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COUPON SAVINGS INSIDE WORTH $388.75

CO UPON SAVINGS INSIDE WORTH $388.75 City mourns loss of friend James ’Sox’ Ruane spent his

City mourns loss of friend

James ’Sox’ Ruane spent his lifetime serving others.

>> PAGE 7

spent his lifet ime serving ot her s. >> PAGE 7 Teacher of the year? Michael

Teacher of the year?

Michael Kolessar is nominated for state award.

>> PAGE 16

Kolessar is nominated for state award. >> PAGE 16 A step back in time Classic car

A

step back

in

time

Classic car show staged at Pittston Tomato Festival lot.

>> PAGE 32, 33

at Pittston Tomato Fest ival lo t. >> PAGE 32 , 33 Sunday, Ma y 6,

Sunday, May 6, 2012

Sunday, Ma y 6, 2012 WILKES-BARRE, PA $1. 00

WILKES-BARRE, PA

$1.00

TONY CALLAIO/SUNDAY DISPATCH
TONY CALLAIO/SUNDAY DISPATCH

S UNDAY DISPATCH , S UNDAY , M AY 6, 2012

INSIDE

PAGE 2

Ed Ackerman, optimist

eackerman@psdispatch.com

Be there Saturday, because ‘life goes on’

Be there Saturday, because ‘life goes on’ I love everything about the Greater Pittston Chamber of

I love everything about the

Greater Pittston Chamber of Commerce event planned for

Saturday night at Open Space in downtown Pittston. We ll, almost ever ything.

I love the entertainment. The

band with the irreverent name of “Bill Gelb and the Banana Hammocks” is one of my fa-

vorites. With a funeral director,

a basketball coach, and a retired

school teacher among the nine members, not counting leader Bill Gelb, a CPA who qualified for Medicare more than a cou- ple of years ago, how can you go wrong? I do miss the ortho- pedic surgeon on rhythm guitar, though. Then, there’s the food. Coop- er’s Seafood is catering and it’s being served hors d’oeuvre style which is right up my alley. Then, there’s the beer. There’s

a good chance we’ll be getting our first taste of the wares of the new Susquehanna Brewing Company, located right here in Greater Pittston. Finally, there’s the company.

Any time people around here get together there is an abun- dance of good cheer and good conversation. These are the things I love. What I don’t love is the rea-

son for the event. It’s being held to raise funds to erect a memorial to Home- town Heroes, four local men who gave their lives in the line

of duty – three in war and one as a police officer – and anoth- er who was severely wounded ser ving our countr y, and I really wish we didn’t have to do that. The memorial, the brainchild of Charlie Adonizio, president of the Greater Pittston Chamber of Commerce, will be a flag pole surrounded by four monu- ments on the chamber’s proper- ty along Kennedy Boulevard in downtown Pittston. The monu- ments will be to 1st Lt. Jeffrey

DePrimo, SPC Dale Kridlo, both of Pittston, and Lt. Col. Richard Berrettini, of Dupont, who were killed in action in Afghanistan, and State Trooper Joshua D. Miller, who was

killed in the line of duty. In addition, a tree will be planted as a living memorial to Capt. TJ Hromisin, who was severely wounded in Iraq. A fund drive to raise the $30,000 it will take to complete the memorial is underway and going well, I’m told. The in- kind donations, including the 50-ft. flagpole, have been more than anyone would have hoped for, and sales of 4 by 8 bricks and 12 by 12 blocks in the walk- way have been brisk. Saturday’s event is expected to added thousands more to the fund, especially since all in- volved have either donated services or offered reduced rates. I understand Bill Gelb and the boys are playing for free. The cause is most appropriate and the motivation of all in- volved pure, but I found myself feeling, well, guilty, I suppose, that come Saturday night I will be having fun at an event that would not be if these four men were alive. So, I turned to the

one person I know for help: my friend Albert Kridlo, father of one of the Hometown Heroes to be honored. “How do we joke and laugh and enjoy a party,” I asked him, “when we know why we are there?” “The answer is simple,” Al- bert said. “We do it because life goes on. “I can’t speak for any of the other parents or loved ones,” he continued, “but I suspect they might be a lot like me. I’m mad, sometimes, really mad … furious actually. Other times, I can find myself crying when I didn’t expect it. It comes out of nowhere. And I live every day knowing my life is changed forever. But I laugh, too. You just can’t stop living.” Albert said the community coming together to erect this memorial helps his healing because it serves as a reminder that we are a country at war. “The vast majority of people go about their business forgetting that kids are being wounded and dying every day defending

this countr y,” he said. “Throughout the history of America a lot of blood has been shed so that the rest of us can live in peace, and go about our lives, and start businesses, and raise families, and do all the things we do, and we should never forget that.” Talking to my friend made me realize that one of the ways – perhaps the best way – to honor those who gave their lives in the line of duty, is to live our lives to the fullest. It made me think of this poem Eleanor Roosevelt carried in her wallet throughout World War II:

Dear Lord Lest I continue My complacent way Help me to remember Somehow out there A man died for me today. As long as there be war I then must Ask and answer Am I worth dying for? Full details on Saturday’s event are on page 27.

Cherry Blossom Rocky Glen Remembering ’Sox’ Local Chatter Matters of Faith

3,

4

VOL. 66, NO. 13 Editorial /Letters Majeski cartoon Maris Remembers Nutrition Peeking into the Past

14

Town News

39

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14

Sports

46

7

15

Obituaries

58

8

15

School menus

B2

10

17

Birthdays

B3

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716657

SUNDAY DISPATCH , S UNDAY , M AY 6, 2012

PAGE 3

41ST ANNUAL WEST PITTSTON CHERRY BLOSSOM FESTIVAL

PA GE 3 41ST ANNUAL WEST PITTSTON CHERRY BLOSSOM FESTIVAL TONY CALLIAO PHOTOS/THE SUNDAY DISPAT CH

TONY CALLIAO PHOTOS/THE SUNDAY DISPATCH

Six-year-old Hannah Gibbs performs a dance routine in front of a large crowd at the opening day of the 41st West Pittston Cherry Blossom Festival on Saturday.

Cherry picking a good time

Annual event continues today with food, entertainment for entire family

By JOE HEALEY

jhealey@psdispatch.com

If there ever was a doubt, let us reassure you. West Pittston is back. The biggest parade in town marched down Exeter and Wyoming avenues on Satur- day afternoon to ring in the

41s t annual West Pittston Cherry Blossom Festival. Jaime Hindmarsh enjoyed the moving display on a street corner with some family mem- bers. Her daughter, Madeline Hindmarsh, a Little Miss Cherry Blossom contestant, had already passed in the pa- rade and now she was just

THE WINNER IS …

Morgan Hosier, 8, of West Pitt- ston, was named Little Miss Cher- ry Blossom 2012.

soaking up some community spirit. “This parade is fabulous, they’re doing a great job,” she

said. “It says ‘we’re back.’” For many of the residents lining the parade route, a sense of community pride brought them out. For the kids, it was the candy. Lots and lots of candy. Lollipops. Pixie stix. Tw ixt bars. Tootsie Rolls. Nearly ev- ery organization marching the

parade was tossing treats to eager children. “I got lollipops,” said 4-year old Janelle Jones of Pittston. Her mom, Janice, said she won’t let her eat all the candy at once. “I’ll give her a treat if she’s good.”

See CHERRY, Page 4

S UNDAY DISPATCH , S UNDAY , M AY 6, 2012

PAGE 4

Cherry

Continued from Page 3

Mayor Tony Denisco said the sun was shining down on We st Pittston. “We’ve had several months of hardship,” he said. “A fes- tival like this eases the pain and shows we’re on the road to recovery.” If you’re headed to the fes- tival today, don’t forget to bring an appetite. Sausage and pepper sand- wiches. Hamburgers. Cheese- burgers. Hot dogs. Wimpies. Soup. Pizza. Haluski. Pop- corn. Oh, and hand cut French fries. “I’ll have one of each,”

joked a patron standing in line. All the food is prepared by members of Boy Scout Troop 202 and the food stands are at- tended to by

Scouts, their family mem- bers, Wyom- ing Area High School Key Club members and festival committee members. The festiv- al continues from noon to 6 p.m. today, May 6, at the riverbank by the Fire- fighters Me- morial Bridge in West Pitt-

ston. Jim Bussacco of Pittston was selling some of his histor- ic Pittston and West Pittston memorabilia near the festival. “There’s so much history here,” he said. “We’re living through some important histo- ry right now.” The Jeanne Zano Band was entertaining the crowd as they were rolling in from the pa- rade. “Rolling in the Deep” by Adele was a crowd favorite. Piano Man Lee Strubeck is perfor ming today. To ni Va lenti, the parade’s Grand Marshal, described the parade as “an overwhelming success.” “It wa s the best ever,” Va len- ti said. “We’re back.” Judy Aita, chairwoman of

“We’ve had several months of hardship. A festival like this eases the pain and shows we’re on the road to recov- ery.”

Tony Denisco

West Pittston

mayor

the road to recov- ery.” Tony Denisco West Pittston mayor TONY CALLIAO PHOTOS/THE SUNDAY DISPAT CH

TONY CALLIAO PHOTOS/THE SUNDAY DISPATCH

Five-year-old Katherine Potter performs a dance number at the West Pittston Cherry Blossom Festival.

a dance number at the West Pittston Cherry Blossom Festival. Parade Grand Marshal Toni Valenti, and

Parade Grand Marshal Toni Valenti, and her granddaughter Nina, are escorted on the parade route.

West Pittston Tomor row, was helping sell T- shir ts and tote bags to raise money for the or- ganization. “It’s a great way for us to get some exposure,” she said. “And to get West Pittston blos- soming again.” Stanley Hanczyc grew up in West Pittston and was happy to be there among his family and friends. “It benefits the whole town,” he said. “It’s good to see the town come together like this. “

“It’s good to see the town come together like this. “ Jeanne Zano sings the national
“It’s good to see the town come together like this. “ Jeanne Zano sings the national

Jeanne Zano sings the national A member of the Irem Temple performs along the parade route. anthem.

SUNDAY DISPATCH , S UNDAY , M AY 6, 2012

PAGE 5

We st Pittston Library gets $10,000 grant

By JOE HEALEY

jhealey@psdispatch.com

Books with bound covers and paper pages? That’s so last year. Thanks to a $10,000 grant from Ve rizon, the We st Pittston Library plans to blast into the 21st century with six new iPads, an interactive white board and hundreds of digital books. The grant, received with the help of State Rep. Phyllis Mun- dy, D-Kingston, wa s par t of Ve ri- zon’s initiative to bring technol- ogy into libraries. Ve rizon calls the progr am “Check Into Literacy.” It allows Ve rizon landline phone custom- ers to support education by checking a box on their monthly phone bills to make a $1 tax-de- ductible donation. Ve rizon then distributes the donations to local organizations that serve the indi- vidual states in which the cus- tomers live. Ve rizon offi cials reached out to Mundy to find an organization that was in need. “It was a logical fit,” Mundy said of the program and the li- brar y. “The community loves this library and it needed some positive news.” The library reopened five months after the flood. It was renovated and re-designed to

meet the demands of changing library services and the needs of changing community demo- graphics. More seating areas have been added for those who use the library as a place to read, work, study and catch up with friends. The children’s area has expanded to meet growing read- ing interests, technological ad- vances and educational pro- grams. The Ve rizon Fo undation aims to improve the literacy skills of children and adults. The goal is to enhance student achievement by supporting strategic grass- roots efforts that target improve- ments in reading and technology literacy and produce measurable results. Frank Buzydlowski, director of state government relations for Ve rizon, and To dd Darlington, director of ex ter nal affa irs at Ve - rizon, were on hand to present the oversized check. “We’ll help out wherever we can use technology to increase literacy,” Buzydlowski said. Library director Anne Bram- lett-Barr said comfortable furni- ture, such as bean bag chairs are also planned for the librar y. “We want to be a destination,” she said. “We want children to feel comfortable here. They’ll likely stick around if we offer a welcoming environment.”

Children’s Book We ek begins Tuesday at Laf lin Library

Laflin Public Library will cel- ebrate Children’s Book We ek Tuesday, May 8, through Satur- day, May 12. Children visiting the library during this time may make a bookmark, while suppli- es last. All are invited to the library at 4 p.m. on Friday, May 11 for stor y time for children ages preschool through kindergarten. A special guest storyteller will read “Pi- casso the Green Tree Frog” and

will make an art project. Regis- tration is necessar y. To end the week, children ages 6 and older we will decorate cup-

cakes to look like a flower at 11 a.m. on Saturday, May 12. Regis- tration is necessar y. Laflin Library is located at 47 Laflin Road, Laflin. Hours are 3 to 6:30 p.m. Tuesday through Friday and 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Sat- urday. Phone number is 654-

3323.

and 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Sat- urday. Phone number is 654- 3323. From left are

From left are Todd Darlington, director of external affairs at Verizon; Summer Belles, youth services director at the West Pittston Library; Library Director Anne Bramlett-Barr; State Rep. Phyllis Mundy; and Frank Buzydlowski, director of state government relations for Verizon,

JOE HEALEY/THE SUNDAY DISPATCH

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PAGE 6

‘Flight Ambassadors’ ease travelers’ worries

11 from Greater Pittston are Airport volunteers

By JACK SMILES

jsmiles@psdispatch.com

shoot for passengers, visitors and guests. The airport calls them “good- will emissaries.” Robinson’s wife, Beverly, a re- tried Mt. Pocono school district teacher, said her husband inspired her to become an ambassador in

2006. “Dean started first. He was always interested in flying and airplanes,” she said. As do all the ambassadors, Be- verly works the information desk, but conducting

tours is her fa- vorite thing. “I always wanted to be a tour guide,” she said. “And when I heard they did tours for children, I volunteered.” Beverly con- ducts tours for

school, Scout and other youth groups. “They get an overview of what it’s like to be a passenger. They learn what they

can carry on and about the weight of the luggage.” Tour kids visit the air por t’s fire department and sit in a training plane. The ambassadors also conduct tours for trainees of Travelocity, an online travel agency. Dean Robinson said the tours

When an elderly woman couldn’t find her car in the Wilkes-Barre/Scranton Interna-

tional Airport parking lot, Dean Robinson found it hidden behind

a large truck. When two ladies who had to get

to Florida had their flight to Phila- delphia cancelled, Ed Hanadel took them to the airline counter and helped them

make a connec- tion to Florida via Detroit. For good measure, the airline bumped the la- dies up to first class. “Here were two little old la- dies who were

all upset and we put them at ease,” Hanadel said. The ladies were so impressed by Hanadel’s kindness, they wrote

a thank you letter to the airport. Robinson, of Pittston Town- ship, and Hanadel, of Exeter, are not airport employees. They are two of 11 retirees from the Greater Pittston area who volunteer as “Flight Ambassadors.” They man the information desk, conduct tours and trouble-

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Volunteer Flight Am- bassadors from the Greater Pittston area, from left, Peggy Mo- ran, Avoca; Beverly Robinson, Pittston Township; Ann Shel- ski; Duruea; Rita Skechus, Duryea; Ed Hanadel, Exeter; Ron Skamanich, Duryea; John Bergen, Pitt- ston Township; Joe Andrews, Duryea; Dean Robinson, Pittston Township; Joe Dessoye, Pitt- ston and Mary Walsh, Avoca.

make sense both for businesses like Travelocity and the public. “The public pays taxes to help support the airport,” he said. “They ought to be able to see it.” Hanadel likes trouble shooting. “I like the interaction with the people. If there are problems, I like to help them out,” he said Hanadel encouraged his friend, John Bergen of Pittston Town- ship, to join the ambassadors in 2006 and Bergen is glad he did. “I like to help out and I like to

stay active,” Bergen said. “I also volunteer at Geisinger.” Joe Dessoye, of Pittston, a re- tired Pittston Area teacher who works the airport information desk on Tuesdays, said it’s his way of giving back to the community. He’s impressed by his fellow am- bassadors. “These are nice peo- ple,” he said. “They are terrific.” Dean Robinson said as much as he likes helping people at the air- port, he can’t fill all their requests. He tells a story about a request

that was rhetorical rather than real and laughs as he recalls the situa- tion. “There was a women getting out of her car and you could tell she was very upset. I said, “may I help you?’ and she said, ‘yes, you can help me kill my husband.’” Other Greater Pittston Flight Ambassadors are Ann Shelski, Rita Skechus, Ron Skamanich and Joe Andrews, all of Duryea and Mar y Walsh, of Avoca.

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PAGE 7

JAMES ‘SOX’ RUANE 1927-2012

City loses ‘surrogate grandfather’

‘Sox’ Ruane’s viewing to be Monday in firehouse where he was a fixture

By JOE HEALEY

jhealey@timesleader.com

What’s in a nickname?

James Ruane had one for ev- eryone.

A fixture in Pittston’s emer-

gency services history and own-

er of a local funeral home, Ruane died Thursday. He was 86. Everyone knew him by his own nickname, “Sox.” Laura Mudlock said Ruane was her adopted grandfather. “Jimmy was a wonderful man who loved everyone and was loved by everyone,” Mudlock

said. “You will not find someone who will say a harsh word against him. He worked hard all of his life, having 16 different jobs and working for 8 different funeral homes, including his own.” Mudlock started helping Ruane in 1998 on the ambulance crew and the funeral home. “He took me in,” she said. “We’ve been best friends ever since.” Pittston Fire Chief Jim Roo- ney has known Ruane for more than 35 years. He said Ruane had

a dry sense of humor and “he’d

tell you things just to get reac- tion.” And Ruane loved to give peo- ple nicknames.

When Rooney was 18, he

worked the morning shift at UPS in Pittston Township.

“I was usually in dirty clothes

from moving boxes all day,” he said. “He started calling me ‘Rags.’” And the nicknames that Ruane collected for himself were nu- merous. Jimmy. Bonesy. Digger. But Sox was the moniker that was most attached to him. “He told me that when he was growing up playing basketball in the Junction, he used to wear stockings,” Mudlock said. “Since then he was Sox.”

stockings,” Mudlock said. “Since then he was Sox.” Laura Mudlock with her '`adopted grandfather' Jim

Laura Mudlock with her '`adopted grandfather' Jim '`Sox' Ruane.

bulance Association, where he volunteered for 57 years. He was a firefighter in the Eagle Hose Co. #1 in Pittston, where he later retired as fire chief. Since its in- ception, he volunteered for many years with Medic 303. He con- tinued working as a licensed fu- neral director and as the owner- operator of the Ruane & Regan Funeral Home until his date of death. Among many other jobs, he enjoyed working for the U.S. Po st Offi ce and the Lehigh Va l- ley Railroad. Ruane was honored in 2011 by the Greater Pittston Ambulance Association at a surprise retire- ment party held at the Tribeca Banquet and Convention Center, Pittston Twp. He retired as from the association as the outgoing president. He spent 35-years as

Four years ago, Ruane tripped and fell while walking his dog, Maggie, and sustained a severe brain injur y. “We didn’t think he was going to make it then,” Mudlock said.

“But he pulled though. He was a fighter.”

After high school, he fought in the Army’s 86th Infantry – Black Hawk Division – during Wo rld War II. He was wounded while serving with the Army’s 86th in- fantry division. When he came back, his moth- er sent him to mortuary school in Philadelphia and he subsequent- ly partnered with Michael Regan and started Ruane and Reagan Funeral Home. Ruane’s wife of 62 years, Ma- ry McGlynn Ruane, will contin- ue the family business and Mu- dlock plans to get her mortician certification soon.

A long legacy

Ruane recently retired as pres- ident of the Greater Pittston Am-

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James 'Sox' Ruane, left, with Pittston Fire Chief Jim Rooney at a surprise retirement party last July.

president out of the 57-years as a member. In addition to his years of service with the ambulance, he also retired as a 50-year mem- ber of the Pittston City Fireman’s Association.

TONY CALLAIO/FILE PHOTO

Pittston Councilman Michael Lombardo, a member of the am- bulance association, said he’s known Ruane since 1995, when

See RUANE, Page 37

Michael Lombardo, a member of the am- bu lance association, said he’s known Ruane since 1995,

S UNDAY DISPATCH , S UNDAY , M AY 6, 2012

PAGE 8

LOCALCHATTER

What are you chattin’ about? Call 602-0177 or email sd@psdispatch.com and let us know.

Castellino is named President/CEO of CBN

and let us know. Castellino is named President/CEO of CBN James Castellino Circle Bolt & Nut

James Castellino

Circle Bolt & Nut Company, Inc. (CBN) a national distributer of fasteners with 7 locations throughout the United States has announced the promotion of James J. Castellino to the posi- tion of President and CEO. He has been employed by CBN since 2009. Mr. Castellino has 33 years of experience in various industries in Sales & Marketing, Manufacturing and Distribution, holding senior level positions over the last 25 years. He is a graduate of University of Dela- ware with a Bachelor of Science in Finance. Jim Sperling the founder of Circle Bolt & Nut Company, Inc. has recently retired and will be retained in a part- time consult- ing role.

Interning in Wa les Megan Endres, the daughter of Patty and Jim Endres of

Megan Endres , the daughter of Patty and Jim Endres of Megan Endres ‘Dime Bank’ gets

Megan Endres

‘Dime Bank’ gets a new tenant

‘Dime Bank’ gets a new tenant On Friday, April 27, the Pittston City and Reilly Associates

On Friday, April 27, the Pittston City and Reilly Associates welcomed a new tenant to the Reilly Building, aka the Dime Bank building, Main Street, Pittston. Luddy Fleming Construction moved into Suite 100. At a reception to celebrate the occasion are: from left, Joe Moskovitz Pittston City manager; Mar ty Quinn; Joe Cher nauskas council; Mike Lombardo, council; Tom Reilly, Jason Klush, Pitt- ston mayor; Luddy Fleming, Marie Manganiello, Joy Adams; Rosemary Dessoye, Pittston Cham- ber of Commece; Rob Rosencrans and Jim Perotti.

Wyoming, just finished her ju- nior year at Pennsylvania Col- lege of Technology where she is majoring in Culinary Arts and Systems. Megan, a 2009 Wyoming Area alumnus, is leaving Friday for Llangammarch Wells in central Wales where she will spend her summer as an intern at the res- taurant located at the Lake Country House Hotel and Spa. A dean’s list student at the Pe nnsylvania College of Te ch- nology, where she leads tours as a student ambassador, Megan is enrolled in a four-year Bache- lor’s degree program that com- bines chef training and business/ management classes. She represented her school at the Finger Lakes Wine Festival in Lake Seneca, NY and at the Pennsylvania Farm show in Har- risburg where she conducted culinary demonstrations and worked with the celebrity chef featured at the Farm Show, Chef Mike Isabella. (Chef/Owner of Graffiato in Washington, DC)

She has already completed

two internships one at the Irem Temple Countr y Club restaurant

in Dallas and one at the campus

restaurant Le Jeune Chef. Megan will be in Wales with Student Chefs Abroad, which places culinary students in in- ternships throughout the United Kingdom. She’ll be back in mid-August to for her senior year at Penn College. She’s hoping to one day open her own restaurant.

Dean’s list Matthew Panzitta, Pittston, was named to the Dean’s List at Villanova University for the fall 2011 semester. Panzitta is en- rolled in the College of Engi- neering. Villanova University Dean’s List recipients are honored by their college’s respective dean.

To qualify, one must be a matric- ulated full-time student and earn

a semester grade point average of at least 3.5.

and earn a semester grade point average of at least 3.5. Dr. Andrea Nerozzi STEM Fellow

Dr. Andrea Nerozzi

STEM Fellow

Dr.

Andrea

Nerozzi

of

Wyoming, a member of the sci- ence faculty at Wyoming Semi- nary College Preparatory School, recently was accepted as a Fellow to the prestigious 2012 Siemens STEM (Science, Te ch-

nology, Engineering and Mathe- matics) Institute at the Discovery Headquarters in Maryland.

The 50 Fellows are chosen from a national pool of educa- tors. The Institute will run from July 29-August 3 in Silver Spring and will include lectures by STEM leaders, field trips to institutions using real-world ap- plications of STEM subject mat- ter and opportunities for net- working and collaborating with peers from across the nation. Nerozzi teaches chemistry and Advanced Placement environ- mental science and is director of the Science Research Group. She has been a member of the Sem faculty since 1996.

Rovinski certified Gregory Stanley Rovinski of MetLife, has been authorized by the Certified Financial Planner Board of Standards Inc. (CFP Board) to use the certification marks CFP® and CERTIFIED FINANCIAL PLANNERTM practitioner in accordance with CFP Board certification and re- newal requirements. Rovinski met the rigorous ex- perience and ethical require- ments, completed financial planning coursework, and passed the CFP® Certification Examination. CFP® certificants must also agree to meet ongoing continuing education require- ments and to uphold the CFP Board’s Code of Ethics and Pro- fessional Responsibility and Fi- nancial Planning Practice Stan- dards. Rovinski is a graduate of The Pennsylvania State University, Smeal College of Business. He is a member of National Associ- ation of Insurance and Financial Advisors. He has worked in the financial services industry for seven years.

Math competition Gregory Cajka and Leslie Shumlas, of Wyoming Area High School, competed in the 64th Annual School of Mathe- matics Contest sponsored by the Luzerne County Council of Te achers of Mathematics (LCCTM) held at Wilkes Uni- versity.

SUNDAY DISPATCH , S UNDAY , M AY 6, 2012

PAGE 9

Rocky Glen book in the works

Author seeks photos, stories, memorabilia

By JACK SMILES

jsmiles@psdispatch.com

most of them of the Baby Boom generation or older, for whom trips to the iconic Moosic amusement park they affection- ately called “The Glen” are pre- mier happy-time childhood me- mories.

In 2009, Savaki- nus released an hour-long DVD en- titled “Rocky Glen Park.” He worked on the movie for a year with partners Shannon Keith and

Mark Migliore The movie includes over 20 in- terviews with people connected to the park and video from the 1930s through the 1980s, includ- ing rare scenes of the Laurel Line Railroad, the famed “Million Dollar Coaster” and the Duck

When the State Historical Marker for Rocky Glen Park was unveiled in 2008, a representa-

tive from the Pennsylvania His- torical and Mu-

seum Commis- sion, which admin- isters the marker program, looked at the crowd of 150 to 200 people, turned to Bob Savakinus

and said, “This is the largest attendance I’ve seen at any state marker dedication.” Savakinus, who helped pre- pare the application for the marker, wasn’t surprised. He knows there are thousands of lo- cal people, he among them, who might be described as Rocky Glenphiles. They are people,

HOW TO HELP

To contribute information to the Rocky Glen book email Bob Savakinus at rsavrobert@aol.com or call him at 57-885-1384.

See ROCKY GLEN, Page 31

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SUNDAY DISPATCH , S UNDAY , M AY 6, 2012

PAGE 10

MATTERS OF FAITH

email items for this page to sd@psdispatch.com; fax to 602-0183

Wo men’s Ministry Spring Te a Saturday

The Wo men’s Ministr y of Christian Missionary and Alli- ance Church, Luzer ne Avenue and Pa rke Street, We st Pittston, is presenting a Spring Tea on Fri- day, May 11, at 7 p.m. in the Fel- lowship Hall for women interest- ed in being challenged by what God is doing through women throughout the world. The speaker is Joan Werzinski. Her presentation is titled “Detours, Roadblocks and Blessings.” Werzinski was bor n and raised in Hudson. She is garadaute of Houghton College. After serv- ing as Director of Christian Edu- cation at a local church in Allen- town, she and her husband Mark were missionaries in Zambia for two terms beginning in 1987. They also ministered to gold and platinum miners in South Africa. Currently they represent a Bible teaching ministry in South Afri- ca. The event is free. Reservations are required. Call the church of- fice at 654-2500.

SENIOR YOGA

During the month of May at Our Lady of the Eucharist Par- ish, North Main St., Pittston, , Senior Yoga will be offered on Wednesday mor nings, 9:30- 10:30 a.m. There will be no on class May 30. A new class, ap- propriate for all levels, including beginners, will be offered on Wednesday evenings, 7-8:15 p.m. Senior Yoga incorporates these objectives: breathe, move, strengthen, renew, relax. This is gentle yoga practice designed to increase awareness, flexibility, strength and relaxation. Partici- pants are asked to bring a yoga mat and blanket. No prior experi- ence is needed. Chairs are used to assist those who require them; there is no need to go to the floor. The first class is offered free. Classes will be offered on Wednesdays, May 2, 9, 16 , & 23 from 9:30-10:30 a.m. at $8 per class YOGA for Peace and Healing is designed for all levels. This class introduces yoga as the pathway toward peace and heal- ing. Students will learn a variety

Orders due today for hoagie sale

On Tuesday, May 8, parishioners of United Methodist Church, corner of Church and Broad streets, Pittston, will offer a hoagie sale. Choic- es are ham, salami and cheese or turkey and

cheese, with or without onion. Price of a hoagie is $4. To order, call 654-3936, 693-1572 or 603- 1915 by today, Sunday, May 6.

of yoga and mindfulness based practices to assist them in stress release and in healing at the deepest levels. Class is open to all; no prior experience is need- ed. Participants are asked to bring a yoga mat and blanket. All class sessions are supported by essential oils and aromatherapy candles. The first class free. Classes are Wednesdays, May 2, 9, 16, & 23 from 7-8:15 p.m.; $10 per class.

DOO WOP SHOW

United Methodist Church, Pittston, Flower Fund is running a b us trip to the Doo Wo p Cava l- cade Show at the American Mu- sic Theater in Lancaster, Pa., on Saturday, Oct. 13, at 2 p.m. Cost is $94 which includes bus seat, show ticket, dinner, all tips and taxes. Reservations must be made no later than May 31. A $50 deposit is required when making reservation and balance is due by August 1. A smorgasbord dinner at Shady Maple follows the show. For additional information or to make a reservation, call 603- 1915 and leave a message if no answer.

PEDIATRIC CLINIC

The Care and Concern Pediat- ric Health Clinic, located in the former Seton Catholic School building on William Street in Pittston, will be open the first and third Thursday of each month. Free health care is pro- vided for inf ants through age 11. Registration is from 4:30 to 5:30 p.m. Participants should bring your child’s immunization records with them. Parents or guardians must be present to have their child examined. All

services are free and confiden- tial. The clinic is sponsored by the Care and Concern ministries of the Parish Community of St. John the Evangelist, Msgr. John Bendik, Pastor. For more infor- mation call 855-6035.

REFORMED PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH OF WYOMING VALLEY

17 00 Wy oming Av enue , Fo rty- Fo rt Pastor Rev. R.F. Dymond Mor ning Wo rship: 10 :30 a.m. Bible School: 11:45 a.m. We dnesday evening praye r service: 6:30 p.m. every other We dnesday Visitors are welcome. For ad- ditional information call 570-

693-1918

BENNETT PRESBYTERIAN

501 Bennett Street, Luzerne Everyone is welcome. The church is handicap accessible.

BETHEL UNITED METHODIST

532Main St., Avoca (570) 457-2566 Pastor Sharon Dietz (570)

282-0104

Sunday – Wo rship Ser vice - 11:15 a.m. Communion first Sunday of each month – non perishable food items will be collected this day. Mondays – Bible study – 6 p.m. alternating each week with Brick UM Church, Duryea. 1st Thursday of each month – food give-away 4 to 6 p.m. for needy of Avoca and Dur ye a. Non perishable food items and mone- tary donations are accepted at

this time. If you have a prayer request, call Pastor Dietz who will activa- te prayer chain.

BRICK UNITED

METHODIST

935 Fo ote Av e. , Duryea

(570)457-4424

Pastor Sharon Dietz (570)

282-0104

Sunday Worship Ser vice 9:45 a.m. Sunday School – 10:15 a.m. during mor ning Wo rship Services for ages 3-12 Communion first Sunday of each month – non perishable food items will be collected this day. Mondays – Bible study – 6 p.m. alternating each week with Bethel UM Church, Avoca. Miracle of Awareness – coffee time – 6 p.m. meeting 7 p.m. Thursday – New beginnings meeting 7 p.m. Third Thursday of each month – United Metho- dist Wo men – 6:30 p.m.

CHRISTIAN AND MISSIONARY ALLIANCE CHURCH

Luzerne Ave. and Parke Street West Pittston Origins – The Foundation of Creation and Man Part will be held from 7 to 8:15 p.m. through May 13. The study is open to Bible stu- dents and well as interested indi- viduals. Pre-registration is rec- ommended by calling the church office 654-2500. Christ’s Community Clothes Closet will be open from 9-11 a.m. on We dnesday and Thurs- day evenings from 6-8 p.m. The Women’s Ministr y is hav- ing a Spring tea on Friday, may 11 at 7 p.m. in the Fellowship Hall for women interested in being

challenged by what God is doing through women throughout the world. The speaker is Joan We r- zinski. He presentation is titled “Detours, Roadblocks and Blessings.” The event is free. Reservations are required. Call the church of- fice at 654-2500.

FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH

Rev. James H. Breese, pastor, Water Street, Pittston Sunday - 9:30 a.m. Wo rship and Praise Service/Children’s Sunday School, Adult/Teen Sun- day School immediately follow- ing service.

FIRST CONGREGATIONAL UCC

500 Luzerne Avenue West Pittston Rev. Joan Mitchell, Pastor Sanctuary is handicapped ac- cessible. Sunday at 11 a.m. Mor ning Worship Ser vice Tuesday at 7 p.m. Diaconate Meeting, and at 7:30 p.m. is a Church Council meeting.

FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH

14 Broad Street Pittston Sunday Worship 9:15 a.m. with Rev. Wi lliam N. Luk esh.

FIRST UNITED PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH

West Pittston Rev. James Thyren

654-8121

Today, May 6 – 10 a.m., Sun- day school; 11:00 a.m., Wo rship; 12:05, Choir rehearsal; May 8 – 7 p.m., Deacons May 9 – 9 a.m., Morning Cir- cle May 10 – 7:30 p.m. Session; May 12 – 1 to 4 p.m. Postal Food Drive at meals on Wheels. Services are being held at St. Cecilia’s Roman Catholic Church on 17 00 Wyoming Ave, Exeter as we recover from the flood of September 2011.

See FAITH, Page 11

SUNDAY DISPATCH , S UNDAY , M AY 6, 2012

PAGE 11

Faith

Continued from Page 10

FIRST UNITED METHODIST CHURCH

Wyoming Ave., West Pittston May 6 - 10 a.m. worship and Sunday school during worship. May 7 – 7 p.m. Admin. Coun- cil and Boy Scouts May 8 – 7 p.m. UMW May 9 – 10 a.m., Mommy and Me; 5 p.m., Strings and Wings; 6:30 p.m., Tops; 7 p.m., Choir May 10 – 6 p.m., Finance com- mittee; 7 p.m. Class 18 and We ight Watchers.

FULL GOSPEL CHAPEL

Avoca Adult Sunday School, 9:30; Sunday morning worship at 10:30 a.m. We dnesday evening Bible study and prayer service at 7:00. The church also hosts the Rose of Sharon Church with Rev. Vi n- cente Torres on Sunday after- noon at 3:00 p.m. for the Hispan- ic community.

GLENDALE GOSPEL CHURCH

105 Church Drive Glendale/Pittston Township Sunday Service 10:45 a.m.

HARDING CHURCH OF CHRIST

RR 1 Box 187A, Falls Sunday services: 10:00 a.m. Sunday School and 11:00 a.m. Church Service. Call 388-6534 www.harding- churchofchrist.org

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HOLY MOTHER OF SORROWS PNCC

212 Wyoming Avenue, Dupont

Rev. Zbigniew Dawid, Pastor Sunday Masses:

8:00 a.m. - Traditional Mass 9:15 a.m. School of Christian Living (SOCL) and Confirma- tion Class 10:30 a.m. Traditional High Mass Daily Mass 9:00 a.m. Monday through Saturday. Do not forget that ever y Wednesday in May we have May Devotions to the Blessed Mother at 7:00 p.m. Please attend. Mother’s Day Breakfast will be held on the May 13 following the 8:00 a.m. Mass. The Parish men’s YMS of R is sponsoring this event and the breakfast is a gift to all mother’s; grandmothers, godmothers, aunts etc, are also invited.

INDEPENDENT BIBLE CHURCH

328 Main Street

Duryea, PA 18642

(570) 451-0346 Home/Office

JLaCava@TheBible-

Church.org

INKERMAN

PRESBYTERIAN

Main St., Inkerman Services: Sundays, 8:30 a.m.

LANGCLIFFE

PRESBYTERIAN

1001 Main St Avoca Sunday worship 11:15 a.m. The Langcliffe Church is handicapped accessible. Nurs- ery is provided for children dur- ing worship.

MOOSIC ALLIANCE CHURCH

608 Rocky Glen Road, Moosic Pastor: Doug Jensen 457-

6020

maccma2@verizon.net

Sunday morning Sunday School for all ages at 9:30 a.m. Sunday mor ning Wo rship at 10:45 a.m. Praye r meeting, We dnesdays at 7:00 p.m. Celebrate Recovery Ministr y, Thursdays at 7:30 p.m.

OBLATES OF ST. JOSEPH

Highway 315, Pittston Masses are held daily in the seminary chapel at 7:00 a.m. (Monday – Friday) and on Sat- urday mornings at 8:00 a.m. There are no weekend Masses. Confessions are heard daily from 9:00 a.m. – 12 and from 3:00 – 6:00 p.m. Office hours are Monday – Friday: 9:30 a.m. – 5:00 p.m., evenings and weekends by ap- pointment.

Office phone number is 654-

7542.

Ever y We dnesday evening Mass is celebrated at 7:00 p.m. in conjunction with the Novena to St. Joseph & St. Joseph Marello. Novena prayers and the blessing of the first-class relic of St. Jo- seph Marello, Founder of the Oblates of Saint Joseph Congre- gation, immediately follow the Mass. All are welcome to partic- ipate! Tune into Catholic Radio 750 AM. The radio studio is located in the seminary building and is broadcast daily from dawn to dusk. For more information about this station, contact Ed Niewinski at 287-4670. Annual Triduum & Feast of St. Joseph Marello will be celebrat- ed from May 27-30 in the semi- nary chapel. Masses will be cele- brated each evening of the Tridu- um (May 27-29) with novena prayers to follow. On the Feast of St. Joseph Ma- rello (May 30) Mass will be of- fered at 7:00pm by retired Auxil- iary Bishop John M. Dougherty, D.D. and concelebrated by the Oblate Fathers. An outdoor re- ception will be hosted by the Jo- sephite-Marellian Lay Associ- ation. St. Joseph Marello, a native of Asti, Italy, is the Founder of the Congregation of the Oblates of St. Joseph. He was canonized by

Blessed John Paul II in 2001 and Oblate Fathers & Brothers are working in 12 different countries throughout the world.

ST. JOSEPH MARELLO PARISH OUR LADY OF MT. CARMEL ST. ROCCO’S

Pittston We ekend Masses:

At Our Lady of Mt. Carmel Church, on Saturday at 4:00 & 7:00 p.m. and on Sunday at 8:00 & 11:00 a.m. At St. Rocco Church, on Sat- urday at 5:30 p.m. and on Sunday at 9:30 a.m. St. Joseph Marello Parish Raf- fle is now underway. Buy your tickets now for a chance to win 2012 Chevrolet Cruz or $20,000. Donations are $20 each and only 2,000 tickets to be sold. Seller of the winning ticket receives $500.00. If you would like to sell tickets call Frank Sciabacucchi 655-6125, Pena Hansen-332- 5989, or the rectory office-654- 6902. Get yours before it’s too late. Bus trip to Shrine of Our Lady of Lourdes, June 23/24. Contact Pat 609-5173 or Jean 693-1041. Anyone wishing to rent the parish banquet hall or meeting room should call Christine Silin-

See FAITH, Page 12

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SUNDAY DISPATCH , S UNDAY , M AY 6, 2012

PAGE 12

Faith

Continued from Page 11

skie, hall manager at 704-8861 for details and/or a tour of the fa- cility. Mt. Carmel Senior Choir will hold rehearsal on Mondays, from 7-8:30 p.m. St. Rocco Se- nior Choir will hold weekly re- hearsals on Tuesdays at 7:30 p.m. in the choir loft of St. Rocco Church. New members are wel- come. Home-bound parishioners who would like to receive Holy Communion, should call the Rectory at 654-6902 and a priest or Eucharistic Minister will visit them. St. Joseph Marello Annual Golf Tournament will be held on Sunday, June 10 at the Wilkes- Barre Municipal Golf Course with an 8 a.m. shotgun start and dinner following at Mt. Carmel Center, William Street Pittston. Registration forms are at the en- trance of the churches. Reserva- tion and payment if received by May 25 is $75 per player or $300 per foursome. The Mass Book for 2012 is available. Come to the rectory office on William St. A Mother’s Day Carnation Sale will take place at all Masses next weekend. The carnations will be at the entrances of the churches. $1.00 donation is sug- gested. You may take it home or offer it to the Blessed Mother in church (vases will be provided). This annual fundraiser will help

the women who are assisted by the Pro-Life Center of Wilkes- Barre. The parish extends a thank you to all who participated in the Penny Auction. A special thank you to Loretta Joyce, chairper- son, all those who organized, collected items, baked, sold tick- ets, counted, etc. Also to Chris- tine Silinskie for setting up, our runners: Amy, Julie, Mar y Silin- skie, Brandon Goodlavage, Ni- cole and Emily Audi, and Dylan Berweld. Congratulations to the raffle winners: $100 - Ann Rey- nolds, $75 - Mary Schifano, $50 - Lucy Singer, and Baby Quilt – “Mr. Lucky” Frank Sciabacuc- chi. Mother’s Day Adoption Mass will be celebrated on Sunday, May 13, at 10 a.m. in St. Peter’s Cathedral, Scranton. Bishop Emeritus James C. Timlin will be the principal celebrant. All are invited to attend. CTV will broadcast the Mass. The Mass is co-sponsored by Catholic Social Services, which provides a wide range of adoption and foster care services. Participants in the litur- gy will include adoptee, adop- tive parents, and professionals who facilitate the adoption proc- ess. A Mother’s Communion Breakfast, sponsored by the St. Joseph Altar and Rosary Society will be held in Mt. Carmel Church Hall on Sunday, May 20, following the 8:00 a.m. Mass. Deacon Santo Agolino will be the Keynote Speaker. Tickets are available at the office (654-

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6902) during office hours until Thursday, May 17. The cost is $11.50 adults, $4 children under 12 with catering by John Bing- ham. You must select your menu choice when purchasing the tick- et. Choices are scrambled eggs with home fries, bacon and sau- sage or Bananas Foster pancakes with bacon and sausage. A fruit cup, Danish, rolls, coffee, tea and juice. Everyone is invited to attend. Reserved seating-tables of eight will be available. Altar and Rosary Society members are asked to sit in reserved seating at the front of the church and re- ceive communion in a body. Anyone wishing to donate fresh flowers in memory of a loved one may bring them to the church on Saturday morning. Thank you. Today Sunday, May 6, at 1:00 p.m. Mass the May Crowning will be held by the First Holy Communion Children. Ava Serino will crown the Blessed Mother. Ben Bowen is the crown bearer. The CCD Closing Mass and May Crowning will take place next Sunday, May 13, at 11:00 a.m. All students (grades K-8) are asked to attend this Mass. During the Mass our sixth grader students will crown the Blessed Mother. First Holy Communion chil-

dren are asked to come dressed with their First Holy Communi- on attire. The children of the First Communion Class will stand as honor guard for the crowning Mary Silinskie will crown the Blessed Mother. Mike Mikitish is the crown bearer. Members of the First Holy Communion class are Joshua Adametz, Jack Albert, Aleni Al- fano, Charles Mathis-Baliatico, Angelo (AJ) Borino, Isabella Rose Bartalotta, Ben Bowen, Tyler Cegelka, Aleksander, Za- char y Chilson, Elizabeth Casey, Frank D’Aiello, Amanda Fath, Seth Gale, Luke Galli Nicholas Giardina, David Girman, Da- niella Granahan, Katie Koss, Ke- vin Herron, Marissa Gubitoso, Olivia Kiwak, Matthew Kellog, Jack Locker Lauren LoPresto, Connor Manganiello, Lidia Ja- nel Marranca, Hannah Merlino, Robert Louis Miller, Jiana Mo- ran, Kyle Norton, John Ozark, Arianna Pisano, Alexander Prete, Karissa Renfer, Robert Sedlak, Olivia Sennett-Occhia- to, Ava Serino, Ky leigh Shupp, Ryan Smith, Bethany Sromoski, Kevin Talipan, Abigal Tirva, Salvatore Turonis, Sage Wei- dlich, and Alexis Wenak. Life Line Screening offers fin- ger-stick blood tests within 10 minutes. Protect your health by finding out your risk of diabetes and vascular disease by partici-

pating in the Screening that will be held at Mt. Carmel Parish Center on Tuesday, May 8. Call

1-888-653-6441.

The St. Joseph Marello An- nual Golf Tour nament is Sunday, June 10 at the Wilkes-Barre Mu- nicipal Golf Course with a 8:00 a.m. Shotgun start and dinner following at Mt. Carmel Center, William Street Pittston. Regis- tration forms are at the entrance of the churches. If reservation and payment are received by May 25 it’s only $75 per player or $300 per foursome. Anyone wishing to rent our Parish Banquet Hall or Meeting Room should call Christine Si- linskie, Hall Manager at 704- 8861 for details and/or a tour of the facility. Great for wedding receptions, bridal showers, grad- uations, bereavements, semi- nars, birthday parties, etc.

CORPUS CHRISTI PARISH

Luzerne Ave., West Pittston Daily Mass 7:30 a.m. at Immaculate Con- ception; 8:30 a.m. at Holy Re- deemer; 12:10 p.m. at Immacu- late Conception 6:00 p.m. at Holy Redeemer 7:00 p.m. at Immaculate Con- ception The Parish Bazaar is Fri, Sat,

See FAITH, Page 13

SPOSPOSPOTLIGHTTLIGHTLIGH Dance Studio 570-540-5910 405 Main St. • Duryea “Spotlight Dance Studio” “Spotlight
SPOSPOSPOTLIGHTTLIGHTLIGH
Dance Studio
570-540-5910
405 Main St. • Duryea
“Spotlight Dance Studio”
“Spotlight Dance Studio”
recently participated in the “Guns and Hoses”
charity basketball game held at the Pittston Area
Senior High School. The competition groups
“Dazzling Divas” and “Glamour” performed
during the charity event. The studio also donated
several items for the ticket raffle.
recently participated in the “Miracles for
Maryann” Fundraiser held at Chacko’s Bowling
Lanes in Wilkes-Barre. The students collected
cash donations. The studio also donated gift
certificates for the raffle.
Shown in the picture are students from the
competition groups at Spotlight Dance Studio.
Shown in the photo are the “Dazzling Divas” Halie Coggins,
Jenna Lombardo, Abby Nelson, Emilee Shaw, Emily Howells
and Marissa Traglia.
Shown in the photo is the group “Glamour” Alexandra
McKitish, Faith Musinski, Alexandra Traglia, Kaitlynn
Wolfram, Gabrielle McNeill and Jamie Lombardo
Center: Halie Coggins. First Row: Gia Turonis, Gianna Guiliano,
Emilee Shaw, Kacie Kridlo and Ashley Thomas.
Second Row: Jenna Lombardo, Marissa Traglia, Jaime Lombardo
holding Spotlight’s Mascot Brayden (little man) Thomas,
Abby Nelson and Emily Howells.

SUNDAY DISPATCH , S UNDAY , M AY 6, 2012

PAGE 13

Faith

Continued from Page 12

Sun, June 29, 30, and July 1 at

Holy Redeemer grounds.

Church

OUR LADY OF THE EUCHARIST PARISH

535 N Main Street, Pittston Parish Website www.eucharist-pittston.org. Mass Schedule Saturday Vigil: 4:00 p.m. Sunday: 8:30 a.m. and 10:30 a.m. Daily Mass: 8:00 a.m. Sacrament of Reconciliation (Confessions) Saturday from 3:30 p.m. to 3:45 p.m. and by appointment Religious Education The School of Religious Edu-

cation has concluded classes for this school year. The parish is grateful to Maurita Bartnikow- ski, Director and all the cate- chists, aides, and substitute teachers. Parish Website The address for the parish webpage is: www.eucharist-pitt- ston.org. You will find links to the Schedule for Liturgical Min- isters, weekly bulletins, monthly calendars, upcoming events and additional information. Check out the parish Facebook page for all the latest informa- tion. The address is www.face- book.com/OLEPARISH. First Holy Communion Congratulations to the follow- ing children who will approach the Eucharistic Table for the first time this Sunday: Richard John Bowen, Madison Barbara Deck- er, Benjamin Joseph Frederick,

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Ethan Jeffrey Ghannam, Madi- son Elizabeth Hector, Shelby Lynn Klush, Isabella Noel Lato- na, Abby Theresa Lazecki, Mat- thew David Maye rs, Aver y Gene McNulty, Samantha Rose Quinn, Kalyssa Marie Reilly, Stephen Schott, Avalon Eliza- beth Starrie, and Paige Ann Washko. The members of the First Communion Class would like to thank all who helped them to prepare for and celebrate the Sacrament of First Eucharist: Fa- ther Tom, their Parents, Maurita Bar tnikowski, Katr yna Reilly, their Catechists and Teachers, the members of the choir, their

families, friends and the Parish Community of Our Lady of the Eucharist. Ministry to the Sick On the first Friday of each month Communion is brought to those who are unable to partici- pate in Sunday Mass because of age or health. The Sacrament of the Anointing of the Sick is cele- brated with anyone seriously ill, anticipating a serious operation, or quite elderly. Please notify the parish office of anyone desiring these Sacraments, as well as any- one in the hospital or a nursing home. Religious Education

Our Lady of the Eucharist Par- ish Community Will Offer Little Rock Scripture Study: James, Peter, and Jude: The Catholic Letters Beginning this Tuesday, May 8, and continuing for seven weeks, there will be two pro- grams, one in the morning from 8:30 a.m. until 10:00 a.m. and one on the evening from 7:00 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. Both programs will be held in the Parish Hall. Father Thomas J. Maloney will direct the program. Come and join us and learn to make the real

See FAITH, Page 18

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PAGE 14

OUROPINION

Pittston in mourning

It’s somewhat ironic that a guy whom

everyone called “Sox” leaves such big shoes to fill. But that is the case with the passing Thursday of James “Sox” Ruane, of Pittston, beloved “surrogate grandfa-

ther” of everyone in Pittston, as Coun- cilman Mike Lombardo called him.

A funeral director by occupation,

Jimmy was a volunteer by desire. A World War II U.S. Ar my veteran, he served the Greater Pittston Ambulance Association for 57 years, many of those as president. He also was a fire- fighter with Eagle Hose Company, where he also served as chief, and volunteered for many years with Medic 303, a rescue operation. But more than anything he was friendly, lovable gentleman who ser ved as a role model for dozens and dozens of young men who encountered him in these volunteer organizations. News of

his death was on the lips of just about everyone in town within hours. Jimmy was not one to accept acco- lades. He turned down more than one offer to be honored as Man of the Year from this organization or that. On such occasions, he would always grateful acknowledge that he was honored to be thought of, and then promptly point to another person he insisted was more worthy. That was his way. Our condolences go to his family and friends and especially to his wife of 62 years, Mary McGlynn Ruane, and to Laura Mudlock, his unofficial granddaughter and dear friend.

A story about Jimmy appears on

page 5 and his obituary is on page 60.

Don’t forget

If you did not have a chance to stop by the We st Pittston Cher ry Blossom Festiv- al Saturday, and even if you did, do your- self a favor and enjoy the festivities today on the rive rbank in We st Pittston. Things get underway this morning at 11:30 with Lee Str ubeck on piano. Enter- tainment continues through closing at 5 p.m. with Richie Kossuth performing from 4 to 5. There’s plenty of food and fun and be sure to stop at the West Pittston Tomor row booth to tell them you support The Gar- den Village “blooming better than ever.”

The Gar- den Village “blooming better than ever.” YOUR OPINION Letter carriers annual food drive is

YOUR OPINION

Letter carriers annual food drive is Saturday

The National Association of Letter Carriers will hold its “Stamp Out Hunger Food Drive” on Saturday, May 12. This drive comes at a critical time as food banks across the country are seeing requests for an increasing number of families. In our area, the letter carriers support Meals on Wheels of Greater Pittston which provides meals for 50 to 60 individuals daily. The letter carriers’ collection provides Meals on Wheels with the largest food drive held each year and provides us with a sig- nificant portion of our needs for the year. Since 2002 when record-keeping began, the mail carriers’

Pens poem on having a relationship with Christ

food drive has provided an estimated 361,000 pounds to Meals on Wheels for us to carry out our services to the people of Grea- ter Pittston. You can help the letter carriers and meals on wheels of Greater Pittston by providing canned and dry food products at your mail- box for the drive which will be held next Saturday, May 12.

Anthony Dombroski Volunteer Coordinator Meals on Wheels

Ju st like Wa lking on Wa ter

A day of sunshine, a day of peace.

A day for your love of the Savior

To increase. When you pray, what do you really say? Do you look to the sun, The moon or the stars? Yes, even Jesus loves you With all your sinful scars!

He forgives you, He loves you, He listens to you pray. Again, when it comes time

To answer Him, What will you say! We educated ourselves In a most spiritual way, We ask saints to intercede Yes, Jesus will help out in Your personal need.

I pick up a Bible

I light a candle or two

If only I can speak face to face With you know who! Blest are they who have not seen But believe

They are in for a spiritual retreat.

What a beautiful desire

For the blue sky and the sun

A desire shared by most everyone

A desire for the reality

To become even hotter, Because sharing a spiritual

Relationship with the Creator

Is “just like walking on water.”

Michael J. English Pittston Townhip

SUNDAY DISPATCH , S UNDAY , M AY 6, 2012

PAGE 15

MARIAREMEMBERS

AT CH , S UNDAY , M AY 6, 2012 PA GE 15 MARIA REMEMBERS Maria

Maria Capolarella Montante

Thoughts of ‘Mama’ bring tears

There is a feeling of serenity as I sit on the back porch watching the sway of the branches on the

trees, a cardinal and blue jay oblivious to each other feeding on the seeds beneath the bird feeder and butterflies flickering on a beautiful lilac bush in full bloom.

It is a beautiful sight - ne that puts a smile on my

face and peace in my soul. Then why is my heart feeling so heavy and my eyes filling with tears? The scene is a time of reflection. In my alone-

ness, I see and miss Mama. She is in my heart at all times but as the reminders of Mother’s Day appear, the thoughts and memories become more vivid.

I remember Mama from the age of 5 and she

was35 years old. Mama’s hair was worn in a bun at the nap of her neck, black-laced shoes with a mid heel were on her feet and most of the time she wore an apron. That apron was a sense of security to me. Her complexion had a rosy glow - one that was there her entire life. Sometimes, those rosy cheeks con- cealed how she felt inside. There are many thoughts of her through the vari- ous phases of my life and the lives of my brothers. By the time I reached graduation age from high school, Mama’s hair was cut and permanently waved, most of the time with the Toni home perma- nent kits popular in the 1950s. She was getting more modern and perhaps looking younger to me. The style of her going-out shoes had changed into a black pump, but the house dress and apron re- mained the same. Uppermost in my mind are the lessons learned from this very patient and wise mother. Keynote is loyalty to self and those you surround yourself with. She was adverse to gossip or unkind words spoken against anyone. Her philosophy was not to repeat what was heard or saw but to forget it. The theory most remembered is when making new friends never forget your old friends. This was lived through example. The biggest lesson she taught was courage. In the last seven years of her life, she was a kidney dialy- sis patient, going for treatment three days a week for five hours. She never complained or lamented, “Why me?” Mama had a sense of humor and, at times, stunned us with a quip or two. One winter, we had a severe storm with a great deal of snow making the roads impassable. Mama was scheduled for a treatment. Having no way to get her to the center, we were informed that trans- portation would be provided. Imagine her surprise when two young soldiers of the National Guard knocked on her door to drive her to the center. There was a smile on her face as she was escort- ed very carefully, ar m in ar m, to an Ar my Jeep by two soldiers dressed in fatigues. When she ar rived home later that day, I told her that a neighbor had seen her get into the Army jeep

and wanted to know why. Her response was, “Tell them I joined the Army!” That story makes me laugh and cr y. I am a crier by nature. I believe that God has giv- en each one a unique characteristic to use in life. There are those who can sit and pray for hours, oth- ers are great listeners, some have the talent of pro- viding laughter, those gifted with kindness to oth- ers and those who can utter words of encourage- ment. The tears continue as my thoughts drift toward the impending closing of our beloved St. Rocco’s Church. The pain and sorrow of what is to come is felt by many. Realizing others have walked this path before us does not make the journey less painful. The church is part of our lives from the time of baptism to the present.

It is the church in which we received the sacra-

ments, learned the love of God, attended cate-

chism, sang in the choir, joined the sodality, attend- ed Mass and, most impor tantly, became par t of a church family. We have tried as others have done in the past, pleading to keep our church open as a worship site.

A r esponse to a letter recently receive d from Rev.

John Polednak, V.E. Southern Pastoral Region, states, “Bishop Bambera was involved from the be- ginning with this process and has always listened with deep respect to not only the needs of people, but their feelings as well. But he also cares for the entire diocese and must ensure health for all the people and works of the diocese. Bishop Bambera has been open to all re- quests for a change, but, after careful review, has seen compelling reasons to maintain the deci- sions.” The cardinal and blue jay have flown away and still I sit, immersed in reverie. The sight and scent of the lilac bush reminds me that soon the hydrangea bushes will be blooming.

They will be a magnificent sight that will give great beauty and pleasure, as well.

It was a sight enjoyed for weeks by me and my

neighbor and good friend, the late Vi cki Moore. We took pride in making bouquets and placing them on the altar of St. Rocco’s Church. They will add to the reminders of what was, what is and what is missed. Being missed in the neighborhood for the past five years is Mary Marcino Soska who had been a resident of Highland Manor. Mary passed away and was laid to rest this past week. Her spirit, easy smile and laughter will long be remembered. My thoughts are interrupted by the calling of my name. The door opens and stepping out on the porch is my name caller, Chet. Looking at me he exclaims, “What, you’re cry- ing again? It’s enough to make a man cry!”

NUTRITION

CORNER

again? It’s enough to make a man cry!” NUTRITION CORNER Mary R. Ehret, MS, RD, LDN

Mary R. Ehret, MS, RD, LDN Penn State Cooperative Extension

Celebrate Mom at home

The annual day of celebrating “Moms” is just around the corner. Gift cards seem to be heavily advertised this year. I see billboards, television commercials, and newspaper ads suggesting that a gift card for their product or service is the right gift for your mom! Many moms have the responsibility for planning, preparing, and serving the meals for their household. In some homes, it’s the dad’s responsibility. If this fits your home, giving a gift card for “in home” cooked family meal might be just the right gift. Much research has shown that both adults and children eat health- ier when they eat at home. There are more benefits to enjoying family mealtime together. Blend the two together and you have doubled the value of your Mother’s Day gift! Here are the long reaching benefits of making and eating family meals at home together. Better relationships Eating together helps build a close relationship with your children. It gives everyone in the family a chance to learn more about each other. Turn off the TV and do not answer the phone during mealtime. Instead use this time to talk, connect, and make memories together. Just recently I viewed a presentation that suggested we ask our chil- dren what they think our core family values are? Smaller portion sizes Children learn about correct portion sizes. Let the children learn by ser ving themselves at dinner. Te ach them to take small amounts at first. Tell them they can get more if they are still hung ry. Greater sense of security Eating with your child gives them a sense of security. Studies show that this decreases the chances that the child will engage in activities such as smoking and drinking. Saves money Eating at home saves the family money. It is cheaper to cook meals at home than it is to dine out. Builds cooking skills Get everyone involved in meal preparation. Kids love to help pre- pare food. Letting them help prepare food will help them feel valued and par t of the family. Builds social skills Eating together as a family gives the children an opportunity to learn and practice their social skills, table manners, and conversation skills. Introduces new foods Offer your children new foods, even if it’s just a taster’s bit. Let them choose how much to eat. Kids are more likely to enjoy a food when eating it is their own choice. The key is not to serve additional foods if they do not like it. They will need to wait until the next regu- lar meal time. Mom’s who spend countless hours ensuring that there is family meals day after day need to be commended. It is not an easy task! This is one endless act of love to appreciate Mom for on Mother’s Day! Give her a break and make this easy to make dessert for Mom! Strawberries are filled with Vitamin C, an antioxidant which helps the body fight disease and aging. Call our office for a copy of the Vitamin C fact sheet. Use dark chocolate for a boost of phytochem- icals!

See NUTRITION, Page 34

Mary R. Ehret, M.S., R.D., L.D.N., is with Penn State Cooperative Extension, Luzerne County, 16 Luzerne Ave., West Pittston, Pa., 18643. (570) 825-1701/602-0600. Fax (570) 825-1709. mre2@psu.edu.

SUNDAY DISPATCH , S UNDAY , M AY 6, 2012

PAGE 16

TEACHER OF THE YEAR NOMINEE

UNDAY , M AY 6, 2012 PA GE 16 TEACHER OF THE YEAR NOMINEE An equation
UNDAY , M AY 6, 2012 PA GE 16 TEACHER OF THE YEAR NOMINEE An equation
UNDAY , M AY 6, 2012 PA GE 16 TEACHER OF THE YEAR NOMINEE An equation

An equation for success

By JOE HEALEY

jhealey@psdisptach.com

The students’ eyes lit up when

they talked about their teacher. “He loves teaching,” one senior yelled out. “He gets us excited about learning,” another chimed “He cares about all students, whether you’re in his class or not.” “He makes calculus fun.” Not to mention the jokes. And the singing. Michael Ko-

“I’m a math teacher by trade and it’s all writing. If I advance, I’ll be the happiest man in the school.”

Michael

Kolessar

lessar, math teacher at Riv- erside High School for the

past 11 years, is

a

semi-finalist

for

the state De-

partment of Education’s Te acher of the Year award. Ko- lessar, 42, is the chairman of the district’s math

department. “I’ve never felt so honored

or humbled,” Kolessar said. Thirty-nine teachers were se- lected by the state to be consid- ered for the award. The list will be narrowed down to 12 this week. Joe Moceyunas, principal at Riverside, said when he sat down to select a possible candidate to nominate, Kolessar rose to the top. “To sum it up in two words, he’s the best,” Moceyunas said. “His concern for students is second to none. He finds ways to reach the kids that other teachers don’t.

He finds ways to reach the kids that other teachers don’t. Michael Kolessar, math teacher at

Michael Kolessar, math teacher at Riverside High School for the past 11 years, jokes with students before the bell rings on Wednesday. Kolessar is a semi-finalist for the state Department of Education's Teacher of the Year.

And his charisma is contagious. He has that personality about him.” Ana Sottile, Melony Plisko, Kelly Siekierka and the rest of the eighth-period calculus class agreed. “He’s the best,” Plisko said. Kolessar received notif ication in February that he had been nominated and had to write nu- merous essays on his philosophy of education, his teaching style and similar topics. “They wanted to know everything.”

After he submitted his writing, he was notified he was a semi-fi- nalist and had to write several more papers. “I’m a math teacher by trade and it’s all writing,” he joked. “If I advance, I’ll be the happiest man in the school.” Kolessar is known for his re- laxed teaching style. He’ll sing a song to make a point. He’ll tell a joke. He’ll tell lots of jokes. “What’s it like to live under a carpet?” Get ready to giggle (or groan).

“Rugged.” “The first time I told that, I heard crickets chirping in the back of the class,” he joked. The way Kolessar sees it, cal- culus is completely useful in ev- eryday life. “Everyone says you’ll forget it once you’re out of high school, but I take a different approach.” He says calculus teaches you how to think rationally. “It provides discipline. It keeps your mind focused. Students start to think logically,” Kolessar said.

TONY CALLAIO PHOTOS/THE SUNDAY DISPATCH

“It’s all about decisions and con- sequences. In calculus and in life.” Being named teacher of the year, Kolessar said, would be a win for all his students as well. “I demand a lot from my stu- dents,” he said. “But if you walk with me, I guarantee you’ll leave my class with a greater knowl- edge of math and a greater knowledge about life.” “It’s amazing,” Moceyunas said. “His students get as excited as he does.”

SUNDAY DISPATCH , S UNDAY , M AY 6, 2012

PAGE 17

Loss of pet touches hearts 53 years ago

Question In 1959, what did Mrs. Joseph Marci- no of Pittston hear for the first time in 32 years?

Peeking into the past With Judy Minsavage
Peeking
into the past
With Judy Minsavage

1969 – 43 Years Ago Michael Cicon of Wyoming was hit

by shrapnel as he bailed out of his plane hit by enemy fire over Romania in 1943. After hiding from the enemy and treat- ing his own wounds he was captured and sent to prison camp 13, Timis De Jos in Romania where he met fellow airmen and prisoners of war, Frank Suponcic of Luzerne, Philip Rurak, Massachusetts; Bill Treichler, Eliza- bethtown; Francis Dolly, Texas; and Charles Reed of New York.

In 1969, the six men gathered for a

reunion at the Pittston Elks Club to reminisce about their 13-month wartime ordeal. Cicon’s plane, a B24 Liberator, was struck on a low-level bombing run over the Ploiesti Oil Field in Romania. Gen. Jacob E. Smart, a four-star general con- ceived the successful strategy for the daring World War II bombing raid on the oil refineries at Ploiesti. Romania was one of the largest oil producers in Europe and Ploesti was a major part of that production. There is an extensive amount of video footage of the bombing of Ploiesti or operation Tidal Wave at youtube.com. Over 60 local artists were expected to perform in the I.L.G. Rave of 1969. Bill Gable and Clem Lyons headed the production along with board members Carmella Suriano, Stella Elko, Sophie Klink, Louise Mullen, Ann Perry, Marge Pukalis, Helen DePhillip, Lena Gregori, Helen Burke, Sally Pakutka, Theresa Cardascia, Ronnie Chiu- mento, Charles Williams, Frank DiVi- zio, Ross Pirelli, John Ventura, and James Loughney.

The show featured a journey through

the Roaring Twenties, Mardi Gras and Holiday in Hawaii.

A special segment of the show was set

aside to show garments made in the Greater Pittston area. Captain Philip Fogli a We st Pittston High School graduate, returned home from duty in Vietnam and visited the school to express his deep appreciation to members of the school’s student council. The 74th Reconnaissance Unit that Captain Fogli served in Vietnam adopt- ed a special Christmas project, which would gather toys for the Lai Theu

1959 – 53 Years Ago The DeLuca children on Tompkins Street in Pittston were mourning the loss of their pet dog. A car had hit him and police officers were forced to put the pet out of his miser y. After the story appeared in the Sunday Dispatch, 50 area residents offered to replace the children’s dog with a brand

new puppy. Mayor Patrick O’Brien didn’t know what to do with so many offers, so he gave all the information to the family to let the children decide. The family chose a dog and the mayor stated “the incident proved to me that there are an awful lot of nice people in this area who will go out of their way to bring happiness to a fellow man.” The on-going legislative probe into the Knox Mine Disaster was nearing an end but legislators in Harrisburg wanted to hear additional testimony from one or two men whose accounts were called in to question. The investigation of the mining disas- ter, which claimed 12 lives focused on mine inspectors who may have perjured themselves on the witness stand. Of the men indicted with mining and labor law violations, conspiracy and manslaughter, none were held responsible. The men were convicted for income tax evasion and served minor jail sen- tences and probation. Rio Bravo star ring John Wayne, Dean Martin and Ricky Nelson played at the Comerford Drive-In. Al Capone starring Rod Steiger showed at the American Theatre. Mother’s Day “dusters” were on sale for $2.88 at the Pittston Kresge’s. Remember the “burner with a brain”? The new gas ranges were on sale at Pittston Gas Company. Luchetti Sales and Service adver- tised the 1959 Edsel, a luxury car pro- duced by the Ford Motor Company during the 1958, 1959 and 1960 model years. The Edsel never gained popularity with contemporary American car buyers and sold poorly. Ford announced the end of the Edsel program on Thursday, November 19,

1959.

School for deaf and mute children. Stu- dent Council officers William Simon- son, secretary; Michael Butera, presi- dent; Michael Blandina, treasurer; and James Gustainis, vice president, helped with the Captain’s project, bringing toys to the Vietnamese students in time for the Christmas holiday. Father Armar, a missionary priest, opened the school for hearing and speaking-impaired children at Lai Thieu in the early 1900s. The school survived the fall of Saigon in 1975 and became the Thuan An Cen- ter. According to the school’s website, “For many, many generations of hearing impaired, the school has provided educa- tion and assistance. Thus, in Viet Nam, we are known as the cradle of this sort of training and assistance.” See more about the school at www.thuongvevietnam.com.

1979 – 33 Year Ago Sgt. James A. Gubbiotti of Inkerman was presented the Army Commendation Medal for meritorious service while serving as project supervisor for the 402 Militar y Police Prisoner of War Camp in Wilkes-Barre. Col. Robert Kachmar presented the award. According to militarypoliceunits.com the police camp was activated on June 8, 1959, reorganized on May 21, 1976 and inactivated on September 15, 1991. The West Pittston Fire Depar tment celebrated its 90th year with the opening of its new hose company building. The company was first organized in 1889. In 1894, the company purchased a four-wheel hose cart drawn by a team of horses. The cart lasted until 1900 when a hose wagon was purchased. In 1919, a “mo- torized” fire truck was obtained. The hose company’s racing team made histor y. Organized in 1891, Captain George Lewis and members listed as Williams, Adams, Searle, Courtright, Campbell, Cook, Barber, Radcliffe, Bryden, Rolen, Dendle, Stanton, Richards, Davis, Thomas and Marritt were four- time Pa State Champions. Officers in 1979 were Arnold Embleton, president; William Bohn, vice president; Hayden Thomas, secretary-treasurer; William Goldsworthy Jr, fire chief; Bennett Carpenter and Ron Foy, assistant chief; Jerome Walsh, foreman; Jeff Carpen- ter and Jamey Smith, assistant fore- men. Top 10 songs of 1979:

“Reunited,” Peaches and Herb “Heart of Glass,” Blondie “Lady,” Little River Band “Knock on Wo od,” Ami Stewart

“Shake your Body,” The Jacksons “Every Time I Think of You,” The Babies “What A Fool Believes,” Doobie Brothers “Love You Inside Out,” Bee Gees “Blow Away,” George Har rison “In the Navy,” Village People

1989 - 23 Years Ago Frank A Pugliese Jr., of West Wyoming and assistant vice president of operations at Allied Services, John Heinz Institute of Rehabilitation Med- icine, was named to nominee status in the American College of Healthcare Executives. After several levels of qualification, a nominee would move on to advance membership status. An adjunct faculty member at Luzerne County Community College, Pugliese had been affiliated with the Heinz Institute since its open- ing in 1982. The American College represented more than 21,000 healthcare executives and in 1989 celebrated its 55th anni- versar y. Joe “Samony” DeSimone of Old Forge was elected president of the Lu- zerne County Chapter of the Pennsylva- nia Sports Hall of Fame. Founder of the chapter, DeSimone was known as one of the best athletes produced by Old Forge High School. He was the school’s first all-scholastic foot- ball player in 1931 and was an undefeat- ed amateur boxer. He was elected to the Scranton Sports Hall of Fame in 1980.

Answer Mrs. Joseph Marcino of Pittston, with the help of family members, placed an overseas telephone call and spoke with her mother in Italy for the first time in 32 years. Connection was made with Mrs. Adrienne Graci in Caltanisetta, Sicily. Both women were very emotional and found it difficult to talk. Arrange- ments were planned for Mrs. Marcino to travel to Italy to see her mother some- time in 1960. Direct long-distance calling was launched in 1951 and international call- ing became a reality in 1956 with the first transatlantic telephone cable, the TAT-1. The word telephone is derived from the Greek words meaning “distant sound.”

Coming together is a beginning. Keep- ing together is progress. Working togeth- er is success.

Henry Ford

SUNDAY DISPATCH , S UNDAY , M AY 6, 2012

PAGE 18

Faith

Continued from Page 13

connection between your faith and your everyday life! In order to be able to order the necessary materials, we ask that you call the parish office (654-0263) or e-mail tjm65654@gmail.com to register. The program is open to all. New Altar Servers After First Holy Communion we will be forming an instruc- tion class for new altar servers. All young people, grade 2 and up are eligible to be altar servers. If you are interested in this Liturgi- cal ministr y, please let Father Tom, Sister Mary Ann or Mrs. Bar tnikowski know. Yoga Class Schedule During the month of May, Se- nior Yoga will be offered on We dnesday mor nings, 9:30- 10:30 a.m. There will be no on class May 30th. A new class, ap- propriate for all levels, including beginners will be offered on We dnesday evenings, 7-8:15 p.m. There will be NO on class May 30th. Catholic Youth Group The Pittston Catholic Youth Group will be sponsoring a Sum- mer Ser vice Project from June 11 – 15. Under the leadership of Mrs. Marie Donnelly and Patrick Leonard, the youth will be work- ing to help with the rehabilitation of homes affected by the Sep- tember 2011 Flood. This is a full week of work. A flyer concern- ing the project can be found at the back of the Church.

PRINCE OF PEACE PARISH

Old Fo rge St. Mary’s Church, Lawrence Street, Saturday Vigil 4 p.m.

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Sunday, Mass 8 and 10 a.m. St. Lawrence Church, Main Street, Saturday Vigil 5:30 p.m. Sunday Mass 11:15 a.m.

SACRED HEART OF JESUS

Lackawanna Ave., Dupont First Communion is today Sunday, May 6.Students are to meet in the church hall at 10:10 a.m. Parents are to proceed di- rectly to their assigned pew in church. The Scranton Chapter of Pennsylvanians for Human Life will conduct its annual Mother’s Day Sale after all of the masses on May 14 and 15. The project (which is the major fundraiser for the year) will honor Mothers and focus awareness on the dig- nity and value of human life, and raise funds to continue the Chap- ter’s Pro-Life work and the oper- ation of its Pro-Life Center. Do- nation is $1.00 each. May is the month of the Ros- ar y. The rosar y will be prayed in church before the first Mass each day in May. Members of the Women’s So- ciety will celebrate 10:30 a.m. Mass as a group on Sunday, May 20.The Rosary will be recited prior to mass. Members will meet at 9:45 a.m. in the church lobby. Flowers will be ordered for members attending the mass. Reservations are required and due by May 16, either by signing up at the next meeting of by call-

 

FACTS OF

  FACTS OF

LAW

By

Dominick P.

Pannunzio, Esq.

A

federal appeals court has upheld a judge’s

decision to throw out a $4.4-million jury verdict

for an Army veteran who lost his hand while trying to defuse a roadside bomb in Iraq. He faced severe disability harassment when he returned

to

Michigan and went to work for the Army. The

court held he was entitled to back pay. *** Florida’s new, tougher unemployment law requires those claiming benefits to report online each week five jobs they’ve applied for or to meet with a state jobs counselor. The law also aims to keep workers with job performance issues from claiming benefits.

 

***

A

federal district court in Washington, D.C.

issued a ruling upholding a new regulation that

requires federally licensed firearms retailers in states bordering Mexico to report multiple sales

of

semi-automatic rifles. Devised by the Bureau

of

Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives,

the plan requires all of the 8,700 firearm dealers

in

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report all sales of two or more semi-automatic rifles within five consecutive business days, if the rifles are larger than .22 caliber and use detachable magazines.

*** The Arkansas state Supreme Court has concluded

that one juror sleeping and a second juror tweeting constituted juror misconduct, granting a new trial

to

a defendant found guilty of murder.

Brought to you as a paid public service by the Law Offices of Dominick P. Pannunzio, 294 Main Street, Dupont, 655-5541

ing Jerrie Coolbaugh at 457- 2623 or Carolyn Klimek at the rectory office at 654-3713.A so- cial for all members who have signed up will follow the mass.

ST. BARBARA PARISH

28 Memorial Avenue, Exeter Office Hours: Monday – Fri- day 9:00 a.m. – 3:00 p.m. Evenings, by appointment.

Phone: 654-2103 The Christian Women’s Orga- nization will hold their monthly

See FAITH, Page 22

751223
751223
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SUNDAY DISPATCH , S UNDAY , M AY 6, 2012

PAGE 19

SUNDAY DISP AT CH , S UNDAY , M AY 6, 2012 PA GE 19 Look
Look On The Following Pages For These Advertiser’s Weekly Ads
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• BOBBY O’S FAMILY RESTAURANT

• CASTLE INN

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• FIRE & ICE

• SAVO’S PIZZA & RESTAURANT

• IPANEMA GRILLE

• JUNIOR’S PASTA HOUSE

To Advertise In The Dining Guide Call:

Karen Fiscus • 829-7291

Steve Morris • 829-7290

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ENTER TO WIN THIS MONTH’S GIFT CERTIFICATE: Fill out and deliver or mail entry to:
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Fill out and deliver
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The Sunday Dispatch
Dining Guide
109 New Street
Pittston, PA 18640
Name:
Address:
City:
State:
Zip:
Phone:
This We ek’s Di ning Guide Fe ature:
This We ek’s Di ning Guide Fe ature:

JUNIOR’S

Pasta House & Rustic Cuisine

HOURS: Serving Lunch Tu esday thru Friday, 11:30-2:00 Serving Dinner Tuesday thru Saturday, 4:30 ‘til close

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SUNDAY DISPATCH , S UNDAY , M AY 6, 2012

PAGE 20

SUNDAY SPECIAL 11 till 4 ½ Pound Petite Lobster Tail Dinner $ 10 99 Served
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OUTDOOROUTDOOR CABCABANAANA OPENOPEN
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OPEN WEEKDAYS 11 TO 9;
FRI. & SAT. 11 TO 10;
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does not include sales tax. Cannot be used with
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EXPIRES 5/31/12
DELIVERY, PICK-UP OR EAT-IN COUPON
Cannot be used with other specials or discounts
SUN., MON., TUES. 7 A.M.-3 P.M. WED., THUR., FRI., SAT. 7 A.M.-8 P.M. “The Best
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Treat Mom On Her Special Day -
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We will feature a Special Mother’s Day
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with extended hours
Breakfast Served On Mother’s Day
7am to 11:30am
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Featured Mother’s Day Menu
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Serving Affordable Home-Cooked Meals • Eat-In or Take-Out
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Voted “Best Value”
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509 Exeter Ave., West Pittston
RESERVE YOUR TABLE FOR MOTHER’S DAY WEEKEND TODAY Fri. & Sat. 4:30, 6:30, 8:30 Sun.
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FOR MOTHER’S DAY
WEEKEND TODAY
Fri. & Sat. 4:30, 6:30, 8:30
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SUNDAY DISPATCH , S UNDAY , M AY 6, 2012

PAGE 21

www.omarscastleinn.net • 675-0804 Murder Mystery May 6th SUNDAY BRUNCH $10.95 over 24 Homemade Items Audience
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SUNDAY

DISPATCH

dinner in front of our 2 fireplaces SUNDAY DISP AT CH To Advertise In The TABLE

To Advertise In The

TABLE TALK

DENTE’S CATERING Dente’s Tent and 50thAnniversary Rental Co. Please Contact Steve Morris 970-7290 Karen Fiscus
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Dente’s Tent
and
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Please Contact
Steve Morris 970-7290
Karen Fiscus 970-7291
FRIED FISH WITHOUT THE
MESSY OIL
Whisk 2 large egg whites until frothy.
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1022 Main St. • Avoca, PA 18641 • 570-457-1600
Monday — 5-10 PM Build a Burger $3.00
6-8PM 12oz. Miller Lite Drafts $1.00
Tuesday — 40¢ Rhode Island Clams
Eat in only (Sold in Quantities of 10)
5-10 PM HOT DOGS $1.00
6-8PM 12oz. Coors Light $1.00
Wednesday — 40¢ Wings
JUNIOR’S
Eat in only (Sold in Quantities of 10)
$6 LUNCH SPECIALS from 11AM-2PM
Pasta House & Rustic Cuisine
Monday - Hot Ham & Cheese Sandwich w/ Small Fries
Tuesday - Chili Dog w/ Small Fries
Wednesday - Porketta Sandwich w/ Chips
Thursday - Chicken Tenders (3) w/ Small Fries
Friday - 3 Slices of Pizza w/ Side Salad
HOURS: Serving Lunch Tu esday thru Friday, 11:30-2:00
Serving Dinner Tuesday thru Saturday, 4:30 ‘til close
• Eat-in • Ta ke-out • Local Delivery with $20 min. order
Catering on or off our premises • Communion • Graduation
or Any Occasion
Serving
Mother’s Day
Check Out Our RUSTIC MENU
11:30am to
Tuesday thru Thursday - ALL NIGHT
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SUNDAY
Friday, May 11th - 2 of Us - 7pm
Friday, May 18th - Tony Alu & Joe Leone
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Check out Junior’s Bar on Facebook

SUNDAY DISPATCH , S UNDAY , M AY 6, 2012

PAGE 22

Faith

Continued from Page 18

meeting at 6:30 p.m. Tuesday, May 8, at the church hall. End of the year dinner will be Tuesday, June 12, and more information will be given at the meeting. Hostesses for the May meeting are Josephine DelPriore, Ann Marie Dillon and Lisa Dolhon. The Cosmopolitan Seniors have openings for their trip to Woodloch Pines on Sunday, May 20. The price is $64 per person which will include famous smor- gasbord and entertainment. If you are interested please contact Johanna at 655-2720. Meeting for planning the Summer Bazaar will be held on Monday, May 7th at 7:00 pm in the Parish Center. Everyone is welcome. The Christian Wo men’s Orga - nization will hold their next monthly meeting on Tuesday, May 8 at 6:30 p.m. at the church hall. End of the year dinner will be Tuesday, June 12. Prepara- tions for the Baccalaureate Mass, that will be held on Sun- day, June 3 will be discussed. Hostesses for the May meeting are Josephine DelPriore, Ann Marie Dillon and Lisa Dolhon. The Golden Age Club will meet on Thursday, May 10 at 1:30 p.m. at the Parish Center. Hostesses are: Lena Seman, Ann Marie Shedlock and Florence Stankoski. Mother’s Day envelopes are available in the back of both churches. May Crowning May Crowing will be held on Mother’s Day, May 13. Any girls wishing to participate in May

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Summer Bazaar Plans are in full swing to make the summer picnic another won- derful event. This years’ celebra- tion will be on July 20 - 22.

ST. JOHN THE EVANGELIST PARISH COMMUNITY

35 William Street Phone: 654-0053 Pittston The Parish Office will be closed on Thursday, May 17, for the Feast of the Ascension. If ser- vices of a priest are needed call

654-0053.

The Holy Name Society held its annual Easter Egg Hunt. Drawings were held for prizes to children of all ages. Lunch was served to all who attended. Grand prize winners of Bicycles were Aiden Jenkins, Connor Yencha, George Donnelly, Aly- cia Foersch, Anna Hankey and Madison Suruilla. Proceeds from the February lottery made this event possible. Thank you to everyone for your help and sup- port. The next Baptismal Instruc- tion will begin 7:30 to 8:30 p.m. June 5 in the parish center. Bereavement Support Group will begin meeting on May 8 and then ever y Tuesday evening in the parish center dining room from 7 to 8:30 p.m. until June 26. For more information call the parish office at 654-0053. Altar and Rosary Society meeting Monday, May 7, star t-

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ing with rosary at 1:30 p.m. Mother’s Day carnation sale will take place May 12 and 13 af- ter all Masses. The Greater Pittston Food Pantry is sponsored by the Care and Concern Committee of St. John the Evangelist Parish. Any- one in need of food is asked to call 654-9923. Distribution of food is by ap- pointment only. The Free Health Clinic is open at 5:30 p.m. ever y We dnesday in the former Seton Catholic High School, first come first serve. Greater Pittston Kids Closet celebrating its third anniversary will provide new and gently used clothing. Regular hours are We dnesday from 9 to 11:30 a.m. and 5 to 7 p.m. The Closet ac- cepts donations new and gently used.

ST JOHN’S LUTHERAN

9 Wood St., Pittston Pastor John Castellani Organist Marcia Colleran Lay Reader Amy Launders Acolyte Emily Goyne Schedule: May 6 Brett Roo- ney; May 13 Brooke Cherney; May 20 Justin Peterson; May 27 Marissa Faccipointi. Altar Guild for May is Mi- chelle Cher ney. Kathy Capo- bianco alternate is Amy Saun- ders. Upcoming Events Church Council meeting on Monday, May 14 at 6:30 p.m. Small group Bible study Tues- day, May 15 at 7 p.m. Ever yone is welcome.

We ek day school has resumed at its normal time. Va cation Bible school will once again be on August 6 to 10. New members and guests are welcome. Call the parish at 655-2505. The e-mail address is stjohn- spittston@verizon.co

ST. JOHN’S P.M. CHURCH

316 Main St., Avoca Pastor Rich Rock

570-457-8281

Sunday Wo rship Ser vice

10:00am

Holy Communion the first Sunday of every month Bible Study ever y We dnesday 6:00-7:30 p.m.

ST. MARIA GORETTI

Laflin Road, Laflin, PA. 18702

42redwood@comcast.net

www.stmariagoretti-laflin.org There will be a Festival meet- ing, May 14, at 7:00 p.m., in the Parish Center if anyone would like to attend and get more infor- mation about helping out at this year’s Festival.

The Festival will be held July 27, 28 & 29 from 5 p.m. to 10 p.m. each night. Festival preparations are under way. If anyone would like to spon- sor a band, please contact the Parish Office at 655-8956. The bands for the Festival this year are Groove Train, Mason Dixon and Jeanne Zano Band. The committee is looking for a donation of a new girls’ and boys’ bicycles. Parish Calendar MAY

6 - First Holy Communion

11:00 a.m. Mass (NO CCD TO- DAY)

7 - Interviews for Seniors

8 - Pastoral Council Meeting

6:30

9 - Drop-off for rummage sale 11a.m. TO 2 p.m.

13 - Last day of CCD, Mother’s

Day The Banquet Hall is available

for all your special events. 655-

8956

See FAITH, Page 23

Starting May 28 New Hours at our Owen Street Location Every MONDAY at Market Street
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GET POUNDED NIGHT!
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FRI. & SAT. 11AM-CLOSE
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29 Market St., Jenkins Twp.
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245 Owen St., Swoyersville
LOCATIONS!
570-655-8091
570-287-6074
Mother’s Day is May 13 th Come See Us For Unique Gift Ideas! • Elle
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259 Wyoming Ave.• Wyoming • 693-5910
Tues. Wed. Thurs. - 9am - 5:30pm • Fri. - 9am - 6pm • Sat. - 10am - 3pm

SUNDAY DISPATCH , S UNDAY , M AY 6, 2012

PAGE 23

Faith

Continued from Page 22

ST. MARY’S POLISH NATIONAL CATHOLIC CHURCH

200 Stephenson St. Duryea Rev. Fr. Carmen G. Bolock, Pastor Phone: 457-2291 Email: padre@saintma- ryspncc.org Website: saintmaryspncc.org Holy Mass: Sunday 9:30 a.m. We ekdays: 8 a.m. Holy Days: 8 a.m. & 7 p.m.

SAINT MONICA’S CHURCH

363 West 8th Street, West Wyoming, PA 18644 Office Hours - 9:00 a.m. to 4:30 p.m., Mon. – Fri. Phone: 570-693-1991 Email: olos363@verizon.net website: www.stmonicanepa- .com. Father Leo J. McKernan, Pas- tor Mr. William Jenkins, Deacon Mass Schedule Saturday Vigil: 4:00 p.m. OLOS Sunday: 8:30 a.m. STJ; 11:00 a.m. OLOS Daily Mass at OLOS Mon-Tues-Fri: 7:00 a.m. (Please note: no Wed. a.m. Mass) Thurs: 7:00 p.m. No Bible Study until after Pentecost. Life in the Spirit will begin. Parish Office: 570-693-1991

Email:olos363@verizon.net

We bsite: www.stmonicanepa- .com The children of the Parish will receive their First Holy Commu- nion today at the 11 a.m. Mass May Crowning of the Blessed Virgin Mary will take place next Sunday, May 13 at the 11 a.m. Mass. May is the Month dedicat- ed to Mary and the Girls of the Sodality will process and one will be selected to Crown the Statue of Our Lady. Another de- votion to the Blessed Mother is the Rosar y. A number of St. Monica’s parishioners will be reciting the Rosary every Mon- day during May at 7 p.m. at O.L.O.S. site. All are most wel- come to join in. Pro-Life Carnation Sale at all Masses on the weekend of May 12 and 13 for the cause of life on Mother’s Day. This is the 25th years that the Wyoming Chapter of Pennsylvanian’s for Human Life have added mothers and ba-

bies of poverty level. Please be supportive. Mother Teresa’s Haven: May 14 to 27, St. Monica’s Parish will host these homeless men at St. Joseph’s Hall. This is an oppor- tunity to help those less fortunate and show a caring spirit. If you call volunteer some time, please call Joanne Austin at 288-6785 or the Parish Office at 693-1991. St. Monica Parish Men’s Group Retreat: This weekend re- treat will be held on the weekend of June 1-3 at Mount Saviour Monastery located between El- mira and Cor ning, New York. To learn more about the Monks and the Monaster y, go to www.msa- viour.org. For information about the retreat or to make reserva- tions contact Father McKernan at 693-1991 or email at moni- ca.ww@verizon.net. You may contact Joe Lisewski at 693-

3366 (home) or his cell at 466- 6099. His email is joelisew- ski@aol.com. Group size is lim- ited to fifteen seats and reserva- tions will be on a first-come ba- sis.

SAINT PETER’S EVANGELICAL LUTHERAN CHURCH

100 Rock Street, Hughestown

Stpeters_elc@yahoo.com

654-1009

QUEEN OF THE APOSTLES PARISH

715 Hawthorne St.

(570) 457-3412 stmarysavoca@verizon.net

www.stmaryavoca.4lpi.com

a.m.

(Wednesday at 7 p.m.) Eucharistic Adoration: Tues- days from 8 a.m. to 8 p.m.

Daily

Masses:

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Miraculous Medal Novena:

We dnesday following the 7 p.m. Mass We ekends Masses: Saturday at 4 p.m.; Sunday at 8, 9:30 and 11 a.m. Confession: Saturdays 3-3:45 p.m.; anytime upon request by calling 457-3412. The parish building and

grounds committee will meet at 6:30 p.m. on Monday, April 30 in St. Mar y’s Rector y. Daily Masses: 8 a.m. (Wednesday at 7 p.m.) Eucharistic Adoration: Tues- days from 8 a.m. to 8 p.m. Miraculous Medal Novena:

We dnesday following the 7 p.m. Mass

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PAGE 24

Pittston Library receives $10,000 grant from Verizon

Funds support Intergenerational Family Center

The Pittston Memorial Li- brary received a grant from the Ve rizon Fo undation for $10 ,000 for the library’s planned Inter- generational Family Center Pro- gram (IFCP). The IFCP will provide sup- port, counseling, information and referrals, legal advice and other services for grandparents who are raising their grandchil- dren. The program is part of the library’s $1.5 million expansion project and will be housed in the library’s planned 5,000-square foot addition. Groundbreaking for the building addition is tenta- tively scheduled for fall. The funding awarded the li- brar y is par t of the Ve rizon Fo un- dation’s focus on literacy pro- grams and valued organizations. Rep. Mike Carroll and Sen. John Yu dichak we re instr umen- tal in obtaining the funding for the librar y.

instr umen- tal in obtaining the funding for the librar y. Pictured as Pittston Library accepted

Pictured as Pittston Library accepted a $10,000 grant from the Verizon Foundation are, row one, left to right, Chris Latona, Pittston City Controller; Lisa Joyce, Pittston Memorial Library Board; Barbara Quinn, Pittston Memorial Library Board President; Anne Hogya, li- brary director; Todd Darlington, Verizon Director of External Affairs; PA Rep. Mike Carroll; Frank P. Buzydlowski, Verizon Director of State Governmental Relations. Row two, Joe Chernouskas, Pittston City Council; Marla Pupa, Pittston Memorial Library Board; PA Sen. John Yudichak; Joe McLean, Pittston City Council; Tom Tigue, Honorary Co-Chair of Pittston Memorial Library Capital Campaign; Joe Moskovitz, Pittston City Clerk.

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We st Side towns eye cooper ation

Municipalities consider forming Council of Government

By JOE HEALEY

jhealey@psdisptach.com

A new street sweeper for a sin- gle borough is an expensive proposition. But if several communities pitched in and shared it, the price tag may be a bit more manage- able. Representative s of all West Side communities, including all the communities that comprise the Wyoming Area School Dis- trict, are meeting this week to consider forming a council of governments, commonly called a COG. The meeting is scheduled for 7 p.m. Thursday, May 10 at the We st Wyoming Hose Co. #1. Invited towns are Exeter Township, Exeter, We st Pittston, We st Wyoming and Wyoming from the Wyoming Area School District and Courtdale, Ed- wardsville, Forty Fort, Kingston,

Larksville, Luzerne, Plymouth, Pringle and Swoyersville from the Wyoming Va lley We st School District. “We’re looking at ways we can help each other,” said Eileen Ci- praini, president of West Wyom- ing Borough Council. “It just makes sense.” The COG would act as a single organization to purchase equip- ment and supplies, make grant applications and aid in the shar- ing of equipment and services. State Sen. John Yu dichak, D- Nanticoke has been a proponent of cooperation and regionaliza- tion for many years. “The idea for next week’s meeting came after West Wyom- ing, Exeter, Kingston and Jack- son Township (The We st Side Compost Commission) applied for and received a $476,000 grant from the Department of Environmental Protection. The commission purchased a tub

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State Sen. John Yudichak D-Nanticoke

grinder that turns yard debris from the four municipalities into mulch.” Yu dichak said it’s a win-win for all municipalities. “The success of that project is a good example of local govern- ments working with each other and pulling their resources to- gether for everyone’s benefit,” Yu dichak added. “Now seve ral We st Side communities wa nt to have a round table discussion to

begin exploring other possible multi-municipality projects.” Dan Guydish, executive direc- tor of the Mountain Council of Governments, will attend and present the recent successes of that group’s multi-municipality efforts in the Greater Hazleton area. The Mountain Council of Governments has been in exist- ence almost 20 years. It began when a few local municipalities joined together for the purpose

of discussing and studying com- munity challenges of mutual in- terest and concern and today consists of over 20 municipal-

ities, school districts, authorities, the Greater Hazleton Civic part- nership and the Chamber of Commerce.

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SUNDAY DISPATCH , S UNDAY , M AY 6, 2012

PAGE 26

Faith

Continued from Page 23

We ekends Masses: Saturday at 4 p.m.; Sunday at 8, 9:30 and 11 a.m. Confession: Saturdays 3-3:45 p.m.; anytime upon request by calling 457-3412. Prayer Chain: 457-5867 The parish will have its May Crowning ceremony during the 11 a.m. Mass today, May 6, at St. Mary’s Church, 715 Hawthorne St. The May Queen is Jacqueline Bennie and her court consists of Amy Hoover, Rachel Hoover and Mackenzie Carroll. The crown bearer is Saige Stampien with escort John McAdarra. During the month of May, the parish invites the community to

pray the rosary and the litany of the Blessed Virgin Mary with them following the daily 8 a.m. Mass at St. Mary’s Church, 715 Hawthorne St. The parish’s women’s guild will meet at 7 p.m. on Tuesday, May 8 in St. Mary’s School audi- torium, 742 Spring St. The Scranton Chapter of Pennsylvanians for Human Life will have its annual Mother’s Day carnation sale following the weekend Masses on May 12 and

13 at St. Mary’s Church, 715

Hawthorne St. All proceeds will

assist the chapter’s pro-life work and the operation of its pro-life center. The parish’s pastoral council will meet at 7 p.m. on Monday, May 14 in St. Mar y’s Rector y,

715 Hawthorne St.

The parish will have a hospi- tality training session at 7:30 p.m. on We dnesday, May 16 in St. Mary’s Church, 715 Haw- thorne St. The parish’s women’s guild annual communion luncheon will take place at noon on Sun- day, May 20 in St. Mar y’s School auditorium, 742 Spring St. The parish’s 2012 high school gradu- ates will be honored at this time. To make a reservation, call the rectory at 457-3412 by May 14. The parish’s worship commit- tee will meet at 7 p.m. on Mon- day, May 21 in St. Mar y’s Recto- ry, 715 Hawthorne St. The parish’s social concerns committee will meet at 8:30 p.m. on Monday, May 21 in St. Mar y’s Rector y, 715 Hawthor ne St. The parish has gone green! Any person who would like to drop off aluminum cans may

place them in a container in the empty bay of St. Mary’s Rectory garage which will be open on the weekend during Mass times:

Saturday at 4 p.m. and Sunday at 8, 10, and 11 a.m. To have your cans picked up, please call Jason at 351-5062. Become a fan of our parish Facebook page today! Anyone who is interested in renting St. Mary’s School for child care, parties, or other use- ful activities is invited to call the rectory at 457-3412 to learn more about this opportunity.

SECOND PRESBYTERIAN

143 Parsonage St., Pittston

654-1411

Today, May 6 – 9:30 a.m. Sun- day school; 11:00 a.m., Wo rship May 8 – 6 p.m., Mission Com- mittee; 7 p.m. AA May 9 – 6:30 p.m. Choir Re- hearsal May 10, noon – Sisterhood of Divine Diners, East Mountain Inn.

May 12 – 1 to 4 p.m. Postal Food Drive at Meals on Wheels.

TRINITY EPISCOPAL CHURCH

Spring Street and Montgom- ery Avenue, West Pittston Parish Mission:

“To live and build holy com- munity.” All welcome: Worldwide An- glican Communion:

“We believe in one holy, Ca-

tholic apostolic church.” We b of information and links at

www.trinityepiscopalchurch-

westpittston.org and www.dio- beth.org. Sunday Holy Eucharist: 11 a.m. ever y Sunday. Food Pantry: March item needed is cereal. Gerrity’s gift cards, cash donations and other non-perishable foods also ac- cepted. Daily prayer for those with needs requesting prayerful sup- port. Start Prayer network at parish

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office 654-3261. Youth Program: 10:45 a.m. ev- er y Sunday. We ekday special events and service projects as announced. Faith Forum for Adults: En- richment for adults seeking spir- itual renewal and opportunities for ministry and volunteerism. Pa rish Life Events Te am: Bi- monthly first Sundays. Parish Council: Every second Sunday. Wo men of Tr inity: Ever y third Sunday. WOT Ministr y Invita- tion. The Women of Trinity have undertaken a ministry to help support Good Shepherd Episco- pal Church of Scranton in their outreach to the homeless of the region. Each month after enjoying a

home cooked meal at Good Shepherd all who have needs may “shop” for necessities like clothing, shoes, toiletries in a store-like setting in the church’s refurbished basement of donated items. The Women of Tr inity have supported this ministry by deliv- ering donations of clothing, new undergarments and socks and toiletries to the Scranton church. WOT will continue to collect trial size and hotel toiletries and invites the parish community to join with them in helping the less fortunate. Donations of trial size and sample size toiletries are wel-

See FAITH, Page 29

SUNDAY DISPATCH , S UNDAY , M AY 6, 2012

PAGE 27

Tickets available for event to benefit Hometown Heroes

Party Saturday at Open Space features popular ‘Banana Hammocks’ band

Tickets are still available and may be purchased at the door when the community comes to- gether Saturday, May 12, to enjoy music, food, beverages and fel- lowship all for a worthy cause. The event – a benefit party from 7 to 11 p.m. at the city’s Open Space venue to support the Chamber of Commerce’s Home- town Heroes Memorial project – will feature Bill Gelb and the Ba- nana Hammocks band, beer, soft drinks and hors d’oeuvres from Coopers’ Seafood Restaurant. Not only will attendees get to experience the new downtown venue but also may be able to sample beer from the brand new Susquehanna Brewing Compa- ny. Mark Nobile of the Susque- hanna Brewing Company is Vice President of the Greater Pittston Chamber of Commerce. Tickets are $30 and may be ob- tained in advance from the

Chamber office at 570-655- 1424, by email at info@pittston- chamber.org or at the door. The event is part of the cham-

ber’s campaign to raise approxi- mately $30,000 for Hometown Heroes Memorial to Army Spc. Dale Kridlo, 1st Lt. Jeffery De- Primo, of Pittston, and Lt. Col Richard Berrettini, formerly of Dupont, who were killed in Af- ghanistan and State Trooper Joshua D. Miller, who was killed

in the line of duty. The memorial design includes

a 50-foot flag pole, four black

polished monuments with af- fixed brass plates engraved with the likeness and information of the memorialized heroes and a pair of searchlights. In addition the chamber also plans to plant a tree to honor retired United States Army Captain Thomas Je- rome “TJ” Hromisin who was severely wounded in Iraq.

The chamber is also selling engraved 4 x 8 bricks and larger 12 x 12 blocks in a monument walkway. An anonymous donor who is a member of the chamber board has already agreed to pay for the flag pole. Joe Makarewicz of Ev- erest Business Services donated such things as brochures and hard boards for an office depic- tion of the memorial. Graphic artist Jenn Robinson designed a

rendering of the memorial. Greg Timonte, of Dupont Monument,

has consulted with the chamber on the monuments and plaques. In an email the chamber said, “The project has received help from a wide range of support from contractors who have pledged in kind construction ser- vices to the monument and other suppliers and of course the com- munity who have responded with their donations.”

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SUNDAY DISPATCH , S UNDAY , M AY 6, 2012

PAGE 28

Falls Senior Citizens Center recognizes volunteers

PA GE 28 Falls Senior Citizens Center recognizes volunteers The members and friends of Falls Senior

The members and friends of Falls Senior Center sponsored by the Area Agency on Aging for Lu- zerne/Wyoming counties recently recognized the many volunteers who contribute to the Center. A special lunch and program was given as a thank you. From left, first row, are Eleanor Rezykowski, Margaret Zalackas, Marie Dowse, Elizabeth Rutkowski, Marita Zim, Marilyn Fitzgerald, John Headley. Second row, Margie O'Fier, Donna Holeman, Elaine Pendleton, Rosemary Lunny, Darlene Headley, Pat Smith, Jeanette Martin, Stanley Kaiser, Nancy Dietrich. Third row, Gayle Bodin, Eugene Smith, Warren Keller, Norene Faux,Don Faux and Ron Dietrich.

The members and friends of Falls Senior Citizens Center, sponsored by the Area Agency on Aging for Luzerne/Wyoming counties, recently recognized the many volunteers who contribute to the center. A special lunch and program was given as a thank you . Anyone 60 years old or older is invited to the following activities at the center:

Tuesday, May 8 - Mother’s Day Luncheon Open House, follow- ing at 1 p.m. “oldies” vocal pre- sentation by Debbie Switzer Thursday, May 10 - at 11:15 a.m. Free blood pressure screen- ing by Julie Grodis RN from Golden Living Center Thursday, May 10 – 2 to 6 p.m. Dinner dance at Best Wester n Genetti’s in Wilkes-Barre in- cludes meal, dance band “King Henry and the Showmen” and door prizes. Cost is $21. Friday, May 11 - at 11:30 a.m. Presentation on “Lyme Disease” by Chris Royek from the Health Department Friday, May 18 and Saturday, May 19 - 9:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. open house and showing of his- torical pictures of Falls, Mill City, Lake Winola and Northmo- reland Townships with pictures and discussion by Herb Watkins and John Headley.

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PAGE 29

Faith

Continued from Page 26

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UNITED METHODIST CHURCH

Corner of Broad & Church Sts. Pittston Rev. Dr. Michael Turner Sunday Wo rship Ser vice 9:30 a.m. Children’s Sunday School:

9:30 a.m. Holy Communion: 1st Sunday each month Choir Rehearsal: Thursday’s at 7 p.m. unless told otherwise United Methodist Wo men:

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PAGE 30

SUNDAY DISP AT CH , S UNDAY , M AY 6, 2012 PA GE 30

SUNDAY DISPATCH , S UNDAY , M AY 6, 2012

PAGE 31

SUNDAY DISP AT CH , S UNDAY , M AY 6, 2012 PA GE 31 This

This newspaper ad is from the early 1950s

6, 2012 PA GE 31 This newspaper ad is from the early 1950s This State Historical

This State Historical Marker, erected in 2008, is on Rocky Glen Road at old park entrance, 1/4 mile off Rt. 502 in Moosic.

Rocky Glen

Continued from Page 9

Boat. The late Ed Miller provided video and photographs of the park and the Laurel Line, which served the park. Gretchen Sterling Frey, the granddaughter of legendary park owner Ben Sterling, provided ac- cess to photos and other infor- mation. “We sold over 2,000 copies,” Savakinus said of the DVD. “We got so much positive feedback, there’s a second one in the works.” Among Rocky Glen lovers in- terviewed for the second book is Duryea resident Dale Mikolac- zyk, aka radio personalities Rus- ty Fender and Shadoe Steele, who considers Rocky Glen “the number one historical point in the area.” Mikolaczyk paid $10,000 for the 1938 Rocky Glen Grandma Fo rt une Te ller machine at auc- tion when the park closed in 1988. Believed to be one of only three in the world, the wax figure in an oak cabinet is 9-feet high and weighs a half ton. Though, at 44, Savakinus is a little young to have experienced

the park’s heyday in the 1950s and ’60s, he does have childhood memories of the park’s second life as Ghost Town in the Glen. “I started to go with my family in the 1970s,” he said. “Good memories. Rides, gun fighters, the family atmosphere, picnics with school groups.” As the president of the Penn- sylvania Anthracite Heritage Museum and Iron Furnace Asso- ciates, Savakinus has a keen in- terest in local histor y. He said it was about 10 years ago that he came to believe the history of Rocky Glen, which operated for a century from 1886 to 1987, had

to be preser ved in some way. “It seemed everybody I talked to had a good Glen stor y.” He’s deep into his next mission on behalf of the park’s history and is working on a book about the park to be published by Arca- dia Publishing in August. Savakinus is looking for sto- ries, photos and memorabilia for the book. “We’d look at anything related to the park,” he said. While the DVDs and books are meant to preser ve histor y, they are also meant to teach his- tor y. “The park has been closed 25 years. There’s a lost genera- tion that doesn’t know anything about it.”

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SUNDAY DISPATCH , S UNDAY , M AY 6, 2012

PAGE 32

SUNDAY DISP AT CH , S UNDAY , M AY 6, 2012 PA GE 32 A

A few of the classic vehicles at the Pittston Car Cruise sponsored by the Montage Mountain Classic Car Club on Saturday night.

by the Montage Mountain Classic Car Club on Saturday night. Frank Novis, left, and Rich Asay,

Frank Novis, left, and Rich Asay, both of Pittston, check out the engine of a 1958 Dodge Coronet.

of Pittston, check out the engine of a 1958 Dodge Coronet. 1951 Jeep CJ3A owner Brian

1951 Jeep CJ3A owner Brian Fahey of Old Forge, left, and George Morgan of Pittston glance across the lot at other car enthusiasts.

PITTSTON C

Poppin’ t

the lot at other car enthusiasts. PITTSTON C Poppin’ t The hood ornament of a black
the lot at other car enthusiasts. PITTSTON C Poppin’ t The hood ornament of a black

The hood ornament of a black 1949 Cadillac.

Souped-up c in Tomato

PHOTOS BY BILL TARUTI

Motorheads and car buffs alike 28, in the Pittston Tomato Festival l season. Montage Mountain Classi which takes place from 5 to 9 p.m. next Pittston show is set for May Joseph’s Center in Scranton, is sche 19 at the Pittston Commons on the

SUNDAY DISPATCH , S UNDAY , M AY 6, 2012

PAGE 33

AR CRUISE

heir hoods

, S UNDAY , M AY 6, 2012 PA GE 33 AR CRUISE heir hoods Jack

Jack Rudeski of Hanover Township wipes down the back windshield of his 1966 GTO con- vertible last Saturday night in the Pittston Tomato Festival lot for the first car cruise of the 2012 season. Montage Mountain Classics Car Club spon- sored the show, which takes place from 5 to 9 p.m. the last Saturday of every month.

ars on display Festival lot

S/THE SUNDAY DISPAT CH

gathered last Saturday night, April ot for the first car cruise of the 2012 cs Car Club sponsored the show, the last Saturday of the month. The 26. A special show, to benef it St. duled from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. on Aug. Pittston Bypass.

it St. duled from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. on Aug. Pittston Bypass. This 1985 Ford

This 1985 Ford Mustang is owned by Carmen Timonte of Pittston.

1985 Ford Mustang is owned by Carmen Timonte of Pittston. Josh Coe, left, and Trevor Smith,

Josh Coe, left, and Trevor Smith, both of Pittston, look over a 1977 Corvette Stingray.

Smith, both of Pittston, look over a 1977 Corvette Stingray. Carla Jackson of Wilkes-Barre, left, and

Carla Jackson of Wilkes-Barre, left, and co-owner Elaine Bonomo of Bear Creek chat next to Bonomo's 1949 Studebaker.

SUNDAY DISPATCH , S UNDAY , M AY 6, 2012

PAGE 34

EVENTS, MEETINGS, BRIEFS

Classic Car Show at Swetland Homestead today

Insalacos to be honored at Salvation Army 100th anniversary dinner Thursday

The Luzerne County Histori- cal Society will present its Sec- ond Annual Classic Car Show at the Historic Swetland Home- stead, 885 Wyoming Avenue, Wyoming today, Sunday, May 6 from 9:00 am to 3:00 pm. The show will be open to any vehicle including classic cars, race cars, muscle cars, tuners, trucks, mo- torcycles, choppers, and bicy- cles. Entry fee is $15.00 per vehicle; free admission for spectators. All proceeds will benefit the LCHS. The show is sponsored by Stell Enterprises and will feature DJ Steel Dragon, 50/50, a prize raf- fle, and food. Trophies will be awarded to the Top 25 entries as well as Best of Show and Peo- ple’s Choice award. Dash Plaques and goody bags will be given to the first 100 entries. The Swetland Homestead will be open for tours. Rain date is May 20.

Salvation Army

The We st Pittston Salvation Army is preparing for its 100th anniversary celebration. There will be a Youth Group presenta- tion on May 9. A banquet and recognition of Michael and Sandy Insalaco will be held on Thursday, May 10 at Saint Anthony’s Center, Exeter. For details, call Major Sheryl Hershey 655-5947

Nutrition

Continued from Page 15

Dark Chocolate Strawberries

An Open House will be held from 4 to 8 p.m. on Friday, May 11 and from 1 to 4 p.m. on Sat- urday, May 12 at the Salvation Ar my Citadel, 214 Luzer ne Ave., West Pittston.

Jenkins Seniors

The Jenkins Township Senior Citizens’ organization will hold their annual anniversary dinner at 6 p.m. Tuesday, May 8, 2012 at the Jenkins Township Hose House. Following dinner, bingo will be played. For more information, please call Jean at 654-9710.

PA class of ‘77

The Pittston Area Class of 1977 will hold a reunion meeting on Wednesday, May 9, at Tony’s Pizza at 7:30 p.m. If you have any questions, please call Jim Collins at 654-8243 or Donna Boylan Ahearn at 212-2348.

PHS Class of ‘57

Pittston High School Class of 57 reunion committee will meet on Wednesday, May 8 at 7:30 pm at Tony’sPizza, City Line, Plaza. The 55th anniversary of the our graduation will be held on Sun- day, September 2, 2012 at Fox Hill Country Club.class All classmates are urged to at- tend this important meeting.

2 quarts of strawberries

16 ounces Special Dark Bar Chocolate

2 Tablespoons & 2 teaspoons shortening

Place chocolate and vegetable shortening in the top of a double boiler or small bowl. Set on the bottom of double boiler or pan half filled with water. Heat on simmer. With a rubber spatula, stir chocolate while melting. Note, do not let water boil. Once melted, remove bowl from pan of hot water and continue to stir until chocolate cools to 80°F or the bowl feels warm. Continue stirring constantly for five minutes to develop crystals for gloss. Dip room temperature strawberries with a spoon or fork. Place on waxed paper. Refrigerate for 30 minutes or until chocolate has set.

Prom basket raffle

Parents of Wyoming Area se- niors are raffling a Prom Basket which includes two free prom tickets good for one couple’s ad- mission to the 2012 Wyoming Area Sr/Jr Prom, a free tuxedo rental from Tuxedo Junction (in stock tuxedo only), a free arm bouquet or wrist corsage and a free boutonniere. Tickets are two for $1 and will be sold at the Senior Lunch and in Mrs. Klepadlo’s room.

NARFE Meeting

The Greater Pittston Chapter 1723 National Association of Active and Retired Federal Em- ployees will hold their regular monthly meeting on Thursday, May 10, at 1 p.m. at the V.F.W. Hall in Dupont. Plans will be finalized for the annual June luncheon. Members wishing to attend the luncheon should contact Liz Tigue at 655- 5153 or John Ryan at 654-3722. All federal employees are invited to attend.

Supervision training

Penn State’s Supervision Es- sentials training program will be offered from 1 to 4:30 p.m. on May 8, 15, 22 and 29 at the NEPA Alliance facility, Oak Street, Pittston. Fee is $695 per person or $645 for three or more from the same organization. For information, call 675-9102 or e-mail jqr8@psu.edu.

La Leche League

The Greater Pittston La Leche League, affiliated with La Leche League International and pro- viding breastfeeding informa- tion and support to families in the Wyoming Va lley since 19 79, will meet at 10 a.m. on Tuesday, May 8 in the Community Room of the Laflin Borough Building, Laflin Road, Laflin. Pregnant women considering breastfeeding will learn more about the benefits of breastfeed- ing at this meeting.

PSEA Retired luncheon

Shirley Judge, president of the Luzerne County Chapter of PSEA-Retired, announces the annual Spring Luncheon will be held on Thursday, May 10 at the East Mountain Inn, Wilkes- Barre. Registration will open at 11:30 a.m. and lunch will be served at noon. Principal speaker will be Sue Jones, president of PSEA-Re- tired, who will update the results of the recently held PSEA-Re- tired House of Delegates and of- fer information concerning events and happenings of PSEA in Pennsylvania. Shirley Judge will be honored as she ends her term as president of Luzerne County Chapter. Elections will also be held for re- gion and county offices.

Jenkins Twp. Open

The Jenkins Township Little League is sponsoring The Jen- kins Township Open to be held at Sand Springs Country Club, Drums, with a shotgun start at 1 p.m. on Saturday, May 12. Re- freshments and R11 Driver give- away tickets can be purchased at check-in. Hole-in-one giveaway and awards for the longest drive and closest to pin will be presented. Italian buffet dinner will be served. Cost for four-player scramble/ Captain and Crew is $75 per per- son or $300 per team. Forms noting team captain, phone and players should be mailed with check payable to Jenkins Township Little League to Joe Zelonis, 453 S. Main St., Jenkins Twp., PA 18640. The tournament benefits the Jenkins Township Little League.

Barbershop Harmony Chorus

The Wyoming Va lley Barber- shop Harmony Chorus will have “Special Guest Night” at the Brooks Estate Community Cen- ter at the Pitttson We sley Vi llage Campus at 7 p.m. on May 14. The chorus is open to men who can sing four-part harmony acapella style.

For

more

information

call

883-7279,

696-3385

or

287-

2476

Third District GOP to meet

The Third District Republi- cans will hold their district con- vention at 8 p.m. Monday, May 14 at the Bar on Oak, 900 Oak St., Pittston Twp. All elected committee mem- bers must bring a certificate of election to this meeting. The purpose of this conven- tion is to elect a chairman. Cash bar will be available. For more information, call Pat Mar- ranca at 654-1112.

Coast Guard Vets

The NEPA Coast Guard Ve ter- ans Assoc. will conduct their monthly meeting on We dnesday, May 16 at 6:30 p.m. at the Dallas American Legion Post at 672 Memorial Highway, Dallas. All Coast Guard Ve terans are welcome to attend the meeting or they may call Neil Morrison at (570)-288-6817 for additional information.

Pittston High class of ‘55

The Pittston High School class of 1955 reunion committee in- vites class members and their spouses to a pizza party at 7 p.m. on Friday, May 18 at Rooney’s Irish Pub, South Main St., Pitt- ston.

CCW breakfast

The Confraternity of Catholic Women of Holy Tr inity Church, Swoyersville will hold their an- nual May Breakf ast on Sunday, May 20, in the school cafeteria. The members are asked to as- semble in the church hall by 8:15 a.m. to attend the 8:30 a.m. Mass. After Mass the women will proceed to the school cafeteria where breakfast will be prepared and served by the Holy Name Society members of the parish. Crowning of the Blessed Mother statue by a chosen member will

See BRIEFS, Page 37

SUNDAY DISPATCH , S UNDAY , M AY 6, 2012

PAGE 35

SUNDAY DISP AT CH , S UNDAY , M AY 6, 2012 PA GE 35

SUNDAY DISPATCH , S UNDAY , M AY 6, 2012

PAGE 36

SUNDAY DISP AT CH , S UNDAY , M AY 6, 2012 PA GE 36 Hometown

Hometown Heroes Memorial

S UNDAY , M AY 6, 2012 PA GE 36 Hometown Heroes Memorial The Greater Pittston

The Greater Pittston Chamber of Commerce

announces a fundraising campaign to construct a memorial to honor the ultimate sacrifice made for our country by the following servicemen/law enforcement ofcers:

by the following servicemen/law enforcement of fi cers: Lieutenant Colonel 1st Lieutenant Captain T.J.
by the following servicemen/law enforcement of fi cers: Lieutenant Colonel 1st Lieutenant Captain T.J.
by the following servicemen/law enforcement of fi cers: Lieutenant Colonel 1st Lieutenant Captain T.J.
by the following servicemen/law enforcement of fi cers: Lieutenant Colonel 1st Lieutenant Captain T.J.
by the following servicemen/law enforcement of fi cers: Lieutenant Colonel 1st Lieutenant Captain T.J.
by the following servicemen/law enforcement of fi cers: Lieutenant Colonel 1st Lieutenant Captain T.J.

Lieutenant Colonel

1st Lieutenant

Captain T.J. Hromisin

Army Specialist

PA State Trooper

Police Officer

Richard Berrettini

Jeffrey DePrimo

Critically wounded in the Iraq conflict

Dale Kridlo

Joshua Miller

Rodney F. Po cceschi

We thank the following donors for their monetary and in-kind donations: Anonymous Donor for the
We thank the
following donors
for their monetary
and in-kind
donations:
Anonymous Donor for the Flagpole
Coon Industries, Inc.
Coopers Seafood on the Waterfront
Dupont Monument Shop
Jennifer Robinson of SEVEN Design
The Times Leader
The Sunday Dispatch • Joseph Makarewicz of Everest Business Services LLC
Mark Kowalczyk of Marks’ Landscaping • Northeast Sign Service
The Banana Hammocks Band • Albert J. Kridlo • Alberta Kridlo • Andy & Michelle Kosik
Ann Marie Morgan & Son • Anthony J Ciliberto, Jr. • Antonino Farinella • Atlas Realty, Inc.
Atty. Joseph & Elizabeth Dessoye • Barbara Coyne • Blue Ribbon Farm Dairy, Inc.
Capozucca Brothers • Carmen Sciandra • Carol Calabrese • Casey-Kasa Coal Co.
Cathee Evans • Catherine and Sandy Gubbiotti • Christian & Kerry Girman
Dale Kridlo’s Daughters • Damian Kridlo • Deborah & Bernard Rachilla
Dr. Eugene Deminico • Dupont Developers, Inc. • Elaine Faleski • Eric and Ann McCabe
Forlance Duffy • Giambra Family • Ginger Murphy • Girard J. Mecadon, Esq.
Greater Pittston Chamber Women’s Network • Helen C. Adonizio
Highway Federal Credit Union • Hon. Fred Pierantoni • Insalaco Development Group
James McHale & the George A. Pugliese Memorial Committee • James Tigue
Jay & Dorothy Delaney • Jay & Katie Duffy • Jeanne Rowker
Jenkins Twp. American Legioin Post 938 • John & Margaret Brozzoski • John P. Robbie
Joseph & Ann DeLucca • Joseph & Rosemary Dessoye • Joseph D. Angelella
Joyce Flynn • Judge & Mrs. Michael Vough • Kenneth J. Musto
Landmark Community Bank • Limongelli Family • Lynn Kridlo Cingolani & Renee Marsola
M&T Bank • Marie Forlenza • Milazzo Industries, Inc.