciplinary matters and can also assist students who wish to change Academic Advisor or Supervisor. The Deans can see students by appointment or during their office hours, which are published outside of OLD 2.04 on the second floor of The Old Building. To arrange an appointment with either of the Deans contact: Debra Ogden, Executive Assistant to the Deans, Student Service Centre, 020 7955 6860,d.ogden@lse.ac.uk Services for Disabled Students and Students with Dyslexia Disability equality is the responsibility of the whole School. If you are disabled, dyslexic or have a long term medical condition you are entitled to services from the School to facilitate equal access and assist you with your studies. The Disability and Well-being Service (DWS), headed by Nicola Martin, co-ordinates specialist individual assistance, for example, advice from a mental health adviser or neurodiversity specialist. You may be entitled to an individual student support agreement (ISSA). This is formulated by the DWS in collaboration with the student and outlines relevant reasonable adjustments. Dissemination is controlled by the student. For further information please visit http://www.lse.ac.uk/collections/disabilityOffice/ or email disability-dyslexia@lse.ac.uk. The Chaplaincy http://www.lse.ac.uk/chaplaincy

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The LSE Chaplaincy is available to all students, of any faith or none. It serves two purposes. Firstly to provide pastoral support to anyone seeking non-judgemental conversation or advice. Secondly, to supports religious life and cohesion within the wider School community. It holds regular events and services for the whole school such as the Christmas Carol Service and the Holocaust Memorial Day Commemoration, as well as a weekly ecumenical communion service and Catholic Mass during term. The Chaplain also convenes the Interfaith Forum which exists to promote dialogue and good relations on campus. The Chaplaincy can put you in touch with any of the faith communities on campus. Careers Service http://www.lse.ac.uk/careers LSE Careers is a very active service offering a wide range of activities about campus, online and in the Careers Service on Floor 3, Tower 3. Find out what is happening right now at: www.lse.ac.uk/careers Our aim is to advise you through the career planning and recruitment process, helping you to research options, acquire new skills and promote yourself to employers in the best way. We do this through a programme of careers advice sessions, seminars, an extensive information website, fairs, forums, employer-led events and more. LSE is very fortunate in attracting the top recruiters in many sectors which enables us to run an LSE-exclusive vacancy board full of internships, voluntary, part time and graduate positions. LSE Careers also run a series of internships schemes. Internships can allow you to gain practical experience in your chosen sector, can help you develop a broad range of transferable skills and can act as the perfect platform to make key contacts for your future job search. We work closely with employers to secure internship opportunities in all sectors with a focus on business and management and with entrepreneurs. We also source a series of graduate internships to help you make the transition from study to employment. You can search for internship opportunities throughout the year on My Careers Service. If you are considering a career in parliament, public and social policy, media policy or corporate social responsibility, look out for the LSE Internship scheme, which offers internships for up to 15 hours per week for postgraduate students. Applications open in early October each year. See www.lse.ac.uk/studentinternships for the latest information. Booking for all events and appointments at LSE Careers and searching for jobs and opportunities is available in one place on the My Careers Service system via our website. To get started, take a look at www.lse.ac.uk/careers. Volunteering - www.lse.ac.uk/volunteerCentre

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The LSE Volunteer Centre is also based within the Careers Service and is here to support you in finding voluntary roles while studying. We advertise volunteering opportunities at different charities across London and internationally, with positions ranging from one-off opportunities to part time internships with charities. The annual Volunteering Fair takes place in the first week of Michaelmas term and is a great opportunity to meet with over twenty charities. Throughout the year, we run skills, training and information events and work with charity partners to support student-focused projects, such as the READ Campus books drive, FoodCycle and the Teach First Access Bus. Take a look at the Volunteer Centre website for practical information and advice about volunteering while at LSE and then search under volunteering to browse through the exciting range of positions available on My Careers Service: www.lse.ac.uk/volunteerCentre Volunteer with the Widening Participation Team lse.ac.uk/wideningparticipation WP aims to raise aspiration and attainment in young people from London state schools. We deliver a number of key projects that encourage young people from under-represented backgrounds to aim for a university education. We need enthusiastic LSE students to be inspiring role models and to contribute to the success of our programmes. We require help with three particular projects: Student Ambassadors, Student Tutoring and Student Mentoring. Mentoring and Tutoring require a weekly commitment; Student Ambassadors is flexible; you can volunteer when youre available. There are many benefits to working with young people and volunteering your time. These include getting involved and giving back to your local community, strengthening your C.V. and personal satisfaction. Come and find our stand at Freshers Fair, look out for posters around campus and attend one of our information presentations the week after Freshers. Visit our website lse.ac.uk/wideningparticipation or email widening.participation@lse.ac.uk LSE Pro Bono Department of Law in association with LSE volunteer centre http://www.lse.ac.uk/collections/law/students/probono/probono.htm The Department of Law and Volunteer Centre run a Pro Bono website, aimed at students interested in taking part in pro bono (free) activities during their studies. It explains who to contact if you would like to find out more information. It also outlines some of the pro bono activities that LSE students have been involved in and have set up themselves in previous years and provides information for non-Law LSE students who may be interested in getting involved, for example as a way of finding out more about a legal career. Paid employment during your studies Having to take paid employment during the academic year will not normally be accepted by examiners as a legitimate mitigating circumstance in the event of a performance at a lesser

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level than could otherwise have been expected. In the event that a student has no choice but to take some paid employment, under School regulations the total hours cannot exceed 15 per week. Student Study Support The LSE Teaching and Learning Centre offers study support, with specialist provision for undergraduate and taught Masters students. There is a series of lectures and workshops throughout the academic year covering essay writing, time management, preparing for exams, dealing with stress, etc: see lse.ac.uk/tlc/training. A limited number of one-to-one appointments can also be booked with a study adviser to discuss strategies for quantitative/qualitative subjects or with the Royal Literary Fund Fellow to improve writing style: email studentsupport@lse.ac.uk or call 020 7852 3627. You are encouraged to register on the Teaching and Learning Centre Moodle course Learning World from the beginning of the Michaelmas Term and to regularly check LSE Training (http://training.lse.ac.uk/) for full details of resources and courses to support your learning. LSE Student Counselling Service The LSE Student Counselling Service is part of the Teaching and Learning Centre and is located in our main office on the 5th floor of 20 Kingsway. This free and confidential service aims to enable you to cope with any personal or study difficulties that may be affecting you while at LSE. Throughout the academic year, there are also group sessions and workshops concerning issues such as exam anxiety and stress management. For full details, please see lse.ac.uk/counselling. All counselling sessions need to be booked in advance, but there is a limited number of daily drop in sessions available (please see the website). You can make appointments by email (student.counselling@lse.ac.uk), phone (020 7852 3627) or by coming in to the Teaching and Learning Centre Reception (Room KSW.G.507). Alumni Association - http://www2.lse.ac.uk/alumni/alumniHome.aspx LSEs Alumni Association is your lifelong network of over 100,000 alumni. You automatically become a member upon graduation. The network includes over 70 international and special interest groups as well as a diverse programme of events for all alumni to enjoy. Membership is free and by registering with the Houghton Street Online community, you will be able to stay connected with former classmates and the School after your graduation. You will receive a monthly e newsletter and the biennial alumni magazine, LSE Connect. LSE alumni also have access to: Alumni Professional Mentoring Network LSE Careers Service An email forwarding address to continue using an LSE email address

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The Librarys superb printed collections on a reference basis, and can borrow free of charge

For more information about the benefits and services available to alumni, please contact the Alumni Relations team on alumni@lse.ac.uk.

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ADMINISTRATIVE INFORMATION Contact information Address: Centre for the Study of Human Rights London School of Economics and Political Science Houghton Street London WC2A 2AE TW2.V510, Fifth Floor, Tower 2, Clements Inn. (Tower 2 is marked TW2 on campus maps) +44 (0)20 7955 6944 S.Ulfsparre@lse.ac.uk (Sara Ulfsparre) http://www.lse.ac.uk/humanrights +44 (0)20 7955 6934

Administrative office:

Tel No: Email: Website: Fax No:

Email The School will use your LSE email address to communicate with you so you should check it regularly. We recommend that you develop a filing system, frequently deleting and archiving mail to ensure you stay within your email storage limit. The email program, Microsoft Outlook is available on all student PCs on the LSE network. You can also access e-mail off-campus using webmail and remote desktop or, on the move using email clients for laptops and mobile phones. For instructions on how to do this visit lse.ac.uk/itservices/remote Moodle Moodle is LSE's Virtual Learning Environment (VLE). Moodle is a password protected web environment that may contain a range of teaching resources, activities, assignments, information and discussions relating to your course. The content of Moodle is the responsibility of your teacher and so it will vary from course to course. Not all teachers choose to use Moodle.

To get started with Moodle see http://moodle.lse.ac.uk/file.php/1/generic_flyer.pdf

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All students on the MSc Human Rights programme are required to register on the Moodle SO424 course at the earliest opportunity and SO499 when available, by visiting the Moodle site (accessible from the LSE homepage) All materials relating to the MSc programme and the core course, SO424 (Approaches to Human Rights), will be posted here, including full reading lists. The online course also offers a virtual discussion forum for MSc Human Rights students. As well as important course information, every week the MSc Human Rights Administrator will post details of events, job opportunities and internships that may be of interest to MSc Human Rights students. Moodle can be accessed from any computer connected to the Internet, on and off campus. You can access Moodle using your School user name and password from http://moodle.lse.ac.uk/. This page also has links to help and advice on using Moodle. You will also find links to Moodle from a number of web pages including the webpage for 'Staff & Students'. If you have any technical problems with Moodle you should contact the IT helpdesk. LSEforYou LSEforYou is a personalised web portal which gives you access to a range of services. For example, you can: view or change your personal details reset your Library and network passwords monitor and pay your tuition fees online check your exam results

You can also access online tutorials on how to navigate and personalise LSEforYou via its login page. Use your LSE network username and password to login. Access LSEforYou at lse.ac.uk/lseforyou Change of address If you change your term-time address, you must inform School by updating your record on LSEforYou. Your address is protected information and will not be disclosed to a third party without your permission unless it is for reasons of official School business. It is important that you keep us informed of your private address (and telephone number). Sociology Departmental meetings Broad decisions on academic issues, curriculum and teaching matters are made by the teaching staff in consultation with the students where appropriate. Most issues are raised and resolved within the Departmental Meetings, which take place once a Term. The first part of the meeting (on Wednesdays at 2.30 pm) is a closed meeting for academic staff.

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Those on the Postgraduate Students/Staff Liaison Committee may be invited to attend the open part of the meeting (usually from 3.30 pm onwards). Teaching and Learning Committee (TLC) The TLC is a committee designed to maintain and improve upon teaching, learning and assessment in the Department. It meets once a term and presents reports to the Departmental Meetings. Student representatives are invited to TLC meetings for consultation and participation under specific agenda items, as well as other members of academic staff. Students are advised to approach their student representative on the Graduate Students Staff Liaison Committee if they have queries or comments related to the Departments teaching and learning environment. The TLC welcomes constructive comments on all aspects of the Department's teaching, learning and assessment activities. The chair of the Departmental TLC will be advised during MT 2011. MSc Human Rights Student Committee Every year, usually during the first lecture of Approaches to Human Rights, a group of students will put themselves forward for election to the student committee. The size and function of the committee is determined by students on the MSc Human Rights programme, but the committee will normally have a single president who will provide one voice for the student body. One of the committees chief functions is social. The student committee traditionally organises various social events during the year. These functions help to bond the student body, and contribute to making the MSc year in London a memorable one. Details of any events organised should be provided to the MSc Human Rights Administrator in good time for posting on Moodle. The Committee may also organise photocopying pools (see page 26), and may take the lead on initiating study groups on specific areas of interest. Two of the members of the Student Committee should be nominated as the MSc student representatives. Those nominated will be responsible for representing the views of the MSc student body at the Sociology Department Staff/ Student Liaison committee meetings. Sociology Department Staff/Student Liaison Committee This committee is a forum to discuss matters of concern to MSc students in the Department. Staff membership of this committee comprises the Programme Conveners of each of the Departments MSc programmes. Student membership comprises up to two students from each MSc programme elected by their fellow students on the respective programme in order to attend meetings and put forward their views. Meetings of the committee are held once a term, and more frequently if necessary. All members, including staff, are asked to confirm their intention to attend a meeting to Tia Exelby after she has circulated (by email) details of its time and venue and a request for agenda items. Substantive agenda items should be accompanied by a written agenda paper to be circulated to all members of the committee at least five working days in advance of the time of the meeting.

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THE CENTRE FOR THE STUDY OF HUMAN RIGHTS Introduction The Centre for the Study of Human Rights provides a resource and a focus of activity for MSc Human Rights students. In addition to the MSc Human Rights, the Centre runs a lively and varied public events programme and, through its research programme, aims to link theory with practice and to facilitate concentrated inquiry into topical questions of human rights theory, policy and practice. Further information about our events, visiting fellows and other activities is available on the Centres website: http://www.lse.ac.uk/humanrights, where you can also sign up to receive email updates. Meetings/study room The Centre is home to a meeting and study room (TW2.V516), which MSc Human Rights students can use for small meetings and study groups. There is a sheet on the door where you can book the room. This room is also used for Centre staff meetings and on these occasions the room will be booked in advance. Priority of booking will be given to the Centre. Human Rights library The Centre has a useful and expanding library of human rights books, many of which feature on course reading lists. The Human Rights library is located in the study room, TW2.V516. A full list of the books in the library can be found on Moodle. Books and other materials such as NGO reports, government reports and related articles are available for short-term loan, by arrangement with the MSc Human Rights Administrator. Small Grants for Research costs The Centre for the Study of Human Rights has a total of 4,000 available to help support the dissertation research-related costs of MSc Human Rights students. Small grant applications should be sent by email to Sara Ulfsparre by Friday 9 March, 4pm. Late applications will not be considered. How to apply Applications must be no longer than two A4 pages, including: The provisional title of the dissertation; Details of the activity for which funding is sought and explanation of why this activity is essential to the investigation of the research question at the heart of the dissertation; A budget setting out the cost of the items for which the grant is sought. Students are welcome to discuss a draft application with their dissertation supervisor during a normal advice and feedback session (office hour) appointment.

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If your proposal includes some element of fieldwork you will be required to carry out a risk assessment and an evaluation of the ethical implications of your proposed research. See Research Ethics Guidelines and Risk Assessment in this handbook or on Moodle. What kind of application will succeed? The primary consideration is how essential the activity is to the investigation of the research problem. Simple applications such as those for attending a conference or travel costs to an NGO to consult staff, archives etc are acceptable. Applications for funding to support travel to a students home country are unlikely to be approved. Individual grants will not usually exceed 500. Reporting back After the work has been completed, recipients of research grants will be required to provide a short report (no more than one A4 page) detailing the research activity which has been the subject of the award. Public Events The Centres public events programme forms a key part of the Centres activities, providing a critical and scholarly forum for discussion and debate. Through a programme of public lectures, visiting speaker seminars and conferences, the Centre enables scholars, practitioners, journalists and policy makers from the public, private, commercial and nongovernmental sectors to examine critical issues in the field of human rights. Full details of the Centres public events programme are available on the Centres website. In addition, the Moodle online course will provide regular updates and reminders about student-specific events. Internships In the past, a large proportion of MSc Human Rights students have taken up internship positions during the academic year. Such internships range from short-term commitments on specific projects to longer-term regular work throughout the year. Such internships offer an excellent opportunity to gain practical human rights-related experience, and the range of NGOs in London means that there is a diverse and exciting range of opportunities. The Centre regularly receives details of internship vacancies, which are advertised to students on Moodle (see page 21). Students are encouraged to seek opportunities that suit their own skills, interests and study schedule. However, you should be careful not to work more than 15 hours per week during term time and if you are in the UK with a student visa you should ensure that you do not breach the conditions of your visa. See also the LSE Internships web pages at: http://www.lse.ac.uk/collections/LSEInternships/

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Students published human rights work The Centre for the Study of Human Rights is able to profile the published human rights work of MSc students on its website. All submissions will be considered by member(s) of the Centre's teaching team before being put online. Only those articles published within two years after joining the MSc Human Rights programme are to be eligible for consideration. If you'd like to see your work on the Centre's website please send the piece and details of its original publication to the MSc Human Rights Administrator. Work can be sent as either a link to another site, a word document of the original piece, or the final article in PDF. Organising photocopying pools Sometimes, if there are only one or two copies of a book in the Library and the whole class is expected to read a particular chapter, it can be helpful for students to organise themselves so that everyone can have access to the required reading. Classes in the past have used a number of methods successfully. One suggestion is that everyone contributes money to a 'class' photocopying card, with one person each week making enough copies for all the class to have one. Alternatively, the class can split into two or more 'teams' - the first person in Team A and the first in Team B each make two copies. They keep one copy for themselves and pass the second to the next person in their team, who makes one copy and passes the other on, and so on, cascading the copies down a list of students until everyone has a copy.

TEACHING Timetables - http://www2.lse.ac.uk/intranet/diaryAndEvents/timetables/Home.aspx The Timetables Offices is responsible for scheduling and allocating rooms to all of the Schools Undergraduate, Masters and Research taught courses. The timetable of all taught courses can be viewed on the Timetables web page. Graduate students use LSEforYou to select their courses and seminar groups. Personal Timetables can then be viewed in LSEforYou. Notification of changes to teaching arrangements is done via email. Teaching Methods Graduates are taught through lectures, seminars, and dissertation tutorials. The formal courses provide you with guidelines and an overview but you must take responsibility for your own learning. You are not expected to read everything on the reading lists but you will be expected to prepare for all lectures and seminars. In the case of the compulsory Approaches to Human Rights course (SO424) two seminar groups of approximately 35 students and lasting two hours accompany the lectures and provide the opportunity for in-depth discussion, questions, and case studies. During the seminars, you will be engaging in a variety of activities, including

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debates, small group work, student presentations, and other exercises that extend the theme of the lecture. Feedback Making feedback work for you: advice for students Feedback is fundamental to learning. It is best seen as a process of dialogue putting your ideas, arguments, evidence and sources forward and seeing how others then see them. Feedback through your course also helps you to understand what standard of work you need to achieve to progress and ultimately pass your programme of study. A key to your success is understanding the feedback you receive and putting it into practice in your work. How can feedback help you? It helps you improve the particular assignment you are working on. It gives you useful pointers for subsequent work. It helps you understand the criteria that will be used to assess you in essays and exams where the grade counts towards your degree result. It motivates you to reach your potential.

How is feedback provided? You will get feedback on all sorts of work course essays class presentations problem sets your contributions to class discussions your participation in Moodle discussion forums questions you raise in lectures or online group projects dissertation outlines mock exams and tests your work overall throughout the term Feedback comes in many different forms written comments on work youve handed in direct oral feedback from your class teacher or seminar leader group feedback from your lecturer informal feedback from discussion with fellow students and teachers online feedback Feedback during Advice and Feedback sessions (also called Office Hours) with your Academic Adviser and your Dissertation supervisor. Feedback should be a dialogue between student and teacher, not simply a grade.

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3 steps to making the most of feedback Get ready for feedback Find out what sort of feedback you will get on each of your courses and across your programme as a whole. Ask what the feedback opportunities are and read about them in your programme/departmental handbook. Find out who you can get feedback from, when and how: What time are staff office hours? Do you need to book in advance or turn up? Can you ask questions in lectures, after lectures, via email? Look at assessment criteria for your courses/programme and ask questions if the criteria are not clear to you. Agree with some fellow students on how you will make the most of each others experiences seeing other peoples work and reading the feedback they have had can often be really useful. Think about what you want feedback on and when (e.g. for your essay, on a class presentation, in your meeting with your academic adviser/supervisor) and then specifically ask for that feedback.

Understand feedback See feedback as dialogue dont just accept it. Arrange to meet with teachers to help understand any new ideas and suggestions given. Read the comments dont just focus on grade! Take up any offers to meet with teachers and come to them with questions. Go back to the assessment criteria do you understand them better now? Ask how feedback in this context relates to other forms of assessment e.g. is this the kind of work you would be expected to do in a formal examination?

Use feedback Try reworking the piece of work youve just had feedback on. Use the more general ideas youve been given to improve future work. See it as a way of improving your writing style, citation and referencing, or your use of English (for these more generic aspects of writing, you may want to consider accessing additional support services - see the back page of this leaflet for details). Use it as an opportunity for more dialogue and discussion with fellow students and teachers. Use it to help you refine your ideas/style/approach for examinations or formally assessed essays, projects and dissertations.

Turning feedback into improved performance As well as your fellow students, class teachers, seminar leaders, lecturers and academic advisers there are several other sources of support around the School, notably: LSE Teaching and Learning Centre
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A series of study skills events throughout the year, along with useful resources for study support. The Teaching and Learning Centres Learning World Moodle site provides further details, as well as links to other related training across LSE For more personalised support, a limited number of one-to-one tutorials with experienced study advisers, in both qualitative and quantitative subjects. One-to-one advice on written work with the Royal Literary Fund Fellow

For one-to-one sessions with a study adviser or the Royal Literary Fund Fellow, youll need to book in advance. Come to the Teaching and Learning Centre office (KSW G.507), email studentsupport@lse.ac.uk or call 020 7852 3627.

MSC HUMAN RIGHTS DEGREE STRUCTURE Students are required to take the course Approaches to Human Rights (SO424) and to submit a dissertation (SO499) of not more than 10,000 words on an approved human rights related subject of their choice. In addition, students have the freedom to select from a list of options to the value of two full units. Part-time students The MSc Human Rights is designed as a full-time one year course but the Centre admits a small number of part-time students each year. Part-time students must meet the same requirements, but have an extended period during which to complete their programme. It is the responsibility of part-time students to ensure that their other commitments allow them to attend their seminars, complete written assignments and attend examinations. Special arrangements cannot be made for them. That said, the Centre recognises that other commitments can make it difficult for such students to become fully integrated into the life of the Department. Students are encouraged to approach their Academic Adviser in the first instance if they have any difficulties. Part-time students will be examined in two papers at the end of the first year and in the remaining two at the end of their second year. The dissertation (which counts as one paper) is normally submitted at the end of the second year. Contents A. SO424: Approaches to Human Rights B. SO499: Dissertation C. Optional courses, to the value of two full units A. SO424: APPROACHES TO HUMAN RIGHTS

Conveners: Dr Claire Moon and Dr Margot Salomon This is a multidisciplinary course, which will provide students with deep insights into:

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three central disciplinary perspectives on the subject of human rights: philosophy, sociology and law (international and domestic); contending interpretations of human rights as idea and practice from the different standpoints that these disciplines present, including debates from within and between the disciplines; the particular knowledge claims, modes of reasoning, and where relevant institutions and procedures that the respective disciplines engage; a selection of key current issues and public debates in the area that explore the contributions and limits of each discipline.

All MSc Human Rights students have a guaranteed place on the course. Content The course is divided into five blocks of lectures. The first block covers the philosophy of human rights and incorporates discussions of political philosophy and rights discourse, foundations of rights, theories of rights, rights claimants and claims, and global justice and human rights. Philosophical perspectives are applied to specific issues which may include the right to life, animal rights, and humanitarian intervention. The second block looks at human rights from the perspective of international law and considers the tools of international law as applied to the protection of human rights, the post-1945 international human rights architecture, the content of various human rights and the scope of obligations; as well as current limits of international human rights law. Specific issues discussed may include socioeconomic rights, globalization and world poverty, and new human rights duty-bearers. The third block is delivered from the perspective of domestic law and includes discussion of the idea of rights in domestic legal discourses, legal reasoning in the European Court of Human Rights, legal reasoning in domestic rights' courts, and restricting rights. Issues discussed may include civil liberties, bills of rights and terrorism. The fourth block covers human rights from a sociological perspective and looks at the idea of rights in classical and contemporary sociological theory, human rights and human rights violations as social construction, knowledge and denial of atrocity and theories of perpetration. Sociological insights are applied to empirical issues which may include genocide, transitional justice, human rights reporting and the perpetrators of atrocity. The final block of lectures combines the different disciplinary perspectives in order to discuss a number of challenges and contentions related to cosmopolitan human rights, culture, sovereignty and new forms of warfare. It also enquires into possible future developments in human rights. Assessment An assessed essay of up to 3,000 words to be submitted by 4pm on Tuesday 24 April 2012 (30%). A three-hour written examination in the Summer Term (70%). Practice (formative) essays Students have the option of writing one or two formative 1,500 word practice essays, one in MT and one in LT, in preparation for the assessed work. Please see Significant Dates on p. 3 for deadlines.

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The practice essay(s) will not count towards your final mark, but essays will be marked and returned with full feedback. Students are strongly encouraged to take advantage of this opportunity to receive mid-course feedback. If you are unable to meet the deadline there is no need to request a formal extension, but essays submitted after this deadline may not be marked by tutors. More information about the practice essays, including questions, deadlines and submission procedure will be posted on Moodle. Guidance notes on the assessed essay (30%) Topic The assessed essay question must be selected from the list of set questions which will be provided by the course conveners. You are advised that although the dissertation and assessed essay may be associated and linked, they must not cover substantially the same topic. (For example, it would be acceptable to write an assessed essay on genocide and a dissertation on application of the theory to a specific case study, such as genocide in Armenia.) The assessed essay must not in effect be chapter one of the dissertation. Guidance Academic Advisers will be offering guidance for the purposes of the assessed essay, but can not advise on drafts of work that are to be submitted for formal assessment. Please see the assessment guidelines on page 39 for further details on producing and submitting assessed work to the Centre. Word limit The word limit for the assessed essay is 3,000 words. Please note that 5 marks will be deducted from submissions that exceed the maximum word-length. Submission Two word-processed copies of the completed essay should be handed by you, in person, to Sara Ulfsparre, MSc Human Rights administrator, in the Centre for the Study of Human Rights, Room TW2.V510 by 4pm on Tuesday 24 April 2012. A marking coversheet (supplied in Moodle) must be secured on the front of both copies of the essay; this should include your examination candidate number and NOT your name. Moodle: You are required to upload an identical copy of your essay electronically on to Moodle so that it may be submitted to plagiarism-detection software. Late submission: Essays submitted after the deadline will be subject to the penalty of a deduction of 5 marks out of a possible 100 marks available for this piece of work per day or part thereof of the late submission. Late submissions may be condoned where there are verifiable extenuating circumstances (e.g. shown by a medical certificate), subject to final confirmation by the Chair of the Sub-Board of Examiners. If you are experiencing problems that may

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prevent you from handing in work on time, please contact the MSc Human Rights Administrator in the first instance for further advice. Final Examination (70%) Three-hour examination covering the key aspects of the core course. The examination paper will have two sections; philosophical/social and legal. Each section will have approximately six questions. You will be required to answer three questions selecting at least one question from each section. The examination paper tends to focus on questions that are not part of the assessed essay list of topics. You will be permitted to take an unannotated copy of the core text book Blackstones International Human Rights Documents, and for this reason you are advised not to make notes in your own copy. Highlighting is technically permitted but not advised. It is strongly recommended that students purchase a copy of this book for use throughout the year. B. SO499: DISSERTATION

MSc Human Rights students write a 10,000-word dissertation, which is assessed as the equivalent of a whole course. Purpose The dissertation is an integral part of the MSc Human Rights programme. It is an important opportunity to study in depth a topic of special interest to you and for you to apply knowledge and skills gained on other parts of the MSc course. Whatever your choice of topic, the dissertation should be logically structured, well researched and clearly written and it must have a human rights theme. The dissertation accounts for one quarter of the MSc requirements and you should allocate your time and effort accordingly. Content and approach The dissertation is an extended piece of written work that critically appraises evidence and opinion to reach a conclusion about the question posed. The key requirement is that the dissertation should demonstrate a high level of independent critical ability. You must show your ability to organise your material clearly and logically and to sustain a reasoned and cogent argument from beginning to end. Where appropriate you should explain clearly the research method(s) that you have applied and the reasons for your choice of approach. You should show awareness of any shortcomings of your study in relation to methods employed and where relevant, quality or quantity of the data, and disciplinary approach. Dissertations can take a number of forms. For example: a library-based project utilising existing secondary sources an empirical investigation using existing data-sets or published data a research report based on the collection of primary data, for example, or survey or ethnographic evidence Where the project involves the collection of your own data, appropriate credit will be given. Whatever the nature of your dissertation, it is never appropriate to present merely an accumulation of disparate factual material, without placing this in the context of a body of

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appropriate literature and, or using it in order to address a particular question, or applying it to assess the correctness or otherwise of a recognised theory or set of theories in the social sciences, or interpreting it with insights from a particular approach or discipline. In sum, mere empiricism will not be acceptable. Examples of previous dissertation titles can be found on Moodle, and copies of these are available to view in the Centre. You will be given help, advice and supervision by your Dissertation Supervisor especially at the crucial early stage of converting your overall topic into a clearly focused problem, question, thesis, or argument. If you are carrying out fieldwork as part of your dissertation research you will be required to carry out a risk assessment and an evaluation of the ethical implications of your proposed research. Please see Research Ethics Guidelines and Risk Assessment sections below. Supervision During Michaelmas Term, your Academic Adviser will be able to advise you on your proposed dissertation topic. In Lent term, you will be assigned to a dissertation tutorial group (based on your dissertation topic as far as is possible) and convened by your Dissertation Supervisor. You have the right to expect your Dissertation Supervisor to be available to see you during term-time and during advice and feedback sessions (office hours). You should therefore plan your work so that, if necessary, you are in a position to receive final advice on your dissertation before the end of the Summer Term. Please note that your supervisor will not be able to provide supervision during the summer break. Sociology departmental practice is that your Dissertation Supervisor must approve your topic in the first instance, and also provide comment on the outline of your dissertation. Your supervisor may also give substantive comments on one draft chapter. However, in the interest of equity between students, your Dissertation Supervisor will not read, or offer extensive comments on your final dissertation draft. Should any problems arise concerning supervision, you should in the first instance consult the Programme Convener, Prof Chetan Bhatt. Research Methods As part of your dissertation research you may need to do some reading on research methods, especially if you are using statistics, carrying out interviews or analysing official documentation. We recommend two very good introductory texts on research methods: i) Alan Bryman, Social Research Methods (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2004) ii) Clive Seale, The Quality of Qualitative Research (London: Sage, 1999) Both of these books are used on Sociology first year PhD methods training course. The Bryman book is an overview of approaches (including qualitative and quantitative research covering statistics, interviewing, ethnography, analysing official texts etc), and the Seale volume evaluates epistemologies/knowledge claims in qualitative methods. Your dissertation could benefit greatly from these, even if you are writing from a more legal perspective since

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there is advice on reading documents critically which all students would do well to think about. In addition, Howard Becker, Writing for Social Scientists (Chicago: University of Chicago, 1986) is a very good writing guide. All three books are available in the Library. Research Ethics Policy http://www.lse.ac.uk/collections/researchAndProjectDevelopmentDivision/research_ethics_ policy.htm The School attaches considerable importance to the maintenance of high ethical standards in research undertaken by its research staff and students. Risk Assessment During research for your dissertation you may be engaged in academic work away from LSE which produces what can be termed serious additional risk through, for example, fieldwork exercises in potentially hazardous locations. If your research falls into this category then it is essential that you consult the following document, in conversation with your tutor, in order that you comply with LSE guidelines: http://www.lse.ac.uk/collections/researchStudents/Risk%20assessment%20advice.doc Procedure Any general queries about the dissertation procedure (supervision, support, deadlines, marking, etc), which are not answered in this handbook, should be addressed either to the MSc Human Rights Administrator or your Dissertation Supervisor. The procedure for research and submission is divided into four stages: 1) Introduction to Dissertation session to be held at the start of Lent Term. Your Academic Adviser is responsible for the initial stage of helping you to identify a suitable topic, and guiding you as to possible expert advisers. You should arrange to speak to your tutor about these matters in the last week of the Michaelmas Term or the first two weeks of the Lent Term. You must submit a preliminary bibliography, details of your provisional topic and a description in the form of a summary of no more than one page (one hardcopy and one electronic copy via email) to the MSc Human Rights Administrator by no later than 12 noon on Tuesday 17 January 2012. You will then be allocated a Dissertation Supervisor and assigned to a dissertation tutorial group, based on the topic or area of research. Dissertation Supervisors will hold regular tutorial group supervisions for their tutees throughout Lent Term. You are strongly encouraged to attend these group supervisions. In addition, other dissertation related activities may also be made available in Lent or Summer Terms.

2)

3)

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4)

You must submit, via email, a working title and a brief abstract of your intended dissertation to the MSc Human Rights Administrator by 4pm on Friday 9 March 2012. This should be two to three pages in length. Your abstract should: Identify a subject for your research (or define a problem) Identify areas of literature you need to consult Describe how you are going to collect evidence (e.g. qualitative or quantitative or both, or primarily library-based research). Describe how you are going to organise and analyse the information Provide a timetable outlining when key stages of the research will be completed

The abstract provides a snapshot of where you are in the process so for this reason no extensions are permitted. Abstracts are not perfect outlines so if you still have work that you plan to do then tell us what that is and what schedule you plan to follow. It is expected that you will continue to develop your abstract over the year so use this to keep your supervisor informed of any developments when you meet. You must also submit a completed Research Ethics Review Checklist along with your abstract. More information about the checklist can be found here: http://www2.lse.ac.uk/intranet/researchAndDevelopment/researchPolicy/ethicsGuidanceAn dForms.aspx Word limit The dissertation should be no longer than 10,000 words (excluding tables, figures, bibliography and any appendices, but including footnotes/endnotes). Please note that 5 marks will be deducted from submissions that exceed the maximum word-length. Include a note of word-length on the title page or contents page. Format and presentation The manuscript should be printed (double-sided where possible) in double spacing and portrait mode using at least 12-point type on A4 or 81/2 x 11 size paper, with page numbers. The finished product must be bound. For essays, staples should be sufficient, but for your dissertation we would recommend a simple spiral bind. The Centre does not encourage the use of folders, files or hard-back covers. Students should bear in mind that great importance is attached to proper notation, grammar, punctuation, spelling and referencing, and they should adopt a consistent set of conventions. Submission Two word-processed copies of the completed dissertation should be handed by you, in person, to Sara Ulfsparre, MSc Human Rights administrator in the Centre for the Study of Human Rights, Room TW2.V510 by 4pm on Thursday 23 August 2012. A marking coversheet (supplied in Moodle) must be secured on the front of both copies of the dissertation; this should include your examination candidate number and NOT your name.

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Moodle: You are required to upload an identical copy of your dissertation electronically on to Moodle (SO499) so that it may be submitted to plagiarism-detection software. Late submission: Dissertations submitted after the deadline will be subject to the penalty of a deduction of 5 marks out of a possible 100 marks available for this piece of work per day or part thereof of the late submission. Late submission may be condoned where there are verifiable extenuating circumstances (e.g., shown by a medical certificate), subject to final confirmation by the Chair of the Sub-board of Examiners. If you are experiencing problems that may prevent you from handing in work on time, please contact the MSc Human Rights Administrator in the first instance for further advice. Please see the assessment guidelines on page 39 for further details on producing and submitting assessed work to the Centre. C. OPTIONAL COURSES

You are required to take optional courses to the value of TWO units from the list of courses below. Other modules offered by departments not in the list below may be available to you. You are advised to discuss additional options with your Academic Adviser to ensure that the module content can be accommodated within the MSc Human Rights programme. (For further details please see Appendix A). Please note that assessment methods vary from department to department. Assessment may be based entirely on exam results or you may find different percentages accorded to coursework and exams (see the Assessment Guidelines section on page 39 for further information). Your options should be chosen in consultation with your Academic Adviser and subject to timetabling constraints. Timetables for all courses are available online, listed by course code: http://www.lse.ac.uk/collections/timetables/ You need to self register for your chosen modules online via LSEforYou, however, if the course is capped or has restricted access you must get approval from the respective Course Convener/Teacher responsible. Capped courses and courses with restricted access usually have early deadlines. Places on capped courses and courses with restricted access are often given on a first come first served basis, but you should check the LSE online calendar/course guides to find out the specific deadline and procedure in each case. To apply for a place on a capped course/a course with restricted access you need to complete the online application form linked to the course selection on LSEforYou. The MSc programme is designed to give you as much choice in what you study as possible, without detracting from the intellectual coherence of the programme as a whole. Unfortunately, such extensive choice can sometimes lead to timetable clashes, especially with respect to courses offered by other departments. The MSc convener and your Academic Adviser will guide you on course selection if you are facing timetable clashes between courses that appear to be equally relevant and interesting for your degree overall.

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Other courses offered by departments not in the list below may be available to you. You are advised to discuss additional options with your Academic Adviser to ensure that the course content can be accommodated within the MSc Human Rights programme. Anthropology AN436 Anthropology of Development (Half Unit) (Not available in 2011/12) AN438 Law in Society: A joint course in Anthropology and Law AN439 Anthropology and Human Rights (Half Unit) (Not available in 2011/12) AN451 Anthropology of Politics (Half Unit) AN456 Anthropology of Economy (1): production and exchange (Half Unit) AN457 Anthropology of Economy (2): Development, Transformation and Globalisation (Half Unit) Development Studies DV411 Population and Development: an Analytical Approach (Half Unit)* DV418 African Development (Half Unit)* DV420 Complex Emergencies (Half Unit)* DV428 Managing Humanitarianism (Half Unit)* DV429 Global Civil Society European Institute EU448 Minorities and Migration in Europe (Half Unit). (Not available in 2011/12) EU457 Ethnic Diversity and International Society (Half Unit) ** EU458 Identity, Community and the Problem of Minorities (Half Unit) ** Gender Institute GI407 Globalisation, Gender and Development GI409 Globalisation, Gender and Development: An Introduction (Half Unit) GI413 Gender and Militarisation (Half Unit) Government GV408 Contemporary Disputes about Justice (Half Unit) GV436 National and Ethnic Conflict Regulation (Half Unit) (Not available in 2011/12) GV442 Globalisation and Democracy (Half Unit)** GV443 The State and Political Institutions in Latin America (Half Unit) GV465 War, Peace and the Politics of National Self-Determination (Half Unit) ** GV4B7 The Liberal Idea of Freedom (Half Unit) GV4C2 Globalisation, Conflict and Post-Totalitarianism (Half Unit) (Not available in 2011/12) GV4D7 Dilemmas of Equality (Half Unit) (Not available in 2011/12) International Relations IR422 Conflict and Peace Studies** IR462 Introduction to International Political Theory (Half Unit)** IR463 The International Political Theory of Humanitarian Intervention (Half Unit)** IR464 The Politics of International Law (Half Unit)**

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IR465 IR466 Law LL409 LL445 LL452 LL453 LL454 LL460 LL468 LL469 LL4A8 LL4A9 LL4B6 LL4C2 LL4E6 LL4H9 LL4K4 LL4L4 LL4L6

The International Politics of Culture and Religion (Not available in 2011/12) Genocide (Half Unit)**

Human Rights in the Developing World** International Criminal Law The International Law of Armed Conflict and the Use of Force** International Human Rights Human Rights of Women** International Law and the Protection of Refugees, Displaced Persons and Migrants** Human Rights Law: The European Convention of Human Rights (Half Unit)** Human Rights Law: The Human Rights Act (Half Unit)** International Law and the Use of Force (Half Unit) MT half of LL452** Law in War (jus in bello) (Half Unit) LT half of LL452** Human Rights Law in the UK ** World Poverty and Human Rights (Half Unit) (Not available in 2011/12) International Dispute Resolution: Courts and Tribunals (Half Unit) (not available in 2011/12) Human Rights in the Workplace (Half Unit) ** The International Law of Self-Determination (Half Unit)** Law and the Holocaust (Half Unit) ** Theory of Human Rights Law (Half Unit) **

Social Policy SA435 NGOs and Development ** SA4B4 Child Rights, Child Poverty and Development (Not available in 2011/12) SA4B5 International Planning and Childrens Rights (Half Unit) SA4B6 International Social Policy and Childrens Needs (Half Unit) (Not available in 2011/12) SA4C8 Globalization and Social Policy (Half Unit) SA4D5 Social Rights and Human Welfare (Half Unit) ** Sociology SO447 SO457 SO461 SO466 SO467

Topics in Race, Ethnicity and Postcolonial Studies** Political Reconciliation (Half Unit)** Racial Formations of Modernity (Half Unit) Race and Biopolitics (Half Unit) (Not available in 2011/12) Race, Ethnicity and Migration in Britain (post-1945) (Not available in 2011/12)

* priority for International Development students to take this course ** This course has restricted access and students are required to obtain permission from the teaching department to take this course, via LSEforYou

Auditing Courses
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You may wish to audit some courses which are not part of your programme, and for which you will not gain credit. You may audit the lectures of any courses in the School in which you are interested subject to the approval of the teacher responsible, but you may not normally attend the associated seminars if you are not registered on the course. It is courteous to introduce yourself to the teacher responsible for any course you intend to audit regularly.

ASSESSMENT GUIDELINES In the assessment section of each course listed above and detailed at Appendix A, you will find details of the particular requirements of each course. Students are usually expected to submit two types of work during their studies: Practice (formative) essays are submitted to the class teacher for assessment, to help students develop their skills and understanding. This work may be graded, to give students a feel for how they are progressing, but this grade is not counted towards the final mark. Students are also required to produce assessed essays and take unseen written examinations for summative assessment, designed to evaluate the student's current level of academic achievement (for grading). Each LSE course will be summatively assessed, most often by a 3 hour examination. See also Examinations. It is worth taking note of the forms of assessment employed in the courses you select. This will enable you to plan a schedule that suits you, and helps to ensure that you are able to work to the best of your ability throughout the year. Towards the end of the Michaelmas Term you will be allocated your candidate examination number by the Examinations and Ceremonies Section. This will be available on LSEforYou. Part time students are required to be examined in the equivalent of two full courses/units at the end of the first year and the remaining two at the end of the second year. The dissertation (which counts as one course/unit) is normally submitted at the end of the second year. The following guidance notes apply to both the assessed essay (30% of SO424) and the dissertation (SO499). You should read them carefully and ensure that you understand them. Word counts The specified word limits refer to the maximum length of the work including footnotes and endnotes, but excluding tables, figures and the bibliography and any appendices. Students must include a note of word length on the title page of the piece of work. Please note that 5 marks will be deducted from submissions that exceed the maximum word-length.

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Plagiarism/Academic Dishonesty The work you submit for assessment must be your own. If you try to pass off the work of others as your own you will be committing plagiarism. Any quotation from the published or unpublished works of other persons, including other candidates, must be clearly identified as such, being placed inside quotation marks and a full reference to their sources must be provided in proper form. A series of short quotations from several different sources, if not clearly identified as such, constitutes plagiarism just as much as does a single unacknowledged long quotation from a single source. The examiners are vigilant for cases of plagiarism and the School uses plagiarism detection software to identify plagiarised text. Work containing plagiarism may be referred to an Assessment Misconduct Panel which may result in severe penalties. If you are unsure about the academic referencing conventions used by the School you should seek guidance from your tutor or the Library, here: http://www2.lse.ac.uk/library/services/training/citing_referencing.aspx. The Regulations on Plagiarism can be found here: http://www.lse.ac.uk/resources/calendar/academicRegulations/RegulationsOnAssessmentOf fences-Plagiarism.htm Presentation and Submission You must submit two suitably bound copies of your piece of work to the MSc Human Rights Administrator by the relevant deadline. You must also upload an electronic version of your submitted piece of work on to Moodle within the same deadline. The manuscript should be printed (double-sided where possible) in double spacing and portrait mode using at least 12-point type on A4 or 81/2 x 11 size paper, with page numbers. The finished product must be bound. For essays, staples should be sufficient, but for your dissertation we would recommend a simple spiral bind. The Centre does not encourage the use of folders or files. A marking coversheet (supplied in Moodle) must be secured on the front of both copies of each piece of work. Should you wish to include a protective front cover, this should be transparent so that your candidate examination number on the supplied cover sheet can be read without opening the dissertation. Submitted copies (hardcopies and electronic copy) must be identical in every respect. Examples can be provided by the MSc Human Rights Administrator. Your work will be accepted as it is handed in i.e. staplers or other binding materials cannot be provided, multiple copies will not be made for you and amendments or additional pages cannot be added after the work has been submitted.

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For each piece of assessed work, you will be asked to complete and sign a form entitled Submission Form and Plagiarism Statement. The bottom part of this form is also your receipt. Plagiarism is an examination offence and carries heavy penalties. The form you will be asked to sign states the following: I declare that, apart from properly referenced quotations, this is my own work and contains no plagiarism; it has not been submitted previously for any other assessed unit on this or other degree courses. I have read and understood the Schools rules on assessment offences as stated in the Graduate/Undergraduate School Calendar. If, for any valid reason you are unable to submit your work in person, you must include this statement disavowing plagiarism within the body of your work between the title page and contents page. A receipt will be provided to the person who submits the dissertation. If you need to post your dissertation, please contact the MSc Human Rights Administrator in advance. In brief, you should send your dissertation directly to the Centre (see address at Appendix C), retain a receipt of posting and allow sufficient time for your dissertation to arrive by the deadline. You should include your statement disavowing plagiarism as above. For your own records, you are advised to prepare and retain a third copy of your work, since the two submitted copies will not be returned to you. Please note that the MSc Examination Board meets only once a year for the purpose of determining degree results; if you do not submit your dissertation in time for it to be assessed, you will have to wait until the following year to receive your degree. Late Submission of Assessed Course Work The Department of Sociology has agreed the following guidelines for the submission of course work. All students must be given clear written instructions on what is required for assessed coursework and dissertations, and the deadline for their submission; 1) if a student believes that s/he has good cause not to meet the deadline (e.g. illness), s/he should first raise the matter with the MSc Administrator and make a formal submission to the Chair of the appropriate MSc Examination Sub-Board. A mitigation form should be submitted via the Student Services Centre: http://www2.lse.ac.uk/intranet/students/studentServicesCentre/examinationsAnd Results/Mitigation.aspx. Normally, penalties for late submissions will only be waived where there is a good reason backed by supporting evidence (e.g. a medical certificate). Late submissions may be condoned where there are verifiable extenuating circumstances (e.g. shown by a medical certificate), subject to final confirmation by the Chair of the Sub-Board of Examiners;

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2)

if a student misses the deadline for submission but believes s/he had good cause which could not have been anticipated, s/he should first raise the matter with the MSc administrator and make a formal submission to the Chair of the appropriate MSc Examination Sub-Board. A mitigation form should be submitted via the Student Services Centre: http://www2.lse.ac.uk/intranet/students/studentServicesCentre/ examinationsAndResults/Mitigation.aspx. Normally, penalties for late submission will only be waived where there is a good reason backed up by supporting evidence (e.g. a medical certificate); Late submissions may be condoned where there are verifiable extenuating circumstances (e.g. shown by a medical certificate), subject to final confirmation by the Chair of the Sub-Board of Examiners; if a student fails to submit by the set deadline the following penalties shall normally apply: five marks out of 100 will be deducted for coursework submitted within 24 hours of the deadline and a further five marks will be deducted for each subsequent 24-hour period (working days only) until the coursework is submitted. After five working days, coursework will only be accepted with the permission of the Chair of the Sub-Board of Examiners; Candidates are strongly advised to make frequent back-up copies of their text. Disc, computer or printer failure will not be regarded as a legitimate excuse for late submission of a piece of course work.

3)

4)

Format and style of assessed work When preparing assessed work, students should bear in mind that great importance is attached to proper noting, grammar, punctuation, spelling, and referencing, and they should adopt a consistent set of conventions. While examples of recommended styles are given below, the standard requirement is an appropriate system to the discipline and internal consistency within your piece of work. Footnotes These are a way of saying something extra that amplifies a point which has been made in the main text but is peripheral to it and would result in the main text containing distracting additional material. In law, where parentheses within the text are not used, footnotes also provide the citation. Footnotes should be numbered consecutively within each chapter. If you choose this referencing system, you are strongly encouraged to use footnotes (at the foot of each page), rather than endnotes (at the end of each chapter). Try to avoid very long notes. Textual references If referencing within the text use parentheses - the so-called Harvard system; author(s), year of publication and (where appropriate) page-number(s). These references should be inserted into the text as close as possible to the relevant point as is consistent with clarity and legibility. The usages contained in the following various examples should be followed as appropriate; these cover all major situations.

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As Dollard (1988) argues... ; Dollards (1988) classic study; (Perrineau 1985) (Messina 1989, pp. 23-6): use the minimum number of digits in page-numbers, except between 10 and 19, 110 and 119, etc.; referencing to individual chapters according their inclusive page-numbers in the edition being cited rather than to chapter-numbers is preferred (Banton 1987a; 1987b): two or more references to works by the same author published in the same year should be distinguished in this way (Banton 1983; 1987a) but (Banton 1983, p.104; Banton 1987a, p.129): omit the authors surname after the first reference only if he or she is the only one being cited within a set of parentheses and if only years of publication but not page-numbers are being used in all instances (Banton 1987a; Anthias 1992): order by ascending year of publication rather than alphabetically by surname of author, using the latter criterion only when citing differently authored publications from the same year (Butler and Stokes 1974; Himmelweit et al. 1981): works by up to three co-authors should cite the surnames of all co-authors, while those with four or more co-authors should be cited using only the surname of the first, followed by et al. For papers with a large legal content, students might refer to The Bluebook: A Uniform System of Citation, published by the Harvard Law Review. Regardless of the referencing system used, all papers must contain a bibliography, which should be typed or printed separately double-spaced at the end of the dissertation beginning on a new page and titled merely References, or Bibliography. The list should be alphabetical by surname of author or first co-author and should be in the style of the examples below. It is important to include, where they exist, part-numbers as well as volumenumbers of cited journals and inclusive page-numbers of material from journals and edited collections. It is also important to provide any subtitle of a book or an article, as well as the forenames and/or initials of authors of cited material, whatever was given in the original reference. You should also take care that only those references cited in the text appear in the list of References/Bibliography and vice versa. General bibliographies should not normally be given. Also, avoid citation mania the tendency to provide citations even for the most trivial or banal assertions. ANTHIAS, FLOYA 1992 Connecting race and ethnic phenomena, Sociology, vol. 26, no. 3, pp.421-38 BANTON, MICHAEL 1983 Racial and Ethnic Competition, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press ____ 1987a Racial Theories, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press

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____ 1987b The beginning and the end of the racial issue in British politics, Policy and Politics, vol. 15, no. 1, pp. 39-47 BUTLER, DAVID and STOKES, DONALD 1974 Political Change in Britain: The Evolution of Electoral Choice, 2nd edn, London: Macmillan DEAKIN, SIMON and MORRIS, GILLIAN S 1998 Labour Law, 2nd edn, London: Butterworths DOLLARD, JOHN 1988 Caste and Class in a Southern Town, 4th edn, Madison, WI: University of Wisconsin Press [1st edn, New Haven, CT: Yale University Press, 1937] ENGBERSEN, GODFRIED and van der LEUN, JOANNE 1998 Illegality and criminality: the differential opportunity structure of undocumented immigrants, in Khalid Koser and Helma Lutz (eds), The New Migration in Europe: Social Constructions and Social Realities, Basingstoke: Macmillan Press Ltd, pp. 199-223 HIMMELWEIT, HILDE T, et al. 1981 How Voters Decide: A Longitudinal Study of Political Attitudes and Voting Extending Over Fifteen Years, London: Academic Press MESSINA, ANTHONY M 1989 Race and Party Competition in Britain, Oxford: Clarendon Press PERRINEAU, PASCAL 1985 Le Front National: un lectorat autoritaire, Revue Politique et Parlementaire, no. 918, pp. 24-31 SOMBART, WERNER 1976 Why Is There No Socialism in the United States?, London: Macmillan [first published in German in 1906] THOMAS, J J R 1985 Rationalization and the status of gender divisions, Sociology, vol. 19, no. 3, pp. 409-20 ALVIN, JAMES 1982 Black caricature: the roots of racialism, in Charles Husband (ed.), 'Race' in Britain: Continuity and Change, London: Hutchinson, pp. 59-72 Give only the first-named place of publication if more than one is listed on the title-page of a book. It is now conventional that the names of American towns or cities (except New York) are followed by the Post-Office-authorised two-letter abbreviation of the state concerned; e.g. Cambridge, Massachusetts, should be identified as Cambridge, MA. Publications with up to three co-authors should be referenced as in the Butler/Stokes example; those with four or more co-authors should be referenced as in the Himmelweit example. If you are using a compilation to reference a legal document, such as Blackstones International Human Rights Documents, you should cite the name of the instrument (and relevant details) and not the book itself, unless you are responding to something unique to the book such as the editors comments, for example. Internet references

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Internet references should be given in the text as in the following examples, normally though not necessarily in every case identifying simultaneously the holder of the website. The website of the Commission for Racial Equality (www.cre.gov.uk) is merely one source for.... However, note: There are several Internet sources providing basic information about current legislation on racial discrimination in employment (e.g. www.cre.gov.uk/rights)... Where it is necessary to give textual and Internet references simultaneously, all the former should be listed first (ordered according to the principles for textual references given above) and all the latter should be listed second, in alphabetical order. All individual references of whatever type should be separated by semi-colons. A demonstrative example follows: There are numerous sources providing information about current legislation on racial discrimination in employment (e.g. Deakin and Morris 1998, pp. 543-626; www.cre.gov.uk/rights). Where a referenced website has been located via a link from some other site, it is usually necessary to identify only the destination site. All Internet references should also be listed at the end of the article after the textual References and with the title Internet references. They should be listed in alphabetical order, detailing the website address and the date on which each was accessed (accurate to the day or, if not feasible, as close thereto as possible). If a website has merely been cited without having been accessed, n.ac. (for not accessed) should be substituted for the date of access. The following examples demonstrate these principles. Commission for Racial Equality, ac. 27 November 1999, www.cre.gov.uk/rights Higher Education Statistics Agency, ac. May 1999, www.hesa.ac.uk Le Monde, ac. 29 November 1999, www.lemonde.fr University of Surrey, n.ac., www.surrey.ac.uk

RESULTS AND ASSESSMENT CRITERIA Formative assessment In most full unit MSc courses, in preparation for the assessed components of the course (long essays and/or the examination) you will be expected to submit written papers during the course of the year. In SO424 you have the opportunity to submit one or two formative (or practice) essays, one in MT and one in LT. You will also be expected to participate in seminar presentations and discussions. These aspects of your coursework are formative, that is, they do not count towards the final grade. The course teachers will provide you with feedback usually in the form of written comments. This feedback is invaluable in your preparation for the formal assessments.

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Most courses include a component of assessed (summative) coursework - see online course outlines for specific information about what is required. In planning for their assessed (summative) coursework, students should be aware that teaching staff are not available during the vacations. Queries and advice on coursework assignments should therefore be obtained during term-time office hours. Sociology Policy on Feedback on Formative Coursework and Dissertations The Department provides feedback on formative coursework, including ongoing dissertation work in a number of forms: (i) verbal feedback during office hours, individual and/or group tutorials and supervisions; (ii) verbal feedback in response to class presentations and in the dissertation workshop; (iii) written feedback on formative coursework, and where appropriate on class presentations and drafts of dissertation work; (iv) written feedback may be provided in hard copy, or electronically via e-mail, Moodle or LSEforYou. The Departments policy is to provide feedback within two weeks of submission of formative coursework or draft written material. Sociology Policy on Feedback on Assessed Coursework Feedback will be provided on summative coursework in the form of qualitative comments by the first examiner and returned via the MSc administrator. Where possible, given the constraints of the examination schedule, the Department will aim to provide written feedback in advance of examinations. Students should be advised that the provision of qualitative feedback is a separate process from the formal assessment of coursework, which is completed by two internal examiners and moderated by an external examiner. Results and Transcripts of results LSE does not release information about marks to students until they are officially ratified by the relevant School Board of Examiners. However, it is open to individual Departments to release provisional marks to students after the examination period. The Centre does not release provisional marks. Provisional marks have no status and may be subject to amendment by the relevant School Board of Examiners. As is usual in all British universities, an external (non-LSE) examiner participates in all stages of the examining process, including vetting examination papers, grading scripts, dissertations and course work.

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Final results are published following ratification at the meeting of the Graduate School Board of Examiners for graduate programmes. The relevant meeting will take place in November and results will be published (on LSEforYou) by the middle of that month. Transcripts for finalists are issued digitally within five working days of the final results being published. For more information, please see lse.ac.uk/transcripts. For the most up to date information on results publication dates, please see lse.ac.uk/results. Staff in the Student Services Centre can provide you with guidance on the School's academic regulations, and degree classification schemes. Please note: the School will not release your results if you owe any fees. Please check your balance on LSEforYou to see if you have any tuition, halls or library fees outstanding. If you cannot see any outstanding fees on your account, then please contact the Finance Office on fees@lse.ac.uk for clarification.

Assessment Criteria The candidates performance shall be assessed across four modules, or module equivalents comprising of half-units (hereinafter referred to generically as modules). Department of Sociology Postgraduate Mark Frame Distinction (70 per cent or higher) This class of pass is awarded when the essay demonstrates clarity of analysis, engages directly with the question, and shows an independent and critical interpretation of the issues raised by it. The essay shows exemplary skill in presenting a logical and coherent argument and an outstanding breadth and depth of reading. The essay is presented in a polished and professional manner, and all citations, footnotes and bibliography are rendered in the proper academic form. Essays in the upper range of this class (80 per cent and higher) may make an original academic contribution to the subject under discussion. Answers in the upper range will be outstanding in terms of originality, sophistication and breadth of understanding of relevant themes and material. Merit (60-69 per cent) This class of pass is awarded when the essay attempts a systematic analysis of the issues raised by the question and demonstrates independent thought. The essay shows appropriate skill in presenting a clearly reasoned argument, and draws on a good range of relevant literature. The essay is well-presented and citations, footnotes and bibliography are rendered in the proper academic form. Pass (50-59 per cent) This class of pass is awarded when the essay shows understanding of the issues raised by the question, and demonstrates an engagement with relevant literature. The discussion may rely more heavily on description than on independent analysis. There may be some inconsistencies, irrelevant points and unsubstantiated claims in the argument. Presentation

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and referencing is adequate but may contain inaccuracies.

Fail (40-49 per cent) The essay shows limited understanding of the subject and lacks evidence of an independent response to the question. It may be based entirely on lecture material, poorly structured and contain significant errors of fact. The essay may be incomplete, including poor presentation and inadequate referencing, and fail to demonstrate an appropriate level of engagement with relevant literature. Bad Fail (0-39 per cent) The essay is incomplete or fails to address the question under study. It provides little evidence of reading or understanding. It may be poorly presented and lack referencing.

Dissertations that are generally satisfactory but fall short of the required standard of presentation may be referred for emendation within one month of the examiners meeting. Schemes for the Award of a Taught Masters Degree These schemes should be read in conjunction with the Regulations for Taught Masters Degrees, the programme regulations for the Masters degree on which the candidate is registered, the relevant on-line Taught Masters Course Guides and the Code of Good Practice for Taught Masters Programmes: Teaching, Learning and Assessment. Classification Schemes Undergraduate and graduate degrees are classified according to the classification scheme which may vary depending on the year a programme started. Classification schemes are applied by the Boards of Examiners at their meetings in July and November each year. Please refer to the following web link for further details on graduate degrees: http://www.lse.ac.uk/resources/calendar/academicRegulations/TaughtMastersDegreesFour Units.htm Codes of Good Practice: Teaching, Learning and Assessment The Codes of Practice for Undergraduates and Taught Masters Programmes explain the basic reciprocal obligations and responsibilities of staff and students. They set out what you can expect from your Departments and what Departments are expected to provide in relation to the teaching and learning experience. The Codes cover areas like the roles and responsibilities of Academic Advisers and Departmental Tutors; the structure of teaching at the School; examinations and assessment. They also set out your responsibilities, i.e. what the School expects of you.

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http://www.lse.ac.uk/resources/calendar/academicRegulations/codeOfGoodPracticeForTaug htMastersProgrammesTeachingLearningAndAssessment.htm Quality Assurance The Schools approach to quality assurance is set out in the document Towards a Strategy for Managing Academic Standards and Quality: http://www.lse.ac.uk/collections/TQARO/TowardsAStrategy.htm. It sets out broad principles for assuring academic standards and for enhancing the quality of educational provision. The Schools Teaching, Learning and Assessment Committee (TLAC) is the body responsible for ensuring that the School and Departments discharge their responsibilities under Towards a Strategy. It does this by receiving reports on a range of related areas: degree and course outcomes, external examiners reports, reviews of Departments and Institutes, and national developments in quality assurance, to name but a few. It also monitors the outcomes of the quality assurance processes that Departments and Institutes operate locally, e.g. StaffStudent Liaison Committees, course and programme monitoring/review, Departmental/Teaching meetings, consideration of teaching surveys, etc. TLAC is serviced by the Teaching Quality Assurance and Review Office (TQARO). This office is responsible for supporting the Schools quality assurance infrastructure. This includes acting as the Schools point of contact with the Quality Assurance Agency, a national body that safeguards quality and standards in UK higher education. Further details about TQAROs work can be found here: http://www2.lse.ac.uk/intranet/LSEServices/TQARO/Home.aspx Student Teaching Surveys The Teaching Quality Assurance and Review Office (TQARO) conducts two School-wide surveys each year to assess students opinions of teaching, one in each of the Michaelmas and Lent Terms. They give students the opportunity to give feedback on their lectures and class/seminar teaching. They provide lecturers and teachers with important information about the perceived quality of their teaching, and the School with a measure of general teaching standards. They are conducted via paper questionnaires which are distributed in classes and lectures. Teaching scores are made available to individual teachers, heads of departments, course convenors, the Director of the Teaching and Learning Centre and Pro-Director (Teaching and Learning). In addition to producing reports for individual teachers, TQARO produces aggregated quantitative data for departments and the School, which provide important performance indicators. These can be found on the TQARO website: http://www2.lse.ac.uk/intranet/LSEServices/TQARO/TeachingSurveys/Results/Home.aspx .

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DEPARTMENT PRIZES The Stan Cohen Prize for the best dissertation in the MSc Human Rights programme A prize of 250 is awarded for the best dissertation that has been written by a student registered on the MSc Human Rights programme. Candidates for nomination to be recipients of the prize are selected by the MSc examination board. The Director of the Centre for the Study of Human Rights shall determine the final winner. His or her decision on these matters will normally be made solely on the basis of the respective marks obtained by each nominee, with the nominee obtaining the highest mark in his or her dissertation being (save in exceptional circumstances) the recipient of the prize. The prize is given in the form of a personal cheque or bank transfer. Professor Stan Cohen is a founder of the MSc Human Rights Programme. Though retired, he remains connected to the School and the Centre as Emeritus Professor. His expertise and research interests include criminological theory; juvenile delinquency; social control; crime control policy and human rights. His publications include States of Denial, Polity Press, 2000 and Visions of Social Control, Polity Press, 1985. A Book of essays in honour of Stan Cohen (Crime, Social Control and Human Rights) appeared in 2007, edited by four of his colleagues at LSE, David Downes, Paul Rock, Christine Chinkin and Conor Gearty. Hobhouse Memorial Prizes This prize has traditionally been given to students who achieve an overall first class classification upon completing their degree. The Department also gives out prizes, based solely on academic merit, to completing students. These prizes are normally in the form of book tokens. Winning the Hobhouse Memorial Prize makes a valuable addition to your CV, especially if you plan to compete for places on further postgraduate programmes.

REGULATIONS ON ASSESSMENT OFFENCES: PLAGIARISM Assessment is the means by which the standards that students achieve are made known to the School and beyond; it also provides students with detached and impartial feedback on their performance. It also forms a significant part of the process by which the School monitors its own standards of teaching and student support. It therefore follows that all work presented for assessment must be that of the student. Plagiarism/Academic Dishonesty The work you submit for assessment must be your own. If you try to pass off the work of others as your own you will be committing plagiarism.

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Any quotation from the published or unpublished works of other persons, including other candidates, must be clearly identified as such, being placed inside quotation marks and a full reference to their sources must be provided in proper form. A series of short quotations from several different sources, if not clearly identified as such, constitutes plagiarism just as much as does a single unacknowledged long quotation from a single source. The examiners are vigilant for cases of plagiarism and the School uses plagiarism detection software to identify plagiarised text. Work containing plagiarism may be referred to an Assessment Misconduct Panel which may result in severe penalties. If you are unsure about the academic referencing conventions used by the School you should seek guidance from your tutor or the Library, here: http://www2.lse.ac.uk/library/services/training/citing_referencing.aspx.

The Regulations on Plagiarism can be found here: http://www.lse.ac.uk/resources/calendar/academicRegulations/RegulationsOnAssessmentOf fences-Plagiarism.htm

HUMAN RIGHTS STAFF Dr Alasdair Cochrane is a Lecturer in Human Rights. He joined the Centre for the Study of Human Rights in 2007. He teaches on the core course for the MSc Human Rights Approaches to Human Rights, as well as on an undergraduate option in Sociology, Human Rights, Social Suffering and Justice. Prior to joining the Centre, Alasdair taught in the Department of Government at the LSE, where he completed his PhD. He holds a 1st Class BA in Politics from the University of Sheffield, an MSc in Political Theory, and a PGCHE, both from the LSE. Alasdair Cochranes research interests include the philosophical justification of rights, contemporary political theory, environmentalism, animal ethics and bioethics. Dr Claire Moon is a Senior Lecturer in the Sociology of Human Rights in the Department of Sociology and the Centre for the Study of Human Rights. She holds degrees in Literature, International Relations and Politics. She joined the LSE in 2004, and previously taught international relations and international conflict analysis at the University of Kent and the London Centre for International Relations. Her research concentrates on transitional justice, post-conflict reconciliation, war trauma, reparations and human rights. Claire is the author of numerous articles and book chapters on these topics, and a book about South Africas political transition, Narrating Reconciliation: South Africas Truth and Reconciliation Commission (2008). She is also co-editor of a special 60th anniversary issue of the British Journal of Sociology (2010). Claire co-convenes the core MSc human rights course, Approaches to Human Rights, an optional postgraduate course, Political Reconciliation, and an undergraduate option Human Rights, Social Suffering and Justice. She is the winner of two LSE teaching prizes. Claire is a member of the Advisory Board of the Centre for the Study of Human Rights and initiator and Convener of the Human Rights Research Cluster

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Atrocity, Suffering and Human Rights. She is also a member of a number of research networks including the London Transitional Justice Network and the Alliance for Historical Dialogue and Accountability, Columbia University, New York. Dr Margot Salomon is a Senior Lecturer at the Centre for the Study of Human Rights and Law Department. Her main research addresses international human rights law and its application to poverty, development and issues of global economic justice. Dr Salomon has been a consultant to the UN Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights on extreme poverty and human rights and on the right to development, is a Member of the International Law Association's Committee on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples, and sits on the Executive Board of the Association of Human Rights Institutes. Dr Salomon coordinates a cross-departmental faculty research group on Globalisation, Poverty and Responsibility and is a Distinguished Research Associate of the North-South Institute in Ottawa. She holds a PhD in international law from the LSE, and an LLM from UCL. Publications include: Deprivation, Causation, and the Law of International Cooperation in M. Langford et al (eds), Global Justice, State Duties: The Extra-Territorial Scope of Economic, Social and Cultural Rights in International Law (Cambridge University Press, 2011); Social Justice and Human Rights in A. Walker et al (eds), The Peter Townsend Reader (Policy Press, 2010); Poverty, Privilege and International Law: The Millennium Development Goals and the Guise of Humanitarianism German Yearbook of International Law (2008-9); Global Responsibility for Human Rights: World Poverty and the Development of International Law (OUP, 2007). Professor Chetan Bhatt Chetan Bhatt is Professor of Sociology, Director of the Centre for the Study of Human Rights, and programme convener for the MSc Human Rights programme. He joined the LSE in April 2010. He was previously Professor of Sociology and Head of Department at the Department of Sociology, Goldsmiths, University of London. Before this, he taught at the Department of Sociology at the University of Essex and the Department of Sociology and Social Policy at the University of Southampton. His gained his PhD (Politics and Sociology) at Birkbeck College, University of London and his BA Hons (Social and Political Sciences) at Sidney Sussex College, University of Cambridge. In addition to extensive work over many years on human rights, discrimination and social justice, Chetan Bhatt's research interests include modern social theory and philosophy, early German Romanticism, philosophical idealism, the religious right and religious conflict, nationalism, racism and ethnicity, and the geopolitical sociology of South Asia and the Middle East.

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APPENDIX A: OPTIONAL COURSES


DEPARTMENT OF ANTHROPOLOGY AN438 - LAW IN SOCIETY: A JOINT COURSE IN ANTHROPOLOGY AND LAW Teachers responsible Dr Alonso Barros SHF 3.01 and Alain Pottage NAB 7.21 Availability The course is compulsory for MSc Law, Anthropology and Society. It is an option on MSc Human Rights, MSc Anthropology and Development, MSc Social Anthropology and the LLM. MSc Regulation and other graduates can take this course at the discretion of those running it. Course content The course offers a foundation in those elements of anthropological and social theory essential to an understanding of law in society. This course draws on anthropological themes and texts to develop an innovative perspective on contemporary legal norms and institutions. It aims to document legal institutions and practices as concrete ethnographic phenomena, focusing on the techniques of writing and documentation, the legal production of persons and things, and the legal framing of institutions. It combines abstract social theory with concrete ethnographic method in the study of ritual, kinship, property and communicative technologies in formal law. The course is structured about the following topics: Law, anthropology, and the production of the social: an introduction to the links between legal and anthropological scholarship, exploring juridical concepts of power, agency and social personality and anthropology's models of society; Legal and political ritual: selected theoretical analyses of modern legal ritual examined against the background of anthropological debates concerning the general nature of ritual; The communication of power in writing: the representation and construction of social institutions in administration; Legal time and evidence: ethnographic analysis of narrative, evidence and proof in different legal cultures; Persons and things: legal forms of personification and objectification in systems of ownership and inheritance, with particular attention to the law governing reproductive resources; Legal collectivities, the modern corporation and its others: ethnographies of the social and legal construction of collective agency; The uses of anthropology in law and politics: the role of anthropology in contemporary contests over indigenous title, cultural property, common property resources, and alternative dispute resolution. Teaching 10 x 1 hour lectures and 10 x 2 hour seminars each in MT and LT, and 2 x 2 hour seminars in the first two weeks of ST. Indicative reading Marc Aug, Non-Places: Introduction to an Anthropology of Supermodernity, 1995; Maurice Bloch, From Blessing to Violence, 1986 and Ritual, History and Power, 1989; Janet Dolgin, Defining the Family. Law, Technology, and Reproduction in an Uneasy Age, 1997; Kaja Finkler, Experiencing the New Genetics. Family and Kinship on the Medical Frontier, 2000; Rebecca French, The Golden Yoke: The Cosmology of Law in Buddhist Tibet, 1995; C M Hann (Ed), Property Relations: Renewing the Anthropological Tradition, 1998; Bruno Latour, We Have Never Been Modern, 1995; Pierre Legendre, Law and the Unconscious. A Legendre Reader, 1997; Niklas Luhmann, Political Theory in the Welfare State, 1990 and Observations on Modernity, 1998; Sally Engle Merry, Getting Justice and Getting Even: Legal Consciousness Among Working-Class Americans, 1990; Brinkley Messick, The Calligraphic State: Textual Domination and History in a Muslim Society, 1993; Ziba MirHosseini, Marriage on Trial: A study of Islamic family law, 1993; Sally Falk Moore, Social Facts & Fabrications: "Customary" Law on Kilimanjaro, 1880-1980, 1986; Henrietta Moore, A Passion for Difference, 1994; Martha Mundy (Ed), Law and Anthropology, 2002; W T Murphy, The Oldest Social Science?, 1997; Laura Nader & Harry F Todd Jr (Eds), The Disputing Process - Law in Ten Societies, 1978; Katherine S Newman, Law & Economic Organization: A Comparative Study of Preindustrial

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Societies, 1983; Leopold Pospisil, Anthropology of Law: A Comparative Theory, 1971; Alain Pottage and Martha Mundy (eds.), Law, Anthropology and the Constitution of the Social: Making persons and things, 2004; Roy Rapapport, Ritual and Religion in the Making of Humanity, 1999; Annelise Riles, The Network Inside Out, 2000; Simon Roberts & John Comaroff, Rules & Processes, 1983; Simon Roberts, Order and Dispute, 1973; June Starr & Jane F Collier (Eds), History and Power in the Study of Law: New Directions in Legal Anthropology, 1989; Boaventura de Sousa Santos, Toward a New Common Sense: Law, Science and Politics in the Paradigmatic Transition, 1995; Marilyn Strathern, Property, Substance & Effect: Anthropological Essays on Persons and Things, 1999; Alain Supiot, Homo Juridicus: On the anthropological function of the law, 2007; Gunther Teubner (Ed), Global Law Without a State, 1997; Victor Turner, The Ritual Process, 1969; Annette Weiner, Inalienable Possessions. The Paradox of Keeping While Giving, 1992; Shelagh Weir, A Tribal Order: Politics and Law in the Mountains of Yemen, 2007; Barbara Yngvesson, Virtuous Citizens, Disruptive Subjects: Order and complaint in a New England court, 1993. Assessment A three-hour examination in the ST (100%). AN439 ANTHROPOLOGY AND HUMAN RIGHTS (HALF UNIT) Teacher responsible Dr Matthew Engelke, OLD.608 Availability For MSc Social Anthropology, MSc Anthropology and Development, MSc China in Comparative Perspective, MSc Human Rights, MSc Race, Ethnicity and Post-Colonial Studies and other degree programmes as permitted by the regulations. Course content The tension between respect for local cultures and universal rights is a pressing concern within human rights activism. In the past decade, anthropologists have been increasingly involved in these discussions, working to situate their understandings of cultural relativism within a broader framework of social justice. This course explores the contributions of anthropology to the theoretical and practical concerns of human rights work. The term begins by reading a number of key human rights documents and theoretical texts. These readings are followed by selections in anthropology on the concepts of relativism and culture. Students will then be asked to relate their understandings of human rights to the historical and cultural dimensions of a particular case, addressing such questions as the nature of humanity, historical conceptions of the individual, colonialism and imperialism, the limits of relativism, and the relationship between human rights in theory and in practice. Case studies will include: gay rights in southern Africa; genocide in Rwanda; state violence in Guatemala. Teaching Lectures weekly MT, seminars weekly MT. Formative coursework Students are expected to prepare discussion material for classes/seminars and are required to write Assessment essays. Indicative reading E Messer, 'Anthropology and Human Rights' Annual Review of Anthropology 1993; J Cowan et al (Eds), Culture and Rights: Anthropological Perspectives; R Wilson (Ed), Human Rights, Culture, and Context: Anthropological Perspectives;; T Turner, 'Human Rights, Human Difference: Anthropology's Contribution to an Emancipatory Cultural Politics' Journal of Anthropological Research 1997; T Asad, Formations of the Secular; P Farmer, On Structural Violence, Current Anthropology 1999; M Mamdani, When victims become killers; C Taylor, Sacrifice as Terror; R Menchu, I Rigoberta Menchu. Detailed reading lists are provided at the beginning of the course. Assessment There is a two-hour examination in the ST.

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AN451 - ANTHROPOLOGY OF POLITICS (HALF UNIT) Teacher responsible Dr Mathijs Pelkmans, OLD.613. Availability MSc Social Anthropology, MSc Anthropology and Development, MSc Anthropology of Learning and Cognition, MSc Law, Anthropology and Society, MSc China in Comparative Perspective, MSc Development Studies, MSc Human Rights, MSc Regulation and Regulation (Research), MSc Comparative Politics and MPA Public and Economic Policy/ MPA Public Policy and Management. Pre-requisites A background in the social sciences, preferably in anthropology. Course content This course focuses on the notion of power and its cross-cultural application. Using Marxist, Weberian, and Foucauldian approaches it explores how power travels through different socio-cultural contexts, paying attention to issues such as domination and resistance, patron-client relations, the mafia, revolution and violence. A recurring theme throughout the course concerns the state. How should the state be studied anthropologically? Processes of state formation and disintegration, nationalism in its various guises, and state-society relations will be reviewed in order to understand how European, post-colonial, and post-socialist societies are governed. Teaching Lectures weekly MT, Seminars weekly MT. Formative coursework Students will do presentations during seminars for which they will receive formative feedback. They will also have an opportunity to write tutorial essays on topics from the course which will be formatively assessed. Indicative reading Anderson, B 1991 [1983] Imagined communities: reflections on the origin and spread of nationalism; Asad, Talal 1973 Anthropology and the Colonial Encounter; Barth, F 1965 Political leadership among Swat Pathans; Blok, Anton 1988 The Mafia of a Sicilian Village 1860-1960; a study of violent peasant entrepreneurs; Evans-Pritchard, EE and M Fortes 1940 African Political Systems; Evans Pritchard, EE The Nuer; Gledhill, John 1994 Power and its disguises; Hansen, T B and F Stepputat (eds) 2001 States of Imagination: Ethnographic Explorations of the Postcolonial State; Leach, Edmund 1954 The Political Systems of Highland Burma; Mbembe, A 2001 On the Postcolony; Navaro-Yashin, Yael 2002 Faces of the state: secularism and public life in Turkey; J Vincent, 2002 The Anthropology of Politics Assessment There is a two-hour examination (100%) in the ST. AN456 - ANTHROPOLOGY OF ECONOMY (1): PRODUCTION AND EXCHANGE (HALF UNIT) Teacher responsible Dr Andrew Sanchez, KGS 2.09 Availability MSc Social Anthropology, MSc Anthropology and Development, MSc Anthropology of Learning and Cognition, and MSc Law, Anthropology and Society, MSc China in Comparative Perspective, MSc Development Studies, MSc Human Rights, MPA Public and Economic Policy/MPA Public Policy and Management/MPA International Development/MPA European Public and Economic Policy/MPA Public and Social Policy, MSc Regulation and MSc Regulation (Research). Course content The anthropological analysis of economic institutions cross-culturally; analysis of the relationship between production and exchange, gifts and commodities, and politics and the economy in a variety of settings. Indicative list of topics: key concepts and theoretical debates in economic anthropology; the social organization of production and exchange; economic aspects of kinship and gender relations; work and alienation; money as an agent of social change; distinctions between gifts and commodities. Pre-requisites A background in the social sciences, preferably in anthropology. Teaching Lectures weekly MT, seminars weekly MT.

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Formative coursework Students will do presentations during seminars for which they will receive formative feedback. They will also have an opportunity to write tutorial essays on topics from the course which will be formatively assessed. Indicative reading M Sahlins, Stone Age Economics (1974); J Parry & M Bloch (Eds), Money and the Morality of Exchange (1989); Carrier, James G. (ed), A handbook of Economic Anthropology (2005); Keith Hart, Money in an unequal world (2001). Detailed reading lists are provided at the beginning of the course. Assessment There is a two-hour examination (100%) in the ST. AN457 - ANTHROPOLOGY OF ECONOMY (2): DEVELOPMENT, TRANSFORMATION AND GLOBALISATION (HALF UNIT) Teacher responsible Dr Laura Bear, and Professor Deborah James, OLD 5.08 Availability MSc Social Anthropology, MSc Anthropology and Development, MSc Social Anthropology (Learning and Cognition), and MSc Law, Anthropology and Society, MSc China in Comparative Perspective, MSc Development Studies, MSc Human Rights, MPA Public and Economic Policy/MPA Public Policy and Management,/MPA International Development/MPA European Public and Economic Policy/MPA Public and Social Policy, MSc Regulation and MSc Regulation (Research). Pre-requisites A background in the social sciences, preferably anthropology. Course content The course addresses, in particular, topics in the anthropology of globalization. It undertakes analysis of the transformation of economic institutions as a result of their incorporation into a wider capitalist market (and of state policies and development initiatives). These themes are examined in relation to relevant theoretical debates and with reference to selected ethnography. The social and political impact of post-Fordism, flexible work regimes and the knowledge economy; the causes and consequences of transnationalism; local responses to the transition from peasant to proletarian; new social movements among peasant communities; the 'new consumer' and consumer citizenship; critiques of concepts of the informal economy and social capital from the perspective of post-socialist societies; capitalist and state interventions in the environment and local reactions to them; commoditization of bodies in biological citizenship; the spaces of neo-liberal cities. Teaching Lectures weekly LT, Seminars weekly LT. Formative coursework Students will do presentations during seminars for which they will receive formative feedback. They will also have an opportunity to write tutorial essays on topics from the course which will be formatively assessed. Indicative reading L.Basch et al Nations Unbound: (1994); C.Freeman, High Tech and High Heels in the Global Economy: women, work and pink-collar identities in the Carribean (2000); M.Mills, Thai Women and the Global Labour Force: consuming desires, contested selves (1999); M.Kearney, Reconceptualising the Peasantry: anthropology in a global perspective (1996); M. Buroway and K.Verdery (Eds) Uncertain Transitions: ethnographies of change in the post-socialist world; J.McGaffey, Congo/Paris: transnational traders on the margins of the law (2000); H.Moore and M. Vaughan, Cutting Down Trees: gender, nutrition and agricultural change in the Northern Province of Zambia, 1890-1990 (1994); J.Collier & A.Ong Global Assemblages: Technology, Politics and Ethics as Anthropological Problems. Assessment There is a two-hour examination (100%) in the ST. DEVELOPMENT STUDIES INSTITUTE (DESTIN) DV411 - POPULATION AND DEVELOPMENT: AN ANALYTICAL APPROACH (HALF UNIT)

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Teacher responsible Professor Tim Dyson CON. H804 Availability This course is for students taking MSc Population and Development, MSc Development Studies, MSc Development Management, MSc International Development and Humanitarian Emergencies, MSc Environment and Development, MSc Urbanisation and Development, LSE-Sciences Po Double Degree in Urban Policy (MSc Urbanisation and Development stream only), MSc Health, Population and Society, MSc Human Rights, MSc Biomedicine, Bioscience and Society, MSc Political Economy of Late Development, MPA International Development and MSc Social Research Methods only. It is also available to all other MSc students where regulations and numbers permit. Please note that in case of over-subscription to this course priority will be given to students from the Department of International Development and its joint degrees (where their regulations permit). Course content Using the demographic transition as its framework, the course examines different analytic approaches to the main interrelationships between population changes and socio-economic development. It draws on a variety of theoretical and historical experiences to address and explore these interconnections. It aims to provide balance between theoretical understanding, knowledge of empirical evidence and basic causal processes, and implications for policy. The course begins by providing an overview of the worlds current demographic situation at both the global and regional levels. It then addresses Malthusian and anti-Malthusian perspectives on the basic relationships linking population growth and economic growth. These contrasting perspectives are considered in the context of both historical and contemporary experience. The course then proceeds to assess demographic transition theories and their relationships to theories and processes of economic development, urbanisation and socio-structural change. Urban growth, migration, and urbanization receive special attention. The implications of population change for issues of employment, savings and investment are considered, as are issues relating to energy, food production and security, carbon emissions and climate change. Contemporary neo-Malthusian arguments, with their environmental components are also considered, as are issues relating to women's empowerment and population aging. Further details will be provided at the start of the session. Teaching 10 x one-and-a-half hour lectures and 9 x one-and-a-half hour seminars, Michaelmas Term. 1 x one-and-a-half revision seminar Summer Term. Formative coursework Students will be given the opportunity to undertake a 'mock examination' essay. This will be graded and accompanied by written feedback within two weeks of its submission. Indicative reading A detailed reading list will be provided. However, relevant readings include: T Dyson 'A partial theory of world development: The neglected role of the demographic transition in shaping modern society' in International Journal of Population Geography, 7, 2001; N. Birdsall, A C Kelley and S Sinding (eds) Population Matters: Demographic change, Economic Growth, and Poverty in the Developing World, Oxford University Press 2001; M Livi-Bacci A Concise History of World Population, Blackwell Publishers, Oxford 2001; T Dyson, Population and Food: Global Trends and Future Prospects, Routledge, 1996; R H Cassen (Ed), Population and Development: Old Debates, New Conclusions, Overseas Development Council, Washington DC, 1994; World Bank, Population Change and Economic Development, Washington DC, 1985; T Dyson, R H Cassen and L Visaria (eds) Twentyfirst Century India - Population, Economy, Human Development and the Environment, Oxford University Press, 2005. Assessment A two-hour written examination in the Summer Term (100%). DV418 - AFRICAN DEVELOPMENT (HALF UNIT) Teacher responsible Professor Thandika Mkandawire, CON. H802.

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Availability For students taking MSc Development Studies, MSc Development Management, MSc International Development and Humanitarian Emergencies, MSc Environment and Development, MSc Anthropology and Development, MSc Urbanisation and Development, LSE-Sciences Po Double Degree in Urban Policy (MSc Urbanisation and Development stream only), MSc Global Politics, MPA International Development, MSc Political Economy of Late Development and MSc Human Rights only. Please note that in case of over-subscription to this course priority will be given to students from the Department of International Development and its joint degrees (where their regulations permit). Course content The major concern of the course is with the political economy of African development, to examine processes of economic, political, social and cultural change in Sub-Saharan Africa. It provides critical analysis of key development interventions and processes. It seeks to combine general theoretical overviews with country case studies illustrating the variety of experiences and trajectories. It does not aim to provide a comprehensive coverage of development issues or of regions. Course content will vary from year to year, depending on the specialities of staff. Attention is paid to legacies of the colonial encounter; the constraints and opportunities presented by African countries' positions in the global economy; the political economy of industrialisation and agrarian transformation, resource mobilisation; trade diversification; institutional reforms and state capacity. Attention will also be paid to social policy with special focus on issues such as the HIV/AIDS pandemic, humanitarian and human rights interventions, horizontal inequality and conflict. Teaching The course will be taught through 10 lectures and 10 seminars, both lasting one-and-a-half hours in the Lent Term. Formative coursework Students will write a 2,000 word essay chosen from class questions and in discussion with the course leader, to be submitted by the beginning of week 6 of Lent Term. Indicative reading A detailed weekly reading list will be provided at the first course meeting. The following readings provide an introduction to the course: Paul Nugent, Africa Since Independence: A Comparative History, Palgrave Macmillan: 2004; Nick Van de Walle, African Economies and the Politics of Permanent Crisis, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2001; Robert Bates, Markets and States in Tropical Africa, Berkeley and Los Angeles: University of California Press, 1981; G. Hyden, No Shortcuts to Progress: African Development Management in Perspective, London: Heinemann, 1983; Mahmood Mamdani, Citizen and Subject: Contemporary Africa and the Legacy of Late Colonialism, London: James Currey, 1996; C Clapham, Africa and the International System, Cambridge: CUP, 1996; T Callaghy and J Ravenhill (eds), Hemmed In: Responses to Africa's Economic Decline, New York: Columbia University Press, 1993; R Joseph (ed.), State, Conflict and Democracy in Africa, Boulder, Co.: Lynn Rienner, 1999; B Wisner, C Toulmin and R Chitiga (eds) Towards a New Map of Africa, London: Earthscan, 2005. W Harbeson and D Rothchild ed.: Africa in World Politics: Reforming Political Order (4th edition: 2009). Hossein Jalilian, Michael Tribe and John Weiss eds. Cheltenham, Industrial Development and Policy in Africa - Issues of De-Industrialisation and Development Strategy. UK: Edward Elgar, Mkandawire, Thandika and Charles Soludo. 1999. Our Continent, Our Future: African Perspectives on Structural Adjustment. Dakar/Trenton, NJ: CODESRIA/African World Publications, Moss, Todd J. 2007. African development: making sense of the issues and actors. Boulder: Lynne Rienner Publishers; UNCTAD. 2002. Economic Development in Africa: From Adjustment to Poverty Reduction: What is New. Geneva: United nations.; White, Howard and Tony Killick. 2001. African poverty at the millennium: causes, complexities, and challenges. Washington, DC: World Bank.; World Bank. 2000. Can Africa Claim the 21st Century? Washington, DC: World Bank., Belshaw, Deryke and Ian Livingstone eds. 2003. Renewing development in Sub-Saharan Africa: policy, performance and prospects. London: Vishnu Padayachee (ed),2010 The Political Economy of Africa Routledge.

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Assessment Two-hour exam (80%) in the Summer Term and 2,000 word essay (20%). The essay will be on a different topic to the formative essay and is due on the first day of Summer Term. DV420 - COMPLEX EMERGENCIES (HALF UNIT) Teacher responsible Professor David Keen, CON. H715 Availability For students taking MSc Development Management, MSc Development Studies, MSc Anthropology and Development, MSc International Development and Humanitarian Emergencies, MSc Population and Development, MSc Environment and Development, MSc Urbanisation and Development, LSE-Sciences Po Double Degree in Urban Policy (MSc Urbanisation and Development stream only), MSc Human Rights, MPA International Development, MSc Global Politics, MSc NGOs and Development and MSc Health, Community and Development only. Please note that in case of over-subscription to this course priority will be given to students from the Department of International Development and its joint degrees (where their regulations permit). Course content The course examines the consequences and causes of humanitarian disasters. It looks at the changing nature of civil conflicts, at the famine process, and at the benefits that may arise for some groups from war and famine. It examines some of the roots of violence in civil wars, as well as the information systems that surround and help to shape disasters. Teaching The course will be taught in Michaelmas Term and will consist of 10 lectures of one-and-ahalf hours and nine seminars of one-and-a-half hours. Formative coursework Students will have the opportunity to receive feed back on formative work, in the form of a practice assessed essay. Indicative reading A detailed weekly reading list will be provided at the first course meeting. A useful text, which is designed in large part around the course, is David Keen, Complex Emergencies (Polity, 2008). Other texts of interest include Stathis Kalyvas, The Logic of Violence in Civil War (Cambridge University Press, 2006); David Keen, Conflict and Collusion in Sierra Leone (James Currey, 2005); David Keen, Endless War? Hidden Functions of the 'War on Terror' (Pluto, 2006); Michael Mann, The Dark Side of Democracy: Explaining Ethnic Cleansing (Cambridge University Press, 2005); Amartya Sen, Poverty and Famines (Oxford University Press, 1981); Frances Stewart and Valpy FitzGerald (eds.), War and Underdevelopment, Volumes 1 and 2 (Oxford University Press, 2001); and Jeremy Weinstein, Inside Violence: The Politics of Insurgent Violence (Cambridge University Press, 2007); Tim Allen, Trial Justice: The International Criminal Court and the Lord's Resistance Army (Zed Press, 2006), Chris Dolan, Social Torture: The Case of Northern Uganda, 1986-2006 (Berghahn, 2009); Zoe Marriage, Not Breaking the Rules, Not Playing the Game: International Assistance to Countries in Conflict (Hurst and Co., 2006); Christopher Cramer, Civil War is Not a Stupid Thing: Accounting for Violence in Developing Countries (Hurst and Co., 2006); Mats Berdal and David Malone, Greed and Grievance: Economic Agendas in Civil Wars (Lynne Rienner, 2000); Hugo Slim, Killing Civilians: Method, Madness and Morality in War (Hurst and Co., 2008). Assessment essay of no more than 2000 words due on first day of Lent Term (20%) and an unseen two-hour examination in the Summer Term worth 80%. DV428 - MANAGING HUMANITARIANISM (HALF UNIT) Teacher responsible Dr Katy Long. Availability For students taking MSc Development Management, MSc Development Studies, MSc Anthropology and Development, MSc International Development and Humanitarian Emergencies, MSc Population and Development, MSc Environment and Development, MSc Political Economy of Late Development, MSc Human Rights, MPA Programme (all streams), MSc Global Politics, MSc NGOs

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and Development and MSc Health, Community and Development. Students taking other degrees may only take this half unit with the permission of the International Development administrators. Please note that in case of over-subscription to this course priority will be given to students from the Department of International Development and its joint degrees (where their regulations permit). Course content The course looks at international, national and local responses to humanitarian disasters and civil wars, with a specific focus on efforts to ameliorate social, economic and political processes. Building on analysis of the consequences and causes of humanitarian disasters (the primary focus of DV420 - Complex Emergencies), this course focuses on the activities of humanitarian actors (including aid workers, journalists, medics, government officials, soldiers, politicians and peace negotiators). It covers both issues relating to humanitarian assistance and humanitarian intervention, and explores the overlaps and tensions between the two. It will also examine ways in which populations that are on the receiving end of humanitarian projects and programmes respond to them, and in some cases subvert or transform them into quite different directions to those anticipated. Case studies will be drawn mostly from Africa. However, there is also likely to be discussion of ongoing humanitarian emergencies, wherever they are located. Teaching The course will be taught in the Lent Term and will consist of 10 lectures of two-hours, 10 film sessions of two hours, and ten seminars of one-and-a-half hours. Formative coursework Students will write a practice essay under take-home exam conditions, not exceeding 2,000 words. Essay topics will relate to class presentations. Students will receive an indicative grade and written feedback before the end of the term. Indicative reading Nicholas J. Wheeler Saving Strangers: Humanitarian Intervention in International Society, Oxford: Oxford U.P. De Waal, A. 1997. Famine Crimes: Politics and the Disaster Relief Industry in Africa. London: James Currey. Gil Loescher (2001) The UNHCR and World Politics, Oxford University Press. David Rieff (2002) A Bed For the Night: Humanitarianism in Crisis, Vintage/Random House. Assessment A take-home examination (100%). The paper will be released via the course Moodle site at 1800 hrs, Friday 4th May for electronic submission by 1800 hrs on Monday, 7th May. Please note that as this is a three-day take-home examination, extensions for disabilities will not apply. Students who cannot commit to be available for the exam period may NOT register for this course. DV429 GLOBAL CIVIL SOCIETY I (HALF UNIT) Teacher responsible Dr Sabine Selchow Other teachers: Professor Mary Kaldor Availability Core course for the Global Civil Society stream of MSc Global Politics. Optional for MSc Anthropology and Development, MSc Development Management, MSc Development Studies, MSc International Development and Humanitarian Emergencies, MSc Human Rights, MSc Gender, Development and Globalisation, general MSc Global Politics and, depending on the available space, open to students from other departments in the school. Course content Civil society has come to be considered as an essential component in contemporary global politics, taken either as a normative concept linked to the idea of democracy or as a descriptive concept referring to the activism of NGOs, social movements, and global advocacy networks. This course provides students with the conceptual and empirical background that allows them to critically engage with the complex debate over global civil society and to assess the potential and the challenges of civil society activism in the context of our increasingly globalising world. The course engages with both, the normative as well as the empirical side of the issue. Against the backdrop of the increasing complexity of the political challenges that are linked to global integration, we will explore the history of the concept of civil society and discuss the hopes, tasks and potentials that are currently ascribed to it. The course covers the characteristics, repertoires and impacts of key global civil society actors, such as NGOs, social movements, nationalist groups, religious movements and global advocacy networks. It explores the role of media in contemporary

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global activism, critically discusses issues such as political consumerism and internet activism, and debates the dichotomy of idealism and professionalisation in contemporary politics. Two of the conceptual foci, which will guide our debates, are the issue of the increasing privatization of global politics and the complex set of problems surrounding global civil society and democracy. Hence, key concepts such as public-private-partnerships, representation, legitimacy, accountability, and transparency will be critically discussed. Our readings cover key texts on globalisation, global politics & development, NGOs, social movements and advocacy networks. Teaching The course is taught in Lent Term and will consist of 10 lectures and 9 classes which will be student-led. Formative coursework Two non-assessed essays (not more than 1,200 words) during term and at least one presentation.. Indicative reading A detailed reading list will be presented at the beginning of the term. A basic introductory text is: Kaldor, Mary (2003) Global Civil Society: An Answer to War Cambridge: Polity Press. Assessment The course will be assessed by one 3-5,000 words essay (40%) due on the first day of Summer Term. The assessed essay can be an extension of one of the two non-assessed essays. A twohour unseen examination in Summer Term (60%). EUROPEAN INSTITUTE EU457 - ETHNIC DIVERSITY AND INTERNATIONAL SOCIETY (HALF UNIT) Teacher responsible Dr J Jackson Preece, COW. J206 Availability For MSc European Studies (Research), MSc European Studies: Ideas and Identities, MSc Politics and Government in the European Union, MSc Global Politics, MSc Comparative Politics, MSc Human Rights and LSE-Sciences Po Double Degree in European Studies. Other students may attend subject to numbers, their own degree regulations and at the discretion of the teacher responsible. This is a capped course (15 students). Students are required to obtain permission from the teaching department to take this course Course content This course problems and practices of ethnic diversity in a world of nation-states including self-determination, boundaries, security, democracy, human rights, national minorities, indigenous peoples, humanitarian intervention, and international criminal law. In analysing these issues, particular attention will be paid to the relationship between evolving international norms (as disclosed in treaties, conventions, international organisations and political discourse) and changing state practices. Teaching 10 x 2 hour lectures/seminars (LT); 1 x 2 hour revision lecture/seminar (ST) Formative coursework One essay (2,000-2,500 words) Indicative reading A Bozeman, Politics and Culture in International History, 1960, A Buchanan, Secession ; H Bull & A Watson (Eds), The Expansion of International Society, 1984; A Cassesse, SelfDetermination of Peoples, 1995; A Cobban, The Nation-State and National Self-Determination, 1970; R Jackson, The Global Covenant, 2000; H Kohn, The Idea of Nationalism, 1944; W McKean, Equality and Discrimination Under International Law, 1985; J Mayall, Nationalism and International Society, 1990. A more detailed reading list is available from Dr Jackson-Preece. Assessment One two-hour written examination in ST (100%). EU458 - IDENTITY, COMMUNITY AND THE 'PROBLEMS OF MINORITIES' (HALF UNIT) Teacher responsible Dr J Jackson-Preece, COW. J206

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Availability This is a core course option on MSc European Studies: Ideas and Identities and the LSESciences Po Double Degree in MSc European Studies: Ideas and Identities. Students on MSc Politics and Government in the European Union can take this course, if space permits. This is a capped course (20 students). Students are required to obtain permission from the teaching department to take this course. Course content This course investigates what we might conveniently term the "problem of minorities" in contemporary politics. It will interrogate both the substance of this "problem" and the various public policy responses it has provoked. Key questions to be considered include: Why is the existence of minorities so often regarded as a threat to political community? Does stability really require homogeneity? Or can it be maintained in the presence of different minority groups? Will a minority rights response finally resolve the "problem of minorities"? Or is a permanent solution likely to remain illusive? Teaching 10 x 2 hour lectures/seminars (LT); 1 x 2 hour revision lecture/seminar (ST) Formative coursework Students are required to write two essays. Indicative reading J. Jackson-Preece, Minority Rights: Between Diversity and Community, 2005; J. Jackson-Preece, National Minorities and the European Nation-State System, 1998; W. Kymlicka, Multicultural Citizenship, 1995; W. Kymlicka, ed., The Rights of Minority Cultures, 1995; C. Macartney, Nation States and National Minorities, 1934; J. Laponce, The Protection of Minorities, 1960; I. Claude, National Minorities, an International Problem, 1955; P. Thornberry, International Law and the Rights of Minorities. A more detailed reading list is available from Dr Jackson-Preece. Assessment One two-hour written examination in ST (100%) GENDER INSTITUTE GI407 GLOBALISATION, GENDER AND DEVELOPMENT Teachers responsible Dr Marsha Henry and Professor Diane Perrons. Availability Compulsory for MSc Gender, Development and Globalisation; and recommended for LSESciences PO Double Degree in Urban Policy, MSc Gender, MSc Gender, Policy and Inequalities, MSc Global Politics, MSc Human Rights, MSc Human Geography and Urban Studies (Research), MSc Management, MSc Development Studies, MSc Development Management, MSc Social Policy and Development, MSc Race, Ethnicity and Post-Colonial Studies, PhD Programme in Human Geography, PhD Programme in Planning Studies, MPhil/PhD in Regional and Urban Planning. Other suitably qualified and interested graduate students may take or audit the course with the permission of the teacher responsible. Note that this course cannot be combined with GI409 Gender, Globalisation and Development: An Introduction. Course content This course will provide students with a thorough knowledge of two key interconnected and intersecting literatures: gender and development and gender and globalisation. The course provides students with an introduction to the history of the field of gender and development studies (from women in development to gender, development and culture) and an examination of some of the consequences of contemporary economic, social and spatial restructuring and how globalisation is associated with widening social, spatial and gender inequalities. The course is organised as a number of themed blocks including Part 1: definitions and concepts; contemporary theories of gender, development and globalisation; postcolonial and anti-racist critiques and gender, and poverty Part 2: work, migration and global divisions; regulating bodies; governmentality and security; and changes, challenges and policies. The course draws on a wide range of perspectives and

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considers diverse analytical tools for the analysis of gender, development and globalisation. Emphasis is placed on the analysis and theorisation of socio-economic and spatial aspects of change, particularly changes in working patterns, living arrangements, experiences and subjectivities. Empirical illustrations are provided through a series of case studies and readings of ethnographies linking global and local issues and the lives of people across the globe. Teaching MT 10 x one-hour lecture and 10 x one-hour seminar, LT 10 x one-hour lecture and 10 x 1hour seminars. Formative coursework One formative essay (1,500 words, excluding bibliography), due in MT. Indicative reading L Benera, Gender, Development and Globalization: Economics as if All people Mattered, Routledge 2003;. D Held and A. Kaya Global Inequality (ed) ,Polity, 2007 N Kabeer, The Power to Choose: Bangladeshi Women and Labour Market Decisions in London and Dhaka, Verso, 2003; A. Ong (1999), Flexible Citizenship, Duke University Press; D Perrons, Globalization and Social Change, Routledge (2004); L Rofel (2007) Desiring China Duke University Press; A, 1999, Sen, Development as Freedom, Anchor Books, 2000. H Afshar & S Barrientos (Eds), Women, Globalisation and Fragmentation in the Developing World, 1999; W Benedek, E Kisaakye & G Oberleitner (Eds), Human Rights of Women: International Instruments and African Experiences, 2002; S.Chant Gender, Generation and Poverty, 2007; S Chant with N Craske, Gender in Latin America, 2003; S Chant & M Gutmann, Mainstreaming Men into Gender and Development: Debates, Reflections and Experiences, 2000; A.Cornwall, E.Harrison & A.Whitehead (Eds) Feminisms in Development, 2007; A.Cornwall and M.Molyneux (Eds) The Politics of Rights: Dilemmas for Feminist Praxis, 2008; C Jackson & R Pearson (Eds), Feminist Visions of Development, 1998; J.Jaquette & G. Summerfield (Eds), Women and Gender Equity in Development Theory and Practice, 2006; N Kabeer, Gender Mainstreaming in Poverty Eradication and the Millennium Development Goals, 2003; M Marchand & J Parpart (Ed), Feminism/Postmodernism/Development, 1995; J.Momsen (Ed) Gender and Development: Critical Concepts in Development Studies, 2008; K Saunders (Ed), Feminist Post-Development Thought,2002; UNRISD, Gender Equality: Striving for Justice in an Unequal World, 2005; UNFPA State of the World's Population 2006: A Passage to Hope, Women and International Migration, 2006; UNMP/TFEGE Taking Action: Achieving Gender Equality and Empowering Women, 2005; Women's International Coalition for Social Justice (Eds), Seeking Accountability on Women's Human Rights, 2004. P. Ngia (2006) Made in China, Duke University Press L.Zhang and A. Ong, (eds) 2008 Privatizing China: Socialism from Afar, Cornell University Press; S. Chant (ed) 2010 International Handbook of Gender and Poverty: Concepts, Research, Policy, Edward Elgar. Assessment One 4,000 word essay (50%) due in MT and one 4,000 word essay due in ST (50%). GI409 GLOBALISATION AND GENDER (HALF UNIT) Teachers responsible Dr Marsha Henry and Professor Diane Perrons. Availability MSc Gender; MSc Gender (Research); MSc Gender, Policy and Inequalities; MSc Gender, Media and Culture; MSc Environment and Development; MSc Human Geography and Urban Studies (Research); MSc Regional and Urban Planning Studies; MSc Human Rights, MSc Global Politics. Other suitably qualified and interested graduate students may take or audit the course with the permission of the teacher responsible. The course cannot be taken alongside GI407 Globalisation, Gender and Development. Course content The course provides students with an introduction to the history of the field of gender, globalisation and development studies; it provides an analysis of how globalisation is associated with widening social, spatial and gender inequalities and an examination of some of the consequences of contemporary economic, social and spatial restructuring on the organisation of daily

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life in the Global North and South The course is organised as follows: definitions and concepts; contemporary theories of gender, development and globalisation; postcolonial and anti-racist perspectives on globalisation and development and gender and poverty. Teaching 10 x 1 hour lecture, and 10 x 1 hour seminar MT. Formative coursework One formative essay (1,500 words, excluding bibliography). Indicative reading L Benera, Gender, Development and Globalization: Economics as if All people Mattered, Routledge 2003; C. Bose, and M. Kim, (eds) Global Gender Research, Routledge, 2009. ; J L Collins, Threads: Gender, Labor, and Power in the Global Apparel Industry, University of Chicago Press, 2003. M. Hardt and A. Negri Empire, Harvard University Press, 2000; D. Held and A. Kaya, Global Inequality (ed), Polity, 2007 ; N Kabeer, The Power to Choose: Bangladeshi Women and Labour Market Decisions in London and Dhaka, Verso, 2003; R. Kaplinski, Globalization, Poverty and Inequality, Polity, 2005; P. Ngai Made in China: Women Factory Workers in a Global Workplace, Duke University Press, 2005 A. Ong Neoliberalism as Exception: Mutations in Citizenship and Sovereignty, Duke University Press, 2007; D Perrons, Globalization and Social Change, Routledge 2004; N. Piper, New Perspectives on Gender and Migration: Livelihood, Rights and Entitlements, Routledge, 2005; L Rofel, Desiring China: Experiments in Neoliberalism, Sexuality and Public Culture, Duke University Press, 2007; I van Staveren, D Elson, N Cagatay and C Grown, Feminist Economics of Trade, Routledge, 2007. Assessment One essay of 4,000 words (100%) due in the Michaelmas term. GI413 GENDER AND MILITARISATION(HALF UNIT) Teacher responsible Dr Marsha Henry, COL. B513. Availability MSc Gender, MSc Gender (Research), MSc Gender, Development and Globalisation, MSc Gender, Policy and Inequalities, MSc Gender, Media and Culture, MSc Comparative Politics (Conflict stream), MSc Human Rights, MSc International Relations, MSc International Relations (Research), and MSc International Relations Theory. Also available to students taking MSc International Relations as part of the LSE-Sciences Po Double Degree in Affaires Internationales. Course content This course will provide students with a general introduction to militarisation and in particular its gendered basis and effects. Students will be introduced to social critiques of militarisation, gender issues within a variety of national militaries including issues of diversity in recruitment and retention, and men's and women's experiences of conflict and peace. Teaching Ten hours of lectures and 10 hours of seminars in MT. Formative coursework A 1,000 word essay in week 7. Indicative reading Cynthia Cockburn. 2007. From Where We Stand: War, Women's Activism & Feminist Analysis. London, UK: Zed Books. Joshua Goldstein 2003 War and Gender: How Gender Shapes the War System and Vice Versa, Cambridge, Cambridge University Press. Zillah Eisenstein. 2007. Sexual Decoys: Gender, Race, and War in Imperial Democracy. London, UK: Zed Books. Cynthia Enloe. 2000. Maneuvers: The International Politics of Militarizing Women's Lives. Berkeley, CA: University of California Press. Robin Riley and Naeem Inayatullah. 2006. Interrogating Imperialism: Conversations on Gender, Race, and War. New York, NY: Palgrave Macmillan. Assessment One 4,000 word essay due in the first week of LT (100%). DEPARTMENT OF GOVERNMENT GV408 - CONTEMPORARY DISPUTES ABOUT JUSTICE (HALF UNIT) Teacher responsible Dr Katrin Flikschuh

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Availability For MSc Political Theory, MSc Political Theory (Research) and MSc Human Rights. Students from other programmes may take this course, subject to space. Course content The course offers a critical analysis of some of the debates about distributive justice following the publication of John Rawls' A Theory of Justice in 1971. The focus is a) on Rawlsian and post-Rawlsian methods of normative justifications in relation to distributive justice, and b) on the extension of Rawls' domestic theory of justice to the global domain. The course begins with an overview of Rawls' theory of justice and goes on to consider some critical responses to it. However, primary focus will be on Rawlsian global justice. Particular attention will be paid to the way in which issues of scope are introduced and dealt with methodologically and substantively. We shall consider attempted early extensions of the Rawlsian difference principle to the global domain and ensuing wider global justice debates, including human rights and arguments for humanitarian intervention. We shall ask whether scope-related issues affect the very way in which we conceive of justice, or whether they merely pose new substantive problems which can, in principle, be solved through the framework of traditional and domestic theories of justice such as Rawls'. Teaching 10 two-hour seminars in the MT and one-to-one advice session on writing the assessed essay in the ST. Formative coursework All students are expected to submit two non-assessed essays which will be marked and commented on but which do not count towards formal assessment of this course. Indicative reading J. Rawls, A Theory of Justice, R. Nozick, Anarchy, State and Utopia, R. Dworkin, Sovereign Virtue, Thomas Scanlon, What we owe to each other; Charles Beitz, Political Theory and International Relations, Thomas Pogge, World Poverty and Human Right; Onora O'Neill, Bounds of Justice; Charles Beitz, The Idea of Human Rights. Assessment One 6,000 word essay submitted at the end of week 6 of the ST (100%). GV442 - GLOBALIZATION AND DEMOCRACY (HALF UNIT) Teacher responsible Mathias Koenig-Archibugi Availability Students on MSc Global Politics are guaranteed access. Optional course for MSc Comparative Politics, MPA Public and Economic Policy/MPA Public Policy and Management/MPA International Development/MPA European Public and Economic Policy/MPA Public and Social Policy, MSc Management and MSc Human Rights. Students on MA/MSc History of International Relations, MA/MSc History of International Relations, MSc Empires, Colonialisation and Globalisation, MSc Global Media and Communications (with Fudan or USC) and other LSE graduate programmes may follow this course, space permitting. Course content The contemporary debate about globalisation raises profound questions about the changing nature and form of politics today. This course examines two dimensions of the debate: the impact of various forms of globalization on democratic and democratizing states, and the prospects for the democratization of global politics. The course covers the following topics: 1) how democracy within states, both in affluent and developing countries, is affected by various dimensions of globalization, notably international trade and financial flows, transnational companies, migration and international institutions; and 2) whether and how global politics can be made more democratic, including an examination of the role played by international organizations, transnational activist networks and novel governance initiatives. Teaching 10 seminars in the MT and two in the ST. Formative coursework Students will produce one 2,000 word essay. Indicative reading D. Held, Democracy and the Global Order, Polity, 1995; L. Diamond, Can the Whole World Become Democratic? Center for the Study of Democracy, 2003; B. Russett, A Fourth Wave?

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The Role of International Actors in Democratization, in International Perspectives on Contemporary Democracies, University of Illinois Press, 2008; D. Brady et al. The Consequences of Economic Globalization for Affluent Democracies, Annual Review of Sociology, 33, 2007; L. Mosley, The Political Economy of Globalization, in Globalization Theory, Polity Press, 2007; R. Keohane et al. "DemocracyEnhancing Multilateralism" International Organization 63, 2009; D. Held and M. Koenig-Archibugi (eds) Global Governance and Public Accountability, Blackwell 2005; D. Archibugi, The Global Commonwealth of Citizens, Princeton University Press, 2008; K. Macdonald and T. Macdonald, Democracy in a Pluralist Global Order: Corporate Power and Stakeholder Representation, Ethics & International Affairs 24, 2010; M. Koenig-Archibugi, Is Global Democracy Possible? European Journal of International Relations, 2010. Assessment A 3,000 word assessed essay due at the end of the first week of the Lent Term will determine 50% of the final course mark. A two-hour written examination in the Summer Term will determine the remaining 50% of the final course mark. GV443 - THE STATE AND POLITICAL INSTITUTIONS IN LATIN AMERICA (HALF UNIT) Teacher responsible Professor George Philip Availability For MSc Comparative Politics (Democracy and Latin America streams) and MSc Human Rights. MSc Global Politics, MSc Media, Communication and Development and other graduate students may follow the course with permission. Course content The main political actors and institutions influencing the condition of democracy Latin America. Thematic study of political actors and institutions in Latin America including the state, presidentialism, populism and caudillismo, political parties, the private sector and labour, civil society,, accountability, the rule of law and human rights, democratic consolidation and unconsolidation. Focus on plurality of theories and frameworks of analysis with aim of developing skills for independent analysis of the advances and setbacks of democracy in the region. Teaching 10 lectures (GV443.1) and seminars (GV443.2) in the MT and one revision seminar in the ST. Formative coursework All students are expected to submit one non-assessed essay. Indicative reading L. Diamond, M. F. Plattner and D. Abente Brum (eds) Latin America's Struggle for Democracy; F. Hagopian and S. P. Mainwarikg (edts) The Third Wave of Democratization in Latin America; F. Aguero, & J. Stark (eds), Fault Lines of Democracy in Post-Transition Latin America; G. Philip, Democracy in Latin America; G. O'Donnell, 'Delegative Democracy' Journal of Democracy 5, 1; P. A. Smith and R. Ziegler 'Liberal and Illiberal Democracy in Latin America' Latin American Politics and Society 50 (1). S. Mainwaring and M. Shugart, Presidentialism and Democracy in Latin America; K. M. Roberts, 'The Mobilization of Opposition to Economic Liberalization' American Review of Political Science11. J; J, Mndez, (et al) The (Un) Rule of Law & the Underprivileged in Latin America; B. De Sousa Santos, Democratizing Democracy: Beyond the Liberal Democratic Canon. Assessment Two-hour unseen written examination in the ST (75%). One 3,000 word essay to be handed in by the second week of the Lent Term (25%). GV465 WAR, PEACE AND THE POLITICS OF NATIONAL SELF-DETERMINATION Teacher responsible Professor Sumantra Bose Availability Priority will generally be given to students taking the MSc Comparative Politics. Students on other programmes (including MSc Global Politics, MSc Human Rights, MSc Empires, Colonialism, Globalisation and MA/MSc History of International Relations) are welcome to apply, but can be admitted only subject to availability of space. All Students are required to obtain permission from the

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teaching department to take this course. This is a capped course and admission cannot be guaranteed. All interested students must apply online as per the stipulated procedure and deadline. Course content This course examines some of the most intractable and violent disputes over sovereignty and national self-determination in the world today, and inquires into the prospects of moving from war to peace through accommodation and compromise. The conflicts studied are drawn from the Middle East (Israel and Palestine), South Asia (Kashmir, Sri Lanka), the Balkans (former Yugoslavia and within it, Bosnia-Herzegovina and Kosovo) and the EU area (Northern Ireland, Cyprus). Students are exposed to the specific histories and contexts of these cases but are also encouraged to think comparatively across countries and regions. The course materials are online on Moodle, the LSE's electronic teaching and learning system. Are disputes arising from conflicting claims to national self-determination inherently of a zero-sum nature, or can they be resolved? If the latter, how? What factors drive conflict at the local level? Which sorts of institutional arrangements might be able to anchor peace settlements? Can we draw useful comparative lessons from the experience of peace processes that have sought or seek to craft solutions to this type of conflict in diverse parts of the contemporary world? What roles can international actorsinfluential and/or interested foreign states, regional alliances of states, multilateral institutionsplay in such processes and their outcomes? Teaching 10 seminars in the MT, and two seminars in the first and second weeks of the ST. The first meeting is a set-up and introductory session and the last a revision session. Formative coursework Students will be required to prepare and make at least one seminar presentation and write one unassessed essay of 2,000 words due in Week 10 of the MT. Indicative reading S Bose, Contested Lands: Israel-Palestine, Kashmir, Bosnia, Cyprus and Sri Lanka (2007); E Said, The Question of Palestine (1980); B Wasserstein, Israel and Palestine (2004); J McGarry (Ed), Northern Ireland and the Divided World (2001); S Bose, Kashmir: Roots of Conflict, Paths to Peace (2003); D Hannay, Cyprus: The Search for a Solution (2005); S Bose, Bosnia after Dayton: Nationalist Partition and International Intervention (2002); S Bose, States, Nations, Sovereignty: Sri Lanka, India and the Tamil Eelam Movement (1994). Assessment A 5,000-word research paper will determine 100% of the final grade. The deadline for submission of the paper is the end of Week 5 of the ST. GV4B7 THE LIBERAL IDEA OF FREEDOM (HALF UNIT) Teacher responsible Professor Chandran Kukathas Availability Optional for MSc Political Theory and MSc Political Theory (Research); open to others on request. Course content Analysis and critical assessment of divergent conceptions of freedom in contemporary liberal political thinking. The liberal idea of freedom does not constitute a unitary concept. The widespread assumption that is does is largely due to Gerald MacCallum's influential analysis of 'freedom' as a 'triadic concept', which repudiates Isaiah Berlin's seminal distinction between 'negative freedom' and 'positive freedom'. This course re-examines the classic Berlin/MacCallum debate in the light of divergent contemporary liberal conceptions of freedom. Following an initial assessment of that debate, we shall turn our attention, first, to the two very different liberal conceptions of negative freedom proposed by Robert Nozick and Hillel Steiner respectively and, second, to the equally different liberal accounts of positive freedom developed by Ronald Dworkin and Joseph Raz. We will additionally examined the work of two further thinkers Amartya Sen and Onora O'Neill - who importantly extend the meaning of liberal freedom both substantively (Sen) and conceptually (O'Neill). Our critical comparative analysis of these distinctive

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and even conflicting approaches of liberal freedom will show that the idea of freedom remains an 'essentially contested concept' within liberal political theory. Our analyses will also give rise to a number of related metaphysical and substantive issues. These include, the prevalence of conflicting liberal conceptions of the person; differences in the articulation of the relation between individual freedom and political responsibility; and disagreement concerning the proper role of the market relative to liberal political morality. Throughout the course we shall be paying particular attention to the universalisability of each of the four accounts of liberal freedom, and shall assess their practical plausibility within an increasingly global moral and political context. Teaching 10 two-hour seminars in the LT and two revision seminars in the ST. Formative coursework All students are expected to submit two non-assessed essays. Indicative reading Isaiah Berlin,'Two Concepts of Liberty' in Berlin, Liberty (edited by Henry Hardy); Gerald MacCallum, 'Negative and Positive Freedom', in Philosophical Review, Vol 76 (1967); Ian Carter, A Measure of Freedom; Matthew Kramer, The Quality of Freedom; John Gray, Liberalisms; Richard Flathman, The Philosophy and Politics of Freedom; John Christman (Ed), The Inner Citadel. Essays on Individual Autonomy; Robert Nozick, Anarchy, State, and Utopia; Hillel Steiner, An Essay on Rights; Joseph Raz, The Morality of Freedom; Amartya Sen, Development as Freedom; Gary Watson (ed), Free Will; Phillip Pettit, A Theory of Freedom.Isaiah Berlin,'Two Concepts of Liberty' in Berlin, Liberty (edited by Henry Hardy); Gerald MacCallum, 'Negative and Positive Freedom', in Philosophical Review, Vol 76 (1967); Ian Carter, A Measure of Freedom; Matthew Kramer, The Quality of Freedom; John Gray, Liberalisms; Richard Flathman, The Philosophy and Politics of Freedom; John Christman (Ed), The Inner Citadel. Essays on Individual Autonomy; Robert Nozick, Anarchy, State, and Utopia; Hillel Steiner, An Essay on Rights; Joseph Raz, The Morality of Freedom; Amartya Sen, Development as Freedom; Gary Watson (ed), Free Will; Phillip Pettit, A Theory of Freedom. Assessment Assessment will consist of an extended essay of between 4,000-5,000 words based on a topic examined in the course. The essay provides 100% of the formal assessment for this course (i.e., there are no examinations). DEPARTMENT OF INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS IR422 - CONFLICT AND PEACE STUDIES Teacher responsible Mr M Hoffman, OLD 2.02 Availability Course intended primarily for MSc International Relations, MSc International Relations (Research), MSc International Relations Theory, [MSc Theory and History of International Relations], MSc Global Politics, and LSE-PKU Double Degree in MSc International Affairs. MSc Comparative Politics (Stream 5), MSc International Development and Humanitarian Emergencies, and MSc Human Rights with permission of the course teacher. Also available to students taking MSc International Relations or MSc International Political Economy as part of the LSE-Sciences Po Double Degree in Affaires Internationales programme. Open to other interested students where regulations permit. All students are required to obtain permission from the Teacher Responsible by completing the Student Statement box on the online application form linked to course selection on LSEforYou. Admission is not guaranteed. Pre-requisites A basic background knowledge of the subject would be an advantage. Course content This course is intended for those interested in theoretical and practical approaches to the question of peace, the problems of conflict and violence, and responses to them particularly in the form of liberal peacebuilding and statebuilding. The course is divided into three unequal but interconnected parts. The first part examines ideas and debates about the causes, contexts, dynamics

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and characterisations of conflict. The second explores and problematises the nature and meanings of peace and peacebuilding. This leads into the third section which is concerned with a critical engagement with the range of international responses to conflict associated with the discourses and practices of liberal peacebuilding and statebuilding. The seminars explore the nexus between theory and practice. Although the course and its readings are mainly theoretical and conceptual rather than empirical, students are encouraged to apply the ideas to actual cases, past and present. Teaching Ten one-and-a-half hour lectures (IR422) beginning week one of MT; 20 one-and-a-half hour seminars (IR422.1) beginning in week two of MT, plus two revision seminars in ST. Lectures covering case studies will also be given during LT; further details to be announced. There will be two revision lectures in weeks 1 and 2 of ST. Formative coursework Two 2,500-word essays, marked by the seminar teacher. One two-page outline of assessed essay. Indicative reading A detailed reading guide will provided at the first meeting. Useful survey texts are: Oliver Ramsbotham, Hugh Miall and Tom Woodhouse, Contemporary Conflict Resolution: The Prevention, Management and Transformation of Deadly Conflicts, 2nd ed (Polity, 2005); Chester Crocker, Fen Osler Hampson and Pamela Aall (eds), Leashing the Dogs of War (USIP, 2007); David Keen, Complex Emergencies (Polity, 2007); Karen Ballantine and Jake Sherman (eds), The Political Economy of Armed Conflict: Beyond Greed and Grievance (Lynne Rienner, 2004); Oliver Richmond, The Transformation of Peace (Palgrave, 2006); Chester Crocker, Fen Osler Hampson and Pamela Aall (eds), Herding Cats: Multiparty Mediation in a Complex World (USIP, 1999); Peter Wallensteen, Understanding Conflict Resolution, 2nd ed (London: Sage, 2007). Assessment One 4,000 word assessed essay due in week 6 of LT (40%) and one two-hour written examination in the ST (60%). IR462 - INTRODUCTION TO INTERNATIONAL POLITICAL THEORY (HALF UNIT) Teacher responsible Dr K Ainley, CLM 7.07 Availability Course intended primarily for students on MSc International Relations, MSc International Relations (Research), MSc International Relations Theory, MSc Political Theory and MSc Theory and History of International Relations. The course is available to students on MSc Global Politics, MSc Human Rights, MSc Race, Ethnicity and Post-Colonial Studies and MSc China in Comparative Perspective with the permission of the Teacher Responsible. Also available to students taking MSc International Relations or MSc International Political Economy as part of the LSE-Sciences Po Double Degree in Affaires Internationales programme. The course is also available as an outside option where degree regulations permit. All students are required to obtain permission from the Teacher Responsible by completing the Student Statement box on the online application form linked to course selection on LSEforYou. Admission is not guaranteed. Course content 1) Background to International Political theory 2) Liberal Political theory and the Development of International Political Theory 3) The Moral Standing of the State 4) International Human Rights 5) Critiques of Human Rights and Universal Values 6) International Humantarianism 7) Global Social Justice 8) International Criminal Law 9) Beyond the Liberal Origins of International Political Theory Teaching 9 x 2 hour seminars in MT (commencing week 2) 2 x 2 hour revision seminars in weeks 1 and 2 of the ST.

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Formative coursework 1 x 800 word book report 1 x 2,000 word essay Indicative reading Appiah, K.A. Cosmopolitanism: Ethics in a World of Strangers (Allen Lane, 2006); Armstrong, D. et al International Law and International Relations (Cambridge UP, 2007); Brown C. Sovereignty, Rights and Justice (Polity, 2002); Beitz C.R. Political Theory and International Relations (Princeton UP, 1979/2000); Dunne T. & N.J. Wheeler (eds.) Human Rights in Global Politics (Cambridge UP, 1999); International Commission on Intervention and State Sovereignty The Responsibility to Protect (Ottawa, 2001); Jackson, R. The Global Covenant (Oxford UP 2003); Kymlicka W & W. M. Sullivan (eds.) The Globalization of Ethics (Cambridge UP, 2007); Rawls J. The Law of Peoples (Harvard University Press, 1999); Walzer M. Just and Unjust Wars (Basic Books, 3rd ed 2000). Assessment 2-hour unseen examination in the Summer Term (100%) IR463 - THE INTERNATIONAL POLITICAL THEORY OF HUMANITARIAN INTERVENTION (HALF UNIT) Teacher responsible Professor C.J. Brown, CLM 4.08 Availability Course intended primarily for students on MSc International Relations, MSc International Relations (Research), MSc International Relations Theory, MSc Political Theory and MSc Theory and History of International Relations. The course is available to students on MSc Global Politics, MSc Human Rights, MSc Race, Ethnicity and Post-Colonial Studies and MSc China in Comparative Perspective students with the permission of the Teacher Responsible. Also available to students taking MSc International Relations or MSc International Political Economy as part of the LSE-Sciences Po Double Degree in Affaires Internationales programme. The course is also available as an outside option where degree regulations permit. All students are required to obtain permission from the Teacher Responsible by completing the Student Statement box on the online application form linked to course selection on LSEforYou. Admission is not guaranteed. Pre-requisites IR462 Introduction to International Political Theory Course content The course will involve both theoretical explorations of the nature and prehistory of 'humanitarianism' and empirical examples of claimed 'humanitarian interventions' (such as Bosnia, Kosovo and East Timor) along with cases where it is claimed interventions should have taken place (such as Rwanda 1994) and others where humanitarianism has been combined with geo-strategic motivations. Notions of 'global social justice' as a response to the root causes of humanitarian disasters will be explored, along with the future of humanitarianism in the light of the changing global strategic architecture. Teaching 10 x 2 hour seminars in the Lent Term 2 x 2 hour revision sessions in weeks 1 - 3 of ST. Students will be encouraged to attend relevant lectures in the UG course IR306 Sovereignty, Rights and Duties: Issues in IPT Formative coursework 1 x 2,000 word essay Indicative reading Chandler, D. From Kosovo to Kabul: Human Rights and International Intervention (Pluto, 2002); Collier, P. The Bottom Billion (Oxford UP, 2007); Finnemore, M The Purpose of Intervention: Changing Beliefs about the Use of Force (Cornell UP, 2004); Forsythe, D. The Humanitarians (Cambridge UP, 2005); International Commission on Intervention and State Sovereignty The Responsibility to Protect (Ottawa, 2001); Hochschild, A. Bury the Chains: The British Struggle to Abolish Slavery (Pan Books, 2006); Kennedy, D. The Dark Side of Virtue: Reassessing International Humanitarianism (Princeton UP, 2004); Kouchner, B. Les Guerriers de la Paix (Bernard Grasset, 2004); Pogge, T. Freedom from Poverty as a Human Right (Columbia, 2007) Wheeler, N.J. Saving Strangers (Oxford UP, 2000).

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Assessment One unseen two-hour examination in the Summer Term (50%), and a 4,000 word long essay to be produced by week 3 of the Summer Term. IR464 - THE POLITICS OF INTERNATIONAL LAW (HALF UNIT) Teacher responsible Dr K Ainley, CLM 7.07 Availability Course intended primarily for students on MSc International Relations, MSc International Relations (Research), MSc International Relations Theory, MSc Political Theory and MSc Theory and History of International Relations. The course is available to students on MSc Global Politics, MSc Human Rights, MSc Race, Ethnicity and Post-Colonial Studies and MSc China in Comparative Perspective students with the permission of the teacher responsible. Also available to students taking MSc International Relations or MSc International Political Economy as part of the LSE-Sciences Po Double Degree in Affaires Internationales programme. The course is also available as an outside option where degree regulations permit. All students are required to obtain permission from the Teacher Responsible by completing the Student Statement box on the online application form linked to course selection on LSEforYou. Admission is not guaranteed. Course content An introduction to the politics of the creation and implementation of international law, intended for non-lawyers. The course focuses on the areas of international law most relevant to International Political Theory: human rights, the use of force and international crime, and examines the increasing legalization of international politics, the tensions between international politics and international law, alternatives to international law and international law post 9/11. Teaching 1 organisational meeting in week 10 of MT 10 x 2 hour seminars in LT. 2 x 2 hour revision seminars in weeks 3 and 4 of ST. Formative coursework 1 x 2,000 word essay Indicative reading Armstrong, D. International Law & International Relations (Cambridge, 2007); Bass, G Stay the Hand of Vengeance: The Politics of War Crimes Tribunals (Princeton UP, 2000); Koskenniemi, M. From Apology to Utopia: The Structure of International Legal Argument (Cambridge, 2006); Maogoto, J. War Crimes and Realpolitik: International Justice from World War I to the 21st Century (Lynn Rienner, 2004); May, L. Crimes against Humanity: A Normative Account (Cambridge, 2004); McGoldrick, D. From 9-11 to the Iraq War 2003: International Law in an Age of Complexity (Hart Publishing, 2004); Reus-Smit, C ed. The Politics of International Law (Cambridge UP, 2004); Rochester, JM. Between Peril & Promise: The Politics of International Law (CQ Press, 2006); Robertson, G. Crimes Against Humanity: The Struggle for Global Justice (Penguin, 2006); Simpson, G. Law, War & Crime (Polity, 2007). Assessment A two-hour unseen examination in the Summer Term (50%) and a 4,000 word long essay to be produced by week 3 of the Summer Term (50%). IR466 - GENOCIDE (HALF UNIT) Teacher responsible Dr Jens Meierhenrich. Availability Optional on MSc International Relations, MSc Theory and History of International Relations, MSc International Relations Theory, MSc Global Politics, MSc Comparative Politics and MSc Human Rights. Also optional for students on Sciences Po-LSE Double Degree in Affairs Internationales taking MSc International Relations. The course is available as an outside option. Course content This seminar course provides an introduction to the study of genocide. The courses disciplinary ambit ranges from anthropology to economics, from history to law, and from political science to sociology. Against the background of diverse disciplinary approaches, it explores major

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theoretical and empirical aspects of the role(s) of genocidal campaigns in international politics, inter alia, their origins, development, and termination; the manner of their perpetration, progression, and diffusion; their impact on the maintenance of international peace and security; their consequences for the reconstruction and development of states and the building of nations; and their adjudication in domestic and international courts and tribunals. Empirical cases to be discussed include Australia, Cambodia, China, the Democratic Republic of Congo, East Timor, Nazi Germany, Guatemala, Iraq, Northern Ireland, the Ottoman Empire, Rwanda, Uganda, the Soviet Union, Sudan, and the former Yugoslavia, among others. The course is designed to equip students with the analytic tools necessary for making sense of the evolution of the international system from the nineteenth century to the presentand for critically assessing the promise and limits of responding to collective violence. Teaching 10 x two-hour seminars in LT. Formative coursework One x 2,000 word essay. Indicative reading Christopher R. Browning, The Origins of the Final Solution: The Evolution of Nazi Jewish Policy, September 1939-March 1942, with contributions by Jrgen Matthus (London: Heinemann, 2004). Virginia Page Fortna, Does Peacekeeping Work? Shaping Belligerents Choices after Civil War (Princeton: Princeton University Press, 2008). Robert Gellately and Ben Kiernan, eds., The Specter of Genocide: Mass Murder in Historical Perspective (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2003). John Hagan and Wenona Rymond-Richmond, Darfur and the Crime of Genocide (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2008). Stathis N. Kalyvas, The Logic of Violence in Civil War (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2006). Michael Mann, The Dark Side of Democracy: Explaining Ethnic Cleansing (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2005). Jens Meierhenrich, Genocide: A Reader (Oxford: Oxford University Press, forthcoming 2011). Jens Meierhenrich, Genocide: A Very Short Introduction (Oxford: Oxford University Press, forthcoming 2011). Anne Orford, International Authority and the Responsibility to Protect (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2011). Filip Reyntjens, The Great African War: Congo and Regional Politics, 1996-2006 (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2009). William A. Schabas, Genocide in International Law: The Crimes of Crimes, Second edition (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2009). Karen E. Smith, Genocide and the Europeans (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2010). Wolfgang Sofsky, The Order of Terror: The Concentration Camp, translated by William Templer (Princeton: Princeton University Press, [1993] 1997). Charles Tilly, The Politics of Collective Violence (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2003). Eric D. Weitz, A Century of Genocide: Utopias of Race and Nation (Princeton: Princeton University Press, 2003). Assessment One 5,000 word essay (100%). DEPARTMENT OF LAW LL409 - HUMAN RIGHTS IN THE DEVELOPING WORLD Teacher responsible Dr Chaloka Beyani, NAB 7.04 Availability For LLM and MSc Human Rights students. This course is capped at 30 students. Students must apply through Graduate Course Choice on LSEforYou. Course content The course looks at how human rights are experienced in the developing global South. It reflects on the question of what socio-cultural significance human rights standards can and do have in the multi-facetted 'developing world', and then examines the role and impact of (domestic) law for their realization. Different types of rights and case studies of their legal enforcement in diverse 'developing country' jurisdictions will serve as illustrations of the multiple 'functionings' of human rights in this realm. 1. What are human rights? What is the 'developing

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world'? Why 'human rights in the developing world'? 2. The question of the socio-cultural significance of human rights in the 'developing world' - cultural relativism v. universalism of human rights. 3. Global, international, and domestic human rights discourse 4. The form and the substance of human rights: international law, constitutional bills of rights and human rights acts and their core contents and aspirations as well as specificities of the 'developing world'. 5. Human rights and (domestic) courts: from legalization to judicialization. Civil and political rights in transnational judicial conversations. 6. The (domestic) judicialization of social and economic rights: questions of justiciability, enforcement and impact. 'Human rights and'...development, poverty, and global economic regimes as reflected in the domestic context. 7. 'Human rights and'...(human) security. 8. 'Human rights and'...the conundrums of the developing nation-state - the rights of minorities, disadvantaged groups and the economically excluded. 9. 'Human rights and'...health and environmental protection. 10. Horizontalizing human rights law: getting (domestically) at 'non-state actors'. 11. Outlook: wither human rights in the 'developing world'. Teaching 23 two-hour seminars, including guest lecturers. Formative coursework Students are asked to participate in regular group Q&A exercises which are posted on the course's Moodle site. Indicative reading Alston, Promoting Human Rights Through Bill of Rights; Alston & Robinson, Human Rights and Development; Anderson & Happold, Constitutional Human Rights in the Commonwealth; An-Naim, Human Rights in Cross-Cultural Perspectives; An-Naim, Human Rights, Local Remedies; AnNaim, Human Rights Under African Constitutions; Bauer & Bell, The East Asian Challenge for Human Rights; Cowan & Dembour & Wilson, Culture and Rights: anthropological perspectives; Donnelly, Universal Human Rights in Theory and Practice; Dunne & Wheeler, Human Rights in Global Politics; Ghai & Cottrell, Economic, Social & Cultural Rights in Practice; Jayawickrama, The Judicial Application of Human Rights Law; Mutua, Human Rights: A Political and Cultural Critique; Shivji, The Concept of Human Rights in Africa; Steiner & Alston, International Human Rights Law in Context; Wilson, Human Rights, Culture & Context, Wilson & Mitchell, Human Rights in Global Perspective. A full reading list will be available through the course's Moodle page. Assessment The course is examined by one extended essay of 8000 words, counting for 50% of the final grade, and one two-hour exam (with 15 minutes reading time) also counting for 50%. The extended essay will meet the LLM Writing Requirement. LL445 - INTERNATIONAL CRIMINAL LAW Teachers responsible Dr Stephen Humphreys, NAB 5.12 (course convenor). Guest lecturers will include: Dr Chaloka Beyani (LSE) Dr. Michael Kearney (Visiting Fellow, LSE) Prof. Gerry Simpson (University of Melbourne) Availability For LLM students, MSc Criminal Justice Policy and MSc Human Rights. Course content This full-unit course on international criminal law seeks to place this burgeoning field of practice in its historical and political context. The course will examine the rationale for the introduction of criminal procedures and institutions at international level, and the degree to which the field is achieving - and is capable of achieving - its stated objectives. It will cover the conceptual and practical problems associated with the turn to legalised retribution and the criminalisation of hitherto political activities, with a view to assessing the field's trajectory and progress. The course looks back at the history of and background to international criminal law: developments at Versailles following the First World War, at Nuremberg and Tokyo following the Second and in the Balkans and Rwanda following the Cold War. It will examine the four core crimes set out in the Rome Statute of the International Criminal Court (war crimes, crimes against humanity, genocide and aggression), as

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well as recent discussions surrounding the crimes of torture and terrorism. It will look at institutional arrangements - at the ICC and the ad hoc and 'hybrid' tribunals - as well as procedural issues, including immunity, defences and modes of participation. It will also cover corporate complicity in international crimes. Teaching Teaching is by seminar. There is normally one two-hour seminar each week. There may be back-up classes, (up to four per term). Formative coursework Students may submit two 2,000 word essays. Students are asked to choose from past exam papers and submit by the end of Week 3 in Michaelmas and Lent terms respectively. Required texts Robert Cryer et al., An Introduction to International Criminal Law and Procedure (Cambridge, 2009), 2nd edition. Indicative reading Gary Bass, Stay the Hand of Vengeance: The Politics of War Crimes Tribunals (Princeton, 2000); Judith Shklar, Legalism (Harvard, 1964); Hannah Arendt, Eichmann in Jerusalem (Penguin, 1997); Gerry Simpson, Law, War and Crime, (Polity, 2007). Assessment A three-hour written examination, based on the entire syllabus (100%). LL452 - THE INTERNATIONAL LAW OF ARMED CONFLICT AND THE USE OF FORCE Teachers responsible Dr Stephen Humphreys, NAB 5.12, Dr Andrew Lang, NAB 6.19. Availability For LLM students and MSc Human Rights. Some prior knowledge of international law is useful but not essential. This course is capped at 30 students. Students must apply through Graduate Course Choice on LSEforYou. Course content The aim of this course is to develop an understanding of the principles of international law which regulate the use of force in international society. The course examines both the law relating to when it is permissible to use force (The Jus ad bellum) and the law governing the conduct of hostilities once the decision to resort to force has been taken (The Law of Armed Conflict or International Humanitarian Law) The first half of the course is devoted to the law on resort to force. It concentrates on the prohibition of resort to force in Article 2(4) of the United Nations Charter and the exceptions to that prohibition. This part of the course looks in detail at the right of selfdefence, humanitarian intervention, intervention to promote democracy, self-determination and to protect nationals, reprisals and intervention in civil war. The use of force by or with the authorization of the United Nations is also considered. The second half of the course is concerned with the conduct of hostilities and takes a critical approach to the international regulation and facilitation of armed conflict. It covers the laws governing the means and methods of warfare (sometimes known as 'Hague' law) and those regarding 'protected' groups hors de combat ('Geneva' law) in times of armed conflict and occupation. The course will further consider the practice of 'lawfare' more generally: that is, recourse to law as an aspect of waging war. Teaching Teaching is by seminar. There is normally one two-hour seminar each week. Formative coursework Students are asked to submit two 2,000 word essays. Indicative reading A detailed reading list will be issued at the first seminar. See, in particular: Dinstein, The Conduct of Hostilities under the Law of Armed Conflict and War, Aggression and SelfDefence (4th ed., 2006); Gray, International Law and the Use of Force (3rd ed., 2008); Roberts & Guelff, Documents on the Laws of War (3rd edn) and Rogers, Law on the Battlefield (2nd edn, 2004). Assessment There is a three-hour formal examination (100%), based on the entire syllabus. LL453 - INTERNATIONAL HUMAN RIGHTS

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Teachers responsible Dr Margot Salomon, TW2. V503, Professor Susan Marks, NAB 7.14, and Professor Christine Chinkin, NAB 6.15 Availability For LLM students, MSc Development Studies and MSc Human Rights. Pre-requisites Some knowledge of public international law is required. Course content This course is concerned with the international protection of human rights and its relation to a range of contemporary global problems involving deprivation, violence and exclusion. Recurring questions will be: in what ways does the international protection of human rights help in alleviating these problems, and in what ways does it instead serve to sustain the conditions for their occurrence? How might we understand the contribution of human rights to addressing contemporary ills and what are their particular limitations? Through the consideration of topical thematic issues, students will learn about, and critically analyse, human rights concepts, norms, institutions and actors. The course is composed of five sections. The first section begins with a review of the key institutions and instruments which define the international human rights regime, along with some fundamental questions to do with the legal protection of human rights. The second is concerned with human rights and deprivation. Here we relate human rights to such issues as globalisation, poverty and climate change. The third section addresses human rights and violence. Here we consider the bearing of human rights for counter-terrorism, violence against women, war, and post-conflict. The fourth section of the course explores issues around identity, including non-discrimination and the prohibition of genocide. At the end of the course we take a step back to reflect on debates within and about international human rights, and explore the contribution, limits and further possibilities of this regime as a force for emancipatory change. Teaching This course is taught by two hour weekly seminars (10 in MT, 10 in LT, three in ST). Formative coursework Two 1,500 word essays. Indicative reading A comprehensive reading list will be provided. Assessment A three-hour exam in June (100%). Students are usually given 10 questions and must answer four. LL454 - HUMAN RIGHTS OF WOMEN Teacher responsible Christine Chinkin, Professor of International Law, NAB 6.15. Availability For LLM and MSc Human Rights. This course is capped at 30 students. Students must apply through Graduate Course Choice on LSEforYou. Course content An introduction to a gender based analysis of the mainstream normative and institutional frameworks for human rights. The course explores the following issues: the concept of women's human rights; international instruments guaranteeing civil and political and economic and social rights; the approach of the mainstream human rights mechanisms and institutions, including the UN Human Rights treaty bodies and special mechanisms and the European, American, and African regional human rights systems; the UN Commission on the Status of Women and the development of specific normative standards relating to women; the background, drafting, content and experience of the Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination against Women 1979 and its Optional Protocol 1999; the work of the Committee on the Elimination of Discrimination Against Women in monitoring States, elaborating general recommendations and making decisions and initiating inquiries under the Optional Protocol; debates around universalism and cultural particularity; the establishment of new standards at the global and regional levels; violence against women, including in armed conflict and trafficking; economic and social rights and the right to development; examples of domestic protection of women's rights, including India and Commonwealth Africa; the rights of the girl child.

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Teaching This course is taught by two-hour weekly seminars in MT and LT. Formative coursework Students are asked to submit a 1,500 word essay in both the MT and LT. Indicative reading Detailed readings are arranged for each class. Assessment A three-hour examination (100%). LL460 INTERNATIONAL LAW AND THE PROTECTION OF REFUGEES, DISPLACESD PERSONS AND MIGRANTS Teacher responsible Dr C Beyani, NAB 7.04 Availability For LLM and MSc Human Rights students. This course is capped at 30 students. Students must apply through Graduate Course Choice on LSEforYou. Course content The course provides a detailed study of the international legal framework in which the causes, problems, policies, standards, techniques and institutions concerning the protection of asylum seekers, refugees and refugee women, internally displaced persons and migrants are situated. The course explores the overlap between International Refugee Law, Human Rights, International Humanitarian Law and Humanitarian Assistance, the phenomenon of legal and illegal Migration, including Human Trafficking in the context of refugees, persons displaced within states during armed conflict, legal and illegal migrants. It covers: the definition of refugees, internally displaced persons, legal and illegal migrants, including trafficking in human beings; the concepts of 'well-founded fear' of persecution and group eligibility to refugee protection; procedures for determining refugee status on an individual and group basis, in Africa, Asia, Australia, the European Union, North America, and Latin America; temporary protection; the process of exclusion from refugee protection and individual criminal responsibility for persecution and associated crimes; the role of the ad hoc Tribunals with criminal jurisdiction and the International Criminal Court; the role, in refugee law and human rights, of the principle of non-refoulement in refugee protection; the cessation of refugee status, voluntary repatriation, and safe return; standards applicable in international law to the protection of refugees, internally displaced persons, migrants, and evolving standards against human trafficking; the regulation of migration in regional economic and political unions, namely the European Union, East African Community, the Union of West African States, the Caribbean Community and the Southern African Development Community; the regime of humanitarian assistance to displaced persons in armed conflict and in refugee settlements, including the Sphere Project and the Humanitarian Ombudsperson; and finally the institutional protection of refugees, displaced persons, and migrants by the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees, the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights and the United Nations Human Rights Treaty Bodies, the Red Cross, the International Organisation for Migration, and Non-Governmental Organisations. Teaching This course is taught by two-hour weekly seminars 10 in MT and LT, and 3 in ST. Formative coursework Students are asked to submit two 2,000 word essays. Indicative reading A detailed reading list for the whole course is provided. Assessment Three-hour formal examination; 10 questions, four to be answered. LL468 HUMAN RIGHTS LAW: THE EUROPEAN CONVENTION OF HUMAN RIGHTS (HALF UNIT) Teacher responsible Professor Conor Gearty, NAB, 7.11 Availability For LLM and MSc Human Rights students and other Master's level students with permission. It is not possible to take this course along with LL4B6. This course is capped at 30 students. Students must apply through Graduate Course Choice on LSEforYou. Course content This course will provide an overview of the origin, development and current standing of the European Convention on Human Rights and Fundamental Freedoms. Its primary focus will be

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on the case-law of the European Court of Human Rights, though the cases of other jurisdictions will also be referred to where appropriate. The course will analyse the Convention from the perspective of selected rights within it, but will also engage with the subject thematically, subjecting such concepts as the 'margin of appreciation' and proportionality to close scrutiny. The goal of the course is to give students a good critical understanding of the Convention, the case-law of the Strasbourg court and the Convention's place within the constitutional and political structure of 'Greater Europe'. This course complements Human Rights Law: The HRA (LL469) but is entirely self-standing and can easily be taken without that course. Teaching 10 two-hour seminars in the MT of each academic year. Formative coursework Students are asked to submit one 2,000 word essay. Indicative reading There are two texts that cover the ground of the course and to which reference will be made: Jacobs and White, The European Convention on Human Rights 4th edn (OUP, 2006) and Harris, O'Boyle and Warbrick, Law of the European Convention on Human Rights 2nd edn (Oxford, 2009). Also useful is Mowbray, Cases and Materials on the European Convention on Human Rights 2nd edn (Oxford, 2007). A strong European perspective is to be found in van Dijk, van Hoof, van Rijn and Zwaak (eds), Theory and Practice of the European Convention on Human Rights 4th edn (Intersentia, 2006). The course will involve textbook reading but will primarily entail analysis of caselaw read for the seminar and discussed in class. Assessment This subject is examined by one two-hour paper, composed of at least five questions of which two must be attempted. LL469 - HUMAN RIGHTS LAW: THE HUMAN RIGHTS ACT (HALF UNIT) Teacher responsible Professor Conor Gearty, NAB, 7:11 Availability For LLM students and MSc Human Rights; other Masters level students with permission. It is not possible to take this course along with LL4B6. This course is subject to an overall cap of 30 students. Students must apply through Graduate Course Choice on LSEforYou. Course content This course will be made up of a detailed study of the UK Human Rights Act. The origins and the political background to the Act will be explained, and the structure of the measure will be fully elaborated, relying on the text of the Act itself but also on the burgeoning case law that accompanies the measure. The course will identify the principles that underpin the Act and explain its proper place in English law. It will also explore the wider constitutional implications of the measure, looking at its effect on the relationship between courts and Parliament. The course complements Human Rights Law: the European Convention on Human Rights (LL468) but can be taken separately from it. Teaching 13 two-hour seminars in the LT and ST of each academic year. Formative coursework Students are asked to submit one 2,000 word essay. Indicative reading Kavanagh, Constitutional Review under the UK Human Rights Act (Cambridge, 2009); Hickman, Public Law After the Human Rights Act (Hart, 2010); Gearty, Principles of Human Rights Adjudication (Oxford University Press, 2004). While these books will be referred to, students will also be expected to read cases: they will receive a detailed Reading list for each topic. Assessment This subject is examined by one two-hour paper, composed of at least five questions of which two must be attempted. LL4A8 INTERNATIONAL LAW AND THE USE OF FORCE (HALF UNIT) Teacher responsible Dr Andrew Lang, NAB 6.19

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Availability For LLM students and MSc Human Rights. Some prior knowledge of international law is useful but not essential. This course, together with its related full course LL452, is subject to an overall cap of 30 students. Students must apply through Graduate Course Choice on LSEforYou. Course content This half-unit course examines the law relating to when it is permissible to use force (jus ad bellum). The course can be taken alone or (when available) together with LL4A9: Law in War (jus in bello), as a full unit course. The aim of this course is to develop an understanding of the principles of international law that regulate the use of force in international society. It concentrates on the prohibition of resort to force in Article 2(4) of the United Nations Charter and the exceptions to that prohibition. It looks in detail at the right of self-defence, humanitarian intervention, prodemocratic intervention, and protection of nationals. The use of force by or with the authorization of the United Nations is also considered. Teaching Teaching is by seminar. There is normally one two-hour seminar each week (MT). Formative coursework Students have the option of submitting a 2,000 word essay. Indicative reading A detailed reading list will be issued at the first seminar. See, in particular: Dinstein, War, Aggression and Self-Defence (4th ed., 2006); Gray, International Law and the Use of Force (3rd ed., 2008). Assessment There is a two-hour formal examination, based on the entire syllabus. Students who take this course together with LL4A9 Law in War (jus in bello) sit a single 3-hour exam on both half-units. LL4A9 LAW IN WAR (JUS IN BELLO) (HALF UNIT) Teacher responsible Dr Stephen Humphreys, NAB 5.12. Availability For LLM students and MSc Human Rights. Some prior knowledge of international law is useful but not essential. This course, together with its related full course LL452, is subject to an overall cap of 30 students. Students must apply through Graduate Course Choice on LSEforYou. Course content This half-unit course covers the law governing the conduct of hostilities (jus in bello, also known as the law of armed conflict (LOAC) or international humanitarian law (IHL)). This course can be taken alone or together with LL4A8: International Law and the Use of Force, as a full unit course. The course will take a critical and historical perspective on the international regulation and facilitation of armed conflict. It covers both the laws governing the means and methods of warfare (sometimes known as 'Hague' law) and those regarding 'protected' groups hors de combat ('Geneva' law) in times of armed conflict and occupation. The course will further consider the practice of 'lawfare' more generally: that is, recourse to law as an aspect of waging war. Teaching Teaching is by seminar. There is normally one two-hour seminar each week (LT). Formative coursework Students have the option of submitting a 2,000 word essay. Students are requested to choose from past exam papers and submit by the end of week 3. Required texts Yoram Dinstein, The Conduct of Hostilities under the Law of Armed Conflict (Cambridge, 2004). Indicative reading David Kennedy, Of Law and War, (Princeton, 2006); Geoffrey Best, War and Law Since 1945 (Clarendon Press, 1997); Roberts & Guelff, Documents on the Laws of War (Oxford, 2000). Assessment There is a two-hour formal examination (100%), based on the entire syllabus. Students who take this course together with LL4A8 sit a single 3-hour exam on both half-units (LL452). LL4B6 - HUMAN RIGHTS IN THE UNITED KINGDOM: THEORY, LAW AND PRACTICE Teacher responsible Professor Conor Gearty, NAB 7.11 Availability For LLM and MSc Human Rights Students and other Master's level students with permission. This is the full unit of LL468 and LL469. It is not possible to take this course in conjunction

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with either LL468 or LL469. This course is capped at 30 students. Students must apply through Graduate Course Choice on LSEforYou. Course content In the first term, the origins, development and current standing of the European Convention on Human Rights and Fundamental Freedoms are considered. The primary focus will be on the case-law of the European Court of Human Rights, though the cases of other jurisdictions will also be referred to where appropriate. The course will analyse the Convention from the perspective of selected rights within it, but will also engage with the subject thematically, subjecting such concepts as the 'margin of appreciation' and proportionality to close scrutiny. The goal of this part of the course is to give students a good critical understanding of the Convention, the case-law of the Strasbourg court and the Convention's place within the constitutional and political structure of 'Greater Europe'. Terms two and three are made up of a detailed study of the UK Human Rights Act. The origins and the political background to the Act will be explained, and the structure of the measure will be fully elaborated, relying on the text of the Act itself but also on the burgeoning case law that accompanies the measure. This part of the course will identify the principles that underpin the UK Act and explain its proper place in British law. It will also explore the wider constitutional implications of the measure, looking at its effect on the relationship between courts and Parliament. Linkages with the broader European framework discussed in term one will be made by students through their reading and through class-engagement. Teaching One two-hour seminar per week in the first two terms of the academic year, and then in the first three weeks of the Summer term. Formative coursework Students are asked to submit two 2,000 word essays. Indicative reading In term one, there are two texts both of which cover the ground of the course and to which reference will be made: Jacobs and White, The European Convention on Human Rights 4th edn (OUP, 2006) and Harris, O'Boyle and Warbrick, Law of the European Convention on Human Rights 2nd edn (Oxford, 2009). Terms two and three will draw from Kavanagh, Constitutional Review under the UK Human Rights Act (Cambridge, 2009), Hickman Public Law after the Human Rights Act (Hart, 2010) and Gearty, Principles of Human Rights Adjudication (Oxford University Press, 2004). Assessment Three-hour examination, with at least six questions of which three must be attempted. LL4H9 - HUMAN RIGHTS IN THE WORKPLACE Teacher responsible Professor H Collins, NAB 7.10. Availability LLM, MSc Human Rights, and MSc Management and Human Resources. Other MSc students can take the course with permission. This course is capped at 30 students. Students must apply through Graduate Course Choice on LSEforYou. Course content The sources and application of human rights in the workplace, including international and European laws and conventions. Civil liberties of employees. Social and economic rights of workers. Protection from discrimination in the labour market and employment. As well as detailed examination of legal materials, the approach involves discussion of theories of human rights and comparisons between legal systems. Teaching 10 two-hour seminars in the LT. Formative coursework One 2,000 word essay and one presentation. Indicative reading A detailed syllabus of weekly readings will be available and the materials can all be accessed through Moodle Preliminary reading: Hugh Collins, Employment Law, 2nd edn (Oxford University Press, 2010), Chapters 9-10.

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Assessment An extended essay, 8,000 words. The extended essay will meet the LLM Writing Requirement. LL4K4 - THE INTERNATIONAL LAW OF SELF-DETERMINATION Teacher responsible Dr James Irving Availability LLM and MSc Human Rights. The course is also available as an outside option where regulations permit. This course is capped at 30 students. Students must apply through Graduate Course Choice on LSEforYou. Pre-requisites Some prior knowledge of international law is useful but not essential. Course content This course will provide a general introduction to the doctrine of self-determination in international law. Self-determination will be historically contextualised from its intellectual progenitors in the Enlightenment through to its political birth at the 1919 Paris Peace Conference and its formal induction into international law by virtue of the 1945 UN Charter. Both the detail of the doctrine's content and the dynamic governing its development will be explored. The relationship between self-determination and state formation (including decolonisation and secession), minority rights, aboriginal rights, women's rights and the nascent right to democratic governance will be central topics. Reference will also be made to the interplay between self-determination and economic rights, including permanent sovereignty over natural resources, the right to development and the "third generation rights" movement more generally. Self-determination's influence upon the international rules governing the use of force will be discussed, but these rules will not be a primary focus. Upon completion of the course students will be in a position to legally analyse contemporary fact patterns and to identify both strengths and weaknesses in the existing legal framework. Students will have considered new and novel approaches to self-determination and will be able to situate the doctrine in relation to international law and human rights. Those taking the course will gain an appreciation for self-determination's particular contribution to political and economic liberty. Teaching 20 hours of seminars (10 weekly two-hour sessions) in MT. Formative coursework Students will be asked to submit one 2,000 word essay. Indicative reading Introductory reading: Crawford, James, "The Right of Self-Determination in International Law: Its Development and Future" in Alston, Philip, ed., People's Rights (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2001) 7. Additional sources: Alston, Philip, ed., Peoples' Rights (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2001); Anaya, S. James, Indigenous Peoples in International Law, 2nd ed. (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2004); Bayefsky, Anne, ed., Self-Determination in International Law: Quebec and Lessons Learned (The Hague: Kluwer Law, 2000); Buchanan, Allen, Justice, Legitimacy, and Self-Determination: Moral Foundations for International Law (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2004); Cassese, Antonio, SelfDetermination of Peoples: A Legal Reappraisal (New York: Cambridge University Press, 1995); Charlesworth, Hillary & Chinkin, Christine, The Boundaries of International Law (Manchester: Manchester University Press, 2000); Crawford, James, ed., The Rights of Peoples (Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1988); Hannum, Hurst, Autonomy, Sovereignty, and Self-Determination: the Accommodation of Conflicting Rights, rev. ed. (Philadelphia: University of Philadelphia Press, 1996); Irving, James, "SelfDetermination and Colonial Enclaves: The Success of Singapore and the Failure of Theory" (2008) 12 S.Y.B.I.L. (forthcoming); McCorquodale, Robert, ed., Self-Determination in International Law (Aldershot, Vt.: Ashgate, 2000); Tomuschat, Christian, ed., Modern Law of Self-Determination (Dordrecht: M. Nijhoff, 1993). Assessment One 8,000 word extended essay (100%). The extended essay will meet the LLM Writing Requirement. LL4L4 LAW AND THE HOLOCAUST

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Teacher responsible Dr Kristen Rundle, NAB 6.06. Availability LLM and MSc Human Rights students. Also available as an outside option where regulations permit and with the permission of the teacher responsible. This course is capped at 30 students. Students must apply through Graduate Course Choice on LSEforYou. Course content This course examines the relationship between law, legal pathology, and the origins and implementation of the events known as the Holocaust. Students will explore the lessons for legal theory and practice arising from Hitler's rise to power under the Weimar Constitution, the legalization of the Nazi racial-biological worldview through eugenics and anti-Jewish legislation, the differential treatment of citizens and non-citizens in parallel anti-Jewish legal programs in Vichy France and elsewhere, the challenge to our conceptions of legal and moral responsibility that is presented by the idea of 'administrative massacre', and the question of how the Nazi legal era has been represented in mainstream jurisprudence. Teaching 10 x 2 hour seminars in the LT, plus film presentations (where able to be timetabled) totalling approximately 6 hours. Formative coursework Short writing task (1500 words) at the mid-point of course. Indicative reading In addition to key primary sources (legislation etc), the following materials will be assigned: Ingo Muller, Hitler's Justice, (Harvard University Press, 1991), extracts Victor Klemperer, I Will Bear Witness - A Diary of the Nazi Years 1933-1941 (1998: Random House, New York), extracts Karl A. Schleunes (ed), Legislating the Holocaust - The Bernhard Loesener Memoirs and Supporting Documents (memoirs translated by Carol Scherer), (2001: Westview Press), extracts H. L. A. Hart, "Positivism and the Separation of Law and Morals", 71 (4) Harvard Law Review 593, and Lon L. Fuller, "Positivism and Fidelity to Law - A Reply to Professor Hart", 71 (4) Harvard Law Review 630 (extracts) David Fraser, Law after Auschwitz: towards a jurisprudence of the Holocaust (Durham N.C.: Carolina Academic Press) David Fraser, "This is not like any other legal question": a brief history of Nazi law before U.K. and U.S. courts. Connecticut Journal of International Law, 19(1), 59-125 Symposium, Nazis in the Courtroom: Lessons from the Conduct of Lawyers and Judges Under the Laws of the Third Reich and Vichy, France, in 61 (4) Brooklyn Law Review 1121 (1995). Hannah Arendt, Eichmann in Jerusalem, (Penguin Books, 1964 revised edition), extracts. Hannah Arendt, The Origins of Totalitarianism (New York: Harcourt Brace, 1951).Films: Conspiracy (2001) Judgment at Nuremberg (1961) The Specialist (1999) Assessment 8,000 word extended essay (100%) on a topic chosen by the student in consultation with the instructor. The extended essay will meet the LLM Writing Requirement. LL4L6 THEORY OF HUMAN RIGHTS LAW Teacher responsible Dr Kai Moller, NAB 7.01 Availability Optional for the LLM and MSc Human Rights. Also available as an outside option where regulations permit and with permission of the teacher responsible. This course is capped at 30 students. Students must apply through Graduate Course Choice on LSEforYou. Pre-requisites Some knowledge of human rights law of any jurisdiction may be helpful, but is not essential. A knowledge of philosophy is not required. Course content The course will provide an introduction to the philosophy of human rights and theoretical issues in human rights law. The emphasis is on a combination of law and theory; to this end, each seminar will rely on a mixture of cases from various jurisdictions and theoretical and philosophical materials. The overarching questions to be examined are to what extent current philosophical theories of human rights can illuminate our understanding of the cases and legal doctrines, and to what extent the cases and doctrines can help improving the theoretical and

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philosophical understanding of human rights. Topics to be discussed will include: Negative and Positive Freedom; Theories of Human Rights; Ronald Dworkin's Theory of Rights; Balancing and Proportionality; Rights Inflation; Human Rights and Judicial Review I (The American Perspective); Human Rights and Judicial Review II (The European Perspective); Absolute Rights. Teaching Twenty hours of seminars in the MT. 2 hours of seminars in the ST. Formative coursework Students are asked to submit one 2,000 word essay. Indicative reading The course will rely on both cases from various jurisdictions and articles and book chapters from authors including Amartya Sen, Ronald Dworkin, Robert Alexy, James Griffin, Mattias Kumm, Jeremy Waldron and Frances Kamm. Assessment One two-hour examination in the ST (100%). DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL POLICY SA435 NGOS AND DEVELOPMENT Teacher responsible Dr A Ishkanian, OLD 2.42 Availability Compulsory for MSc NGOs and Development. Optional for MSc Social Policy and Development, MSc Human Rights, MSc China in Comparative Perspective, MSc Development Management, MSc Development Studies, MSc Global Politics, MSc Social Policy (Research) and MPA Public and Economic Policy/MPA Public Policy and Management/MPA International Development/MPA European Public and Economic Policy/MPA Public and Social Policy. Pre-requisites Applicants will be expected to be well-qualified graduates with at least some (six months minimum) experience of work within NGOs and/or relevant government departments or donor agencies working with NGOs. Course content The course considers a wide range of conceptual, contextual, and policy issues and ideas related to NGOs. These include the changing policy contexts in which NGOs operate, the complexities of accountability, organisational growth and change, the ethical dimensions of NGO work, the links between human rights (civil, political, and economic) and development, the new conceptual debates around civil society, globalisation, humanitarianism, development, social movements, social capital, and social entrepreneurship. As an MSc course at the LSE, this academic programme provides a unique opportunity for critical reflection, analysis, and debate on the topic of NGOs working in development, relief, and advocacy contexts. The MSc is not a professional training course; it draws together theory and practice through the seminars and lectures, equipping participants with essential analytic skills to operate strategically in the work environment. The MSc draws on documentation from many countries. The MSc focuses broadly on the work of NGOs engaged in development, humanitarian relief, and advocacy. It examines - (a) the work NGOs do, the challenges they encounter, and the special role they play in development, relief, and advocacy contexts; (b) the NGOs relationships with other stakeholders including beneficiaries, communities, government, donors, social movements, transnational networks, private companies, the media, and other organisational actors and how these relationships affect the work of NGOs; (c) the internal organisational challenges NGOs face including human resources, accountability, legitimacy, and planning; (d) the changing policy contexts in which development NGOs are operating and how those policy contexts affect the work of NGOs and (e) theories of civil society and non-governmental public action and how these can be used to analyse and understand the changing roles of NGOs. Teaching 20 one-and-a-half hour lectures (SA435) and 20 one-and-a-half hour seminars (SA435) in MT, LT. Plus a dissertation seminar in LT and one revision seminar in the ST.

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Formative coursework Students will be expected to produce ONE course essay of not more than 2,000 words on titles supplied by the course teachers. Indicative reading The following publications are some of the key texts. Much of the relevant literature is contained in book chapters and journal articles. Additional references will be provided at the start of the course and in the lectures. A Fowler, Striking a Balance: a guide to enhancing the effectiveness of NGOs in international development; C Hann & E Dunn, Civil society: challenging western models (1996); J Howell & J Pearce, Civil Society and Development: A Critical Exploration (2001); D Hulme & M Edwards (Eds), Too Close for Comfort? NGOs, States and Donors (1995); M Kaldor, H Anheier & M Glasius, Global Civil Society Yearbooks 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004 and 2005/06 www.lse.ac.uk/Depts/global/5publications3.htm; M Keck & K Sikkink, Activists beyond borders: advocacy networks in international politics (1998); D Lewis, The Management of Non-Governmental Development Organisations: An Introduction (2001); D Lewis & T Wallace, New Roles and Relevance: Development NGOs and the Challenge of Change (2000); M Ottaway & T Carothers, Funding virtue: civil society aid and democracy promotion (2000); Glasius, M, Lewis, D and Seckinelgin, H (2004) eds. Exploring Civil Society: Political and Cultural Contexts, London: Routledge; Van Rooy, A (1997) Civil Society and the Aid Industry London: Earthscan. Assessment The mark of the essay submitted during the LT (25%). A three-hour written examination in the ST (75%). SA4B5 INTERNATIONAL PLANNING AND CHILDRENS RIGHTS (HALF UNIT) Teachers responsible Professor E Munro, OLD 2.46 and Dr A Ishkanian, OLD 2.57 Availability For graduate students as an optional course for Masters' degrees, where regulations permit. Available on MSc Human Rights. Course content This is an interdisciplinary course that explores the links between child rights and child poverty at all levels of development in rich and poor countries. The social and economic as well as the civil and political rights of children, as defined in recent international laws, charters and Conventions, are examined in relation to the conditions, especially poverty and multiple deprivation, experienced by many children. Human rights theories as a basis for international and social policies will be a focus of attention. There has to be universal planning and not only specific proposals to deal with serious violations of rights. Issues of child labour, , the violations of war, cultural discrimination against girl children and the right to a minimally adequate family income will be discussed in relation to the roles played by international agencies, Trans National Corporations, governments and NGOs. Teaching Lectures: 10 x one-hour. Seminars: 10 x one-and-a-half hours, MT and one summer revision session x one-and-a-half hours. Students will be expected to participate in seminars and to give seminar presentations. Formative coursework Students are expected to submit one written essay (1,500 words) by the start of the Lent term. This will be marked but not assessed in the award of the degree. Indicative reading H J Steiner & P Alston, International Human Rights in Context, Oxford University Press, 2000; P Townsend & D Gordon (Eds), World Poverty: New Policies to Defeat an Old Enemy, Policy Press, 2002; D Gordon, et al, Child Poverty in the Developing World, Policy Press, 2003; K Watkins, Rigged Rules and Double Standards: Trade, Globalisation and the Fight Against Poverty, London, World Development Movement, 2002; C Chinkin, 'The United Nation Decade for the Elimination of Poverty: What Role for International Law?', Current Legal Problems 2001, Oxford University Press, 2002; M Flekkoy & N Kaufman, The participation rights of the child. London, Jessica Kinglsey, 1997; D Fottrell (Ed), Revisiting Children's Rights: 10 Years of the UN Convention on the Rights of the Child, The Hague and London, Kluwer Law International, 2000; ILO, Social Security: A

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New Consensus, Geneva, 2001; ILO, P.Townsend, The Right to Social Security and National Development: Lessons from OECD Experience for Low-income Countries, Discussion paper 18, ILO, 2007; A. Hall and J. Midgley, Social Policy for Development, London, Sage, 2004; J. Madeley, Big Business, Poor peoples: The Impact of Trans National Corporations on the World's Poor, London, Zed Books; UNICEF, A League Table of Child Poverty in Rich Nations, Innocenti Report, Florence, 2000; H Cunningham & P Viazzo, Child Labour in Historical Perspective 1800-1995, UNICEF, 1996; G. Lansdown, Evolving Capacities of Children: Implications for the Exercise of Rights, UNICEF Innocenti Centre, Florence, 2005; W.A. Corsaro, The Sociology of Childhood (2nd ed), Sage, 2006; R. Smith, Textbook on International Human Rights, Oxford University Press, 2005; D. Gordon, R. Parker, F. Loughran and P. Heslop, Disabled Children in Britain, London, TSO, 2000. Redmond G, 2008, Children's Perspectives on Economic Adversity: A Review of the Literature, Unicef Innocenti Centre, Florence, Discussion Paper. Assessment A two-hour written examination in the ST (100%). SA4D5 - SOCIAL RIGHTS AND HUMAN WELFARE (HALF UNIT) Teacher responsible Professor H Dean, OLD 2.30 Availability This is an optional course for MSc Human Rights, MSc NGOs and Development, MSc Social Policy (Research), MSc Social Policy and Planning and other MSc programmes where regulations permit. Course content The course will examine the basis of social or welfare rights as a component of human rights. It will situate social/welfare rights in an historical and comparative context and explore a range of debates concerning the relevance and effectiveness of a rights based approach to poverty alleviation and social welfare provision, both in the developed and the developing world. It will address the practical limitations of and the constraints upon social/welfare rights. Specifically, it will address: concepts of social rights and welfare citizenship; human needs and human rights; social/welfare rights in global context; critiques of social/welfare rights as human rights; the scope and substance of social/welfare rights; social/welfare rights and mechanisms of redress; rights based approaches to poverty alleviation; social development and social/welfare rights; constitutional instruments and social/welfare rights; human rights and the ethics of welfare. Teaching 10 lectures and 10 seminars in LT and one revision seminar in ST. Indicative reading This reading list is indicative only - a detailed list will be provided at the start of the session: H Dean, Understanding Human Need, The Policy Press, 2010; H Dean, Welfare Rights and Social Policy, Prentice Hall (2002); A Eide, et al (Eds), Economic, Cultural and Social Rights: A textbook, Martinas Nijhaff (2001); P Hunt, Reclaiming Social Rights: International and comparative perspectives, Dartmouth (1996); B Turner, Vulnerability and Human Rights, Pennsylvania State University Press, 2006; T Pogge (Ed), Freedom from Poverty as a Human Right, Oxford University Press, 2007; L Williams (Ed), International Poverty Law: An emerging discourse, CROP/Zed Books, 2006. Assessment An essay of 1,500 words (25%) and a two-hour written examination in ST (75%). DEPARTMENT OF SOCIOLOGY SO447 - TOPICS IN RACE, ETHNICITY AND POSTCOLONIAL STUDIES Teachers responsible Professor Paul Gilroy, STC. S200 and Dr Suki Ali, STC. S216 Availability MSc Sociology, MSc Culture and Society, MSc Political Sociology, MSc Human Rights, MSc BIOS and MSc Race, Ethnicity and Post-Colonial Studies. This is a capped course. Students are

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required to obtain permission from the Sociology department to take this course, unless it is a compulsory course for their programme. Course content This new course is a whole unit that functions as the intellectual core of our proposed MSc programme in Race, Ethnicity and Postcolonial-Studies. It will offer a preliminary genealogy of race thinking which connects the concerns of anthropology and imperial government with new scholarly debates over multi-culture, diversity, genomics, human rights and the morality and legality of reviving colonial power. The course is sociological in focus but is enriched by the introduction of scholarly discussions from neighbouring disciplines. We regard this multi-disciplinary character as a strength and an asset the helps to define the uniqueness of our approach. The course offers students a broad exposure to theory and history of race, racism and ethnicity as well as an opportunity to consider a range of contemporary instances in which the social and political problems arising from these factors of division have been manifested. We start by addressing the history and character of the colonial and imperial expansion with which modern theories of race and ethnicity were intertwined. The first block introduces material drawn from various disciplines that is aimed at interpreting the social, political, governmental, cultural and economic characteristics of the colonial "contact zones" which were so important in making racial categories and keeping them alive. The development of racialised conceptions of humanity, progress, civilisation, national identity, cultural difference and geo-politics are tracked through the rise and fall of European empires in the second and third blocks. Block three takes on the scholarly agenda set by the anti-colonial theorists and intellectuals who led the movements against colonial rule as its initial point of departure. The final block engages contemporary approaches to diaspora, interculture and biocolonialism before concluding with a sequence addressed to the failure of human rights initiatives to sufficiently engage the issues of racial hierarchy and racism. The course will be taught through a weekly pattern of linked lectures and seminars. Teaching 10 hours each of lectures and seminars in MT and LT. Course requirement Attendance at all seminars and submission of all set coursework is required. Indicative reading Appiah, Anthony (1996) Color conscious: the political morality of race, Princeton, N.J, Princeton University press; Ballhatchet, Kenneth (1980) Sex, Race and Class under the Raj, Weidenfeld and Nicolson; Barber, Benjamin R (c2003) Fear's empire: war, terrorism, and democracy, New York, W.W. Norton & Co; Bauman, Zygmunt (2004) Wasted lives: modernity and its outcasts, Cambridge, Polity; Buck-Morss, Susan (2003) Thinking past terror: Islamism and critical theory on the left, London, Verso; Butler, Judith P (2004) Precarious life: the powers of mourning and violence London, Verso; Cabral, Amilcar (2000) Return To The Source, Monthly Review; Cole, David (2003) Enemy aliens: immigrants' rights and American freedoms in the war on terrorism, New York, New Press; Devji, Faisal (2005) Landscapes of the Jihad: militancy, morality, modernity, Crises in world politics. London, Hurst & Co; Eze, Emmanuel Chukwudi (2001) Achieving our humanity: the idea of the postracial future, London, Routledge; Fanon, Frantz (1967) Toward The African Revolution, Grove; Fredrickson, George M (2002) Racism: a short history, Princeton, N.J, Princeton University Press; Jones, Greta (1980) Social Darwinism and English Thought, Harvester; Hacking, Ian (2002) Historical ontology, Cambridge, Mass, Harvard University Press; Hannaford, Ivan (1996) Race: the history of an idea in the West, Washington, D.C. Woodrow Wilson Center Press; Haraway, Donna (1997) ModestWitness@SecondMillennium, FemaleManMeetsOncoMouse: feminism and technoscience, New York, Routledge; Hulme, Peter, and Jordanova, L. J (1990) The Enlightenment and its shadows, London, Routledge; Kuhl, Stefan (1994) The Nazi connection: eugenics, American racism and German national socialism, New York, Oxford University Press (N. Y.); Lorimer, Doug (1978) Colour, Class and The Victorians, Leicester University Press; Mamdani, Mahmood (2004) Good Muslim, bad Muslim:

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America, the Cold War, and the roots of terror, 1st ed New York, Pantheon Books; Poliakov, Lon (1974) The Aryan myth: a history of racist and nationalist ideas in Europe, London, Chatto and Windus; Schiebinger, Londa (1994) Nature's body: sexual politics and the making of modern science, London, Pandora; Tapper, Melbourne (1999) In the blood: sickle cell anemia and the politics of race, Critical histories. Philadelphia, University of Pennsylvania Press; Traverso, Enzo (2003) The origins of Nazi violence; translated by Janet Lloyd, New York, New Press. Formative coursework Students have the option of writing a 3,000 word paper in preparation for the assessed essay. Assessment The course is assessed by two 5,000 word essays. Two hard copies of each essay are to be handed in to the Sociology Administration Office, S219a, no later than 4.30pm on the second Wednesday of the Lent Term and the second Tuesday of the Summer Term, respectively. A third copy of each is to be uploaded to Moodle. SO457 POLITICAL RECONCILIATION (HALF UNIT) Teacher responsible Dr Claire Moon, STC. S267 Availability Optional course. This course is capped. Priority is given to students on the following programmes: MSc Human Rights, MSc Political Sociology, MSc Sociology and MSc Race, Ethnicity and Post-Colonial Studies. Students from other programmes are welcome to apply where their degree regulations permit, but can be accommodated only if space is available. Course content The course explores the politics of reconciliation by identifying and examining its key themes, the practices and institutions in which it is embedded and the political subjects of reconciliation discourse. It is an interdisciplinary course that draws upon literature from sociology, law, political theory, anthropology and philosophy amongst others, because any investigation of reconciliation must be approached from a variety of perspectives in order to understand and interpret its wider social and political reach, as well as its limitations. The course introduces students to current research in the field of transitional justice and historical injustice, and draws upon a range of examples from Africa, Latin America, post-communist Europe, Australia and the US. Topics include transitional justice as a field of practice and a field of knowledge; historical injustice - apologies and reparations; state crimes; retributive and restorative justice; perpetration; theology and therapy in reconciliation; memory and atrocity. Teaching 10 lectures and 10 seminars in MT plus 1 two-hour revision seminar in the ST Course requirement Attendance at all seminars, completion of set readings and submission of set coursework is required. Indicative reading Hannah Arendt, Eichmann in Jerusalem: A Report on the Banality of Evil (Penguin Books, 1977); Penny Green and Tony Ward, State Crime: Governments, Violence and Corruption (London: Pluto Press, 2004). Priscilla Hayner, Unspeakable Truths: Confronting State Terror and Atrocity (Routledge, 2001); Michael Humphrey, The Politics of Atrocity and Reconciliation: From Terror to Trauma (Routledge, 2002); Karl Jaspers, The Question of German Guilt (Capricorn Books, 1961); Neil Kritz, Transitional Justice: How Emerging Democracies Reckon with Former Regimes (US Institute of Peace, 1995); Claire Moon, Narrating Political Reconciliation: South Africa's Truth and Reconciliation Commission (Lexington, 2008); Judith Shklar, Legalism: Law, Morals, and Political Trials (Harvard University Press, 1986); Nicholas Tavuchis & Mea Culpa, A Sociology of Apology and Reconciliation (Stanford University Press, 1991); Richard Wilson, The Politics of Truth and Reconciliation in South Africa: Legitimizing the Post-Apartheid State (Cambridge University Press, 2001).

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Assessment One 3,000 word essay (30% of the overall mark), two hard copies to be handed in to the Sociology Administration Office, S219a, before 4.30pm on the first Wednesday of LT; a third copy uploaded to Moodle, and one two-hour unseen examination (70% of the overall mark) in which candidates answer two questions out of six. SO461 RACIAL FORMATIONS OF MODERNITY (HALF UNIT) Teacher responsible Professor Paul Gilroy, STC. S200 Availability Optional for MSc Sociology, MSc Human Rights, MSc Political Sociology, MSc Culture and Society and MSc Race, Ethnicity and Post-Colonial Studies. Available to students following other MSc programmes subject to numbers, their own degree regulations and at the discretion of the teacher responsible. Course content The course will explore the sociological, political and philosophical debates that have emerged where the concept of modernity intersects with the formation and reproduction of racial hierarchy. It will look in particular at articulations of modernity with colonial power, war, national character and, above all, with the idea of "race". Four inter-linked lines of enquiry will be followed: 1] We will explore some of the different ways that the subject of modernity has been imagined and articulated in racialised forms; 2] We will see what attributes and experiences have qualified that subject as properly human and rational. How has it been endowed with or deprived of rights? 3] We will try to understand where its human identity has been recognised as coming from, both culturally and materially. 4] We will explore where cosmopolitan loyalties have emerged in conjunction with demands to see and act beyond the boundaries of immediate particularity. These inquiries will be pursued in the urgent spirit that follows from another timely desire: the need to find histories of our multi-cultural present. The intellectual core of this course is historical and sociological but we will also be reading a range of material drawn from a variety of different disciplinary sources. The underlying approach is comparative in character. Students will be asked to become familiar with a number of contrasting historical cases and to examine a wealth of theoretical perspectives that have been applied to the analysis of races, racisms and raciologies by writers who have often enjoyed more than an exclusively scholarly relationship to their analyses of race and racism. Teaching Ten lectures and ten seminars (LT). Formative coursework One formative essay will be required. Course requirement Attendance at all seminars and submission of all set coursework is required. Indicative reading Stephen Toulmin, Cosmopolis; Ivan Hannaford, Race, (John Hopkins); George Fredrickson, Racism: A Short History (Princeton); David Goldberg, The Racial State, (Blackwell). Core readings will be supplemented weekly by a comprehensive combination of essays, journal articles and online materials. Assessment Students will be expected to complete the reading assignments each week, to participate in class discussions and at some point during the term, to make a presentation to the seminar group. One 5,000 word assessed essay, two hard copies to be handed in to the Sociology Administration Office, Room S219a, by 4.30pm on the first Wednesday of ST; a third copy to be posted on Moodle.

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APPENDIX B: WORD PROCESSING NOTES FOR STUDENTS The standard School word-processing package is Microsoft Word. IT Services provides basic introductory classes for students in Word along with individual user-support. Detailed notes can be obtained from the IT Services Information Point in the library. If you are not familiar with MS Word, attend a course as soon as possible. The most important and fundamental principles and functions are listed here. Organise your work. Much time and aggravation can be saved by organising your work carefully from the start.

Always put a label on your USB memory stick or other portable storage device, and remember to write at least your name and department on it. Additionally, create a file on each with the name If lost please return to Label all your disks, directories, folders and files clearly. Adopt a hierarchic (i.e., branching) or alphanumeric (i.e., 123ABC) listing system that organises your work logically. Use obvious file names that will not require efforts of memory to recall what they contain. (Windows file names cannot contain the \/:*?<>or | characters.)

Complex work like a thesis should be split into several different files and special care needs to be taken when naming them. E.g., each file might have a three-part file name: 1. an alphanumeric place holder which determines that the file is always listed in the right place (e.g., the first chapter in a thesis might be preceded by 1or 01 if there are going to be 10 or more). an abbreviated but informative name that reveals contents (e.g. Intro) a version number that is incremented every time the file is saved with significant changes and which distinguishes it clearly from earlier, superseded versions: e.g., 1Intro3.5 would mean that this is the fifth version of the third major revision of the first, introductory chapter. (Incremental numbering may not seem important if you simply add material to each new version of a document. However, if you delete or radically alter something and then want to undo the changes, being able to trace an earlier version that contained the original material is much easier if you used incremental numbering and kept copies of earlier, superseded versions.)

2. 3.

Attaching .doc to the end of the file name will ensure that it is recognised as a document file by Windows operating systems. Save frequently. Only when you save your work is it secure and physically written to the disk. Otherwise it exists only in a volatile memory that vanishes with power loss and system failures.

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Always save before you leave your work. Always save after a complex change or extensive re-writing. Always save before you do something that you think might have unforeseen or unpredictable effects on your work (e.g., an unfamiliar routine). Always save your work onto a removable medium (e.g. CD or memory stick) or your home (H) space on the network. Work saved on a shared computer hard disk can be accessed and deleted, either deliberately or inadvertently, by other users. Do NOT keep your only copy of your work on a single disk. Always keep a copy on your network space (H:) Dont create documents that are too large. As a rough guide, 30-40 pages of A4 is as large as any document should be. Small documents are easier to edit and if something goes wrong with a small document less work is lost or has to be recovered from backups. Beware Save As: if you choose this saving option, Word will save to the destination specified by the Save As command on subsequent saves unless a new Save As is specified. (This can result in loss of files if you use Save As to save backups in a different place to originals, and then return to work on the original assuming it will be saved where it originally was: it wont be!)

In the Save tab under Options in the Tools menu, Word allows you to set various options for automatically saving and backing up your work automatically, including an AutoRecover option which it is important to have turned on. You can never save too often. Backup frequently. Backup copies are essential. Sooner or later you will lose data, often through no fault of your own. And although Word allows you to set an automatic backup facility (Tools Options Save Always create backup copy), it is unwise to rely on this alone since such automatically saved backups can easily be lost or inadvertently erased. (But see the advice above regarding Save As.)

Always backup to a disk that is different from the one your originals are on (autobackup probably wont do this). Keep backups of important work in different places. (Three backups guards against a drive being faulty and erasing your work. The chances are that it will only be after the second backup is erased that you will realise what is happening! Keeping backups in different places guards against fire and theft. Free backup on the internet is also possible, and may be available from your Internet Service Provider.) Cumulative backup (i.e., adding later backups to earlier ones) preserves earlier versions of your work that you may wish to go back to later. (You can do this easily if, rather than keeping a box of blank disks, you use them to backup sequentially, taking one from the front and replacing it at the back. This way you preserve the order of your backups, and dont waste disks. Alternatively, many CD burner applications allow incremental backupi.e., only save changes or new files.)

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You cant backup too often or too much. Never end a work session without making at least one backup. Use different fonts and formats. Documents look a lot better if you follow a few basic principles: Learn to use italics, bold and CAPITALS as appropriate. Dont use more than two or three different fonts in the same document. Avoid single spacing for long documents. Headers can ensure that detached pages of your work can be identified. Page numbers are essential in documents of more than three pages. In drafts, you can use strikethrough like this or even double strikethrough like this (Format Font Effects) to indicate something you may wish to delete, but are not sure about yet. Word also allows you to add comments (Insert Comment) to annotate a text. You can also add text in different fonts like this to make it stand out, for example as an addition you are still thinking about. Text can also be coloured (but on a black-and-white printer the effect will obviously be lost, and some colours may result in illegible print). You can also set Word to track changes, which means that the system keeps a record of all your editing changes and can display them if required (Tools Track Changes). If you need special characters like , , or , you can find them in the Character Map accessory in Windows XP (start All Programs Accessories System Tools Character Map). Simply select, copy, and paste into your document. Take care printing. Inevitably, you will have to print your work. Much time can be saved by mastering the process before you try to print something important.

Always save before you print. Look at your document in print preview to check that the pages look as you want them. Check by inspecting a sample page that the output is as you wish it to be and that the printer is functioning correctly. Ensure that the paper size and/or Page Setup are correct and that page breaks on the paper you are printing on coincide with the breaks in your document. This is a common reason for documents not printing properly. If you are including illustrations, or printing PowerPoint slides, avoid too much use of black or dark backgrounds. This will use a lot of toner, and slow down printing.

Dont panic! Even if you save and backup conscientiously, things can still go wrong and you can lose valuable work. The following points are worth bearing in mind:

If something unexpected happens, try the Undo command in the Edit menu (also often on the menu bar indicated by ) before you do anything else. Undo can also undo previous key strokes or mouse clicks: click on the arrow next to the icon on the toolbar to see options for undo. In the event of a crash, Word will probably have saved files that you can access as soon as you re-launch it if you had the AutoRecover feature turned on (Tools Options Save Save AutoRecover info).

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Take viruses seriously and routinely disinfect your disks, especially if you use public computer rooms or other peoples disks or machines. This not only protects you, but protects others whom you might infect accidentally. If you have a home PC you can obtain Anti-Virus Software from the IT Services Helpdesk or on-line. Data are never deleted from a computer disk until they are over-written by later saves. This means that although your files may appear to be loste.g., through unintended deletionsaved versions are still on the disk. The good news is that file-recovery software exists that can restore saved but deleted files. The bad news is that it doesnt always work!

Dont save any further data to a disk that contains lost or damaged files. EndNote Plus Entering reference citations is an essential part of preparing any piece of scholarly writing, and correct and helpful citation can make a huge difference to readers of your work. However, providing references is also a vastly time-consuming and often fiddly chore. EndNote Plus is a specialized piece of reference-management software that is supported by the IT Services, used in the Library, and installed on standard workstations throughout the School. It makes referencing quick, easy, and accurate, and you should use it from the beginning of your studies at LSE. Students can sign up for courses which are run regularly in the Library. Attend a course on EndNote as soon as possible. The time devoted to it will be quickly be repaid once you start to use it. EndNote is first and foremost a database: in other words, it provides you with ready-made fields in which to enter all the relevant bibliographical data about a publication you may wish to cite. And once entered, none of this data need ever be entered again, either into EndNote, nor into anything you may subsequently write. Such data is stored in a Library, and you can also include your own notes, quotations, and in the latest version, even graphics and PDFs of the original document. The second thing that EndNote does is to automatically format anything you write in any bibliographical style it supports (hundreds!). You simply copy and paste in temporary citation markers from your library as you go, and then EndNote will either format immediately (citewhile-you-write) or whenever you ask it to do so. In other words, it will enter text citations in the correct style and then add a corresponding bibliography at the end. Nothing could be simpler, but here are a few tips:

Limit yourself to one library, so that any and all additions to your bibliographical database are stored in the same place. Processing papers is much easier if you only have one library (if you have more than one, you need to specify which library EndNote is to use each time, and confusion and complications can follow if you get it wrong). Backup your library: if you lose it entirely, EndNote cannot format anything you may have written using it in the past. And if your library is large, it will represent hours of work entering data, so you cant afford to lose it!

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Use EndNote for efficient note-taking related to particular things you read. (If you choose Annotated as the output style, all fields are printed in the bibliography, including your notes.) Use Copy Formatted for quick citations of selected references in PowerPoint slides or handouts (The British Journal of Sociologythe house journalhas a nice-looking and appropriate citation style which is included in EndNote styles.) Learn EndNotes basic rules about entering author names, titles, and so on at the beginning, so as to avoid problems later. Download EndNote-compatible references from the Library catalogue and many other remote databases. Dont cite titles you havent read: its misleading at best and dishonest at worst, and can occasionally make a complete fool of you (as many students and some academics have learnt to their cost!).

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APPENDIX C: CENTRE FOR THE STUDY OF HUMAN RIGHTS STAFF DIRECTORY

Name

Room

Ext

E mail

Professor Chetan Bhatt Director Centre for the Study of S285/ Human Rights and TW2.V502 MSc Programme Convener Dr Alasdair Cochrane Lecturer TW2.V504

6262 C.Bhatt@lse.ac.uk

6787 A.D.Cochrane@lse.ac.uk

Ms Zoe Gillard Centre Manager

TW2.V505

6428 Z.Gillard@lse.ac.uk

Dr Claire Moon Senior Lecturer and SO424 Co- S267 Convener

C.Moon@lse.ac.uk

Dr Margot E Salomon Senior Lecturer and SO424 Co- TW2.V503 Convener

6922 M.E.Salomon@lse.ac.uk

Ms Sara Ulfsparre MSc Administrator

TW2.V510

6944 S.Ulfsparre@lse.ac.uk

Address:

Centre for the Study of Human Rights London School of Economics and Political Science Houghton Street London, WC2A 2AE +44 (0)20 7955 6934 s.ulfsparre@lse.ac.uk http://www.lse.ac.uk/humanrights

Fax No: Email: Website:

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