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May 2012
1900 E. Hubbard 940-327-5400 www.fbmw.com
MINERAL WELLS
MEMBER FDI C
Values. Commitment. Community.
First Financial Bank is proud to be part of this great
community. We welcome this years rodeo participants
and wish them the best. It takes a lot of hard work and
dedication to make the ride ... So, hats of to everyone
on the trail!
WEDNESDAY, MAY 9, 2012 PPCLA RODEO PAGE 2
WEDNESDAY, MAY 9, 2012 PPCLA RODEO PAGE 3
First National Bank
Albany/Breckenridge
Strawn Branch
P.O. Box 338 254-672-5211
Strawn, Texas
Enjoy the 75th PPCLA Rodeo
940-325-4442 10:30 - 8 Tues- Fri 10:30- 9 Sat
319 N. Oak Mi neral Wel l s ( Next t o Crazy Wat er Hot el )
Ol d Fashi oned Soda Shop
Sandwi ches Cof f ee I ce Cr eam
R O D E O S P E C I A L A L L D A Y M A Y 1 0 - 1 2
$12.00
*
2 Deli Sandwiches 2 Sides 2 Drinks
*Good May 10-12 only. Regular Price $15.00
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Dear rodeo fans,
In 1937, the Palo Pinto
County Livestock Association
was formed to make the rais-
ing of livestock a more effec-
tive profession for ranchers
and farmers in the County.
Some things change some
things never change!
The same year, the
Association planned and exe-
cuted its first professional
rodeo under the national asso-
ciation of that time it was our
first PRCA-recognized rodeo
and our 75th Annual PRCA All-
American Pro-Rodeo is just
around the corner. Our prede-
cessors have been working all
these years to put on a best-
ever rodeo each year for your
enjoyment. Some things never
change!
From the inception, there
have been three different ven-
ues for the rodeo from a
near-southeast cattle pen area
to a larger northeast 14-acre
facility where the Annual
Livestock Show and the Pro-
Rodeo took place together.
Then, the Association pur-
chased our present grounds
from the State of Texas
through the City of Mineral
Wells. The arena facility was
built by members and other
volunteers totally from donated
materials and the maintenance
was done in the same way.
Some things never change!
Rodeo chairmen always
looked for the best stock con-
tractors/rodeo producers to
provide us with top-performing
stock and top-rated contes-
tants for our annual event.
From producers like Bad
Company and Tommy Steiner,
now we have Jim Gay of the
Rafter G Rodeo Company, one
of the top PRCA producers
with his top-notch team and
stock. Great bullfighters and
an entertaining clown are man-
datory and Rafter G has them!
Rodeo chairmen like John
Winters and Bill Rhodes and
others made sure that hap-
pened, in addition to having
top notch specialty acts. From
six-gun shooting William Elliott,
who played Wild Bill Hickok
and Red Ryder in the movies
of the time, to trick roper Jerry
Diaz and the One-Armed
Bandit John Payne, we are
proud to provide the nationally
renowned All-American Cowgirl
Chicks and their trick riding
performance each night of the
rodeo. They alone will make
your night at the 75th Annual
Pro-Rodeo worth your effort.
Some things never change!
We have been blessed with
proclamations from both
Mineral Wells Mayor Mike
Allen and the Palo Pinto
County Commissioners that
name the second week in May
as Pro-Rodeo week in the city
and county. Wonderful spon-
sors have also come forward
to assure that you have a
great time at this event. From
all the PRCA and WPRA pro
events to local team roping,
Mutton bustin, calf scrambles,
the Cowgirls of Hope riding
team and the Cowgirl Chicks
Trick Riders nightly, you
shouldnt miss being with us
every night! As our nationally
famous PRCA announcer,
Doug Mathis, says its rodeo
time in Mineral Wells, Texas
well see you there!
Some things change some
things never change!
Bring on the 75th!
Wendell Barker
Palo Pinto County
Rodeo Chairman
Welcome to the 75th annual pro rodeo
where some things never change
75TH ALL-AMERICAN SERIES
PRCA-WPRA PRO-RODEO
SCHEDULE
May 9-12 PPCLA Rodeo Arena
Advance tickets $10 adults, $5 children
(available through the Mineral Wells Area
Chamber of Commerce, local banks and
the 2012 rodeo queen and princess
contestants).
Tickets at the gate $12 adults, $7
children.
Nightly attractions
Mutton busting and kids calf scramble each
night.
Cowgirls of Hope riding team open each
night and the All-American Cowgirl Chicks
perform their trick riding act each night of the
rodeo.
Armed forces personnel in uniform receive
free admission (and each night of the rodeo.)
SCHEDULE
Wednesday, May 9
5 p.m. Slack night (free admission).
Thursday, May 10
8 a.m. Trail ride from Weatherford to
Mineral Wells.
5 p.m. parade in downtown Mineral Wells.
7:30 p.m. Rodeo.
Friday, May 11
7:30 p.m. Cure Cancer Wear Pink
Night. Wear pink or purple and help us
defeat cancer in Palo Pinto County. The rodeo
will donate 10 percent of Friday nights ticket
sales to Palo Pinto County Relay for Life.
Saturday, May 12
7:30 p.m. Rodeo. Queen and princess
crowning early.
9:30 p.m. to 1 a.m. Dance to the Tommy
Hooker Band at the Expo Center.
WEDNESDAY, MAY 9, 2012 PPCLA RODEO PAGE 4
FIRST STATE BANK WWW.FIRSTSTATEBANKMW.COM
MINERAL WELLS BANKING CENTER 940-325-7821
PK LAKE BANKING CENTER 940-779-4061
WEATHERFORD BANKING CENTER 817-599-4321
The voice of pro rodeo Doug Mathis to call the action
Every day is a good day because
we get to rodeo is the mantra of
Professional Rodeo Announcer Doug
Mathis of Cleburne, Texas.
Mathis, a member of the
Professional Rodeo Cowboys
Association since 1995 is ranked as
one of the top announcers in the
country.
In a career filled with highlights,
announcing the 2005 Dodge National
Circuit Finals in Pocatello, Idaho, and
the 2009 National Finals Steer
Roping put feathers in his hat, as
well as placing seventh out of all
PRCA announcers for Announcer of
the Year voting in 2005, 2006, 2007,
2008, 2009, 2010.
In 2005, 2006 and 2007 Mathis
was chosen for the TV broadcasting
job on The Altitude Channel for The
Greeley Independence Day
Stampede Extreme Bull Riding.
Mathis is not just another pretty
face, although he has appeared in sev-
eral fashion print campaigns, but his
overall presentation and attitude have
won him the admiration of all whom he
works with. His outstanding ability to
make what goes on in the arena look
better than what it is and his smooth
intelligent delivery satisfies the sea-
soned fan as well as the newcomers.
Doug is a highly sought after
announcer, but his voice and face
have taken him further outside of the
arena than what he expected.
Besides the numerous national fash-
ion print campaigns, Mathis can also
be seen acting in television commer-
cials from Reliant Energy to the tele-
vision pilot of Knockoffs, to CBSs
New Years Eve at Billy Bobs Texas,
to Tylenol and Esquire Watches, and
also appeared in George Straits
Pure Country.
Bob Tallman, 2004 PRCA
Announcer of the Year and the voice
of the Wrangler National Finals
Rodeo, gives this recommendation for
Mathis professional expertise: You
dont have to teach him, just trust him
for 100 folks or 100,000 fans.
Mathis has been behind the mic
since he sustained a career ending
injury as a bull rider. He has
announced in 23 states and averag-
es 50,000 miles a year on the road.
He jokes that he gets his mail in
Cleburne, but that he really lives on
the road.
My friends are on the road and part
of the fun of working in this industry is
reconnecting every year, he said.
When hes not announcing rodeos,
Mathis can be found on his family
ranch overseeing his 65 head of
mother cows and calves.
Come rodeo with Mathis and his
friends. Youll be glad you did.
My friends are on the road
and part of the fun of work-
ing in this industry is recon-
necting every year.
Barrel man Cameron Keeton said
he was very excited when he learned
he would be returning to Mineral Wells
for this years rodeo.
2011 was a very busy year for me
and 2012 is going to be the same,
said Keeton. I had the opportunity to
work rodeos from south Texas to
northern Nebraska. Im very excited to
be coming back to Mineral Wells. We
had three great performances last
year and I hear that this years line up
will be even better.
Its always a privilege and honor
when you get to work with a legendary
rodeo family such as the Gays, they
are true professionals and I feel very
honored to be coming back to Mineral
Wells. So come on out and join us for
a fun filled and exciting weekend.
There is bound to be three-great
nights of action with something to
please everyone.
Known as the politically incorrect
rodeo clown, Cameron Keeton prom-
ises to be a barrel full of laughs as this
years barrel man for the Mineral Wells
Pro Rodeo.
My goal is to have a successful,
safe and enjoyable rodeo, said
Keeton. I bring more than 35 years of
rodeo experience, both as a contes-
tant or as an entertainer.
Keeton said he began his rodeo
career at the age of 9 competing on a
local youth circuit.
At 13 and a whopping 85 pounds I
tried my first bull, Keeton said. It was
a short ride, but long enough to get
me hooked. I continued to ride bulls
through high school in local bull riding
events and, at 19, I started fighting
bulls.
Being a bull fighter is not for the
timid and someone who wishes to
avoid a variety of injuries and ail-
ments. Keeton, at the age of 33,
required some down time after suffer-
ing an injury. It was during that time
that his career took a new direction.
I received several job offers to be a
barrel man, he said. I quickly learned
I had a knack for entertaining the
crowds, not to mention how much I
loved to hear the laughter and
applause. I have several acts, but my
biggest act is me walking, talking
and entertaining the crowd.
In an interview published in the
January 2009 issue of Texas
Highways magazine, Keeton was
asked what he likes most about being
a rodeo clown.
Theres not one specific thing; its
the travel, making people laugh, mak-
ing new friends, and making a living
doing something I really enjoy, he
said.
Asked what part he doesnt like, he
replied, When nobody laughs; that
sucks.
So be sure and laugh and have a
good time with Keeton at the Palo
Pinto County Livestock Association
arenas center of attention.
WEDNESDAY, MAY 9, 2012 PPCLA RODEO PAGE 5
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Cameron Keeton
The politically incorrect rodeo clown
WEDNESDAY, MAY 9, 2012 PPCLA RODEO PAGE 6
Weatherford riding
group to open each
night of rodeo in
honor of those
who have and
are fighting cancer
Giving Hope to those who need it
the most.
The Cowgirls of Hope, from
Weatherford, Texas, are a high-speed
equine precision team, whose mission
is to Give Hope to Those Who Need
it the Most. They provide emotional
and financial support to individuals
and families who are in need by rid-
ing to raise money. All proceeds go
towards their causes, often support-
ing childhood cancer victims and
awareness.
The Cowgirls of Hope is made up
of five very special and dedicated
cowgirls: coach and founder Kerrie
Pytlik; assistant coach Leah Stevens;
and members Jamie Lynne Pytlik, 13;
Taylar White, 14; and the youngest
member, Maggie Mae Pytlik, 11.
The team was formed when Sam
Nash, a very special Texas Cowboy
(also a member of the Parker County
Sheriffs Posse) was diagnosed with
stage 3A lung cancer. The group
wanted to help him and his family by
providing them with financial and
emotional support as he fought this
horrible disease. Unfortunately, Nash
lost his courageous battle with cancer
on April 22, 2011. He is loved and
greatly missed by all and will be in
peoples hearts forever. The Cowgirls
of Hope perform in his honor and will
continue to honor him at all future
events.
Garett Christopher Hall was anoth-
er inspiration. Garett was a 5-year-
old Texas superhero diagnosed in
May 2010 with DIPG, an inoperable
form of brainstem cancer. He fought
his cancer strong and hard, and the
girls were right there fighting with
him. Unfortunately he lost his battle
and earned his wings June 23, 2011.
The group says he was their Lil
Man and they will never forget his
courage. The Cowgirls of Hope also
perform in his honor at all of their per-
formances past, present and future.
This year the Cowgirls of Hope will
be riding for a little girl named Brooke
Hester. She is battling neuroblastoma
cancer and is also just 5 years old.
She is described as a happy and cou-
rageous little girl. She and her family
provide other little girls who are bat-
tling cancer just like Brooke with
Brookes Blossoms headbands
and hats adorned with flowers, bows,
feathers and bling. They do this to
make the little girls who have
lost their hair to chemotherapy
feel pretty. Brooke is a selfless little
girl wanting to help others while wag-
ing her own fight with cancer.
The Cowgirls of Hope will be riding
with blossoms on their horses and on
the cowgirls. If you would like to help
Brooke, contact her family at brookes-
blossom@yahoo.com. The Cowgirls
of Hope will take part in a fundraiser
on June 7th to raise money for
Brooke at Chandor Gardens
in Weatherford.
The Cowgirls of Hope say they are
very honored and excited to perform
at the Mineral Wells Pro Rodeos 75th
anniversary event and hope to really
get the crowd ready for an action-
packed evening. We will be there,
performing all three nights. We will
also be riding in the parade on
Thursday.
For more information about
Cowgirls of Hope or to book them for
a performance contact Kerrie at cow-
girlsofhope@yahoo.com and find
them on Facebook.
Cowgirls of Hope ride to help others
The Cowgirls of Hope of Weatherford, Texas, will open each night of the Mineral Wells rodeo.
This year the Cowgirls
of Hope will be riding
for a little girl named
Brooke Hester.
WEDNESDAY, MAY 9, 2012 PPCLA RODEO PAGE 7
FDIC
Cool
940-682-9212
Comanche
325-356-2577
Palo Pinto
940-659-3611
Millsap
940-682-4129
Santo
940-769-3611
Mingus
254-672-5910
We Have Six Locations To Serve You
www.comanchenational.com
WEDNESDAY, MAY 9, 2012 PPCLA RODEO PAGE 8
Brazos
Animal
Hospital
Mon-Fri-7:30-5:30 Sat. 8:00-Noon
801 E. Hubbard
940-325-CARE (2273)
Phones Answered 24 Hours
Dr. Tad Jarrett
All-American Cowgirl Chicks much
more than a daring trick-riding team
Team that rides to support
the fight against cancer
will perform each night
Trish Lynn and the All-American Cowgirl Chicks is
a rodeo cowgirl daring trick-riding team based out of
Fort Worth.
The Power of Team
When its all said and done, the Cowgirl Chicks
(www.cowgirlchicks.com) are more than just a fast
horse, hard tricks or cowgirls. Its a team, a team with
a story, a style, and a vision all its own.
Trish Lynn and the Cowgirl Chicks know what it is
like to start from the ground up, get dirty, get knocked
down and take something that no one believed in and
turn it into a something.
The overall picture is what this team is all about and
not being afraid of doing what it takes to get there and,
most of all, who will still be standing when its all said
and done.
The Cowgirl Chicks give all credit to their horses.
These horses have a story of their own. They were
turned away, abused or just given up on. With time
and dedication the girls have turned these problem
horses into a somebody a champion.
These incredible horses were given up on and these
cowgirls with time, hard work and nurturing became a
true champion in the rodeo arena. Performing with all
heart and guts, they became a team and a powerful
one at that. It just goes to show you when given a
chance and the power of not giving up, amazing things
can unfold.
These cowgirls bring a cutting edge performance to
the rodeo circuit all across the country. With daring
stunts and athleticism, these tough cowgirls and their
horses are what best describes a life well lived in the
rodeo world.
Their Story
In order to keep this team of athletes on the road
they offer clinics, training sessions for horses and stu-
dents, at their ranch in Weatherford through out the
year. If you need a horse trained or tuned up for a
30-day ride, weaning and haltering young colts, moti-
vational public speaking and demonstrations to large
groups, or know of a rider who needs guidance on
how to be the best they can be in this sport, this is our
way to earn our financial needs to remain active on the
road and mentor people of all ages on how to help
them accomplish their dreams in the horse world.
The Cowgirl Chicks and their horses are one of the
See CHICKS, page 9
Jane E. Privitt
Co-Owner
Elliott & Waldron Abstract Co.
of Palo Pinto, Inc.
Abstract & Title Insurance
940-325-6564 940-325-3386
Since 1959
403 South Oak Mineral Wells TX 76067
elliott100@sbcglobal.net
Terri Roundtree
Escrow Ofcer
WEDNESDAY, MAY 9, 2012 PPCLA RODEO PAGE 9
817-677-3446
4272 E. Hwy. 199 Springtown TX 76082
Lic# R35875
16X72-Redman-3/2 Stk# 0901 .................. $13,900
28X60-Redman-3/2 Stk# 0994 .................. $26,900
NEW 2012 MODELS
32X52-Champion-3/2 Stk# 0811 ............... $49,900
32X68-Champion-4/2 Stk# 0809 ............... $59,000
(Tape & Textured)
Store Hours:
9 am-5:30 pm Tuesday-Friday
9 am-3:30 pm Saturday
CHICKS from page 8
most inspirational rodeo performance
teams in the business today. There is
nothing these cowgirls cant do and
they are known as some of the top
hands in the horse business today.
The mission of The All-American
Cowgirl Chicks is to improve the quality
of life for children and families served
by charitable programs and services
provided children and local charities in
North Texas. The All-American Cowgirl
Chicks will accomplish its mission by
inspiring and mentoring people of all
ages at a quality professional rodeo
that exposes the community to the
awareness and knowledge of our west-
ern heritage and donating the monies
raised beyond the operational costs to
our charitable causes.
Wearing the patriotic colors of red,
white and blue, Trish Lynn and the All-
American Cowgirl Chicks are an eques-
trian drill team, exemplifying the true
meaning of their western heritage as
they entertain crowds while riding for a
cure for cancer. The Cowgirl Chicks
carry the American and Texas flags as
they perform an aggressive 10-minute
routine to upbeat music.
The Cowgirl Chicks are experienced
athletes who have been:
Featured and invited five times to
the Tournament of Roses Parade and
Equestfest.
Nominated for Specialty Act of the
Year in 2010 and 2011 by the PRCA.
Invited to perform at Breyerfest.
Appeared twice in The Road to the
Horse Clinic.
Active member of the ABBI Bucking
Bull Program.
Served as the ambassadors of the
United States in Stockholm, Sweden.
Active in the adoption of a Wild
Mustang Foundation.
Perform trick riding and stunts in
over 85 performances a year.
On TV
The Cowgirl Chicks can be seen on
RFD-TV in the All-American Cowgirl
Chicks
Never Quit Series that airs
Tuesdays at 8:30 p.m. CDT and
repeats Wednesdays at 10:30
a.m. and Sundays at 4 p.m.
The Chicks have participated in
many fundraisers. They ride and raise
money for cancer patients. They visit
nursing homes and distributed toys to
children at the Cooks Children Hospital
in Fort Worth during the holidays. The
Chicks schedule is booking up quickly
for 2012. For more information go to
www.cowgirlchicks.com.
WEDNESDAY, MAY 9, 2012 PPCLA RODEO PAGE 10
Visit Us
Before The
Rodeo
SCOREBOARD SPONSORS
Keg 1-ONeal Distributing
NOV FiberGlass Systems
Upham Oil & Gas
Specialty Sponsors
All-American Cowgirl Chicks IESI
Benefactor Mineral Wells Area
Chamber of Commerce
Bull Fighters Mesquite Pit
Clown Palo Pinto General Hospital
Grand Entry Link Field Services
North Roping Time Clock Shires
Garden Center
Program Best Western Inn
Saturday Rodeo
Dance Barbara Upham
Sponsor/Producer Meals Comfort
Suites
Bucking Chute Sponsors
Collision Center
First Financial Bank
First State Bank
HMW Fabrications
Mineral Wells B&PT
Powell Auto Group
North Release HMW Fabrications
Event Sponsors
Bareback Riding Titan Bank
Barrel Racing Chubbys BBQ & Grill
Bull Riding (rst section) Palo Pinto
Co. Farm Bureau & Insurance
Bull Riding (second section)
Diamond Pharmacy
Calf Scramble Diamond Pharmacy
Local Team Roping Garner Equine
Mutton Bustin W.C. Ranch
Pro Team Roping Eventide Water
Saddle Bronc Riding NOV
FiberGlass Systems
Steer Wrestling Holiday Inn Express
Tie Down Calf Roping Masseys
Environmental Services
Combo Sponsors
Community Christian School
Component Solutions
David & Sons Sand Blasting
Davis Glass & Body
Nesmith Trucking
Personalized Communication
Premier Properties
Waddy Pharmacy
Ofcial Veterinarian
Sonny Seale, DVM
Ofcial Printer
Weavers Print Shop
Wall Sign Sponsors
92.1 FM The Hank
95.9 FM The Ranch
Ace Hardware
Air Evac Lifeteam
Arena Tractor Supplier
Baum-Carlock-Bumgardner Funeral Home
BJs Pizza Mingus
Chicken Express
Chilis
Dairy Queen of Santo
D&D Motors
Days Inn & Suites
Durant Auto Group
East Dairy Queen of Mineral Wells
Ellis Equipment Co. Weatherford
First Christian Church
First National Bank of Santo
First National Bank/Gordon & Strawn
First United Methodist Church
Four Seasons Dental Clinic
Fudgies Bail Bonds
Furr Building Materials
HM Weapons Mfg.
Lees Collision Repair
Lindas Jewelry Weatherford
Lone Star Ranch & Outdoors
Lonestar Ranch & Outdoors/Mahindra
Lonestar Ranch & Outdoors/New Holland
Mac Coalson Real Estate
Marys Caf Strawn
Metro Discount Foods
Metroplex Service Welding
Millsap Veterinary Clinic
Mueller, Inc.
Natty Flats Smokehouse and
Furniture
Nickols Exhaust Center
Palo Pinto Nursing and Rehab Center
Pilgrim Farm & Ranch
Price Surveying
S&S Western Wear Resale
Southside Church of Christ
Southwest Ford Weatherford
Stripes and More
Taco Casa
The Bank of Weatherford
Thornton Mercantile Santo
Walden Farm and Ranch
Woodmen of the World

Special Thanks
88.5 QXFM The RAM
Dan Anderson
Area emergency medical services
Area law enforcement departments
Awards & More
Joe Bielinski
Comanche National Bank
County FFA and 4H members
County re departments
Cowboy Church of Mineral Wells
Cowboy Jubilee - Judy James
Cowgirls of Hope
Garner Equine/Sonny Seale, DVM
Tommy Hooker Band
Lake Country Sun
Perri Leavelle
Mineral Wells Index
Palo Pinto County Sheriffs Posse
Parker County Sheriffs Posse
Richards Signs & Cranes
75TH ANNUAL MINERAL WELLS PRO RODEO SPONSORS
WEDNESDAY, MAY 9, 2012 PPCLA RODEO PAGE 11
HARDWARE
of Mineral Wells
The Helpful Place
acehardwareofmineralwells.com
940-325-5952 Toll Free 866-614-1181
2901 Hwy. 180 E. Mineral Wells, TX 76067
Offering
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Also offering Day Stay and Respire Care
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900 Autumn Ridge Dr., Granbury Lic#122816
817-573-7720
www.arborhouse4u.com
2012 Rodeo Queen Candidate Gabby Burson
Queen Candidate
Gabriel (Gabby) Burson
Age: 18
Why do you want to be
the 2012 PPCLA Rodeo
Queen?
PPCLA rodeo queen is a
very proud title to carry. I
would be honored to hold it.
After my wreck many said I
would never ride my horse
again. I received second
runner-up last year and am
here to try it again.
Education
I nished my junior year in
high school and then went
to Weatherford College to
receive my GED.
What are your future
career goals?
I plan on going to
Weatherford College in
the fall. Im leaning more
towards something in the
criminal justice eld. Also
would like to get my farrier
certication.
What awards/honors have
you received (school,
private club, etc.)?
In high school all sorts of
FFA awards and UIL awards.
Greenhand and Chapter.
Reserved Champion in
Duroc pigs. My most proud
of all is second runner-up for
rodeo queen for 2011.
What are your hobbies/
activities/interests?
Riding and taking care of my
horse is one of my hobbies.
I enjoy watching movies and
being around my dog.
When and where did you
become interested in
rodeo?
As long as I can remember
I have been going to the
rodeo. Every girl in Texas
wants to be a cowgirl, but
most grow out of it. I did not,
every year I go.
What contributions do you
believe a rodeo queen can
make to benet the sport
of rodeo?
A rodeo queen can bring
smiles to fans. She will show
to others how family and
community friendly the rodeo
is. She would help bring
more people to see the life of
a cowboy/cowgirl.
What other titles and/
or rodeo titles have you
held?
I was second runner-up for
rodeo queen in 2011.
What experience do you
have with horses?
Ive rode for about nine
years. Most of the time just
pleasure. I own my horse
and provide for her every
day.
Additional information
Im easy to get along with. I
love a challenge, to prove it
can be done. After my wreck
last year I had to prove to
myself I am worth it!
Get your advanced discount rodeo tickets from Gabby Burson
Photo courtesy
David Thompson Photography
WEDNESDAY, MAY 9, 2012 PPCLA RODEO PAGE 12
Tinchers Custom Homes
& Remodeling, Inc.
600 Highway 337 North
(940)325-3013 (940) 325-2607
(940) 682-8384 mobile
Dealer
1704 SE 1st Street (940) 325-8888
Mineral Wells, TX 76067
2012 Rodeo Queen Candidate Brooke Nesmith
Queen Candidate
Brooke Allison Nesmith
Age: 17
Why do you want to be
the 2012 PPCLA rodeo
queen?
I like to be challenged with
my horse and this is an
opportunity I am honored
to compete in.
Education
High school (currently 12
th

grade), middle school and
elementary.
What are tour future
career goals?
My future goals are going
to Cedar Valley College to
be a vet tech then maybe
go onto a university to get
my bachelors.
What awards/honors
have you received
(school, private club,
etc.)?
Poor Boy Riding Club
reserve champion buckle
ribbons, trophies, various
prizes.
What are your hobbies/
activities/interests?
Fishing, going dancing,
making decorations, going
to church, roping, tanning
and hunting.
When and where did you
become interested in
rodeo?
Ever since I was a little
girl.
What contributions do
you believe a rodeo
queen can make to
benefit the sport of
rodeo?
To be an inspiration to the
younger horse riders.
What other titles and/
or rodeo titles have you
held?
Palo Pinto County Sheriffs
Posse Sweetheart,
Peaster High School
Rodeo Sweetheart,
Poor Boy Riding Club
Sweetheart (Jr.).
What experience do you
have with horses?
I have been riding horses
since I was 8 years old. I
have so much experience
because I was involved in
clubs, parades, rodeos,
barrel races etc.
Additional information
I have been involved with
ag for three years. I went
to Area in public relations
and have been in horse
judging for two years.
Get your advanced discount rodeo tickets from Brooke Nesmith
Photo courtesy
David Thompson Photography
WEDNESDAY, MAY 9, 2012 PPCLA RODEO PAGE 13
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B E E R L I Q U O R WI N E
2012 Rodeo Queen Candidate Autumn West
Queen Candidate
Autumn West
Age: 15
Why do you want to be
the 2012 PPCLA Rodeo
Princess:
As I volunteer for the
association along with
my family, I am interested
in the advancement of
the association and the
queen/princess program to
bring more attention and
participation in and from the
community of Palo Pinto
County.
Education
I am currently a sophomore
at Mineral Wells High School
taking a mixture of regular
and pre-AP and ranked sixth
in my class of 2014.
What are your future career
goals?
I plan to do what is necessary
to receive my oral design
certicate by the end of my
junior year and vet tech
certicate by the end of my
senior year working within the
program provided by MWHS.
Ill use that to work my way
through college to study some
sort of equine specialty.
What awards/honors have
you received (school,
private club, etc.)?
Math, English and Art awards
through junior high. Presidents
Award for 95 plus yearly
average. National Junior
Honor Society. Tenth individual
high score at area horse
judging contest. Third place
team at area horse judging.
What are your hobbies/
activities/interests?
Drawing, painting, horseback
riding and barrel racing,
music, running, sports
medicine training.
When and where did you
become interested in
rodeo?
About three years ago I started
running barrels on a horse
that belonged to some friends.
I got my rst barrel horse
several months later and have
been going ever since.
What contributions do you
believe a rodeo queen can
make to benet the sport of
rodeo?
The trait that a rodeo queen is
chosen for can be a positive
inuence to bring more
interest from the community in
the local PRCA rodeo and the
association that puts it on.
What other titles and/or
rodeo titles have you held?
None as of yet. I just get on
there and run and enjoy the
time on my horse.
What experience do you
have with horses?
Barrel racing, pleasure riding
and trail riding. Caring for
basic every day health and
grooming of my horses.
Additional information
I would be proud to be the
PPCLA Rodeo Queen and
represent the association
that does so much to put this
program and rodeo on.
Get your advanced discount rodeo tickets from Autumn West
Photo courtesy
David Thompson Photography
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WEDNESDAY, MAY 9, 2012 PPCLA RODEO PAGE 14
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2012 Rodeo Princess Candidate Ambra Burkheimer
Princess Candidate
Ambra Lein Burkheimer
Age: 13
Why do you want to be
the 2012 PPCLA rodeo
princess?
Because I would like to
represent the PPCLA in a
well-mannered way and
to help promote rodeo
throughout the county and
all other counties.
Education
I am in the seventh grade at
Brock Middle School.

What are your future
career goals?
To become an equine/large
animal veterinarian and
to become a professional
barrel racer.
What awards/honors have
you received (school,
private club, etc.)?
I have held different honors
from being the Denton
Round-up Club mascot
when I was 3 and then
several other ones, plus I
have won several buckles
and other awards since
then.
What are your hobbies/
activities/interests?
My hobbies are barrel
racing, volleyball, track,
rodeoing and roping.
When and where did you
become interested in
rodeo?
I became interested in
rodeo when I was just a
baby because my mother
has always ran barrels and
I love the sport.
What contributions do
you believe a rodeo
queen can make to
benet the sport of
rodeo?
To be the best role model
I can be and to go out into
the community and tell
everyone about rodeos.
What other titles and/
or rodeo titles have you
held?
I have been the mascot for
the Denton Round-up Club,
senior sweetheart for the
Weatherford Comancheros
and junior and senior
sweetheart for the Lonestar
Riders.
What experience do you
have with horses?
I have been around horses
my whole life. I have ridden
in several different horse
activities and I have started
a few colts.
Additional information
I enjoy helping children to
learn how to ride and just
working with animals and
my biggest thing is I always
try to do my very best and
to be a good person.
Get your advanced discount rodeo tickets from Ambra Burkheimer
Photo courtesy
David Thompson Photography
WEDNESDAY, MAY 9, 2012 PPCLA RODEO PAGE 15
2012 Rodeo Princess Candidate Taylor Otwell
Princess Candidate
Taylor Ann Otwell
Age: 13
Why do you want to be the 2012
PPCLA rodeo princess?
I want to be the 2012 Palo Pinto County
Livestock Association Rodeo Princess
because I think that the princess is
a very important part of the livestock
association and I would like to be that
important part. I love rodeos and horses,
so I think that this is a good thing for me
to do. I love to talk to and help people as
well and I believe that is a part of holding
this title. I love putting that special smile
on someones face!
Education
I am an eighth grader at Mineral Wells
Junior High where I am in all pre-advanced
placement classes and Spanish I, which is a
high school-level class.

What are your future career goals?
I am planning on graduating from Mineral
Wells High School in the top 10 percent of
my class and will already have a few college
credits on my records (thanks to dual credit
classes in my junior and senior year). Then,
I will be going to Texas A&M to study to
become a doctor of veterinary medicine. I
understand that this is a long, difcult career
path, but I will to do all that I possibly can
to save the lives of animals of all shapes
and sizes, therefore I will not be solely a
large or small animal vet but will welcome all
animals.
What awards/honors have you
received (school, private club, etc.)?
I am on the A honor role every six weeks
and I get many academic and social
awards at the Academic Awards Assembly
each six weeks period. I have also been
inducted into the National Junior Honor
Society and was highlighted as the
Spotlight Star in the Mineral Wells Index.
I am the top runner for Mineral Wells
Junior High School and have won many
awards related to my track and cross
country performance. At the play days
that I compete in, I have won many year-
end and daily awards, such as buckles,
halters, buckets, breast collars and other
tack, and I was a nalist in barrels and
poles in the Pro Youth Rodeo Association
in 2011.
What are your hobbies/activities/
interests?
I am interested in all things related to
horses and animals. I am especially
interested barrel racing and pole bending.
My dad is even teaching me how to team
rope. I also show animals through the
Palo Pinto County Livestock Association. I
have showed goats for three years, and I
am planning on showing a heifer this year.
I also have been a cheerleader for Mineral
Wells Junior High School for two years,
played volleyball, and I have passionately
competed in track and cross country for
the past two years. I will continue with all
of these activities through high school.
When and where did you become
interested in rodeo?
Rodeo has always interested me. My mom
and dad have been involved in rodeo since
they were young so I was born into it. My
mom is a barrel racer, and my dad is a
team roper which has played a huge part
in my life. I started competing in play days
when I was 4 which has helped develop
my horsemanship skills and knowledge of
horses and has prepared me for youth and
high school rodeos.
What contributions do you believe a rodeo
queen can make to benet the sport of
rodeo?
I believe that a rodeo princess or queen
is not only the glitz and glamour of rodeo,
but she also draws people to the rodeo
by being a good, strong person with good
sportsmanship, is able to ride and speak
well, and is good socializing with people.
Because she is in the spotlight, it is
important that she is very strong in each
one of these areas. She keeps people
coming back by being the friendly face of
rodeo that they can get close to and talk
with.
What other titles and/or rodeo titles
have you held?
I have held the positions of Poor Boy
Riding Club Junior Sweetheart two years
and Senior Sweetheart one year. I am
currently the Wise County Wrangler Junior
Sweetheart. I was also Little Miss Justin
and All Star Kids National Supreme Junior
Talent in 2002, when I was 4 years old.
What experience do you have with
horses?
I have literally been riding horses since
before I was born. My mom won two
saddles while she was pregnant with me.
I havent ever been away from horses for
more than a few days at a time. I started
riding by myself when I was three and
even when I was that little, I would help
out with the horses by brushing, feeding
them and other things. My favorite thing
to do was putting the bell boots on. I have
also helped with the horses at the cutting
horse ranch my mom works at and I have
bathed, unsaddled, cooled down, and
cleaned stalls for my neighbor who is a
PRCA Team Roper.
Additional information
I am from Mineral Wells and I love my
town, my county and this community, and
I would love the opportunity to represent
my county as Palo Pinto County Livestock
Association Rodeo Princess.
Get your advanced discount rodeo tickets from Taylor Otwell
Photo courtesy
David Thompson Photography
WEDNESDAY, MAY 9, 2012 PPCLA RODEO PAGE 16
Parade Start Parade End
S.E. 1st Street
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75TH ANNUAL PPCLA RODEO PARADE
THURSDAY, MAY 10 5 P.M.
East Hubbard St.
N.W. 4th Street
N.W. 2nd Street
Mineral Wells High
School boys basketball
coach Aaron Pappas is
grand marshal for this
years 75th Annual
Mineral Wells Pro
Rodeo parade.
The parade will take
place beginning at 5
p.m. on Thursday, May
10, taking its usual route
through downtown,
beginning and ending at
the old train depot on
South Oak Avenue.
The procession will
move past the Index
building before turning at
S.E. 4th Avenue to west
on East Hubbard Street,
making a right at the
Baker Hotel before mak-
ing the loop around the
Crazy Water Retirement
Hotel and returning to
the depot south along
North Oak Avenue.
The parade lineup
begins at 4 p.m. Entry
is free, and the form is
available online at cow-
boychurchofmineral-
wells.com where you
can print it out and
return it by mail, fax or
email. The form
includes rules and regu-
lations for certain
entries like floats and
riding entries.
Entries will be judged
in the categories of
local commercial, non-
local commercial,
churches, horses and
riders, decorated cars,
antique tractors, antique
cars and clubs.
For more information
call or email the
Cowboy Church of
Mineral Wells at (940)
452-8038 or cbcmwell@
gmail.com.
Rams boys basketball coach
Pappas to lead rodeo parade The annual Mineral Wells Pro Rodeo
trail ride from Weatherford to Mineral
Wells is set for Thursday morning.
Riders can be begin arriving at the
Parker County Sheriffs Posse Arena on
U.S. Highway 180 just west of
Weatherford beginning at 6 a.m. The ride
will leave at 8 a.m. Negative coggins
required for all horses.
Riders ages 18 and under need to
have a release form signed by a parent
or legal guardian. Download a form by
going to www.parkercountysheriffsposse.
com or call (817) 565-3950.
The day-long ride will follow its usual
path, going west along U.S. 180 to Old
Millsap Highway and heading to Millsap.
Lunch will be served midday at Waldens
Farm and Ranch before the riders will
remount and head up Old Millsap
Highway to Mineral Wells, with a stop at
Ashleys Hats near MH 379 for a rest and
drinks for completing the ride into Mineral
Wells in time for the 5 p.m. rodeo parade.
So saddle up and enjoy the ride.
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The following businesses are supporting
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renting rodeo bunting for the front of their
stores. Others around town with banners
are rodeo sponsors for whom the banners
are included in their sponsorship. Tell
them all that you appreciate their support
and shop with them!
Award Co., Inc.
Awards & More
Awesome Blossoms
Basic Necessities
Bennetts Brazos Printing
Bennett Ofce Supply
Brazos Animal Hospital
Brazos Valley Physical Therapy
Century 21 Properties Ltd.
Chubbys BBQ & Grill
City of Mineral Wells/Lance Howerton
Coles House of Flowers
Comet Cleaners
Coys Barber Shop
Double H Tires
Expressions
Famous Water Company
First National Bank of Santo at Cool
Four Seasons Dental
Furr Building Materials
Fuzzys Taco Shop
Garretts
Hickeys Dairy Queen
Jesses Drive Inn
Kwik Kar Lube
Logo Shop
Low Cost Insurance
Mineral Wells Ofce Supply
Mineral Wells Rent All
Nickols Exhaust Center
Noels Auto Sales
OReilly Auto Parts
Parts Plus
Pennys Flower Shop
Randys Service Center
Simms Lumber Co.
Source 1 Real Estate
South Oak Motor
Suddenlink
Suttons
Shotguns BBQ
Texas Details
W&E Electronics
Wells Express
WEDNESDAY, MAY 9, 2012 PPCLA RODEO PAGE 18
EVENTS SADDLE BRONC
S
addle bronc riding is rodeos
classic event, both a comple-
ment and contrast to the wilder
spectacles of bareback riding and bull
riding.
Bronc riding requires strength to be
sure, but the event also demands style,
grace and precise timing. Saddle bronc
riding evolved from the task of breaking
and training horses to work the cattle
ranches of the Old West.
Many cowboys claim riding saddle
broncs is the toughest rodeo event to
master because of the technical skills
necessary for success.
Every move the bronc rider makes
must be synchronized with the move-
ment of the horse. The cowboys objec-
tive is a fluid ride, somewhat in contrast
to the wilder and less-controlled rides
of bareback riders.
Among the similarities shared by
saddle bronc riding and bareback riding
is the rule that riders in both events
must mark out their horses on the first
jump from the chute.
To properly mark out his horse, the
saddle bronc rider must have both
heels touching the animal above the
point of its shoulders when it makes its
first jump from the chute. If the rider
misses his mark, he receives no score.
While a bareback rider has a rigging
to hold onto, the saddle bronc rider has
only a thick rein attached to his horses
halter. Using one hand, the cowboy
tries to stay securely seated in his sad-
dle. If he touches any part of the horse
or his own body with his free hand, he
is disqualified.
Judges score the horses bucking
action, the cowboys control of the
horse and the cowboys spurring
action. While striving to keep his toes
turned outward, the rider spurs from
the points of the horses shoulders to
the back of the saddle. To score well,
the rider must maintain that action
throughout the eight-second ride.
While the bucking ability of the horse
is quite naturally built into the scoring
system, a smooth, rhythmic ride is sure
to score better than a wild, uncontrolled
effort.
WEDNESDAY, MAY 9, 2012 PPCLA RODEO PAGE 19
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EVENTS BAREBACK RIDING
B
areback riding is a tough way
to make a living! Its a difficult
event to do correctly, and,
even when you do, you can expect to
be punished.
Most cowboys agree that bareback
riding is the most physically demanding
event in rodeo, taking an immense toll
on the cowboys body. Muscles are
stretched to the limit, joints are pulled
and pounded mercilessly, and liga-
ments are strained and frequently rear-
ranged.
The strength of bareback broncs is
exceptional, and challenging them is
often costly. Bareback riders endure
more abuse, suffer more injuries and
carry away more long-term damage
than all other rodeo cowboys.
To stay aboard the horse, a bare-
back rider uses a rigging made of
leather and constructed to meet PRCA
safety specifications.
The rigging, which resembles a suit-
case handle on a strap, is placed atop
the horses withers and secured with a
cinch.
As the bronc and rider burst from the
chute, the rider has to mark out his
horse. In other words, he must have
both spurs touching the horses shoul-
ders until the horses feet hit the
ground after its initial move from the
chute. If the cowboy fails to do this, he
is disqualified.
As the bronc bucks, the rider pulls
his knees up, dragging his spurs up the
horses shoulders. As the horse
descends, the cowboy straightens his
legs, returning his spurs over the point
of the horses shoulders in anticipation
of the next jump.
But it takes more than sheer
strength to make a qualified ride and
earn a money-winning score.
A bareback rider is judged on his
spurring technique, the degree to
which his toes remain turned out while
he is spurring and his exposure, or
willingness to take whatever might
come during his ride.
Its a tough way to make a living, all
right. But, according to bareback riders,
its the cowboy way.
DAVID MAY/INDEX
WEDNESDAY, MAY 9, 2012 PPCLA RODEO PAGE 20
Palo Pinto General Hospital
400 S.W. 25th Ave Mineral Wells, TX 76067 (940) 325-7891 (800) 442-2811 www.ppgh.com
"Our Family Taking Care of Your Family"
Anesthesiologist
Dr. Kelly Matlock
Cardiology
Dr. Jay Puppala
Emergency Medicine
Dr. Robert Allensworth
Dr. Michael L. Bailey
Dr. Robert Campbell
Dr. John Jones
Family Practice
Dr. Ty Gore
Dr. Sat Gupta
Dr. Patrick Hisel
Dr. Kevin Jones
Dr. Alice Ramsey
Gastroenterology
Dr. S.R. Boya
General Surgery
Dr. Ralph "Trey" Brookshire
Hospitalist
Dr. Earl Clement
Dr. Robin Knight
Dr. George Thomas
Neurology
Dr. Daalon B. Echols
Nurse Practitioners
Vicki Brooks
Sharla Carver
Carla Hay-Perdue
Coleen Hendrix
Susan Potter
OB/GYN
Dr. Glena Davis
Dr. Richard Hoefelmann
Dr. Tim Tarkenton
Ophthalmologist
Dr. Neil Bealka
Orthopedics
Dr. Eric Brock
Dr. Buck Rose
Oncology
Dr. Gregory Friess
Pain Management
Dr. Ved Aggarwal
Dr. R. Herrara
Dr. K. Mitchell
Pediatrics
Dr. Anantha Bhandari
Dr. Tom Tarkenton
Podiatry
Dr. John Lockyer
Dr. Wm Warren
Radiology
Dr. Nanette Evans
Dr. Chuck Myers
Urology
Dr. Deshmukh
Vascular/Thoracic
Dr. Ralph "Trey" Brookshire
Dr. J.P. Reddy
WEDNESDAY, MAY 9, 2012 PPCLA RODEO PAGE 21
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EVENTS CALF ROPING
A
s with saddle bronc riding and
team roping, the roots of calf
roping can be traced back to the
working ranches of the Old West.
When calves were sick or injured,
cowboys had to rope and immobilize
them quickly for veterinary treatment.
Ranch hands prided themselves on the
speed with which they could rope and tie
calves, and they soon turned their work
into informal contests.
As the sport matured, being a good
horseman and a fast sprinter became as
important to the competitive calf roper as
being quick and accurate with a rope.
In modern rodeo, the mounted cow-
boy starts from a box, a three-sided
fenced area adjacent to the chute hold-
ing the calf. The fourth side of the box
opens into the arena. The calf receives a
head start that is determined by the
length of the arena. One end of a break-
away rope barrier is looped around the
calfs neck and stretched across the
open end of the box. When the calf
reaches its advantage point, the barrier
is released. If the roper breaks the barri-
er before the calf reaches its head start,
the cowboy is assessed a 10-second
penalty.
The horse is trained to come to a stop
as soon as the cowboy throws his loop
and catches the calf. The cowboy then
dismounts, sprints to his catch and
throws it by hand, a maneuver called
flanking. If the calf is not standing when
the cowboy reaches it, he must allow the
calf to get back on its feet, then flank it.
After the calf is flanked, the roper ties
any three legs together with a pigging
string a short, looped rope he clenches
in his teeth during the run.
While the contestant is accomplishing
all of that, his horse must pull back hard
enough to eliminate any slack in the
rope, but not so hard as to drag the calf.
When the roper finishes tying the calf,
he throws his hands in the air as a sig-
nal that the run is completed. The roper
then mounts his horse, rides forward to
create slack in the rope, then waits six
seconds to see if the calf remains tied. If
the calf kicks free, the roper receives no
time.
DAVID MAY/INDEX
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WEDNESDAY, MAY 9, 2012 PPCLA RODEO PAGE 23
EVENTS TEAM ROPING
T
eam roping, the only true team
event in professional rodeo,
requires close cooperation and tim-
ing between two highly skilled ropers - a
header and a heeler.
The event originated on ranches when
cowboys needed to treat or brand large
steers and the task proved too difficult for
one man.
The key to success? Hard work and end-
less practice. Team roping partners must
perfect their timing, both as a team and
with their horses.
Similar to calf ropers and steer wrestlers,
team ropers start from the boxes on each
side of the chute from which the steer
enters the arena. The steer gets a head
start determined by the length of the arena.
One end of a breakaway barrier is
attached to the steer then stretched
across the open end of the headers box.
When the steer reaches its advantage
point, the barrier is released and the head-
er takes off in pursuit, with the heeler trail-
ing slightly further behind. If the header
breaks the barrier before the steer com-
pletes its head start, the ropers are
assessed a 10-second penalty. Some
rodeos use heeler barriers, too.
The header ropes first and must make
one of three legal catches on the steer -
around both horns, around one horn and
the head, or around the neck. Any other
catch by the header is considered illegal
and the team is disqualified.
After the header makes his catch, he
turns the steer to the left and exposes the
steers hind legs to the heeler. The heeler
then attempts to rope both hind legs. If he
catches only one foot, the team is
assessed a five-second penalty.
After the cowboys catch the steer, the
clock is stopped when there is no slack in
their ropes and their horses lace one
another.
Another aspect vital to the event is the
type of horses used by the ropers.
The American Quarter Horse is the most
popular among all timed-event competitors,
particularly team ropers.
Heading horses generally are taller and
heavier because they need the power to
turn the steer after it is roped. Heeling
horses are quick and agile, enabling them
to better follow the steer and react to its
moves.
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EVENTS STEER WRESTLING
S
peed and strength are the name
of the game in steer wrestling. In
fact, with a world record sitting at
2.4 seconds, steer wrestling is the quickest
event in rodeo.
The objective of the steer wrestler, or
bulldogger, is to use strength and tech-
nique to wrestle a steer to the ground as
quickly as possible. That sounds simple
enough. But theres a catch: the steer gen-
erally weighs more than twice as much as
the cowboy and, at the time the two come
together, theyre often traveling at 30 miles
per hour.
Speed and precision, the two most
important ingredients in steer wrestling,
make bulldogging one of rodeos most
challenging events.
As with calf ropers and team ropers, the
bulldogger starts on horseback in a box. A
breakaway rope barrier is attached to the
steer, then stretched across the open end
of the box.
The steer gets a head start that is deter-
mined by the size of the arena. When the
steer reaches the advantage point, the
barrier is released and the bulldogger
takes off in pursuit. If the bulldogger
breaks the barrier before the steer reaches
its head start, a 10-second penalty is
assessed.
In addition to strength, two other skills
critical to success in steer wrestling are
timing and balance.
When the cowboy reaches the steer, he
slides down the right side of his galloping
horse, hooks his right arm around the
steers right horn, grasps the left horn with
his left hand and, using strength and lever-
age, slows the animal and wrestles it to
the ground.
His work isnt complete until the steer is
on its side with all four feet pointing the
same direction. But thats still not all there
is to it.
In order to catch the sprinting steer, the
cowboy uses a hazer, another mounted
cowboy who gallops his horse along the
right side of the steer and keeps it from
veering away from the bulldogger.
The efforts of the hazer can be as
important as those of the steer wrestler.
For that reason, and the fact a hazer
sometimes supplies the bulldogger a
horse, the hazer often receives a fourth of
the payoff.
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WEDNESDAY, MAY 9, 2012 PPCLA RODEO PAGE 25
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EVENTS BARREL RACING
S
uccess in barrel racing depends on the skills and training
of both rider and horse, as well as on the quality of the
communication between the rider and her horse.
Contestants compete for the fastest time in running a triangular,
cloverleaf pattern around three barrels. The horse and rider are
allowed a running start and time begins and ends upon crossing a
visible starting line. Touching a barrel is permitted, but a 5-second
penalty is assessed for knocking over a barrel. The pattern can be
started either from the left or right, and contestants who go off the
prescribed course are disqualified.
Barrel racing became popular as an event that would keep
wives, girlfriends and daughters busy and involved when men were
competing in the rough rodeo sports. In some circles, barrel racing
is known as a womans sports. However, many argue that its a
great sport for men, and some male racers have proved that by
winning millions of dollars and numerous trophies in barrel racing.
Women, indeed, have the advantage of being lighter in a sport
where lightning speed is expected. Enthusiasts, though, have no
trouble viewing barrel racing as a manly endeavor.
mineralwellsindex.com
DAVID MAY/INDEX
WEDNESDAY, MAY 9, 2012 PPCLA RODEO PAGE 26
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EVENTS BULL RIDING
I
n the beginning, rodeo competition
was a natural extension of the daily
challenges cowboys confronted on
the ranchroping calves and breaking
broncs to be ridden.
But intentionally climbing on the back of
a 2,000-pound bull? There is nothing nat-
ural about that. Most people, in fact, con-
sider that a fool-hearted act.
The risks are obvious. Serious injury is
always a possibility for those fearless
enough to sit astride an animal that
weighs a ton and is usually equipped with
dangerous horns.
But cowboys do it, fans love it and bull
riding ranks as one of rodeos most popu-
lar events. Bull riding is dangerous and
predictably exciting, demanding intense
physical prowess, supreme mental tough-
ness and courage.
Like bareback and saddle bronc riders,
the bull rider may use only one hand to
stay aboard during the eight-second ride.
If he touches the bull or himself with his
free hand, he receives no score. But
unlike the other roughstock events, bull
riders are not required to mark out their
animals. While spurring a bull can add to
the cowboys score, riders are commonly
judged on their ability to stay aboard the
twisting, bucking mass of muscle.
Balance, flexibility, coordination, quick
reflexes and, perhaps above all, a good
mental attitude are the stuff good bull rid-
ers are made of.
To stay aboard the bull, a rider uses a
flat braided rope, which is wrapped
around the bulls chest just behind the
front legs and over its withers. One end of
the bull rope, called the tail, is threaded
through a loop on the other end and tight-
ened around the bull.
The rider then wraps the tail around his
hand, sometimes weaving it through his
fingers to further secure his grip.
Then he nods his head, the chute gate
swings open and he and the bull explode
into the arena.
Every bull is unique in its bucking hab-
its. A bull may dart to the left, then to the
right, then rear back. Some spin, or con-
tinuously circle in one spot in the arena.
Others add jumps or kicks to their spins,
while others might jump and kick in a
straight line, or move side to side while
bucking.
DAVID MAY/INDEX
WEDNESDAY, MAY 9, 2012 PPCLA RODEO PAGE 27
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EVENTS LOCAL TEAM ROPING
The following have qualied to rope
in the Local Team Roping event of
the 75
th
Annual Mineral Wells PRCA
ProRodeo May 1012. They will
rope for a winners prize of $600
plus a treasured buckle from a
purse of $2,000. Nightly order is
tobedetermined. Here are this
years teams, listed by header then
heeler:
Anthony LuciaGarrett Wright
Corey SmothersDonny
Anderson
Anthony LuciaJustinWalker
Hoss NeatherlinKeith Hall
Larry CoxDonny Anderson
Larry CoxSeth Jones
Corey SmothersGarrett Wright
Larry CoxRyan Peacock
Larry CoxShawn Crockett
Anthony LuciaSeth Jones
Corey SmothersCody Blue
Anthony LuciaDoug Gibbins
Rudy DanleyRyan Peacock
Jared NewmanCody Corey
Casey BrunsonJarrod Goree
DAVID MAY/INDEX DAVID MAY/INDEX
Professional judges officiate every
PRCA rodeo.
Although the PRCA enforces a set of
strict rules to guarantee the humane
treatment of livestock, some of rodeos
detractors say there are too many rode-
os in too many locations
for anyone to effectively
enforce the regulations.
But professional
rodeo has provided a
way to ensure compli-
ance with its rules, no
matter how far away an
event might be from the
PRCA national head-
quarters in Colorado
Springs, Colo.
Professional judges officiate all
PRCA-sanctioned rodeos, and it is their
responsibility to make sure the animals
are treated humanely. Judges who are
aware of animal abuse by any PRCA
member are required to report the viola-
tion to the PRCA infractions department.
Violators may be disqualified on the
spot and fined by the PRCA.
We feel we have backing when we
turn someone in, said judge Larry
Davis. Thats real important.
Davis says the system of having pro-
fessional judges intervene in the few
cases of suspected abuse at rodeos
produces the desired
effect of preventing mis-
treatment of animals.
California stock con-
tractor Cotton Rosser
says judges play an
important role in assuring
the proper treatment of
professional rodeo live-
stock.
We are fortunate to
have the PRCA judges to
uphold and enforce these rules and
make sure the animals are treated fairly.
Contestants need healthy stock, Rosser
said.
Judge George Gibbs emphasizes that
most rodeo livestock are treated well
and cases of abuse are rare. But if he
thinks an animal is being mistreated, he
and his colleagues wont hesitate to
report the violation.
I know I can speak for all the judges,
Gibbs said. We take it seriously; its one
of our responsibilities to see that rodeo
is done humanely.
Mistreatment of animals at PRCA
rodeos is all but non-existent, judges
say.
Basically, I dont see many, if any,
problems in the rodeo business, said
pro official Duane Howard.
Everyone involved in professional
rodeo makes an effort to ensure that the
animals are treated well.
Contestants, stock contractors, arena
workers and even audience members,
as well as the judges, watch for mis-
treatment of animals and are quick to
confront offenders.
The cowboys themselves control
their own destiny, judge Tommy Keith
said. The cowboys watch out for their
own event. If they see a guy starting to
get a little rough with his horse over a
bad run or something, theyll straighten
him out. And were the first ones to hear
about it.
Howard added that such instances
are rare.
Everyones pretty well aware, and
they treat the animals very well, he
said.
WEDNESDAY, MAY 9, 2012 PPCLA RODEO PAGE 28
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Rodeo judging in the hands of professionals
I know I can speak
for all the judges.
We take it serious-
ly; its one of our
responsibilities to
see that rodeo is
done humanely.
As part of its ongoing effort to
ensure appropriate treatment of
animals in rodeo, the
Professional Rodeo Cowboys
Association employs a full-time
animal-welfare coordinator who
oversees internal and public-
education programs. The PRCA
shares and collects information
through membership in the
Animal Welfare Council, the
American Horse Council and the
Horse Industry Alliance.
The PRCAs Humane Advisory
Committee meets twice each
year to discuss pressing animal-
welfare issues, to review rules
and to make recommendations
regarding animal welfare to the
PRCAs board of directors.
Membership of the Humane
Advisory Committee consists of
a large-animal veterinarian, an
attorney, a PRCA stock contrac-
tor, a PRCA board member,
PRCA contestants and other
appropriate interested individu-
als.
Opinions of veterinarians are a
vital part of the PRCAs animal-
welfare program, and the
American Association of Equine
Practitioners, the American
Association of Bovine
Practitioners and the American
Veterinary Medical Association
provide veterinary expertise to
the PRCA. Rules require that all
PRCA sanctioned events provide
on-site veterinarians who allow
the PRCA to gather information
on rodeo livestock and to con-
duct studies that continue to
support the very low rate of inju-
ry to rodeo livestock at PRCA
events.
In addition, the PRCA has
adopted and enforces the follow-
ing rules regarding the treatment
of rodeo animals. They have
been taken directly from the
PRCA Rule Book.
These rules are intended to
ensure the humane treatment of
rodeo animals and shall be in
effect for all PRCA-sanctioned
events. No animal shall be treat-
ed inhumanely by any member.
Some of these rules are:
Animals for all events will be
inspected before the draw, and
no sore, lame, sick or injured ani-
mal or animal with defective eye-
sight shall be permitted in the
draw at any time. Should an ani-
mal become sick or incapacitated
between the time it is drawn and
the time it is scheduled to be
used in competition, that animal
shall not be used in competition
and another animal shall be
drawn for the contestant as pro-
vided in the PRCA Official Rodeo
Rules.
A rodeo committee shall
ensure that a veterinarian is pres-
ent for every performance and
section of slack. Any rodeo com-
mittee failing to do so shall be
subject to a fine of $200 per
rodeo.
Animals removed from the
arena pursuant to this section
shall be placed in a situation as
isolated and comfortable as pos-
sible to reduce stress.
Any injured livestock shall be
humanely removed from the
arena before continuing the
rodeo contest or performance.
No locked rowels, or rowels
that will lock on spurs, may be
used on bareback horses
or saddle broncs. Spurs must
be dulled. Violation of this rule
shall be a Class III offense.
No sharp or cutting objects in
cinch, saddle girth, or flank
straps, shall be permitted. Flank
straps used for horses must be
either sheepskin lined or neo-
prene lined, and shall be of the
quick-release type. Sheepskin-
lined or neoprene lined flank
straps shall be placed on the ani-
mal so the lined portion is over
both flanks of the animal.
In bull riding, a soft cotton
rope at least 5 inches to 8 inches
in diameter is acceptable as a
flank strap and does not require
the sheepskin or neoprene lining.
Standard electric prods shall
be used only when necessary.
Animals shall be touched only on
the hip or shoulder area with a
prod.
Chutes must be constructed
to prevent injury to an animal.
Maintenance personnel and
equipment shall be available at
chutes to assist in removal of
any animal should it become
necessary.
The arena shall be as free
as possible of rock, holes and
unnecessary obstacles.
No small animals or pets
shall be allowed in the arena,
unless part of a contract act.
Livestock must be removed
from the arena after each com-
petition is completed.
In calf roping, a neck rope
must be used. Calves may not
be intentionally flipped back-
ward. Contestant must adjust
rope and reins in such a manner
that will prevent horse from drag-
ging calf. Rope to be removed
from calfs body as soon as pos-
sible after tie is approved.
Roping calves shall be strong
and healthy.
No stimulates or hypnotics
may be given to any animal
used for contest purposes.
Any animal that becomes
excessively excited and lays
down in the chute repeatedly, or
tries repeatedly to jump out of
See RULES, page 30
WEDNESDAY, MAY 9, 2012 PPCLA RODEO PAGE 29
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PPCLA Rodeol
Strict rules govern PRCA rodeo events
WEDNESDAY, MAY 9, 2012 PPCLA RODEO PAGE 30
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RULES from page 29
the chute, or in any way
appears to be in danger of injur-
ing itself, may be released imme-
diately.
No stock shall be confined or
transported in vehicles beyond a
period of 24 hours without being
unloaded, properly fed and
watered. Failure to abide by this
rule shall subject the stock con-
tractor or contestant involved to a
$500 fine for the first offense and
a progressively doubling fine for
any offense thereafter.
If a member abuses an animal
by any unnecessary non-competi-
tive action, he may be disqualified
for the remainder of the rodeo and
fined $250 for the first offense,
with that fine progressively dou-
bling with each offense thereafter.
Judges will immediately inform the
announcer that the contestant has
been disqualified and spectators
will be informed of the disqualifica-
tion due to unnecessary rough-
ness against livestock.
Any member guilty of mis-
treatment of livestock anywhere
on the rodeo grounds shall be
fined $250 for the first offense,
with that fine progressively dou-
bling with any offense thereafter.
No cattle that have been used
may be held over from one calen-
dar year to the next.
No steers may be switched in
events unless approved by the
event representative or the
director of rodeo administration
prior to the time of entry closing.
Fine shall be $100 per head per
competition per event. Cattle
used for steer roping, team rop-
ing, cutting or other events shall
not be used for steer wrestling.
All timed-event stock shall be
run through event chutes and
through the arena prior to start of
contests, where conditions permit.
At all rodeos, fresh calves
shall be tied down no later than
two hours prior to the perfor-
mance or section of slack in
which they are scheduled to be
used. The tie-down shall be
overseen by the judge of that
rodeo and/or the calf roping
event representative or his duly
appointed designee.
An event representative may
declare particular animals unsat-
isfactory. Upon notification,
either written or verbal, the stock
contractor or rodeo committee
shall eliminate such animal(s)
from competition draw.
Continued use of said animal(s)
after notification will result in a
$250 fine per competition levied
against the offending party.
If an animal has been
declared unsatisfactory for an
event, that animal may not be
used for another event without
the approval of the event repre-
sentative.
Stock contractors and the
rodeo committee will be expected
to cooperate in trimming horns of
steers that are not able to pass
through the timed event chute.
Plaster and rebar must be
placed around the horns of steer
roping cattle prior to contesting,
and all such steers should have
horn wraps which extend 4 inch-
es down the jaw from the base of
the horns.
All team roping cattle shall be
protected by horn wraps.
An animal used in the contest
events of a PRCA rodeo may not
be used in any other way until
after the last time that animal
has been used in the contest
events at that rodeo. Failure to
abide by this rule shall result in a
$50 fine per head per competi-
tion levied against the stock con-
tractor or rodeo committee.
All animals in riding events
must have been tried at least
once as a bucking animal before
being put into the draw. Failure
to abide by this will subject stock
WEDNESDAY, MAY 9, 2012 PPCLA RODEO PAGE 31
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STOCK CONTRACTOR: Neal Gay;
general manager, Jim Gay
LOCATION: Terrell, Texas.
BACKGROUND: In 1958, a group of
cowboys, including Neal Gay (father of
eight-time world bull riding champion
Don Gay), Jim Shoulders, Ira Akers,
Bob Grant, Harry Tompkins
and D.J. Gaudin formed the
company. Neal Gay also
founded Mesquite
Championship Rodeo, for-
merly Mesquite Rodeo
Company.
Gay and Shoulders pur-
chased an old auction barn
in 1957, tore it down and
built the Mesquite Rodeo
Arena, which opened in
1958, the $6.5 million Home
of the Mesquite
Championship Rodeo made
its successful debut in 1986
and played host to the 2000
Copenhagen Cup Finale of
the summer Wrangler Pro
Rodeo tour.
In 1999, Gay sold the Mesquite
Championship Rodeo complex and
changed the name of his rodeo compa-
ny to Rafter G. In 2008, Rafter G rodeo
company sent six animals to the
Wrangler National Finals rodeo.
Rafter G rodeo company once again
the Mineral Wells rodeo stock provider
RODEO WEEK
Mayor Mike Allen, left, presents a proclamation to Palo Pinto County Livestock
Association President Ronnie Lee, center, and Publicity Chairman Ken Johnson,
declaring the second week in May 'Pro Rodeo Week' in Mineral Wells. The 75th
annual pro rodeo takes place May 10-12 at the PPCLA arena.
CHRIS AGEE/INDEX
mineralwellsindex.com
WEDNESDAY, MAY 9, 2012 PPCLA RODEO PAGE 32
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