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MALC Configuration Guide MALC 723, MALC 719, and MALC 319

For software version 1.14.1 November 2007 Document Part Number: 830-00990-13

Zhone Technologies @Zhone Way 7001 Oakport Street Oakland, CA 94621 USA 510.777.7000 www.zhone.com info@zhone.com COPYRIGHT 2000-2007 Zhone Technologies, Inc. and its licensors. All rights reserved. This publication is protected by copyright law. No part of this publication may be copied or distributed, transmitted, transcribed, stored in a retrieval system, or translated into any human or computer language in any form or by any means, electronic, mechanical, magnetic, manual or otherwise, or disclosed to third parties without the express written permission from Zhone Technologies, Inc. BAN, GigaMux, MALC, Raptor, SLMS, Z-Edge, Zhone, ZMS, and the Zhone logo are trademarks of Zhone Technologies, Inc. Zhone Technologies makes no representation or warranties with respect to the contents hereof and specifically disclaims any implied warranties of merchantability, noninfringement, or fitness for a particular purpose. Further, Zhone Technologies reserves the right to revise this publication and to make changes from time to time in the contents hereof without obligation of Zhone Technologies to notify any person of such revision or changes.

MALC Configuration Guide

CONTENTS
About This Guide .............................................................................................................................11
Style and notation conventions............................................................................11 Typographical conventions.....................................................................................11 Related documentation...........................................................................................12 Acronyms....................................................................................................................12 Contacting Global Service and Support.............................................................13 Technical support....................................................................................................14 Service requirements...............................................................................................14

Chapter 1

Basic Configuration..............................................................................................15
Configuration overview...........................................................................................15 MALC default configuration ..................................................................................16 Zhone SLMS Web Interface Tool features.............................................................17 Managing the MALC using Zhone Web User Interface ..................................19 Logging into the serial (craft) port.......................................................................20 Configuring a management interface..................................................................22 VLAN management interface .................................................................................22 Uplink card 10/100 BaseT Ethernet interface.........................................................22 ATM management connection................................................................................24 Managing the MALC with ZMS.............................................................................25

Chapter 2

Configuring IP .........................................................................................................27
IP Overview ................................................................................................................27 DNS.........................................................................................................................28 DHCP......................................................................................................................29 RIP ..........................................................................................................................29 IP TOS support ......................................................................................................29 Fields in IP header............................................................................................30 Source address based routing..................................................................................30 Applications ...............................................................................................................31 Routing....................................................................................................................31 Host-based and network-based routing ............................................................32 Host-based routing with DSL bridges.....................................................................34 Host-based routing with DSL routers .....................................................................34

MALC Configuration Guide

Contents

Network-based routing with DSL bridges ..............................................................35 Network-based routing with DSL routers...............................................................36 IP filtering ..............................................................................................................37 Unnumbered IP interfaces.......................................................................................38 IP provisioning procedures ...................................................................................39 Configuring a management IP interface .................................................................39 Configuring host-based routing ..............................................................................41 Configuring network-based routing........................................................................46 Configuring RIP .....................................................................................................49 Configuring static routes.........................................................................................50 Adding routes ...................................................................................................50 Configuring the device as a DHCP server ..............................................................51 DHCP server profiles and scope ......................................................................51 Setting DHCP server options ...........................................................................52 Creating DHCP server subnet options..............................................................54 Enabling a DHCP server ..................................................................................56 DHCP relay.............................................................................................................57 TOS/COS processing ..............................................................................................59 802.1p priority queues......................................................................................60 Fields in IP header............................................................................................60 Fields in the VLAN header ..............................................................................60 TOS/COS parameters .......................................................................................61 Advanced IP provisioning procedures ....................................................................62 Advanced DHCP applications..........................................................................62 Configuring DNS resolver................................................................................64 Configuring IP filters........................................................................................66 IP Service Level Agreement (IPSLA)..............................................................69 IP fallback route......................................................................................................78 Configuring the MALC for IP video......................................................................82 IP administrative procedures ................................................................................86 Modifying profiles created by host/interface add commands.................................87 Displaying hosts......................................................................................................89 Displaying interfaces ..............................................................................................90 Displaying routing information...............................................................................90 Displaying the routing table .............................................................................90 Displaying RIP information .............................................................................90 Deleting hosts..........................................................................................................91 Deleting interfaces ..................................................................................................91 Deleting routes ........................................................................................................91 DHCP logging.........................................................................................................92 Understanding DHCP server log messages......................................................92 IP statistics commands............................................................................................94

Chapter 3

Configuring Bridging ...........................................................................................95


Overview .....................................................................................................................95 Bridge default settings for asymmetric bridges ..............................................99

MALC Configuration Guide

Bridge default settings for symmetric bridges...............................................100 Bridge enhancements to flood unknowns and multicasts .........................101 FloodUnknown parameter ....................................................................................101 FloodMulticast parameter .....................................................................................102 Broadcasts and bridging ......................................................................................103 TLS Bridging behavior for untagged, tagged, and s-tagged ......................103 VLANs ........................................................................................................................105 Q-in-Q.........................................................................................................................110 Configuring Q-in-Q using the Interface command...............................................111 Configuring Q-in-Q using the Bridge command ..................................................112 Bridge path enhancements..............................................................................114 Untagged bridging..................................................................................................114 Ethernet RPR ...........................................................................................................116 Overview...............................................................................................................116 RPR ring topology..........................................................................................117 RPR ring topology with redundant GigE cards..............................................119 RPR ring topology with redundant GigE cards and subtended MALCs........121 RPR configuration ................................................................................................123 Linear GigaBit Ethernet ........................................................................................132 GigE-2 Uplink card redundant configuration in linear topology..........................134 GigE-2 card bridging ............................................................................................135 PPPoA - PPPoE Conversion ................................................................................137 PPPoE Intermediate Agent...................................................................................140 Advanced bridging configurations ....................................................................142 Packet-rule records (Option 82, Forbid OUI, DHCP relay, PPPoE vendor tag) .143 Tagged bridgeVLANs.......................................................................................145 Broadcast suppression...........................................................................................146 Bridge with DHCP relay.......................................................................................147 Administrative commands ...................................................................................149 Bridge delete command ........................................................................................149 Bridge show/showall commands ..........................................................................149 Bridge stats............................................................................................................150 COS in bridges ........................................................................................................150 Bridge profile ........................................................................................................150 Video bridging ......................................................................................................152 Verifying bridge settings ................................................................................154

Chapter 4

Configuring ATM ..................................................................................................157


Configuration overview.........................................................................................157 Overview ...................................................................................................................158 VPI/VCI ranges.........................................................................................................158 Changing VPI/VCI ranges ....................................................................................158 Configuration overview ........................................................................................159

MALC Configuration Guide

Contents

Configuring PCR and SCR values......................................................................160 Creating traffic descriptors..................................................................................163 Creating VCLs and VPLs ......................................................................................166 Creating cross connects.........................................................................................170 Subtending ............................................................................................................172

Chapter 5

Configuring GR-303 or V5.2 Interface Groups ........................................177


Configuring a GR-303 interface .........................................................................177 Modifying a GR-303 interface group ...................................................................182 Displaying GR303 interface group status .............................................................183 Configuring a V5.2 interface ................................................................................183 Creating a V5.2 interface group............................................................................187 Finding the line group identifiers of the physical connection...............................188 Provisioning V5.2 links ........................................................................................189 Adding C-channels within links............................................................................190 Provisioning C-paths.............................................................................................192 Activating the V5.2 IG..........................................................................................194 Modifying the v52-interface-group profile...........................................................194 Displaying V5.2 interface group status.................................................................195

Chapter 6

Configuring Voice ...............................................................................................197


Overview ...................................................................................................................197 Updating system settings ....................................................................................198 Setting a-law or mu-law and DSP settings ...........................................................198 Checking bandwidth before accepting a voice call (AAL2).................................199 Creating voice connections.................................................................................200 DS1 voice gateway connections ...........................................................................200 Voice over IP (VoIP) connections ........................................................................203 SIP server configuration ................................................................................206 MGCP configuration ......................................................................................209 Additional VoIP features................................................................................215 AAL2 connections ................................................................................................228 DS1 to POTS connections ....................................................................................230 Configuring CES connections ............................................................................233 Creating CES connections ....................................................................................234 CES signaling .................................................................................................234 CES clocking..................................................................................................235 CES configuration.................................................................................................236 Additional voice features......................................................................................249 Setting ring cadence and call progress parameters ...............................................252 Call progress tones for Canada .............................................................................255 Emergency StandAlone (ESA) SIP and TDM support .................................256 Configuring VoIP ESA clusters............................................................................258 Configuring ESA for 911 calls .............................................................................260

MALC Configuration Guide

Verifying ESA ......................................................................................................261 Configuring TDM ESA.........................................................................................261 T.38 fax ......................................................................................................................263 T.38 fax using SIP.................................................................................................263 T.38 fax using SIP PLAR to PSTN ......................................................................265 T.38 using SIP PLAR to POTS fax ......................................................................266

Chapter 7

Configuring the Voice Gateway.....................................................................269


Overview ...................................................................................................................269 Configuring voice gateway connections .........................................................270 VoIP to voice gateway connections......................................................................272 Overview ........................................................................................................272 Deleting voice gateway host and voice connection........................................277 Deleting voice connection ..............................................................................277 Subtended MALC POTS VoIP voice gateway connections.................................277 Overview ........................................................................................................278 Deleting subtended voice connection ............................................................279 AAL2 voice gateway connections ........................................................................280 Overview ........................................................................................................280 Deleting voice connection ....................................................................................289 Subtended MALC ISDN or POTS voice gateway connections............................290 Configuring subtended AAL2 voice connection ...........................................291 POTS cards running POTS to VoIP in same chassis as voicegateway card

293 Voicegateway configuration .................................................................................293 POTS to VOIP connections ..................................................................................296 Configuring SIP-PRI media gateway .................................................................297 About the VoIP Endpoint......................................................................................299 ISDN Signaling profile .........................................................................................300 SIP trunks..............................................................................................................300 Hardware requirements ........................................................................................300

Chapter 8

Configuring GPON Data,Voice, and Video ...............................................307


GPON configuration...............................................................................................307

Chapter 9

Diagnostics and Administration ...................................................................309


Logging .....................................................................................................................309 Overview...............................................................................................................309 Enabling/disabling logging ...................................................................................310 Log message format..............................................................................................310 Modifying logging levels......................................................................................312 Using the log cache...............................................................................................313 Examples ........................................................................................................313 Viewing the persistent logs...................................................................................314

MALC Configuration Guide

Contents

Sending messages to a syslog server ....................................................................314 Specifying different log formats for system and syslog messages .......................316 Example log messages ..........................................................................................318 DSL line down message .................................................................................318 Slot card up message ......................................................................................318 Log filter command...............................................................................................318 SNMP..........................................................................................................................319 Creating SNMP community names and access lists .............................................320 Creating a community profile.........................................................................320 Creating community access lists ....................................................................320 Configuring traps ..................................................................................................321 Statistics and alarms .............................................................................................322 Bulk statistics ........................................................................................................322 Bulk statistics file format ...............................................................................323 IF-Name in bulk stats (32 character limit) .....................................................326 Alarm manager......................................................................................................327 Supported alarms............................................................................................328 ADSL low power alarm ........................................................................................335 Alarm suppression ................................................................................................336 System maintenance .............................................................................................337 MALC file system.................................................................................................338 Accessing the flash card .................................................................................338 Using the ata command ..................................................................................339 Using the image command .............................................................................339 Changing the serial craft port settings ..................................................................339 Deleting card profiles............................................................................................340 Manually binding interfaces .................................................................................341 Renaming interfaces..............................................................................................342 Saving and restoring configurations .....................................................................343 SNTP ..............................................................................................................344 User accounts ........................................................................................................344 Adding users...................................................................................................344 Changing default user passwords ...................................................................345 Deleting users .................................................................................................345 Deleting the admin user account ....................................................................346 Resetting passwords .......................................................................................346 Radius support ......................................................................................................347 Viewing chassis and slot information ...................................................................350 Controlling Telnet access......................................................................................352 TFTP server support .............................................................................................353 Testing.......................................................................................................................353 Activating or deactivating interfaces ....................................................................353 BER tests...............................................................................................................354 IMA test pattern procedure ...................................................................................356 Loopbacks .............................................................................................................360 T1 loopbacks ..................................................................................................360 SONET loopbacks..........................................................................................362 DS3 loopbacks................................................................................................363

MALC Configuration Guide

ISDN loopbacks .............................................................................................365 Viewing IMA group status....................................................................................366

Appendix 10MALC ATM Overview .........................................................................................369


ATM overview ..........................................................................................................369 ATM data ...................................................................................................................370 ATM voice .................................................................................................................370 ATM Video ................................................................................................................371 Cross connects .......................................................................................................371 Early packet discard (EPD) and partial packet discard (PPD)....................372 Usage parameter control (UPC)..........................................................................372 ATM validation.........................................................................................................372 VPI and VCI ranges ................................................................................................373 Virtual channel and virtual path links ...............................................................374 Service categories..................................................................................................375 Constant bit rate (CBR) ........................................................................................375 Non-real-time variable bit rate (nrt-VBR) ............................................................375 Real-time variable bit rate (rt-VBR) .....................................................................376 Unspecified bit rate (UBR) ...................................................................................376 Traffic descriptors ..................................................................................................376 Configuring PCR and SCR ...................................................................................376 Traffic descriptor parameters................................................................................377 Traffic descriptor configuration rules ...................................................................379 Connection admission control (CAC) ...............................................................379 CAC oversubscription...........................................................................................380 Bandwidth allocation for ATM cards ...................................................................380 Example CAC calculation.....................................................................................382 ATM traffic policing................................................................................................382 Enforcing SCR and MBS......................................................................................382 Enforcing PCR and CDVT ...................................................................................383 General policing rules ...........................................................................................383 Traffic shaping ........................................................................................................383 Shaping for non-ADSL2+ cards with GigE uplinks .............................................386 Traffic shaping for 1.13.x and higher mixed IP and ATM networks ...................387 ATM statistics ..........................................................................................................387

Index ....................................................................................................................................................389

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Contents

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MALC Configuration Guide

ABOUT THIS GUIDE

This guide is intended for use by technicians, system administrators, network administrators. It explains how to configure the MALC software features. For information on installing the MALC chassis and cards, refer to the MALC Hardware Instlallation Guide.

Style and notation conventions


The following conventions are used in this document to alert users to information that is instructional, warns of potential damage to system equipment or data, and warns of potential injury or death. Carefully read and follow the instructions included in this document. Caution: A caution alerts users to conditions or actions that could damage equipment or data. Note: A note provides important supplemental or amplified information. Tip: A tip provides additional information that enables users to more readily complete their tasks. WARNING! A warning alerts users to conditions or actions that could lead to injury or death. WARNING! A warning with this icon alerts users to conditions or actions that could lead to injury caused by a laser.

Typographical conventions
The following typographical styles are used in this guide to represent specific types of information.

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About This Guide

Bold

Used for names of buttons, dialog boxes, icons, menus, profiles when placed in body text, and property pages (or sheets). Also used for commands, options, parameters in body text, and user input in body text. Used in code examples for computer output, file names, path names, and the contents of online files or directories. Used in code examples for text typed by users. Used in code examples for variable text typed by users. Used for book titles, chapter titles, file path names, notes in body text requiring special attention, section titles, emphasized terms, and variables. Used for environment variables. Brackets [ ] indicate optional syntax. Vertical bar | indicates the OR symbol.

Fixed Fixed Bold Fixed Bold Italic Italic

PLAIN UPPER CASE Command Syntax

Related documentation
Refer to the following publication for additional information: MALC Hardware Installation Guideexplains how to install the chassis and cards, and configure hardware interfaces. Zhone CLI Reference Guideexplains how to use the Zhone command line interface (CLI) and describes the system commands and parameters. Refer to the release notes for software installation information and for changes in features and functionality of the product (if any).

Acronyms
The following acronyms are related to Zhone products and may appear throughout this manual:
Table 1: Acronyms and their descriptions Acronym Description

ADSL ARP ATM BAN

Asymmetrical digital subscriber line Address resolution protocol Asynchronous Transfer Mode Broadband Access Node

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MALC Configuration Guide

Contacting Global Service and Support

Table 1: Acronyms and their descriptions Acronym Description

CID DSL EFM SHDSL IAD MALC MIB MTAC MTAC-FC PBX POTS RIP SDSL SHDSL SLMS SNMP TFTP VCI VCL VPI ZMS

Channel identifier Digital subscriber line Ethernet in the First Mile Symmetric high-bit-rate digital subscriber line Integrated access device Multi-access line concentrator Management information bases Metallic Test Access Card Metallic Test Access Card with fan controller Private branch exchange Plain old telephone service Routing Information Protocol Symmetric digital subscriber line Symmetric high-bit-rate digital subscriber line Single Line Multi-Service Simple Network Management Protocol Trivial File Transfer Protocol Virtual channel identifier Virtual channel link Virtual path identifier Zhone Management System

Contacting Global Service and Support


Contact Global Service and Support (GSS) if you have any questions about this or other Zhone products. Before contacting GSS, make sure you have the following information:

Zhone product you are using System configuration Software version running on the system Description of the issue

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About This Guide

Technical support
If you require assistance with the installation or operation of your product, or if you want to return a product for repair under warranty, contact GSS. The contact information is as follows:
E-mail Telephone (North America) Telephone (International) Internet support@zhone.com 877-ZHONE20 510-777-7133 www.zhone.com/support

If you purchased the product from an authorized dealer, distributor, Value Added Reseller (VAR), or third party, contact that supplier for technical assistance and warranty support.

Service requirements
If the product malfunctions, all repairs must be performed by the manufacturer or a Zhone-authorized agent. It is the responsibility of users requiring service to report the need for service to GSS.

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MALC Configuration Guide

BASIC CONFIGURATION
This chapter describes how to perform the basic configuration of the MALC, including how to modify the default settings for the Uplink cards and how to enable slot cards. It includes the following sections:

Configuration overview, page 15 Logging into the serial (craft) port, page 20 Configuring a management interface, page 22

Configuration overview
Note: For redundant systems, you must configure the physical interfaces on both the active and standby cards. In addition, you must manually keep the configuration of the physical interfaces on the active and standby cards in sync. The following table describes where to find the information you need to configure the MALC.
Feature See

ADSL ATM cross connects ATM data ATM traffic descriptors ATM VCLs and VPLs Bridging Clocking DS3/E3 Uplink card Ethernet interface GigaBit Ethernet GR-303

The MALC Hardware Installation Guide. Creating cross connects on page 170. MALC ATM Overview on page 369 and Configuring ATM on page 157 Creating traffic descriptors on page 163. Creating VCLs and VPLs on page 166. Configuring IP on page 27 The MALC Hardware Installation Guide. The MALC Hardware Installation Guide. The MALC Hardware Installation Guide. The MALC Hardware Installation Guide. Configuring GR-303 or V5.2 Interface Groups on page 177

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Basic Configuration

Feature

See

IMA groups IP IP video Linear GigaBit Ethernet Management interface MTAC/Ring card OC-3c/STM1 PON POTS RPR SHDSL card Slot cards SNMP Subtending T1/E1 CES T1/E1 IMA and TDM Uplink cards V5.2 interface groups VDSL VLANs Voice

The MALC Hardware Installation Guide. Configuring IP on page 27. Configuring the MALC for IP video on page 82. Linear GigaBit Ethernet on page 132 Configuring a management interface on page 22. The MALC Hardware Installation Guide. The MALC Hardware Installation Guide. The MALC Hardware Installation Guide. The MALC Hardware Installation Guide. Ethernet RPR on page 116. The MALC Hardware Installation Guide. The MALC Hardware Installation Guide. SNMP on page 319. Subtending on page 172. Configuring CES connections on page 233. The MALC Hardware Installation Guide. Configuring a V5.2 interface on page 183. The MALC Hardware Installation Guide. VLANs on page 105. Configuring Voice on page 197.

MALC default configuration


This default configuration of the MALC is as follows:

Administrative user name is admin, password is zhone. Slot cards (except the Uplink card) must be enabled in a card-profile before they will boot up. A single record for the Ethernet interface on the Uplink card exists. No other profiles to configure physical interfaces exist. A default system profile 0 exists with the following configuration: Authentication traps are not enabled ZMS communication is not configured

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MALC Configuration Guide

Configuration overview

Alarm notification and output is enabled for all severity levels

Zhone SLMS Web Interface Tool features


The MALC enables Web-based configuration using the Zhone SLMS Web Interface Tool. The Zhone SLMS Web Interface Tool supports Malc723, Malc719, Malc319 configuration and management using the following cards for 1.13.2 and earlier features: MALC uplink cards:

MALC-UPLINK-2-GE cards MALC-UPLINK-2-FE/GE cards

MALC downlink cards: ADSL cards MALC-ADSL-32A (single-slot AC6 ADSL) MALC-ADSL-48B (single slot ADSL Annex B) MALC-ADSL-48A (single slot ADSL Annex A) MALC-ADSL+POTS-TDM-48A-2S (two slot ADSL Annex A with TDM POTS) MALC-ADSL+POTS-TDM/PKT-48A-2S (two slot ADSL Annex A with TDM POTS and packet voice support) MALC-ADSL-48A/M MALC-ADSL+POTS-TDM-48A/M-2S (two slot ADSL Annex A with TDM POTS) MALC-ADSL+POTS-PKT-48A/M-2S (two slot ADSL Annex A with TDM POTS and packet voice support) MALC-ADSL+POTS-TDM-48-2S (two slot ADSL with TDM POTS) MALC-ADSL+SPLTR-48A/M-2S (two slot ADSL Annex A/M with splitter)

DS3/E3 cards MALC-DS3/E3-4 * No port provisioning GPON cards MALC-GPON-SC1 G.SHDLS cards MALC-G.SHDSL-4W-12 MALC-G.SHDSL-24 MALC-SHDSL-48

ISDN cards

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Basic Configuration

MALC-ISDN2B1Q-24 * No port provisioning

MTAC cards MALC-MTAC/RING-ENH MALC-MTAC/RING-FC (MALC 319 only) MALC-MTAC/RING

POTS cards MALC-POTS-GBL-TDM/PKT-24 MALC-POTS-TDM/PKT-48 (single slot with POTS TDM and packet voice support) MALC-POTS-TDM-48 (single slot with POTS TDM voice support)

POTS cards MALC-POTS-GBL-TDM/PKT-24 MALC-POTS-TDM/PKT-48 (single slot with POTS TDM and packet voice support) MALC-POTS-TDM-48 (single slot with POTS TDM voice support)

T1/E1 cards MALC-T1/E1-ATM-32 MALC-T1/E1-CES-12 * No Add card or provisioning MALC-EFM-T1/E1-24 * No Add card or provisioning

Voicegateway cards MALC-VG-T1/E1-32-2S MALC-VG-T1/E1-8-2S

Features not currently supported in the Web Interface Tool:

Voice connection through uplink RPR ports. GR303 voice connection through uplink RPR ports. Only GR303-VG allowed. V5.2 interface, voice provisioning, and connection table support. VoIP to V5.2 provisioning. ISDN port provisioning. ISDN voice provisioning and connection table. ATM T1 IMA provisioning.

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MALC Configuration Guide

Configuration overview

AAL2 support.

Managing the MALC using Zhone Web User Interface


To manage the MALC using the Zhone Web User Interface:

Add an IP address to the interface to be used for management. On the MALC-UPLINK-2-GE uplink or MALC-UPLINK-2-FE/FE uplink cards, the interface on the 10/100 Ethernet port or GigE ports can be used. Ensure that the IP address is in the same subnet as the client devices and is reachable through Telnet. This example adds an IP interface for 172.24.94.103 to the 10/100 Ethernet port using VLAN 94.

zSH> interface add 1-1-1-0/ethernetcsamcd vlan 94 172.24.94.103/24 Created ip-interface-record ethernet1-94/ip

Configure a default route to the IP interface. The default route enables connectivity to the IP interface.

zSH> route add default 94 172.24.94.103 metric 1

Note: A cross-over cable is required to manage the MALC from the 10/100 or GigE port. To launch the Zhone Web User Interface, in a browser URL address space on a PC with connectivity to the MALC, enter the IP address configured on the MALC. The Zhone Web User Interface launches and displays the Login window for the MALC.

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Basic Configuration

Figure 1: Zhone Web User Interface Login Screen

On the Login page, enter the user name and password. The default user name is admin and the default password is zhone. Click the desired menu to display the management options. For online help, click the Help icon or product title in any window.

Note: The del command can be used to delete all of the Zhone Web User Interface files if needed.

Logging into the serial (craft) port


Note: Do not use the serial craft port of a standby card to modify its configuration. The MALC unit provides an out-of-band RS232 D serial (craft) interface for managing the unit. To access the serial port, configure your terminal interface software with the following settings:

9600bps

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MALC Configuration Guide

Logging into the serial (craft) port

8 data bits No parity 1 stop bit No flow control Tip: The serial (craft) port settings can be changed by modifying the rs232-profile.

You must perform the initial configuration of the system using the serial (craft) interface. After you have completed the initial configuration, you can manage the MALC unit over the network through a telnet session over the Ethernet interface or over the management Permanent Virtual Circuit (PVC). Note: The MALC supports 6 concurrent management sessions, 5 telnet sessions and a single local session through the serial (craft) port.

Logging in and out of the system


Log into the system (the default user name is admin, the default password is zhone):
login:admin password: zSH>

To log out of the system, enter the logout command:


zSh> logout

Tip: The system automatically logs you out after a period of inactivity. The default logout time is 10 minutes, but can be changed with the timeout command. Refer to Zhone CLI Reference Guide for information on the timeout command.

Enabling and disabling logging


By default logging is enabled on the serial craft port and disabled over telnet sessions. To enable or disable logging for the session, using the following command:
zSh> log session on | off

The log session command only applies to the current session. You can also enable or disable logging for all serial craft port sessions using the following command:
zSh> log serial on | off

This command setting persists across system reboots.

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Basic Configuration

Configuring a management interface


This section describes how to configure the following interfaces to remotely manage the MALC:

VLAN management interface on page 22 Uplink card 10/100 BaseT Ethernet interface on page 22 ATM management connection on page 24 Managing the MALC with ZMS on page 25 Note: Ethernet interfaces can be addressed as either eth or ethernetcsmacd. The eth abbreviation is used in command output.

VLAN management interface


To create a management interface over the first GigE port, use the interface add command and specify a VLAN:
zSH> interface add 1-1-2-0/ethernetcsmacd vlan 99 10.10.10.1/24 Created ip-interface-record ethernet1-99/ip

Uplink card 10/100 BaseT Ethernet interface


The MALC has a 10/100 BaseT Ethernet interface on the Uplink card. The ip-interface-record for the Uplink card is named ethernet1. This interface is shared between the two Ethernet ports on redundant Uplink cards (if they exist). The system can be reached using the address configured in the ethernet1 ip-interface-record, no matter which card is active. Caution: The Uplink card Ethernet interface must be configured before any other interfaces on the system, even if you do not intend to manage the unit over the Ethernet.

Configuring the Ethernet IP interface


The following example configures the IP address for the system:
zSH> interface add 1-1-1-0/ethernetcsmacd static 192.168.8.21 255.255.255.0 Created ip-interface-record ethernet1/ip

Note: If you have problems with IP interfaces not automatically binding, refer to for more information.

Verifying the interface


Use the interface show command to verify that the Ethernet interface was configured correctly:

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MALC Configuration Guide

Configuring a management interface

zSH> interface show Interface Status Rd/Address Media/Dest Address IfName --------------------------------------------------------------------------1/1/1/0/ip UP 1 192.168.8.21/24 00:01:47:65:02:f2 1-1-1-0

Creating a default route


The following example creates a default route using the gateway 192.168.8.1 with a cost of 1 (one):
route add default 192.168.8.1 1

Verifying the route


Use the route show command to verify that the routes were added:
zSH> route show Dest Nexthop Cost Owner -----------------------------------------------------------0.0.0.0/0 192.168.8.1 1 STATICLOW 192.168.8.0/24 1/1/1/0/ip 1 LOCAL

Use the ping command to verify connectivity to the default gateway:


zSH> ping 192.168.8.1 PING 192.168.8.1: 64 data bytes !!!!! ----192.168.8.1 PING Statistics---5 packets transmitted, 5 packets received round-trip (ms) min/avg/max = 0/0/0

To stop the ping, press CTRL+C.

Adding a route to the remote LAN


After creating the IP interface, you might need to create a route to the remote devices LAN interface using the route add command. The command uses the following syntax:
route add destination mask next-hop cost

For example, in the following configuration, add a route to the 192.168.10.0 network using the MALC Uplink interface as the gateway.

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Basic Configuration

Figure 2: Adding a remote route to LAN

ATM

192.168.8.21

192.168.8.1 192.168.10.0

route add 192.168.10.0 255.255.255.0 192.168.8.1 1

ATM management connection


The MALC can terminate an ATM PVC and route it over an Ethernet interface for management traffic. The following table summarizes the configuration tasks for creating an ATM management connection.
Task Command

Create a traffic descriptor. See Creating the ATM traffic descriptor on page 24. Create the VCL. See Creating the ATM management VCL on page 25.

new atm-traf-descr index Multiple connections can use the same traffic descriptors and a single VCL must use the same traffic descriptor for both transmit and receive. interface add interface/atm vc vpi/vci td td_index static IpAddress Netmask This command creates the ATM VCL and the IP interface for the management PVC.

Add a route to the Ethernet interface. See Adding a default route to the ATM network on page 25.

route add destination netmask nexthop cost This enables the MALC to route from the IP management interface to the Ethernet interface

Creating the ATM traffic descriptor


Create a new atm-traf-descr profile and specify a unique index:
zSH> new atm-traf-descr 200 Please provide the following: [q]uit. td_type: ------------- {atmNoClpNoScr}: enter traffic descriptor type td_param1: ----------- {0}: enter PCR td_param2: ----------- {0}: enter PCR (for CLP=0 traffic) or SCR td_param3: ----------- {0}: enter MBS td_param4: ----------- {0}: enter CDVT td_param5: ----------- {0}: cac-divider: -------------> {1}: td_service_category: - {ubr}: rtvbr | nrtvbr | ubr | cbr td_frame_discard: --------> {false}: usage-parameter-control: -> {true}:

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Configuring a management interface

.................... Save new record? [s]ave, [c]hange or [q]uit: s New record saved.

Creating the ATM management VCL


The following example configures an ATM connection with a VPI/VCI of 0/35 that uses the atm-traf-descr profile you just configured (with an index of 200). The VCL uses the Uplink interface:
zSH> interface add uplink1/atm vc 0/35 td 200 static 192.168.1.1 255.255.255.0 Created ip-interface-record uplink1-0-35/ip

This command creates the ip-interface-record and the associated VCL:


zSH> list ip-interface-record ip-interface-record ethernet1/ip ip-interface-record uplink1-0-35/ip 2 entries found. zSH> list atm-vcl atm-vcl uplink1/atm/0/35 1 entry found.

Adding a default route to the ATM network


After adding the IP interface for management, create a default route to the ATM network:
route add default 192.168.1.254 1

Verifying the interface


Use the interface show command to verify that the interfaces are active:
zSH> interface show Interface Status Rd/Address Media/Dest Address IfName --------------------------------------------------------------------------------1/1/1/0/ip UP 1 192.168.8.21/24 08:00:3e:03:02:01 1-1-1-0 1/1/2/0/ip UP 1 192.168.1.1/24 0/35 uplink1-0-35 --------------------------------------------------------------------------------2 interfaces

Managing the MALC with ZMS


Note: For details on using ZMS, refer to the ZMS Administrator's Guide and the NetHorizhon User's Guide. The system profile contains parameters that configure the system contact information for the MALC and connection information for the ZMS. This profile does not need to be modified in order to manage the MALC with ZMS.

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Basic Configuration

CLI provisioning and ZMS


Making a change to the device configuration CLI configuration of a device being managed by the ZMS is disabled by default. Attempting to configure the device results in an error: If you plan to use a script to provision the device from the CLI while it is being managed by the ZMS: 1 Update the system profile to disable partial config syncs to ZMS:

zSH> update system 0 Please provide the following: [q]uit. syscontact: ----------> {Zhone Global Services and Support 7001 Oakport Road Oakland Ca. (877) Zhone20 (946-6320) Fax (510)777-7113 support@zhone.com}: sysname: -------------> {Zhone MALC}: syslocation: ---------> {Oakland}: enableauthtraps: -----> {disabled}: setserialno: ---------> {0}: zmsexists: -----------> {true}: false zmsconnectionstatus: -> {inactive}: zmsipaddress: --------> {192.168.210.28}: configsyncexists: ----> {false}: configsyncoverflow: --> {false}: configsyncpriority: --> {high}: configsyncaction: ----> {noaction}: configsyncfilename: --> {192.168.8.21_4_1014067321329}: configsyncstatus: ----> {synccomplete}: configsyncuser: ------> {cfgsync}: configsyncpasswd: ----> {}: ** private ** numshelves: ----------> {1}: shelvesarray: --------> {}: numcards: ------------> {3}: ipaddress: -----------> {192.168.8.21}: alternateipaddress: --> {0.0.0.0}: countryregion: -------> {us}: primaryclocksource: --> {0/0/0/0/0}: ringsource: ----------> {internalringsourcelabel}: revertiveclocksource: -> {true} voicebandwidthcheck: --> {false} .................... Save changes? [s]ave, [c]hange or [q]uit: s Record updated.

After the provisioning is complete, perform a full config sync from ZMS.

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CONFIGURING IP
This chapter explains IP services on the MALC. It includes the following sections:

IP Overview, page 27 Applications, page 31 IP provisioning procedures, page 39 Advanced IP provisioning procedures, page 62 Configuring the MALC for IP video, page 82 IP administrative procedures, page 86

IP Overview
The MALC provides the following IP services:

IP forwarding and routingincoming packets from an interface are forwarded to the appropriate output interface using the routing table rules. DHCP servers to simplify user IP address configuration. IP filtering. IP filtering is typically performed to enhance network security by limiting access between two networks. Numbered or unnumbered (floating) interfaces Telnet client IP TOS Source address based routing IP redundancy

The following MALC interfaces support IP traffic: One Ethernet interface on the Uplink card for management traffic or subscriber traffic. The ATM/IP Uplink cards are required for IP services on MALC. The ATM/IP Uplink card terminates the IP traffic. DSL interfaces. IP on DSL runs over ATM PVCs using RFC 1483 encapsulation.

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Note: IP features may not be supported on your device. Contact GSS about enabling IP features. The Internet protocol (IP) allows devices to communicate over interconnected networks. IP is a layer 3 protocol in the seven-layer Open Systems Interconnection (OSI) model. Layer 3, or network layer, handles the delivery of data packets from source to destination. Any device connected to a network is considered a host or a node on that network. Zhone devices with IP capability can act as routers to accept network traffic and forward it on to host destinations based on IP addressing. To get from source to destination, the IP packet passes through many nodes, or hops, along the way. All routers maintain routing tables of the sequence of hops taken from source to destination. The routing table is used by the router to direct datagrams most efficiently. The routing table information is also shared with other routers on the same network.
Figure 3: IP stacking on Zhone devices

IP

Layer 3 IP Layer 2 ETHERNET SAR TWISTED PAIR RFC1 483 DSL ATM CC SAR ETHERNET Layer 1 CATEGORY 5 CABLE

The following IP protocols are supported on the MALC.

DNS
Domain Name System (DNS) maps domain names to IP addresses, enabling the system to reach destinations when it knows only the domain name of the destination.

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IP Overview

DHCP
The Dynamic Host Control Protocol (DHCP) provides a mechanism through which client computers using TCP/IP can obtain configuration parameters (such as the default router and the DNS server, subnet mask, gateway address, and lease time) from a DHCP server. The most important configuration parameter carried by DHCP is the IP address. As a DHCP server, MALC can assign temporary (leased) IP addresses to client PCs. Each DHCP client PC sends a request to the MALC for an IP address lease. The MALC then assigns an IP address and lease time to the client PC. The MALC keeps track of a range of assignable IP addresses from a subnetwork. Some customers prefer to have the same IP address every time their DHCP lease renews. This is known as sticky IP addresses. By default, the MALC attempts to assign the same IP address to the same client on DHCP lease renewal. With shared DHCP pools (or subnet groups), DHCP servers are not linked to physical interfaces. Customers can easily configure an arbitrary number of DHCP pools. Zhone devices can assign blocks of IP addresses specifically for certain customers.

RIP
Routing Information Protocol (RIP), an interior gateway protocol (IGP), is widely used for routing traffic on the Internet. RIP performs routing within a single autonomous system. It is based on distance-vector algorithms that measure the shortest path between two points on a network. The shortest path is determined by the number of hops between those points. RIP routers maintain only the best route (the route with the lowest metric value) to a destination. After updating its routing table, the router immediately begins transmitting routing updates to inform other network routers of the shortest route. Routing Information Protocol version 2 (RIPv2) is the latest enhancement to RIP. RIPv2 allows more information to be included in RIP packets and provides an authentication mechanism.

IP TOS support
The MALC now supports IP QOS. This service enables you to assign a service level or type of service (TOS) to an IP interface. The configured TOS level specifies the packet priority and queueing methods used to transport the packet through the IP network. The MALC originates and preserves the TOS settings to ensure these settings are passed to other IP devices in the network.

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Fields in IP header
IP packets have a TOS byte in their headers that contains information about relative priority. The TOS byte is divided into two fields called IP Precedence and TOS. The IP Precedence field contains a 3-bit priority designation. Most normal traffic has an IP Precedence value of zero. Higher values in this field indicate that traffic is more important and that it requires special treatment. IP Precedence values greater than 5 are reserved for network functions. The TOS field indicates the queueing priority or Class of Service (COS) value based on eight (0-7) levels of service. This field contains information about how the traffic should be forwarded. The MALC supports basic TOS marking without queue servicing options in the ip-interface-record profile. Packets marked based on a configurable profile to let the system know which bits use which queue. Note: TOS bits are not altered for VoIP Real Time Transport Protocol (RTP) packets, which have their own TOS bit settings set in the voip-server-entry profile regardless of the TOS setting on the outgoing interface. Table 2 specifies the IP TOS settings used in the voip-server-entry profile based on IP Precedence bits.
Table 2: IP TOS settings and IP Precedence bits Precedence Bits TOS value

0 (Routine) 1 (Priority) 2 (Immediate) 3 (Flash) 4 (Flash override) 5 (CRITIC/ECP.) 6 (Internetwork control) 7 (Network control)

0 32 64 96 128 160 192 224

Source address based routing


Source Address Based Routing (SABR) adds flexibility to route planning for network administrators and allows the MALC to forward outbound VoIP SIP traffic based on a specific source IP address of a data packet instead of the destination IP address.With SABR routing, the source IP address or subnet address of a data packet is examined before packet forwarding. If the device finds a matching source route in the source routing table, the packet is forwarded according to the matched source route. If the device does not find a

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Applications

matching source route, destination routing is performed based on the destination routing table and if necessary the configured default route. Note the following about SABR support on the MALC:

SABR routing is only supported on AAL5 Virtual Channel Links (VCLs) using Logical Link Connections (LLC) encapsulation The ping and traceroute commands support SABR SABR is only supported for VoIP SIP The route commands use the source keyword to indicate that a source route is used. Note: For existing configurations with static routes, users must either:

use the dump and restore commands to backup and restore the
configuration after upgrading to this release.

delete all the existing static routes after upgrading to this release,
but before rebooting the system. After rebooting the system, static routes must be manually provisioned.

Applications
The following IP applications are supported on the MALC:

Routing on page 31 Host-based routing with DSL bridges on page 34 Host-based routing with DSL routers on page 34 Network-based routing with DSL bridges on page 35 Network-based routing with DSL routers on page 36 IP filtering on page 37 Unnumbered IP interfaces on page 38

Routing
Routing is the process of selecting a next hop for forwarding data traffic. The routing information base (RIB) contains all the information about the routes in the system, including the preference values and interface states. The forwarding information base (FIB) is derived from the RIB and only contains the best route to a given destination. IP routing through the system makes use of the following types of routes:

Interface routesThese routes are defined by the addresses and netmasks that are provisioned on the IP interfaces.

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Static routesThese routes are manually configured as either destination based or source address based routes (SABR). Destination routes define paths to destinations in terms of an interface identifier or the IP address of a next-hop router on a directly attached network. SABR enables the forwarding of outbound VoIP SIP traffic based on a specific source IP address of a data packet instead of the destination IP address.With SABR routing, the source IP address or subnet address of a data packet is examined before packet forwarding. If the device finds a matching source route in the source routing table, the packet is forwarded according to the matched source route. If the device does not find a matching source route, destination routing is performed based on the destination routing table and if necessary the configured default route. There are two kinds of static routes: Low preferenceThese routes are only used to define default routes (that is, routes of last resort) and are less preferable to most other routes. Normal preferenceAll other static routes are considered more preferable than other types of routes (with the exception of interface routes).

Dynamic routesThese routes are learned by running routing protocols, such as RIP, and have varying preferences, depending on how they were learned.

The following table describes the default routing preferences on the device. These preferences cannot be overridden. Higher numbers indicate more preferred route types:
Type of route Default preference

Local Static RIP Static low (used for default routes)

10 9 4 4

Host-based and network-based routing


The MALC supports both host-based routing and network-based (subnet) routing. Host-based routing uses a unnumbered interface and adds a single IP address to the routing table for each route. This type of routing allows a granular allocation of addresses based on the host floating (unnumbered) IP address and the available subnetwork addresses. Routes are configured individually using the host add command. For each configured route, an IP address is added to the routing table. For example, an unnumbered host address of 10.10.10.1/24, adds one entry in the routing table for the address 10.10.10.1

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and makes available a subnet of 254 addresses for individual route configuration. When each host route is added, a new routing table entry is created. The host add command can also assign VLAN, SLAN, and COS values to the host interface. In the host add, host modify and host delete commands, <slot> and <port> may be replaced with brackets containing numbers in series and/or (dash-separated) ranges; <port> may be replaced with wildcard '*' for all ports on the card. The host modify command enables you to change individually configured routes for a host-based routing environment by altering values in the existing routing table entry. Refer to the CLI Reference Guide for a complete description of the command options and syntax. Note: In the host modify command, <slot> and <port> may be replaced with brackets containing numbers in series and/or (dash-separated) ranges; <port> may be replaced with wildcard * for all ports on the card. Examples: 1-[10-13]-[1,3-5,21]-0/ds3 specifies DS3 ports 1,3,4,5,21 on cards 10,11,12, and 13. 1-[6,7,9]-*-0/adsl specifies all ADSL ports on cards 6, 7, and 9 Network-based (subnet) routing uses a numbered interface and adds IP network addresses with variable length subnet masks to the routing table. This type of routing allows a single routing table entry to represent many numbered host addresses. However, it does not allow for granular IP address allocation. For example, an interface configured with 10.10.10.1/24 adds just one entry to the routing table for 10.10.10.1/24. All 254 addresses in this subnet are assigned to this interface, regardless of how many addresses in this subnet are actually used. The command used to create the IP interface depends on the application, IP assignment, type of address allocation and interface type. Commands to add an IP interface on page 33 shows the commands to add an IP interface and the requirements.
Table 3: Commands to add an IP interface Command Application IP Assignment Address Allocation Encapsulation Interface Type

Host add

Host-based routing with DSL bridge or router Network-based routing with DSL bridge or router

Static/Dynamic

Single per host add command

For bridge: other For router: LLC

Unnumbered

Interface add

Static

Multiple based on subnet mask length

For bridge: other For router: LLC

Numbered

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Configuring IP

Host-based routing with DSL bridges


Host-based routing takes advantage of IP unnumbered interfaces and shared DHCP pools to conserve IP addresses. In the host-based routing with DSL bridges application, subscribers connected to the MALC are on the same subnet as the MALC unnumbered interface.
Figure 4: Host-based routing with DSL bridges

PC x.x.y.2

Bridge subscriber A IP

x.x.y.1

Bridge PC x.x.y.3 subscriber B

Host-based routing with DSL routers


In the host-based routing with DSL routers application, remote IADs (or routers) are on the same subnet as the MALC unnumbered interface. The IADs connect private networks to the MALC.

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Figure 5: Host-based routing with DSL routers

Private network x.x.y.2 x.x.a.1 NAT router

Public subnet

IP x.x.a.2 Private network x.x.y.1

x.x.b.1 NAT router

x.x.y.3

x.x.b.2

Network-based routing with DSL bridges


Network-based routing is ideal for adding large numbers of IP addresses. Unlike host-based routing, network based-routing requires numbered IP interfaces on the MALC. In network-based routing with DSL bridges application, each bridge is in the same network as one of the MALC numbered interfaces.

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Configuring IP

Figure 6: Network-based routing with bridges

Bridge x.x.y.2 x.x.y.1/24

IP x.x.y.3

x.x.z.1/24 Bridge x.x.z.2

x.x.z.3

Network-based routing with DSL routers


Network-based routing with DSL routers allows multiple statically assigned addresses per customer. In this application, each remote router is on a subnet with a numbered interface on the MALC.

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Figure 7: Network-based routing with routers


Private network a.b.c.0/30 a.b.c.1 x.x.y.1 NAT router IP a.b.c.2 Private network d.e.f.0/30 d.e.f.1 NAT router Public subnet

x.x.z.1

d.e.f.2

IP filtering
IP filtering is typically performed to enhance network security by limiting access between two networks. IP filtering is based on the recognition and selective transmission or blocking of individual IP packets. Packets meeting some criterion are forwarded, and those that fail are dropped. IP filtering is used to block inbound traffic to the management network.

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Configuring IP

Figure 8: IP filtering

Management network

Internet

Filter

Subscribers

IP filtering allows or denies IP packets based on:

source IP address destination IP address

IP filtering can be provisioned from the CLI by using the filter command and modifying the ip-interface-record where you wish to apply the filter.

Unnumbered IP interfaces
Unnumbered IP interfaces reduce the number of IP addresses used by a device. Unnumbered interfaces are just like other point-to-point connections, except a floating or virtual IP interface is used as the local IP address in the ip-interface-record.

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IP provisioning procedures

Figure 9: Unnumbered IP interfaces


Shared or floating IP address Unnumbered IP interface Point to point connection

IP provisioning procedures
This section includes the following procedures:

Configuring a management IP interface on page 39 Configuring host-based routing on page 41 Configuring network-based routing on page 46 Configuring RIP on page 49 Configuring static routes on page 50 Configuring the device as a DHCP server on page 51 TOS/COS processing on page 59 IP fallback route on page 78 Note: Ethernet interfaces can be addressed as either eth or ethernetcsmacd. The eth abbreviation is used in command output.

Configuring a management IP interface


Caution: The Uplink card Ethernet interface must be configured before any other interfaces on the system, even if you do not intend to manage the unit over the Ethernet.

Configuring an Ethernet connection


1 Enter the interface add command with the following options. Refer to the CLI Reference Guide for a complete description of the command options and syntax.

zSH> interface add 1-1-1-0/ethernetcsmacd 10.10.10.10 255.255.255.0 Created ip-interface-record ethernet1/ip

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This example: 2 creates an ip-interface-record on ethernet1/ip adds host 10.10.10.10. sets netmask as 255.255.255.0.

Verify that the Ethernet connection is active.

zSH> interface show Interface Status Rd/Address Media/Dest Address IfName -------------------------------------------------------------------------------1/1/1/0/ip UP 1 10.10.10.10/24 00:01:47:bb:d5:f1 ethernet1 -------------------------------------------------------------------------------1 interface

or ping the host


zSH> ping 10.10.10.10 PING 10.10.10.10: 64 data bytes !!!!!

Note: If necessary, you can modify the ip-interface-record on the Uplink card to change the settings created by the interface add command.

Creating a default route


The following example creates a default route using the gateway 192.168.8.1 with a cost of 1 (one):
route add default 192.168.8.1 1

Verifying the route


1 Use the route show command to verify that the routes were added:

zSH> route show Dest Nexthop Cost Owner -----------------------------------------------------------0.0.0.0/0 192.168.8.1 1 STATICLOW 192.168.8.0/24 1/1/1/0/ip 1 LOCAL

Use the ping command to verify connectivity to the default gateway:


zSH> ping 192.168.8.1 PING 192.168.8.1: 64 data bytes !!!! ----172.24.200.254 PING Statistics---4 packets transmitted, 4 packets received round-trip (ms) min/avg/max = 0/0/0

The ping command stops after 5 transmits.

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Use the route list command to display all configured static routes.

zSH> route list Domain Dest Mask Nexthop IfNum Cost Enable --------------------------------------------------------------------------------1 0.0.0.0 0.0.0.0 172.24.94.254 0 1 enabled 1 172.24.64.0 255.255.255.0 172.25.64.64 0 1 enabled 1 172.24.64.0 255.255.255.0 172.25.64.129 0 2 enabled 1 10.212.0.0 255.255.0.0 10.2.1.254 0 1 enabled

Configuring host-based routing


Host-based routing interoperates with DSL bridges and routers. The type of AAL5 encapsulation determines interoperability with DSL routers or DSL bridges. LLC encapsulation is used with DSL routers; RFC 1483 encapsulation is used with DSL bridges. Specify LLC encapsulation (llc) in the command line for host-based routing to DSL routers. If no encapsulation type is specified in the command line, RFC 1483 encapsulation (other) is the default. The following table summarizes the configuration tasks for configuring host-based routing:
Task Command

Create an atm-traf-descr.

new atm-traf-descr index Where index is a user-defined value.

Create the IP interface record for the specified unnumbered (floating) interface.

interface add float interfacename IPaddr netmask Where interfacename is the name assigned to the IP record and IPaddr and netmask are the IP address and network mask assigned to the interface. dhcp-relay add index Where index is a user-defined value.

Create subnet groups.

Configure a connection to a host.

host add index/type vc vpi/vci td tdvalue other | llc static x.x.x.x | dynamic subnetgroup count This command creates the VCL and IP interface for the host route.

Verify provisioning

host show index/type vc vpi/vci td tdvalue dynamic subnetgroup count

Configuring host-based routing with DSL routers


1 Create an atm-traf-descr for unnumbered interfaces:

zSH> new atm-traf-descr 100 Please provide the following: [q]uit. td_type: -----------------> {atmNoClpNoScr}: td_param1: ---------------> {0}: 106133 td_param2: ---------------> {0}: 38 td_param3: ---------------> {0}:

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td_param4: ---------------> {0}: td_param5: ---------------> {0}: cac-divider: -------------> {1}: td_service_category: -----> {ubr}: td_frame_discard: --------> {false}: usage-parameter-control: -> {true}: .................... Save new record? [s]ave, [c]hange or [q]uit: s New record saved.

Create an floating (unnumbered) IP interface with the desired IP interface record for the IP address that is to be shared for all devices in the host-based routing subnet. The example uses ptm1 as the interface name and 10.0.0.1 as the IP address and 255.0.0.0 as the subnet mask.

zSH> interface add float ptm1 10.0.0.1 255.0.0.0 Created ip-interface-record Zhone1/ip

Note: This is a virtual interface that will share its IP address; binding the IP interface is not necessary. 3 Create a DHCP relay for each customer, use the dhcp-relay command to create a relay agent. The subnet address/mask will be derived from the system's floating IP address, if present, or may be specified NULL for use only with bridged interfaces. If multiple floating IP records are present, the desired <name>/<type> may be specified. The range (or pool) of assignable addresses which that customer can be assigned can be specified in the dhcp-server-subnet profile.
zSH> dhcp-relay add 255.0.0.0 172.16.80.20 Created DHCP Relay Agent number 99. zSH> update dhcp-server-subnet 99 Please provide the following: [q]uit. network: ---------------> {0.0.0.0}: netmask: ---------------> {0.0.0.0}: domain: ----------------> {0}: 1 range1-start: ----------> {0.0.0.0}: range1-end: ------------> {0.0.0.0}: range2-start: ----------> {0.0.0.0}: range2-end: ------------> {0.0.0.0}: range3-start: ----------> {0.0.0.0}: range3-end: ------------> {0.0.0.0}: range4-start: ----------> {0.0.0.0}: range4-end: ------------> {0.0.0.0}: default-lease-time: ----> {-1}: min-lease-time: --------> {-1}: max-lease-time: --------> {-1}: boot-server: -----------> {0.0.0.0}: bootfile: --------------> {}: default-router: --------> {0.0.0.0}: primary-name-server: ---> {0.0.0.0}:

10.0.0.0 255.0.0.0 10.0.0.10 10.0.0.20

10.0.0.1

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secondary-name-server: -> {0.0.0.0}: domain-name: -----------> {}: subnetgroup: -----------> {0}: 1 This number does not have to match the subnet index stickyaddr: ------------> {enable}: .................... Save new record? [s]ave, [c]hange or [q]uit: s New record saved.

Issue the host add command to create the IP interface, ATM VCL, and IP address for individual subscribers. Also assigns VLAN and SLAN settings. The host add and host delete commands, <slot> and <port> may be replaced with brackets containing numbers in series and/or (dash-separated) ranges; <port> may be replaced with wildcard '*' for all ports on the card. The following example adds dynamically assigned hosts:

zSH> host add 1-11-1-0/adsl vc 0/35 txtd 100 rxtd 1 tpid 0x8200 vlan 100 slan 10 cos 2 scos 3 llc dynamic 1 3

This example: creates an ip-interface-record on 1-11-1-0/adsl creates an atm-vcl with VPI/VCI=0/35 and LLC encapsulation of AAL5 data, which accommodates DSL routers creates an ATM cross connect from the virtual interface on the Uplink card to the designated slot card specifies the TAG protocol identifier (TPID) to identify the type of VLAN used. assigns VLAN ID 100. assigns SLAN ID 10. assigns COS value of 2 to VLAN 100. assigns COS value of 3 to SLAN 2. uses atm-traf-descr 100 for the transmit and atm-traf-descr 1 for the receive sides of the connection since ADSL is an asymmetrical connection adds 3 host entries that will have their addresses assigned dynamically as defined by subnetgroup 1. Note: Hosts that already have DHCP-assigned addresses will need to renew those leases after the DHCP change. This is done by rebooting the host. The following example adds a statically assigned host:
zSH> host add 1-11-2-0/adsl vc 0/35 td 1 llc static 10.10.10.1

This example:

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creates an ip-interface-record on 1-11-2-0/adsl creates an atm-vcl with VPI/VCI=0/35 and LLC encapsulation of AAL5 data creates an ATM cross connect from the virtual interface on the Uplink card to the designated slot card uses atm-traf-descr 1 for the connection adds 1 host entry IP address 10.0.0.1.

Verify that hosts have been added:

zSH> host show Rd/Address Interface Group T Host Address -------------------------------------------------------------------------------1 10.0.0.1 1-11-1-0-adsl-0-35 0/32 1 D <unassigned> D <unassigned> D <unassigned>

To find the other end of the ATM cross connect:


zSH> find-matching-data ATM 1-11-1-0-adsl/atm 0 35 VCL 1-11-1-0-adsl/atm 0 35 is used in atm-cc 1 The far end of this cross connect is 1-1-1-0-propvirtual/atm 0 32

To see the ATM virtual interfaces created by the host add command:
zSH> list atm-vcl atm-vcl 1-11-1-0-adsl/atm/0/35 atm-vcl 1-1-1-0-propvirtual/atm/0/32 2 entries found.

8
zSH> get atm-cc 1 cc-index: ------> low-if-index: --> low-vpi: -------> low-vci: -------> high-if-index: -> high-vpi: ------> high-vci: ------> admin-status: --> handle-id: ----->

To see the ATM cross connect created:

{1} {1-1-1-0-propvirtual/atm} virtual interface on the Uplink card {0} {32} {1-11-1-0-adsl/atm} the slot card {0} {35} {up} {handle_1}:

Configuring host-based routing with DSL bridges


1 Create an atm-traf-descr for unnumbered interfaces:

zSH> new atm-traf-descr 100 Please provide the following: [q]uit. td_type: -----------------> {atmNoClpNoScr}: td_param1: ---------------> {0}: 106133 td_param2: ---------------> {0}: 38

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td_param3: ---------------> {0}: td_param4: ---------------> {0}: td_param5: ---------------> {0}: cac-divider: -------------> {1}: td_service_category: -----> {ubr}: td_frame_discard: --------> {false}: usage-parameter-control: -> {true}: .................... Save new record? [s]ave, [c]hange or [q]uit: s New record saved.

Create an floating (unnumbered) IP interface the desired IP interface record for the IP address that is to be shared for all devices in the host-based routing subnet. The example uses ptm1 as the interface name and 10.0.0.1 as the IP address and 255.0.0.0 as the subnet mask.

zSH> interface add float ptm1 10.0.0.1 255.0.0.0 Created ip-interface-record Zhone1/ip

Note: This is a virtual interface that will share its IP address; binding the IP interface is not necessary. 3 Create a DHCP relay for each customer, use the dhcp-relay command to create a relay agent. The subnet address/mask will be derived from the system's floating IP address, if present, or may be specified NULL for use only with bridged interfaces. If multiple floating IP records are present, the desired <name>/<type> may be specified. The range (or pool) of assignable addresses which that customer can be assigned can be specified in the dhcp-server-subnet profile.
zSH> dhcp-relay add Operation completed successfully.

For advanced DHCP setting changes, edit the dhcp-server-subnet profile.


zSH> update dhcp-server-subnet 99 Please provide the following: [q]uit. network: ---------------> {0.0.0.0}: netmask: ---------------> {0.0.0.0}: domain: ----------------> {0}: 1 range1-start: ----------> {0.0.0.0}: range1-end: ------------> {0.0.0.0}: range2-start: ----------> {0.0.0.0}: range2-end: ------------> {0.0.0.0}: range3-start: ----------> {0.0.0.0}: range3-end: ------------> {0.0.0.0}: range4-start: ----------> {0.0.0.0}: range4-end: ------------> {0.0.0.0}: default-lease-time: ----> {-1}: min-lease-time: --------> {-1}: max-lease-time: --------> {-1}: boot-server: -----------> {0.0.0.0}:

10.0.0.0 255.0.0.0 10.0.0.10 10.0.0.20

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bootfile: --------------> {}: default-router: --------> {0.0.0.0}: 10.0.0.1 primary-name-server: ---> {0.0.0.0}: secondary-name-server: -> {0.0.0.0}: domain-name: -----------> {}: subnetgroup: -----------> {0}: 1 This number does not have to match the subnet index stickyaddr: ------------> {enable}: .................... Save new record? [s]ave, [c]hange or [q]uit: s New record saved.

Issue the host add command to create the IP interface, ATM VCL, and IP address for individual subscribers. The host add,and host delete commands, <slot> and <port> may be replaced with brackets containing numbers in series and/or (dash-separated) ranges; <port> may be replaced with wildcard '*' for all ports on the card. The following example adds dynamically assigned hosts:

zSH> host add 1-11-1-0/adsl vc 0/35 txtd 100 rxtd 1 dynamic 1 3

This example: creates an ip-interface-record on 1-11-1-0/adsl creates an atm-vcl with VPI/VCI=0/35 and RFC 1483 encapsulation of AAL5 data, which accommodates DSL bridges creates an ATM cross connect from the virtual interface on the Uplink card to the designated slot card uses atm-traf-descr 100 for the transmit and atm-traf-descr 1 for the receive sides of the connection since ADSL is an asymmetrical connection adds 3 host entries that will have their addresses assigned dynamically as defined by subnetgroup 1. Note: Hosts that already have DHCP-assigned addresses will need to renew those leases after the DHCP change. This is done by rebooting the host.

Configuring network-based routing


Similar to host-based routing, network-based routing interoperates with DSL bridges and routers. The type of AAL5 encapsulation determines interoperability with DSL routers or DSL bridges. LLC encapsulation is used with DSL routers; RFC 1483 encapsulation is used with DSL bridges. Specify bridge in the command line to connect to DSL bridges. If no encapsulation type is specified in the command line, LLC encapsulation (llc) is the default. Refer to the CLI Reference Guide for a complete description of the command options and syntax.

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The following table summarizes the configuration tasks for adding network-based routes.
Task Command

Create an atm-traf-descr.

new atm-traf-descr index Where index is a user-defined value.

Configure a connection to routed subnets.

interface add index/type vc vpi/vci td tdvalue | txtd tdvalue rxtd tdvalue llc | other IPaddress This command creates the VCL and IP interface for the host route.

Verify provisioning

interface show

Configuring network-based routing with DSL routers


1 Create an atm-traf-descr for unnumbered interfaces:

zSH> new atm-traf-descr 100 Please provide the following: [q]uit. td_type: -----------------> {atmNoClpNoScr}: td_param1: ---------------> {0}: 106133 td_param2: ---------------> {0}: 38 td_param3: ---------------> {0}: td_param4: ---------------> {0}: td_param5: ---------------> {0}: cac-divider: -------------> {1}: td_service_category: -----> {ubr}: td_frame_discard: --------> {false}: usage-parameter-control: -> {true}: .................... Save new record? [s]ave, [c]hange or [q]uit: s New record saved.

Issue the interface add command to create the IP interface, ATM VCL, and IP address allocation:

zSH> interface add 1-5-1-0/adsl vc 0/35 td 1 10.10.10.10 255.255.255.0 Created ip-interface-record 1-5-1-0-adsl-0-35/ip

This example: 3 creates an ip-interface-record on 1-5-1-0/adsl creates an atm-vcl with VPI/VCI=0/35 and LLC encapsulation of AAL5 data, which accommodates DSL routers uses atm-traf-descr 1 for transmit and receive sides of the connection creates an ATM cross connect from the virtual interface on the Uplink card to the designated slot card adds IP address 10.0.0.1 with a subnetwork defined by the netmask.

Verify that interfaces have been added:

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zSH> interface show Interface Status Rd/Address Media/Dest Address IfName -------------------------------------------------------------------------------1/1/1/0/ip DOWN 1 10.10.10.10/24 0/36 1-5-1-0-adsl-0-35 --------------------------------------------------------------------------------

To find the other end of the ATM cross connect:

zSH> find-matching-data ATM 1-5-1-0-adsl/atm 0 35 VCL 1-5-1-0-adsl/atm 0 35 is used in atm-cc 5 The far end of this cross connect is 1-1-1-0-propvirtual/atm 0 36

To see the ATM virtual interfaces created by the interface add command:
zSH> list atm-vcl atm-vcl 1-5-1-0-adsl/atm/0/35 atm-vcl 1-1-1-0-propvirtual/atm/0/36 2 entries found.

6
zSH> get atm-cc 5 cc-index: ------> low-if-index: --> low-vpi: -------> low-vci: -------> high-if-index: -> high-vpi: ------> high-vci: ------> admin-status: --> handle-id: ----->

To see the ATM cross connect created:

{5} {1-1-1-0-propvirtual/atm} virtual interface on the Uplink card {0} {36} {1-5-1-0-adsl/atm} the slot card {0} {39} {up} {handle_5}

Configuring network-based routing with DSL bridges


1 Create an atm-traf-descr for unnumbered interfaces:

zSH> new atm-traf-descr 100 Please provide the following: [q]uit. td_type: -----------------> {atmNoClpNoScr}: td_param1: ---------------> {0}: 106133 td_param2: ---------------> {0}: 38 td_param3: ---------------> {0}: td_param4: ---------------> {0}: td_param5: ---------------> {0}: cac-divider: -------------> {1}: td_service_category: -----> {ubr}: td_frame_discard: --------> {false}: usage-parameter-control: -> {true}: .................... Save new record? [s]ave, [c]hange or [q]uit: s New record saved.

Issue the interface add command to create the IP interface, ATM VCL, and IP address allocation:

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zSH> interface add 1-5-1-0/adsl vc 0/35 td 1 other 10.10.10.10 255.255.255.0 Created ip-interface-record 1-5-1-0-adsl-0-35/ip

This example: 3 creates an ip-interface-record on 1-5-1-0/adsl creates an atm-vcl with VPI/VCI=0/35 and RFC 1483 encapsulation of AAL5 data, which accommodates DSL bridges uses atm-traf-descr 1 for transmit and receive sides of the connection creates an ATM cross connect from the virtual interface on the Uplink card to the designated slot card adds IP address 10.0.0.1 with a subnetwork defined by the netmask.

Verify that interfaces have been added:

zSH> interface show Interface Status Rd/Address Media/Dest Address IfName -------------------------------------------------------------------------------1/1/1/0/ip UP 1 10.10.10.10/24 0/35 multipoint 1-5-1-0-adsl-0-35 --------------------------------------------------------------------------------

To find the other end of the ATM cross connect:

zSH> find-matching-data ATM 1-5-1-0-adsl/atm 0 35 VCL 1-5-1-0-adsl/atm 0 35 is used in atm-cc 5 The far end of this cross connect is 1-1-1-0-propvirtual/atm 0 36

To see the ATM virtual interfaces created by the interface add command:
zSH> list atm-vcl atm-vcl 1-5-1-0-adsl/atm/0/35 atm-vcl 1-1-1-0-propvirtual/atm/0/36 2 entries found.

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zSH> get atm-cc 5 cc-index: ------> low-if-index: --> low-vpi: -------> low-vci: -------> high-if-index: -> high-vpi: ------> high-vci: ------> admin-status: --> handle-id: ----->

To see the ATM cross connect created:

{5} {1-1-1-0-propvirtual/atm} virtual interface on the Uplink card {0} {36} {1-5-1-0-adsl/atm} the slot card {0} {39} {up} {handle_5}

Configuring RIP
RIP behavior for the system as a whole is configured in the rip-global-config profile. Each IP interface is then configured for RIP using the rip command.

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Currently, the MALC supports RIP v1 and v2. Note that the only routing domain currently supported is domain 1.

Configuring RIP global defaults


The following example configures RIP global behavior on the MALC: 1 Enable RIP for the system as a whole:
zSH> rip enable

To enable receipt of RIP version 1 or version 2 advertisements on an interface, use the rip command and specify the interface and the type of advertisements to receive:
zSH> rip interface 172.16.92.191 listen v1v2

To enable transmission of RIP advertisements on an interface: a b


zSH> rip interface 172.16.92.191 talk v2

or
zSH> rip interface 172.16.92.191 talk v1compat

Configuring static routes


Use the route command to add or delete static routes. The MALC supports both destination and Source Address Based Routing (SABR). SABR adds flexibility to route planning for network administrators and allows the MALC to forward outbound VoIP SIP traffic based on a specific source IP address of a data packet instead of the destination IP address.With SABR routing, the source IP address or subnet address of a data packet is examined before packet forwarding. If the device finds a matching source route in the source routing table, the packet is forwarded according to the matched source route. If the device does not find a matching source route, destination routing is performed based on the destination routing table and if necessary the configured default route. Note the following about SABR support on the MALC:

SABR routing is only supported on AAL5 VCLs using LLC encapsulation. The route, ping and traceroute commands support SABR. SABR is only supported for VoIP SIP.

Adding routes
To add static routes, use the route add command. The command uses the following syntax:
route [source] add destination mask next-hop cost

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Note: The word default can be substituted for a 0.0.0.0 destination and mask. The following example creates a network route to 192.178.21.0 using the gateway 192.172.16.1:
route add 192.178.21.0 255.255.255.0 192.178.16.1 1

The following example creates a default route using the gateway 192.172.16.1:
route add default 192.178.16.1 1

The following example creates a SABR route to 198.168.1.1 on the interface 198.168.1.101. The interface is the name of the outbound (egress) interface for this route (minus the /ip suffix).
zSH> route add source 198.168.1.1 255.255.255.255 198.168.1.101 1 uplink1-0-36

Configuring the device as a DHCP server


The MALC DHCP supports the following types of DHCP configurations:

Dynamic address allocation, where the server chooses and allocates an IP address with a finite lease. By default, the MALC will attempt to assign the same address (if available) to a device on lease renewal. This default can be changed to force a new address to be assigned. Static address allocation, where the server allocates the same IP address every time a device connects to the network.

DHCP server profiles and scope


Use the following profiles to configure the devices as a DHCP server:

dhcp-server-optionsConfigures a default profile that is used to generate default configurations for networks that are not explicitly configured. See Setting DHCP server options on page 52 for more information. dhcp-server-subnetDefines options for a specific network that is being managed by the DHCP server. Settings in the dhcp-server-subnet record override the default address pool set up by the dhcp-server-options record. See Creating DHCP server subnet options on page 54 for more information. dhcp-server-groupDefines options for a set of clients in a given domain. Inclusion of a given client into the group is based on a substring match of either the clients DHCP vendor class identifier, its DHCP client identifier values, or both. The scope of a group object always overrides those of a subnet object for any DHCP client lease. See Advanced DHCP applications on page 62 for more information.

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dhcp-server-hostDefines options for a specific host within a given domain. See Advanced DHCP applications on page 62 for more information. ip-interface-recordenables DHCP on the interface. The IP address defined in the ip-interface-record is used to determine the DHCP address pool for the attached network. See Enabling a DHCP server on page 56 for more information.

The DHCP server looks for configuration settings in order from the most specific record (the dhcp-server-host) to the most general (the dhcp-server-options record). It uses parameter settings in the following order: 1. dhcp-server-host 2. dhcp-server-group 3. dhcp-server-subnet 4. dhcp-server-options If a parameter is set in multiple profiles (for example, lease times or default routers), the MALC uses the settings that are in the most specific record. This means that the DHCP server could use parameter settings in multiple records (if, for example, all client lease times were set in the dhcp-server-options record, and address ranges were set in the dhcp-server-subnet records.) If only the dhcp-server-options record exists, the MALC uses those settings as the default for all DHCP server interfaces. For information about logging DHCP requests, see DHCP logging on page 92.

Setting DHCP server options


At startup, the MALC creates a default dhcp-server-options record. This profile defines global options for the MALC DHCP server. The following example shows the dhcp-server-options profile with its default values:
zSH> get dhcp-server-options 0 Please provide the following: [q]uit. lease-time: -----> {43200}: min-lease-time: -> {0}: max-lease-time: -> {86400}: reserve-start: --> {5}: reserve-end: ----> {5}: restart: --------> {no}:

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The dhcp-server-options profile supports the following parameters (all others should be left at their default values):
Parameter Description

lease-time

The global default time in seconds that will be assigned to a DHCP lease if the client requesting the lease does not request a specific expiration time. The minimum expiration time in seconds that will be assigned to a DHCP lease by the server, regardless of the value specified by a client. Values: -1 to 2147483647 -1 indicates the parameter should be ignored. Default: 0

min-lease-time

max-lease-time

The maximum time in seconds that will be assigned to a lease regardless of the value specified by a client. Values: -1 to 2147483647. -1 indicates the parameter should be ignored. Default: 86400

reserve-start

The default number of IP addresses, at the beginning of the MALC subnet IP address space, that are reserved by the DHCP server. To override this default, create a specific subnet rule for each subnet that needs to be handled differently. The default number of IP addresses at the end of the MALC s subnet IP address space that are reserved by the DHCP server. To override this default, create a specific subnet rule for each subnet that needs to be handled differently.

reserve-end

The following example changes the dhcp-server-options record to specify that each DHCP server reserve the first 10 addresses and the last 10 addresses in a network and does not include them in the DHCP server address pool.
zSH> update dhcp-server-options 0 Please provide the following: [q]uit. lease-time: -----> {43200}: min-lease-time: -> {0}:

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max-lease-time: -> {86400}: reserve-start: --> {5}: 10 reserve-end: ----> {5}: 10 restart: --------> {no}: .................... Save changes? [s]ave, [c]hange or [q]uit: s Record updated.

In this example, if a DHCP server on the 192.168.9.0 network reserved the first 10 addresses and last 10 addresses, it would assign addresses from 192.168.9.11 to 192.168.9.244.

Creating DHCP server subnet options


The dhcp-relay command enables you to create, modify, delete and show DHCP relay agents. The subnet address/mask will be derived from the system's floating IP address, if present, or may be specified NULL for use only with bridged interfaces. If multiple floating IP records are present, the desired <name>/<type> may be specified. The dhcp-server-subnet profile allows you to edit the options for a specific network that is being managed by the DHCP server. All subnets within a routing domain must be unique, so a given subnet object will provide options for exactly one connected network. The dhcp-server-subnet profile supports the following parameters (all others should be left at their default values):
Parameter Description

network netmask

The IP network address of this subnet. The subnet mask associated with the IP interface. The value of the mask is an IP address with all the network bits set to 1 and all the hosts bits set to 0. The routing domain to which this subnet, group, or host parameter applies. The starting IP address of an address pool in this subnet. If either the start or end range has a value of 0 then the entire address pool is ignored. The ending IP address of an address pool in this subnet. If either the start or end range has a value of 0, then the entire address pool is ignored. The default time, in seconds assigned to a lease if the client requesting the lease does not request a specific expiration time. See description in dhcp-server-options profile. See description in dhcp-server-options profile.

domain range1-start, range2-start, range3-start, range4-start range1-end, range2-end, range3-end, range4-end default-lease-time

min-lease-time max-lease-time

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Parameter

Description

boot-server

The IP address of the server from which the initial boot file (specified in the bootfile parameter) is to be loaded. The name of the initial boot file loaded by the client. The filename should be recognizable to the file transfer protocol that the client will be using to load the file. The IP address of the client default gateway. The IP address of the primary domain name server that the client should use for DNS resolution. The IP address of the secondary domain name server that the client should use for DNS resolution. The name of the DNS domain. A number which indicates which DHCP subnet group this pool is a member of. A value of 0 (default) indicates that the subnet is not a member of any group. The DHCP server attempts to assign the same IP address to the same host, if possible, based on hardware address. Values: disable enable Default: enable

bootfile

default-router primary-name-server secondary-name-server domain-name subnetgroup

stickyaddr

The following example defines a DHCP server subnet profile that is set up as follows:

Defines a single DHCP address pool with 11 addresses. Defines a default router. Defines a boot server and a boot filename. Defines a domain name. Defines two DNS servers. Uses the minimum, maximum, and default lease time (by accepting the default settings for the default-lease-time, min-lease-time, and max-lease-time).

zSH> new dhcp-server-subnet 12 Please provide the following: [q]uit. network: ---------------> {0.0.0.0}: 192.168.1.0 netmask: ---------------> {0.0.0.0}: 255.255.255.0 domain: ----------------> {0}: 1 range1-start: ----------> {0.0.0.0}: 192.168.1.10

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range1-end: ------------> {0.0.0.0}: 192.168.1.20 range2-start: ----------> {0.0.0.0}: range2-end: ------------> {0.0.0.0}: range3-start: ----------> {0.0.0.0}: range3-end: ------------> {0.0.0.0}: range4-start: ----------> {0.0.0.0}: range4-end: ------------> {0.0.0.0}: default-lease-time: ----> {-1}: min-lease-time: --------> {-1}: max-lease-time: --------> {-1}: boot-server: -----------> {0.0.0.0}: 192.168.1.55 bootfile: --------------> {}: filename.bin default-router: --------> {0.0.0.0}: 192.168.1.1 primary-name-server: ---> {0.0.0.0}: 192.168.8.21 secondary-name-server: -> {0.0.0.0}: 201.23.20.2 domain-name: -----------> {}: zhone.com subnetgroup: -----------> {0}: stickyaddr: ------------> {enable}: .................... Save new record? [s]ave, [c]hange or [q]uit: s New record saved.

Enabling a DHCP server


Modify the following parameters in the ip-interface-record to enable DHCP server (all others should be left at their default values):
Parameter Description

dhcp

Indicates whether this interface is a DHCP client, a DHCP server, both, or neither. Values: none client server both Default: none

address

The IP address of LAN port.

The following example enables the DHCP server on an IP-enabled interface in MALC shelf 1, slot 1, port 2, and subport 0.
zSH> update ip-interface-record 1/1/2/0/ip Please provide the following: [q]uit. vpi: ---------------> {0}: vci: ---------------> {0}: rdindex: -----------> {1}: dhcp: --------------> {none}: ** read-only ** addr: --------------> {172.24.200.162}: netmask: -----------> {255.255.255.0}:

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bcastaddr: ---------> {172.24.200.255}: destaddr: ----------> {0.0.0.0}: farendaddr: --------> {0.0.0.0}: mru: ---------------> {1500}: reasmmaxsize: ------> {0}: ingressfiltername: -> {}: egressfiltername: --> {}: pointtopoint: ------> {no}: mcastenabled: ------> {yes}: ipfwdenabled: ------> {yes}: mcastfwdenabled: ---> {yes}: natenabled: --------> {no}: bcastenabled: ------> {yes}: ingressfilterid: ---> {0}: egressfilterid: ----> {0}: ipaddrdynamic: -----> {static}: dhcpserverenable: --> {false}: true subnetgroup: -------> {0}: unnumberedindex: ---> {0}: .................... Save changes? [s]ave, [c]hange or [q]uit: s Record updated.

DHCP relay
The MALC supports DHCP relay. DHCP broadcast messages do not, by default, cross the router interfaces. To solve the problem of DHCP broadcast messages on multiple-subnet, the MALC can be configured as a DHCP relay agent that communicates with a DHCP server and acts as a proxy for DHCP broadcast messages that need to be routed to remote segments. In DHCP relay scenarios, the MALC serves as a DHCP relay agent that forwards broadcast DHCP discover and DHCP request packets to an external DHCP server. It then forwards the unicast DHCP offer and DHCP ack/nak replies to the requesting DHCP host.

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Figure 10: DHCP relay


DHCP server

DHCP client DHCP relay agent

Note the following requirements for DHCP relay:

The external DHCP server must be configured to assign addresses on the same subnet as the floating IP address used by the remote device. The external DHCP server must be configured with a static route for the remote devices subnet back to the MALC on which the relay agent is running. (The DHCP server will send DHCP unicast packets to the relay agents address, which is the first one in the subnet.) A separate DHCP server can be specified per subnet.

Specifying an external DHCP server


Use the dhcp-relay command to configure, modify, delete and show the DHCP relay. The subnet address/mask will be derived from the system's floating IP address, if present, or may be specified NULL for use only with bridged interfaces. If multiple floating IP records are present, the desired <name>/<type> may be specified. The dhcp-server-subnet profile is available for advanced DHCP configuration changes. The following parameter has been added to this profile:
Parameter Description

external-server

Enable an external subnet server in order to support DHCP relay agent. Default: 0.0.0.0

To specify an external DHCP server:

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Create a dhcp-server-subnet profile and specify the IP address of the external server:
zSH> new dhcp-server-subnet 1 Please provide the following: [q]uit. network: ---------------> {172.24.41.0}: netmask: ---------------> {255.255.255.0}: domain: ----------------> {1}: range1-start: ----------> {172.24.41.11}: range1-end: ------------> {172.24.41.100}: range2-start: ----------> {0.0.0.0}: range2-end: ------------> {0.0.0.0}: range3-start: ----------> {0.0.0.0}: range3-end: ------------> {0.0.0.0}: range4-start: ----------> {0.0.0.0}: range4-end: ------------> {0.0.0.0}: default-lease-time: ----> {-1}: min-lease-time: --------> {-1}: max-lease-time: --------> {-1}: boot-server: -----------> {172.24.38.102}: bootfile: --------------> {i3micro/ etherboot-I3M-i.img}: default-router: --------> {172.24.41.254}: primary-name-server: ---> {172.24.38.102}: secondary-name-server: -> {0.0.0.0}: domain-name: -----------> {nat.myrio.net}: subnetgroup: -----------> {1}: stickyaddr: ------------> {enable}: external-server: -------> {0.0.0.0}: 172.16.88.71 .................... Save changes? [s]ave, [c]hange or [q]uit: s Record updated.

Create a host route and specify the subnet group. For example:
zSH> host add 1-1-1-0/adsl vc 0/36 td 200 dynamic 1 1

This specifies that the host route over the specified ATM interface uses dynamic addressing and subnet group number 1.

TOS/COS processing
The MALC supports the marking and remarking of TOS values in IP packets and COS values in Ethernet VLAN headers as defined by IETF RFC1349 and IEEE 802.1p respectively. The configured TOS and COS levels specify the packet priority and queueing methods used to transport the packet through the IP and Ethernet networks. The MALC sets and transports the TOS/COS values, while the switches and routers connected to the MALC perform the queuing services and packet QOS processing.

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Note: TOS bits are not altered for VoIP Real Time Transport Protocol (RTP) packets, which have their own TOS bit settings set in the voip-server-entry profile regardless of the TOS setting on the outgoing interface. This service enables you to:

Add IP packet TOS values and VLAN header COS values to packets originating from the MALC. Overwrite existing IP packet TOS values and VLAN header COS values that are transported through the MALC. Leave existing IP packet TOS values and VLAN header COS values unchanged in all packets.

802.1p priority queues


Multi-media Traffic Management (MTM), is a rules-based policy enforcement mechanism for SLMS systems. The MALC MTM is used to mark packet priorities and service queues. The MALC will support 4 (four) strict priority queues (served until emptied) as part of the MALC's implementation of the MTM feature set for QoS. New line cards supporting 802.1p priority queues are: MALC-ACTIVE-ETH-10, MALC-GPON-SC1, MALC-VDSL2-24 DMT, MALC-EFM-SHDSL-24, and MALC-EFM-T1/E1-24. Existing line cards supporting 802.1p priority queues are: MALC-ADSL-48B, MALC-ADSL-48A, MALC-ADSL+POTS-TDM-48A-2S, MALC-ADSL+POTS-TDM/PKT-48A-2S, MALC-ADSL-48A/M, MALC-ADSL+POTS-TDM-48A/M-2S, MALC-ADSL+POTS-PKT-48A/M-2S, MALC-ADSL+POTS-TDM-48-2S

Fields in IP header
IP packets have a TOS byte in their headers that contains information about relative priority. The TOS byte is divided into two fields called IP Precedence and TOS. The IP Precedence field contains a 3-bit priority designation. Most normal traffic has an IP Precedence value of zero. Higher values in this field indicate that traffic is more important and that it requires special treatment. IP Precedence values greater than 5 are reserved for network functions.

Fields in the VLAN header


The VLAN header in Ethernet packets contains a COS field for queueing priority or Class of Service (COS) values based on eight (0-7) levels of service. This field contains information about how the traffic should be

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forwarded. The MALC supports basic COS marking and remarking without any queue servicing options. Packets marked or remarked based on a configurable profile to let the system know which bits use which queue.

TOS/COS parameters
The following parameters in the IP interface record are used for TOS and COS support.
Parameter Description

tosOption

Specifies how to handle the IP TOS precedence and VLAN header COS bits. Values: Disable Leave any existing TOS and COS values unchanged. The default setting. Originate Replace the current TOS and COS values in all packets originating from the current device. TOS and COS values in packets that are transported through (not originating on) this MALC are not affected. The TOS value is specified in the tosCos field. The COS value is specified in the vlanCOS field. All Replace the current TOS and COS values in all packets originating and transported through this device. The TOS value is specified in the tosCos field. The COS value is specified in the vlanCOS field.This setting has no affect on VoIP RTP packets originated from this interface.

tosCOS

Specifies the value loaded into the TOS precedence bits in the IP header for packets originating and transported through the current device. Value range is 0 to 7. Default is 0. Specifies the value loaded into the COS field of the VLAN header for packets originating and transported through the current device. Value range is 0 to 7. Default is 0.

vlanCOS

To display the TOS/COS settings in the ip-interface-record profile, enter the show ip-interface-record command.
zSH> show ip-interface-record vpi:---------------> {0} vci:---------------> {0} rdindex:-----------> {0 - 2147483647} dhcp:--------------> none client server addr:--------------> {0 - -1} netmask:-----------> {0 - -1} bcastaddr:---------> {0 - -1} destaddr:----------> {0 - -1} farendaddr:--------> {0 - -1} mru:---------------> {0 - 2147483647} reasmmaxsize:------> {0 - 65535} ingressfiltername:-> {33}

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egressfiltername:--> pointtopoint:------> mcastenabled:------> ipfwdenabled:------> mcastfwdenabled:---> natenabled:--------> bcastenabled:------> ingressfilterid:---> egressfilterid:----> ipaddrdynamic:-----> unnumbered dhcpserverenable:--> subnetgroup:-------> unnumberedindex:---> mcastcontrollist:--> vlanid:------------> maxVideoStreams:---> tosOption:---------> tosCOS:------------> vlanCOS:----------->

{33} no yes no yes no yes no yes no yes no yes {0 - 2147483647} {0 - 2147483647} static ppp dhcpclient true false {0 - 2147483647} {0 - 2147483647} {264} {0 - 4095} {0 - 210} disable originate {0 - 7 {0 - 7}

all

Note: TOS bits are not altered for VoIP Real Time Transport Protocol (RTP) packets, which have their own TOS bit settings set in the voip-server-entry profile regardless of the TOS setting on the outgoing interface.

Advanced IP provisioning procedures


The following advanced IP procedures are supported on the MALC:

Advanced DHCP applications on page 62 Configuring DNS resolver on page 64 Configuring IP filters on page 66 IP Service Level Agreement (IPSLA) on page 69

Advanced DHCP applications


This section explains how to configure more advanced DHCP applications. It includes the following sections:

Creating dhcp-server-group profile on page 62 Creating dhcp-server-host profile on page 63

Creating dhcp-server-group profile


The dhcp-server-group defines options for a set of clients in a given domain. Inclusion of a given client into the group is based on a substring match of either the clients DHCP vendor class identifier, its DHCP client identifier

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values, or both. The scope of a group object always overrides those of a subnet object for any DHCP client lease. Modify the following parameters to create a new dhcp-server-group profile:
Parameter Description

name vendor-match-string

The DHCP server group name. The vendor class identifier match string that determines which clients should be placed in the group. Client identifier match string that determines which clients should be placed in this group.

client-match-string

zSH> new dhcp-server-group 1 Please provide the following: [q]uit. name: ------------------> {}: group1 domain: ----------------> {0}: vendor-match-string: ---> {}: 'oakland' this is converted to an octet string vendor-match-offset: ---> {0}: vendor-match-length: ---> {-1}: client-match-string: ---> {}: 'oakland'this is converted to an octet string client-match-offset: ---> {0}: client-match-length: ---> {-1}: default-lease-time: ----> {-1}: min-lease-time: --------> {-1}: max-lease-time: --------> {-1}: boot-server: -----------> {0.0.0.0}: bootfile: --------------> {}: default-router: --------> {0.0.0.0}: primary-name-server: ---> {0.0.0.0}: secondary-name-server: -> {0.0.0.0}: domain-name: -----------> {}: .................... Save new record? [s]ave, [c]hange or [q]uit: s Record created.

Creating dhcp-server-host profile


The dhcp-server-host defines options for a specific host within a given domain. Set the following parameters in the dhcp-server-host profile:

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Parameter

Description

name hwaddr

The DHCP host name for the client The MAC address of the network interface that was used to acquire the lease. The DHCP client identifier

clientId zSH> new dhcp-server-host 1 Please provide the following: [q]uit. name: ------------------> {}: host1 domain: ----------------> {0}: hardware-address: ------> {}: 09:00:07:A9:B2:EB client-identifier: -----> {}: clientgroup1 ipaddr1: ---------------> {0.0.0.0}: ipaddr2: ---------------> {0.0.0.0}: ipaddr3: ---------------> {0.0.0.0}: ipaddr4: ---------------> {0.0.0.0}: default-lease-time: ----> {-1}: min-lease-time: --------> {-1}: max-lease-time: --------> {-1}: boot-server: -----------> {0.0.0.0}: bootfile: --------------> {}: default-router: --------> {0.0.0.0}: primary-name-server: ---> {0.0.0.0}: secondary-name-server: -> {0.0.0.0}: domain-name: -----------> {}: .................... Save new record? [s]ave, [c]hange or [q]uit: s Record created.

Configuring DNS resolver


Domain Name System (DNS) maps domain names to IP addresses, enabling the system to reach destinations when it knows only the domain name of the destination. DNS configuration uses the following profiles:

resolverConfigures the global DNS resolver, including the DNS search order, default domain name, and list of nameserver addresses. The DNS settings in this record can be used for local applications by administrators on the system, such as traceroute or ping. host-nameA replacement for the Unix local hosts table. Up to four host aliases can be defined for each host entry. Settings in the resolver record determine whether the hosts table is searched.

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The resolver profile supports the following parameters (all others should be left at their default values):
Parameter Description

query-order

The kind of resolver query for this routing domain. Values: hosts-first searches the local hosts table first then the list of nameservers. dns-first searches the list of nameservers first then the local hosts table. dns-only searches only the list of nameservers. Default: hosts-first

domain

The routing domain to which this host parameter applies. The default is an empty string. The only routing domain supported is domain 1.

first-nameserver

The IP address of the first or primary nameserver for this routing domain. The default value is 0.0.0.0. The IP address of the second or secondary nameserver for this routing domain. This nameserver is queried if the first nameserver cannot resolve the query. The default value is 0.0.0.0. The IP address of the third or tertiary nameserver for this routing domain. This nameserver is queried if the first nameserver cannot resolve the query. The default value is 0.0.0.0.

second-nameserver

third-nameserver

The following example creates a resolver record for a routing domain:


zSH> new resolver 1 Please provide the following: [q]uit. query-order: -------> {hosts-first}: domain: ------------> {}: zhone.com first-nameserver: --> {0.0.0.0}: 192.168.8.21 second-nameserver: -> {0.0.0.0}: 201.23.20.2 third-nameserver: --> {0.0.0.0}: .................... Save new record? [s]ave, [c]hange or [q]uit: s Record created.

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Optionally, you can create a hosts profile after the resolver profile has been created. The syntax is new host-name routingdomain/ipoctet1/ipoctet2/ ipoctet3/ipoctet4. The host-name profile supports the following parameters (all others should be left at their default values):
Parameter Description

hostname

Client host name (if any) that the client used to acquire its address. The default is an empty string. Host name alias for the specified host. The default value is an empty string. Secondary host name alias for the specified host. The default value is an empty string. Tertiary host name alias for the specified host. The default value is an empty string. Quaternary host name alias for the specified host. The default value is an empty string.

hostalias1 hostalias2

hostalias3

hostalias4

zSH> new host-name 1/192/168/8/32 Please provide the following: [q]uit. hostname: ---> {}: www.zhone.com ipaddress: --> {0.0.0.0}: 192.168.8.32 hostalias1: -> {}: engineering.zhone.com hostalias2: -> {}: marketing.zhone.com hostalias3: -> {}: sales.zhone.com hostalias4: -> {}: gss.zhone.com .................... Save new record? [s]ave, [c]hange or [q]uit: s Record created.

Configuring IP filters
The following table summarizes the configuration tasks for configuring IP filters.
Task Command

Create a new filter. Specify what to filter. Save the filter. Apply the filter to an IP interface.

filter new filter add rule [from | to] [IP address] [permit | deny] filter save update ip-interface-record interface

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Task

Command

Show filters created. Edit existing filters.

filter show index filter load index filter delete index

Configuring IP filters
Follow these steps to set up IP filtering: 1 Use the filter new command to create a new filter. The filter will be given an index value which you can use to specify the filter. The example below creates a filter with an index value of 5.
zSH> filter new filter: 5 successfully created and loaded for editing

After creating the filter, rules must be applied to it. To do this, use the filter add command. The syntax is:

filter add rule [from | to] [IP address] [permit | deny]

The rule is a user-defined value for the filtering rules to be applied. The example below permits traffic from 192.168.1.15, but denies traffic from all others:
zSH> filter add from 192.168.1.15 permit 5/101 from 192.168.1.15 permit zSH> filter add deny 5/110 deny

You can also specify a range of IP addresses on which to filter:


zSH> filter add 102 from 10.0.0.1-10.0.0.254 permit 5/102 from 10.0.0.1-10.0.0.254 permit zSH> filter add 192.168.1.15 permit 5/120 deny

You can also specify both source and destination addresses in the same rule:
zSH> filter add 103 from 10.0.0.1-10.0.0.254 to 192.168.0.0-192.168.0.254 permit 5/103 from 10.0.0.1-10.0.0.254 to 192.168.0.0-192.168.0.254 permit zSH> filter add 130 deny 5/130 deny

Once you have added rules to a filter, you must save it with the filter save command:

zSH> filter save Save loaded filter: 5 (it has been modified) yes/no [yes]? yes filter: 5 has been saved

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After you have saved your filter, you will need to apply it to an IP interface. Update the ip-interface record where you wish to apply the filter. Insert the filter index value in the ingressfilterid or egressfilterid parameter:
zSH> update ip-interface-record 1/1/1/0/ip Please provide the following: [q]uit. vpi: ---------------> {0}: vci: ---------------> {0}: rdindex: -----------> {1}: dhcp: --------------> {none}: addr: --------------> {172.16.160.11}: netmask: -----------> {255.255.255.0}: bcastaddr: ---------> {172.16.160.255}: destaddr: ----------> {0.0.0.0}: farendaddr: --------> {0.0.0.0}: mru: ---------------> {1500}: reasmmaxsize: ------> {0}: ingressfiltername: -> {}: egressfiltername: --> {}: pointtopoint: ------> {no}: mcastenabled: ------> {yes}: ipfwdenabled: ------> {yes}: mcastfwdenabled: ---> {yes}: natenabled: --------> {no}: bcastenabled: ------> {yes}: ingressfilterid: ---> {0}: 5 the number of the filter egressfilterid: ----> {0}: 5 the number of the filter ipaddrdynamic: -----> {static} dhcpserverenable: --> {false} subnetgroup: -------> {0} unnumberedindex: ---> {0} .................... Save changes? [s]ave, [c]hange or [q]uit: s Record updated

Use the filter show command (with the filter index) to view created filters:

zSH> filter show 5 Filter: 5 Line Rule ---- ---101 from 192.168.1.15 permit 102 from 10.0.0.1-10.0.0.254 permit 103 from 10.0.0.1-10.0.0.254 to 192.168.0.0-192.168.0.254 permit 150 from 192.168.120.1-192.168.123.254 to 192.168.120.16 permit

If you wish to edit a filter, use the filter load filterID command to load the filter for editing. Then use the filter delete RuleNum command to delete rules from the filter.
zSH> filter load 5 filter: 5 successfully loaded for editing

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zSH> filter delete 101 5/101 from 192.168.1.15 permit Delete rule: 5/101 yes/no [yes]? yes rule: 5/101 deleted

Use the rule add command to add new rules, and the rule save command to save filter rules. See Step 2 and Step 3. Note: Refer to the Zhone CLI Reference Guide for full explanations of the filter command options and variables.

IP Service Level Agreement (IPSLA)


The IP Service Level Agreement (IPSLA) feature assists service providers and network operators with enforcing and monitoring access network connections and performance. IPSLA uses ICMP Ping messages over configured IPSLA paths to track Round Trip Times (RTTs) and EHCOREQs/ RSPs between initiator and responder devices to determine network performance and delays. Typically, one initiator device is used to monitor other responder devices in the network. A maximum of 32 IPSLA paths can be configured per MALC and 4 IPSLA paths per IP device. Initiator devices must be running IPSLA to request data for a responder device. Responder devices must be accessible through the ping command in the IP network , but do not need to run IPSLA. Responder devices not running IPSLA display limited statistical data and functionality. Note: Networks must support CoS queues and DSCP to provide valid per CoS statistics. Otherwise, all statistics are sent to the default CoS queue. Default CoS-actions are assigned to each CoS queue so threshold crossing alarms can be configured to generate system alarms when thresholds are crossed for uptime, latency, jitter, and packet size. Data based on received/sent packets and train rates is collected and displayed as real-time statistics for the current 15 minute interval as well as over 96 15-minute intervals for 24 hour historical statistics. By default, IPSLA is disabled on all EtherXtend, MALC card ports and other SLMS devices.

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Figure 11: IPSLA

MALC as IPSLA Initiator IPSLA Path for ICMP Pings

IP Network
IPSLA Path for ICMP Pings

MALC as IPSLA Responder IPSLA Path for ICMP Pings

EtherXtend as IPSLA Responder

EtherXtend as IPSLA Responder

Configuring IPSLA
IPSLA requires the following configuration steps:

Set ipsla-global settings to enable device state and optionally set polling interval Create ICMP path between devices Optionally, modify COS actions for the desired COS queues Optionally modify COS map for Diff Server Control Point (DSCP) mappings

To configure IPSLA: 1 Display the global IPSLA settings and update the state and polling interval. The polling interval (60 to 3600 seconds) is used for real-time and historical statistics.
zSH> ipsla show global state: -------> {disabled} pollSeconds: -> {60}

Using the IPSLA command, enable IPSLA and set the polling interval to 120 seconds.
zSH> ipsla modify global state enabled pollseconds 120

Create a ICMP path between devices. The device on which this command is entered becomes the initiator device, while the device for which an IP address is entered becomes the responder device. Typically, one initiator device can be used to monitor other responder devices in the network over a maximum of 32 MALC and 4 EtherXtend IPSLA paths per device.
zSH> ipsla add path 172.16.78.11

zSH> ipsla show path

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Path configuration for ipAddress: 172.16.78.11 forwarding: -> {disabled} state: ------> {enabled}

Modify the path using the IPSLA modify path command. This example disables the static path on device 192.168.254.17.
zSH> ipsla modify path ipaddress 192.168.254.17 state disabled

Delete a path using the IPSLA delete command.


zSH> ipsla delete path ipaddress 192.168.254.17

Note: Disabling or deleting the path or globally disabling the IPSLA feature will reset historical data. 3 Modify the default CoS actions to specify the response and threshold behavior for each CoS Action Index (1-8). These CoS actions map respectively to the CoS queues (0-7). The following CoS actions are defined by default.
CoS Action Index CoS Queue

Default Name

Default AFClass 1 AFClass 2 AFClass 3 AFClass4 Cos-5 ExpFwd NetwCtrl

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8

0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7

Each COS action contains the following parameters:

Parameter

Description

Default

Name

Name of the IPSLA CoS action, up to 9 characters in length.

(1) Default, (2) AFClass1, (3) AFClass2, (4) AFClass3, (5) AFClass4, (6) Cos-5, (7) ExpFwd, (8) NetwCtrl. Disabled 3 timeouts

Traps Timeouts

Specifies whether a trap is issued when any SLA performance error threshold within this CoS is crossed. Specifies the number of consecutive missed IP SLA responses within this CoS before a zhoneIpSLATimeoutTrap is issued.

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Parameter

Description

Default

Timeout Clear Latency

Specifies the number of consecutive IPSLA responses within this CoS which must be received before the timeout error condition is cleared. Specifies the 15 sample average roundtrip latency value which must be exceeded within this CoS before a zhoneIpSLALatencyTrap is issued. Specifies the number of consecutive IPSLA latency samples for which the 15 sample average roundtrip latency must be below the configured SLA latency error threshold within this CoS before the latency error condition is cleared. Specifies the 15 sample roundtrip jitter value which must be exceeded within this CoS before a zhoneIpSLAJitterTrap is issued. Specifies the number of consecutive IPSLA RTT samples for which the 15 sample roundtrip jitter must be below the configured SLA jitter error threshold within this CoS before the jitter error condition is cleared. Specifies the minimum IPSLA Ping packet size in bytes. The range is 64 thru 2048 if the target IP device is running IPSLA, 64 thru 512 otherwise.

1 sample

10000 milliseconds

Latency Clear

1 sample

Jitter

10000 milliseconds

Jitter Clear

1 sample

Packetsize

64 bytes

Display the settings for an individual CoS action.


zSH> ipsla show cos-action cosactionindex 1 Cos Action Configuration for cosActionIndex: 1: name: -------> {Default} traps: ------> {disabled} timeOuts: ---> {3} latency: ----> {10000} jitter: -----> {10000} packetSize: -> {64}

Display the settings for all CoS actions (1-8).


zSH> ipsla show cos-action Cos Action Configuration for cosActionIndex: 1: name: -------> {Default} traps: ------> {disabled} timeOuts: ---> {3} latency: ----> {10000} jitter: -----> {10000} packetSize: -> {64} Cos Action Configuration for cosActionIndex: 2: name: -------> {AFClass1} traps: ------> {disabled} timeOuts: ---> {3} latency: ----> {10000}

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jitter: -----> packetSize: ->

{10000} {64}

Cos Action Configuration for cosActionIndex: 3: name: -------> {AFClass2} traps: ------> {disabled} timeOuts: ---> {3} latency: ----> {10000} jitter: -----> {10000} packetSize: -> {64} Cos Action Configuration for cosActionIndex: 4: name: -------> {AFClass3} traps: ------> {disabled} timeOuts: ---> {3} latency: ----> {10000} jitter: -----> {10000} packetSize: -> {64} Cos Action Configuration for cosActionIndex: 5: name: -------> {AFClass4} traps: ------> {disabled} timeOuts: ---> {3} latency: ----> {10000} jitter: -----> {10000} packetSize: -> {64} Cos Action Configuration for cosActionIndex: 6: name: -------> {Cos-5} traps: ------> {disabled} timeOuts: ---> {3} latency: ----> {10000} jitter: -----> {10000} packetSize: -> {64} Cos Action Configuration for cosActionIndex: 7: name: -------> {ExpFwd} traps: ------> {disabled} timeOuts: ---> {3} latency: ----> {10000} jitter: -----> {10000} packetSize: -> {64} Cos Action Configuration for cosActionIndex: 8: name: -------> {NetwCtrl} traps: ------> {disabled} timeOuts: ---> {3} latency: ----> {10000} jitter: -----> {10000} packetSize: -> {64}

To modify a cos-action, specify the desired parameters to change in the command line. This example enables traps for cosActionIndex 1.

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zSH> ipsla modify cos-action cosactionIndex 1 traps enabled

Configured the desired COS maps to modify the default DSCP to COS Action Index mappings. By default, DSCP are mapped to COS Action Index entries based of RFC 2599. The following tables shows the default mappings. A COS Action Index of 0 indicates that the DSCP is not used.
COS Action Index

DSCP

1 11, 13, 15 19, 21, 23, 27, 29, 31 35, 37, 39 41 47 49, 57 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 12, 14, 16, 17, 18, 20, 22, 24, 25, 26, 28, 30, 32, 33, 34, 36, 38, 40, 42, 43, 44, 45, 46 ,48, 50, 51, 52, 53, 54, 55, 56, 58, 59, 60, 61, 62, 63, 64

8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1 0

Display the CoS map for an individual CoS action or for all CoS actions.
zSH> ipsla dscpIndex: dscpIndex: dscpIndex: dscpIndex: dscpIndex: dscpIndex: dscpIndex: dscpIndex: dscpIndex: dscpIndex: dscpIndex: dscpIndex: dscpIndex: dscpIndex: dscpIndex: dscpIndex: dscpIndex: dscpIndex: dscpIndex: Type A<CR> stop: show cos-map 1 cosActionIndex: 1 2 cosActionIndex: 0 3 cosActionIndex: 0 4 cosActionIndex: 0 5 cosActionIndex: 0 6 cosActionIndex: 0 7 cosActionIndex: 0 8 cosActionIndex: 0 9 cosActionIndex: 0 10 cosActionIndex: 0 11 cosActionIndex: 2 12 cosActionIndex: 0 13 cosActionIndex: 2 14 cosActionIndex: 0 15 cosActionIndex: 2 16 cosActionIndex: 0 17 cosActionIndex: 0 18 cosActionIndex: 0 19 cosActionIndex: 3 to print all, <CR> to continue, Q<CR> to

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Specify the desired index values in the command line to change the mapping of the DSCP index 1 to COS queue 7. This example changes the mapping of DSCP index 1 to COS queue 7.
zSH> ipsla modify cos-map dscpindex 1 cosactionindex 7

To clear a CoS map, specify the desired index values in the IPSLA command to delete the mapping of the DSCP index for the COS queue. This example clears the mapping of DSCP index 1 and resets it to the COS queue 0.
zSH> ipsla modify cos-map dscpindex 1 cosactionindex 0

Display real-time statistics for path or COS queue. Real-time statistics represent minimum, maximum, average, and current values over the current 15 minute polling period based on data collected for each polling intervals. For example, if the polling interval is configured for 60 seconds, the real-time statistics display the data compiled from the latest 15 60-second polling intervals contained in the current polling period. Note: RTT values of 0 (zero) indicate a lack of data, while sub-millisecond RTTs are reported as 1. These statistics can be displayed individually or collectively for a specified IP address or for all configured paths. Note: When a card swact occurs, historical data does not failover and data for the15-minute interval during which the swact occurred may be lost. Current and historical statistics on redundant uplinks are not supported. On switchovers, these statistics are reset to 0.

zSH> ipsla stats path ipaddress 192.168.254.15 zSH> ipsla stats path

The table below explains the statistics for the configured paths.

Path Statistic

Description

Target IP Address Target Name Target Type ACT Source IP CNX

IP Address of the device which is at the other end of the path. Name of the remote device. Type of the remote device. Availability status of the remote device. IP Address of the discovery source device. Type of path either static or dynamic.

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Path Statistic

Description

UpTime (secs) I/R

Amount of time in seconds that elapsed since the last transition from Inactive to Active. Role played by the local device in collection of latency and availability statistics. Initiator - Device that initiates the IPSLA ping packet used for statistics collection; Responder - Device that returns the IPSLA ping packet sent by the Initiator.

CoS Mismatch

Number of IPSLA ping packets received which indicate a mismatch between the Class Of Service (CoS) definitions at the remote unit and those of the source unit.

Display real-time CoS statistics individually or collectively by CoS action index, IP address or all CoS actions.
zSH> ipsla stats cos cosactionindex 1

zSH> ipsla stats cos ipaddress 10.2.1.254

zSH> ipsla stats cos

The table below explains the CoS Action Index statistics.

COS Action Index Statistic

Description

CoS Index Target IP Address Last RTT Min RTT Avg RTT

Index number of the CoS Action Index. IP Address of the device which is at the other end of the path. RTT reported in the most recent successful ping attempt. Smallest RTT since this statistic was last cleared to a zero value. Average RTT since this statistic was last cleared to a zero value. Calculated as (RTT1 + RTT2 + RTT3 + .+RTTn)/n where n equals the number of successful ping attempts since this statistic was last cleared to a zero value. Largest RTT since this statistic was last cleared to a zero value. Number of failed pings since this statistic was last cleared to a zero value.

Max RTT Drop Resp

Display historical statistics individually or collectively based on IP address, CoS action index, and index value of a 15 minute interval. Historical statistics are displayed for the latest 24 hour period or a specified 15 minute interval within the latest 24 hour period. For historical statistics, IPSLA averages values for the most recent 96 15-minute intervals and displays the minimum, maximum, average and current values in a table for a 24 hour summary.
zSH> ipsla stats history cosactionindex 1 Up to 96 intervals....

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zSH> ipsla stats history ipaddress 10.2.1.254

zSH> ipsla stats history index 1

zSH> ipsla stats history Up to 96 intervals....

Each bulk statistic relies on a bulk-statistics profile to define the OID, instance and other MIB information used to collect and display the data. When a IPSLA path is modified or deleted during the process of data collection, the related bulk-statistics profiles may lose their association and become dangling profiles. The following console message is generated whenever a bulk-statistics profile becomes dangling.

The bulkstats audit command enables users to check for and delete dangling bulk-statistics profiles. The bulkstats audit command provides an interactive and repair option. The interactive option lists all dangling profiles with the option to modify or delete the profile. The repair option prompts for profile deletion. bulkstats audit -interactive | repair To display and repair dangling bulk-statistics profiles, enter the bulkstats audit command.
zSH> bulkstats audit -interactive Checking validity............ 3 dangling profiles found. bulk-statistic 5 enabled: ----------> oid: --------------> instance: ---------> include-children: ->

{true} {zhoneIpSLAPathStatByCOSAvgRTT} {6.1.11.1.15.253} {false}

[d]elete, [m]odify, [n]ext, [p]revious, [h]elp, [q]uit ? d bulk-statistic 55 enabled: ----------> oid: --------------> instance: ---------> include-children: ->

{true} {zhoneIpSLAPathStatByCOSAvgRTT} {2.1.173.24.95.2} {false}

[d]elete, [m]odify, [n]ext, [p]revious, [h]elp, [q]uit ? d bulk-statistic 555 enabled: ----------> oid: -------------->

{true} {zhoneIpSLAPathStatByCOSAvgRTT}

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instance: ---------> {2.1.173.24.72.103} include-children: -> {false} [d]elete, [m]odify, [n]ext, [p]revious, [h]elp, [q]uit d

zSH> bulkstats audit -repair Checking validity............ 1 dangling profile found. Delete profile? { [y]es or [n]o } y

IP fallback route
The MALC supports IP redundancy or fallback IP routes. A fallback route is a second static route with the same destination and netmask of an existing route but with a different nexthop destination. The redundant or fallback route is used when the original nexthop destination is unavailable. The fallback route continues to be used until the revertive period expires. At that time, traffic switches back to the primary route. A ping interval and ping retry count are use to determine route availability. The MALC pings the active nexthop router once during each ping interval. The ping-interval is specified in milliseconds and has a minimum value of 500 milliseconds or 1/2 second. If the number of ping failures to the current nexthop destination exceed the ping-fail-max setting, the current nexthop destination is replaced in the routing table with the fallback nexthop destination.The system begins pinging the new nexthop router and monitoring the number of ping failures. The revertive period is set by the system based on a multiple of the ping interval and retry count. Note: The cost (metric) of the fallback route is automatically calculated to be one more than the cost of the first active route.

Configuring IP redundancy
To configure IP redundancy: 1 Add a route with the IP addresses of the nexthop router and fallback router.

zSH> route add default 192.168.34.254 1 fallback 192.168.34.201 2000 3 zSH> route add 10.10.1.0 255.255.255.0 192.168.34.254 1 fallback 192.168.34.201 3000 5

2
zSH> show route ... Source Routing Table

Display the configured IP routes.

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Dest Nexthop Cost Owner Interface --------------------------------------------------------------------------Destination Routing Table Dest Nexthop Cost Owner Fallback

--------------------------------------------------------------------------0.0.0.0/0 192.168.34.254 1 STATICLOW 10.10.1.0/24 192.168.34.254 1 STATIC 192.168.34.201 192.168.34.0/24 1/1/1/0/ip 1 LOCAL

To delete the primary and fallback routes:

zSH> route delete 10.10.1.0 255.255.255.0 192.168.34.254 fallback 192.168.34.201

route command updates


Administers the routing information base (RIB). The route add and route delete commands take a keyword called source which indicates that a source route is used and must to added or removed from the source routing table. The user must also specify the IP interfaces of the next hop.The route show command now accepts an optional keyword of either source or destination which specifies the type of routing table is to be displayed. If the keyword is not used, both source and destination routing tables are displayed.
Syntax The following command displays the forwarding information base. route [domain domain-spec] show [source|destination]

domain domain-spec Specifies the routing domain. Only domain 1 is supported. show Displays the routes in the route domain for source and destination routing.
Syntax The following command adds a high-preference static route for the

destination IP address with the specified network mask (dotted decimal format) to the specified next hop with the specified routing cost. The word default may be substituted for a 0.0.0.0 destination and mask. If a fallback route is also specified, a second next hop, ping interval (in milliseconds), and ping maximum failure count must be specified. Fallback routes have the same destination and mask as the original route, but use a different next hop. After a route and fallback route are configured, the current next hop is pinged once every ping interval. If the number of ping maximum failures is exceeded, the fallback next hop becomes the current next hop. The next hop validation continues once every ping interval.
route [ domain domain-spec ] add [source] destination-address netmask nexthop-address

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nexthop-interface metric [fallback nexthop2 ping-interval ping-fail-max]

domain domain-spec Specifies the routing domain. Only domain 1 is supported. source Indicates that a source address based route is being added. The interface is the name of the outbound (egress) interface for this route (minus the /ip suffix). destination-address netmask Adds a static route with the specified destination and network mask. nexthop-address IP address of the next hop. nexthop-interface Interface for the next hop. This is valid only when the next-hop address is 0.0.0.0. Otherwise, this should be 0 (zero). This option is currently unsupported. metric A numeric value specifying the metric for the route. Lower metrics indicate more preferred routes. nexthop2 IP address of the fallback or redundant next hop. ping-interval The ping interval with a minimum value of 500 milliseconds. maxretry The max retry (fail) count for the pings. When this limit is reached, the fallback nexthop is used.
Syntax The following command deletes a static route from the system routing table.

The word default may be substituted for a 0.0.0.0 destination and mask. The fallback and nexthop2 options must be specified to delete routes configured with fallback routes.
route [ domain domain-spec ] delete [source] destination-address netmask nexthop-address nexthop-interface [fallback nexthop2 ping-interval ping-fail-max]

domain domain-spec Specifies the routing domain. Only domain 1 is supported. source Specifies that a source address based route is being removed. The interface is the name of the outbound (egress) interface for this route (without the /ip suffix). destination-address netmask Deletes the destination address and netmask from the routing table.

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nexthop-address IP address of the next hop address. nexthop-interface Interface for the next hop. This is valid only when the next-hop address is 0.0.0.0. Otherwise, this should be 0 (zero). This option is currently unsupported. nexthop2 IP address of the fallback or redundant next hop. ping-interval The ping interval with a minimum value of 500 milliseconds. maxretry The max retry (fail) count for the pings. When this limit is reached, the fallback nexthop is used.
Example zSH> route show Source Routing Table Dest Nexthop Cost Owner Interface -----------------------------------------------------------------------------10.10.201.2/32 10.10.201.1 1 STATIC 1/1/1/0/ip 10.10.204.2/32 10.10.204.1 1 STATIC 1/1/1/0/ip Destination Routing Table Dest Nexthop Cost Owner ------------------------------------------------------------0.0.0.0/0 172.24.94.254 1 STATICLOW 10.10.201.2/32 1/1/1/0/ip 1 LOCAL 10.10.204.0/30 1/1/1/0/ip 1 LOCAL 172.24.94.0/24 1/1/1/0/ip 1 LOCAL 172.16.80.0/24 172.24.94.254 1 STATIC zSH> route show source Source Routing Table Dest Nexthop Cost Owner Interface -----------------------------------------------------------------------------10.10.201.2/32 10.10.201.1 1 STATIC 1/1/1/0/ip 10.10.204.2/32 10.10.204.1 1 STATIC 1/1/1/0/ip zSH> route show destination Destination Routing Table Dest Nexthop Cost Owner ------------------------------------------------------------0.0.0.0/0 172.24.94.254 1 STATICLOW 10.10.201.2/32 1/1/1/0/ip 1 LOCAL 10.10.204.0/30 1/1/1/0/ip 1 LOCAL 172.24.94.0/24 1/1/1/0/ip 1 LOCAL 172.16.80.0/24 172.24.94.254 1 STATIC zSH> zSH> route add source 198.168.1.1 255.255.255.255 198.168.1.101 1 uplink1-0-36

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zSH> route add default 192.168.34.254 1 fallback 192.168.34.201 2000 3 zSH> route add 10.10.1.0 255.255.255.0 192.168.34.254 1 fallback 192.168.34.201 3000 5 zSH> show route ... Source Routing Table Dest Nexthop Cost Owner Interface --------------------------------------------------------------------------Destination Routing Table Dest Nexthop Cost Owner Fallback

--------------------------------------------------------------------------0.0.0.0/0 192.168.34.254 1 STATICLOW 10.10.1.0/24 192.168.34.254 1 STATIC 192.168.34.201 192.168.34.0/24 1/1/1/0/ip 1 LOCAL zSH> route delete source 198.168.1.1 255.255.255.255 198.168.1.101 uplink1-0-36 zSH> zSH> route delete 10.10.1.0 255.255.255.0 192.168.34.254 fallback 192.168.34.201 Access Level admin Products BAN, MALC, Raptor 100, Raptor 319, Raptor 719, Raptor 723, Sechtor

100A, Z-Edge 64
See Also rip

Configuring the MALC for IP video


When configuring an interface for IP video, you should dedicate a VCL to deliver the IP video to the subscriber. transmitting other types of traffic over the same VCL as video could affect the quality of the video. This section provides an example of how to create a video connection on the MALC. For details on video bridging, see Video bridging, page 152. Note: Ethernet interfaces can be addressed as either eth or ethernetcsmacd. The eth abbreviation is used in command output.

Configuring a video connection between the MALC and the ZRG


The following example configures an IP video connection between the MALC and the ZRG over an ADSL interface. The video is delivered over a bridged connection and the IP video server is reached via a GigaBit Ethernet

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Uplink card. This example uses the ZRG default configuration. Most of these procedures are done on the MALC. 1 (Perform this step on the ZRG) Update the video-system-profile to specify the IP address of the IP video server and associated services. In this example, the IP address of the IP video server is 192.168.3.200:

zSH> update video-system-profile 1 Please provide the following: [q]uit. ntp-server-address: -----------------> {0.0.0.0}: 192.168.72.1 epg-server-address: -----------------> {192.168.34.165}: 192.168.72.1 settop-box-head-end-server-address: -> {0.0.0.0}: default-channel: --------------------> {0.0.0.0}: 224.10.10.1 no-channel-available: ---------------> {0.0.0.0}: 224.10.10.1 epgType: ----------------------------> {myrio}: epgPort: ----------------------------> {8500}: epgFtpAddress: ----------------------> {192.168.34.165}: 192.168.72.1 .................... Save new record? [s]ave, [c]hange or [q]uit: s New record saved.

Create an IP interface on the MALC GigaBit Ethernet port with VLAN ID 999 for the IP video:

zSH> interface add 1-1-2-0/ethernetcsmacd vlan 999 192.168.1.14/24 Created ip-interface-record ethernet2-999/ip

Create a mapping between the video connection and the multicast address space. The video profile specifies the interface the MALC uses to reach the IP video server. (The following example uses the Uplink interface to reach the IP video server). Multisource multicast enables IGMP join/ leaves to the video headend for each configured video-source profile. One video-source profile is assigned to each GigE uplink interface. Use the videosource command to configure the mapping between the video connection and the multicast address space.
zSH> videosource add 224.1.1.1 1-1-2-0/ip Added video-source profile zSH> videosource show Domain: 0 multicastAddr: 224.1.1.1 IfName: 1-1-2-0/ip zSH> get video-source 1 Please provide the following: [q]uit. routing-domain: ----> {1}: multicast-address: -> {224.1.1.1}: ifIndex: -----------> {ethernet2-999/ip}: vpi: ---------------> {0}: vci: ---------------> {0}: ....................

Use the videosource delete command to remove a video source:


zSH> videosource delete 224.1.1.1 1-1-2-0/ip

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Deleted video-source profile

Note: You only need to enter the first multicast address in the group. 4 Create a traffic descriptor for IP video (this example is for ADSL2+):
zSH> new atm-traf-descr 2 index can be any value Please provide the following: [q]uit. td_type: -----------------> {atmNoClpNoScr}: td_param1: ---------------> {0}: 44080 td_param2: ---------------> {0}: td_param3: ---------------> {0}: td_param4: ---------------> {0}: td_param5: ---------------> {0}: cac-divider: -------------> {1}: td_service_category: -----> {ubr}: cbr td_frame_discard: --------> {false}: usage-parameter-control: -> {true}: .................... Save new record? [s]ave, [c]hange or [q]uit: s New record saved.

Create an floating (unnumbered) IP interface the desired IP interface record for the IP address that video set top boxes will use for their far end address.

The example uses the default interface name (interface name not specified) and 192.168.49.1 as the IP address and 255.0.0.0 as the subnet mask. The default name is used.
zSH> interface add float 192.168.49.1 255.0.0.0 Created ip-interface-record Zhone1/ip

Note: This is a virtual interface that will share its IP address; binding the IP interface is not necessary. Note: The MALC may display a message that there is nothing to bind to. This message is informational. Continue with this procedure. 6 To create a DHCP server address pool for the far end video set top device, use the dhcp-relay command to create a relay agent. The subnet address/ mask will be derived from the system's floating IP address, if present, or may be specified NULL for use only with bridged interfaces. If multiple floating IP records are present, the desired <name>/<type> may be specified.The range (or pool) of assignable addresses which that customer can be assigned can be specified in the dhcp-server-subnet profile..
zSH> dhcp-relay add Operation completed successfully.

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This network must specify the network for the IP video server. This example configures the MALC for DHCP relay on subnet 2 using Myrio server (192.168.88.73) at domain nat.myrio.net. The unnumbered IP address of the default router is 192.168.49.1. To make advanced modifications to the DHCP settings, edit the dhcp-server-subnet profile.
zSH> update dhcp-server-subnet 2 Please provide the following: [q]uit. network: ---------------> {0.0.0.0}: 192.168.49.0 netmask: ---------------> {0.0.0.0}: 255.255.255.0 domain: ----------------> {0}: range1-start: ----------> {0.0.0.0}: 192.168.49.5 range1-end: ------------> {0.0.0.0}: 192.168.49.10 range2-start: ----------> {0.0.0.0}: range2-end: ------------> {0.0.0.0}: range3-start: ----------> {0.0.0.0}: range3-end: ------------> {0.0.0.0}: range4-start: ----------> {0.0.0.0}: range4-end: ------------> {0.0.0.0}: default-lease-time: ----> {-1}: min-lease-time: --------> {-1}: max-lease-time: --------> {-1}: boot-server: -----------> {0.0.0.0}: 192.168.88.73 bootfile: --------------> {}: default-router: --------> {0.0.0.0}: 192.168.49.1 ip-unnumbered interface primary-name-server: ---> {0.0.0.0}: boot-server: -----------> {0.0.0.0}: 192.168.88.73 secondary-name-server: -> {0.0.0.0}: domain-name: -----------> {}: nat.myrio.net subnetgroup: -----------> {0}: 2 stickyaddr: ------------> {enable}: external-server: -------> {0.0.0.0}: 192.168.88.73 external DHCP server address .................... Save new record? [s]ave, [c]hange or [q]uit: s New record saved.

Create a multicast control list, which defines which multicast addresses the remote end video can access. By default, the multicast control list entry enables subscriptions up to the number of maximum video streams on the interface without control list checking. Video streams can be configured on 10/100, GigE, and other interfaces. The following example adds three entries to multicast list 1:
zSH> new mcast-control-entry 1/1 Please provide the following: [q]uit. ip-address: -> {0.0.0.0}: 224.1.1.1 type: -------> {normal}: .................... Save new record? [s]ave, [c]hange or [q]uit: s

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New record saved. zSH> new mcast-control-entry 1/2 Please provide the following: [q]uit. ip-address: -> {0.0.0.0}: 224.1.1.2 type: -------> {perodic}: .................... Save new record? [s]ave, [c]hange or [q]uit: s New record saved. zSH> new mcast-control-entry 1/3 Please provide the following: [q]uit. ip-address: -> {0.0.0.0}: 224.1.1.3 type: -------> {always-on}: .................... Save new record? [s]ave, [c]hange or [q]uit: s New record saved.

Continue adding as many multicast entries as necessary. To view the multicast control group, use the mcast show command:
zSH> mcast show mcl 1 MCAST CONTROL LIST : 1 224.1.1.1 224.1.1.5 224.10.10.10

224.1.1.2 224.1.1.6 224.10.10.11

224.1.1.3 224.1.1.7 224.10.10.12

224.1.1.4 224.1.1.8 224.10.10.13

Note: The ip igmpstat command displays the ports receiving multicast traffic and the joined multicast group(s). 8 Add a host route for the video interface.

zSH> host add 1-5-1-0/adsl vc 0/36 td 2 dynamic 1 4 video 1/4

These examples assume 1 is the multicast control list index and 4 is the maximum number of IP video streams (from the IP interface record). By default, the multicast control list entry enables subscriptions up to the number of maximum video streams on the interface without control list checking.

IP administrative procedures
The following IP administrative procedures are supported on the MALC:


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Modifying profiles created by host/interface add commands on page 87 Displaying hosts on page 89 Displaying interfaces on page 90 Displaying routing information on page 90 Deleting hosts on page 91

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Deleting interfaces on page 91 Deleting routes on page 91 DHCP logging on page 92 IP statistics commands on page 94

Modifying profiles created by host/interface add commands


After profiles have been created by the host add and interface add commands there are two methods of modifying the profiles:

You can perform a host delete or interface delete, which deletes all associated profiles, then re-create those profiles with another host add or interface add command, specifying changes in the command line. You can modify the individual profiles which have been created by host add and interface add commands.

For example, the command:


zSH> host add 1-8-1-0/adsl vc 0/35 td 1 dynamic 1 3

Creates the following profiles:


ip-interface-record 1-8-1-0-adsl-0-35/ip ip-interface-record 1-8-1-0-adsl-0-35-1/ip ip-interface-record 1-8-1-0-adsl-0-35-2/ip ip-interface-record 1-8-1-0-adsl-0-35-3/ip atm-vcl 1-8-1-0-adsl/atm/0/35 atm-vcl 1-1-1-0-propvirtual/atm/0/32 atm-cc 1

Note: You must disable the cross-connect and the ATM-VCL before changing the AAL5 encapsulation type in active cross-connects. The host add, and host delete commands, <slot> and <port> may be replaced with brackets containing numbers in series and/or (dash-separated) ranges; <port> may be replaced with wildcard '*' for all ports on the card. Refer to the CLI Reference Guide for a complete description of the command options and syntax.

Modifying individual profiles created by host/interface add


1
zSH> update atm-cc Please provide the cc-index: ------> low-if-index: --> low-vpi: -------> low-vci: ------->

Before modifying ATM-VCLs, the cross-connect in which they are used, must be disabled:

1 following: [q]uit. {1}: ** read-only ** {1-1-1-0-propvirtual/atm}: {0}: ** read-only ** {32}: ** read-only **

** read-only **

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high-if-index: -> {1-8-1-0-adsl/atm}: ** read-only ** high-vpi: ------> {0}: ** read-only ** high-vci: ------> {35}: ** read-only ** admin-status: --> {up}: down handle-id: -----> {handle_1}: .................... Save changes? [s]ave, [c]hange or [q]uit: s Record updated.

Active VCLs must be disabled before making any modifications to them:

zSH> update atm-vcl 1-8-1-0-adsl/atm/0/35 Please provide the following: [q]uit. vpi: -----------------------------> {0}: ** read-only ** vci: -----------------------------> {35}: ** read-only ** admin_status: --------------------> {up}: down receive_traffic_descr_index: -----> {1}: transmit_traffic_descr_index: ----> {1}: vcc_aal_type: --------------------> {other}: ** read-only ** vcc_aal5_cpcs_transmit_sdu_size: -> {9188}: vcc_aal5_cpcs_receive_sdu_size: --> {9188}: vcc_aal5_encaps_type: ------------> {other}: vcl_cast_type: -------------------> {p2p}: vcl_conn_kind: -------------------> {pvc}: fault-detection-type: ------------> {disabled}: .................... Save changes? [s]ave, [c]hange or [q]uit: s Record updated.

Make changes to the VCL:

zSH> update atm-vcl 1-8-1-0-adsl/atm/0/35 Please provide the following: [q]uit. vpi: -----------------------------> {0}: ** read-only ** vci: -----------------------------> {35}: ** read-only ** admin_status: --------------------> {down}: receive_traffic_descr_index: -----> {1}: transmit_traffic_descr_index: ----> {1}: vcc_aal_type: --------------------> {other}: ** read-only ** vcc_aal5_cpcs_transmit_sdu_size: -> {9188}: vcc_aal5_cpcs_receive_sdu_size: --> {9188}: vcc_aal5_encaps_type: ------------> {other}: llcencapsulation vcl_cast_type: -------------------> {p2p}: vcl_conn_kind: -------------------> {pvc}: fault-detection-type: ------------> {disabled}: .................... Save changes? [s]ave, [c]hange or [q]uit: s Record updated.

Re-enable the VCL:

zSH> update atm-vcl 1-8-1-0-adsl/atm/0/35 Please provide the following: [q]uit. vpi: -----------------------------> {0}:

** read-only **

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vci: -----------------------------> {35}: ** read-only ** admin_status: --------------------> {down}: up receive_traffic_descr_index: -----> {1}: transmit_traffic_descr_index: ----> {1}: vcc_aal_type: --------------------> {other}: ** read-only ** vcc_aal5_cpcs_transmit_sdu_size: -> {9188}: vcc_aal5_cpcs_receive_sdu_size: --> {9188}: vcc_aal5_encaps_type: ------------> {llcencapsulation}: vcl_cast_type: -------------------> {p2p}: vcl_conn_kind: -------------------> {pvc}: fault-detection-type: ------------> {disabled}: .................... Save changes? [s]ave, [c]hange or [q]uit: s Record updated.

Re-enable the cross-connect after changes have been made:


zSH> update atm-cc 1 Please provide the following: [q]uit. cc-index: ------> {1}: ** read-only ** low-if-index: --> {1-1-1-0-propvirtual/atm}: ** read-only ** low-vpi: -------> {0}: ** read-only ** low-vci: -------> {32}: ** read-only ** high-if-index: -> {1-8-1-0-adsl/atm}: ** read-only ** high-vpi: ------> {0}: ** read-only ** high-vci: ------> {35}: ** read-only ** admin-status: --> {down}: up handle-id: -----> {handle_1}: .................... Save changes? [s]ave, [c]hange or [q]uit: s Record updated.

Displaying hosts
Issue the host show command to display hosts, which displays the IP address of the unnumbered interface used in the host route, interface of the host route, VPI/VCI of the internal VCL used to create the host, the subnet group to which the host belongs, whether the host is dynamically or statically assigned, and if the host has been assigned an IP address.
zSH> host show Rd/Address Interface Group T Host Address -------------------------------------------------------------------------------1 10.0.0.1 1-11-1-0-adsl-0-35 0/32 1 D <unassigned> D <unassigned> D <unassigned> S 192.168.11.5 1 192.168.11.1 1-8-6-0-adsl-0-35 0/33 0 S 192.168.11.6 1 192.168.11.1 1-8-2-0-adsl-0-35 0/35 0 S 192.168.11.55

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Displaying interfaces
Issue the interface show command to display interfaces:
zSH> interface show Interface Status Rd/Address Media/Dest Address IfName -------------------------------------------------------------------------------1/1/1/0/ip UP 1 [10.0.0.1] 0/35 multipoint 1-5-1-0-adsl-0-35 --------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Brackets around IP addresses in the output of the interface show command indicate unnumbered interfaces.

Displaying routing information


The following commands display routing information:

route show rip show

Displaying the routing table


To display the routing table, use the route show command:
zSH> route show Dest Nexthop Cost Owner -----------------------------------------------------------0.0.0.0/0 172.24.200.254 1 STATICLOW 172.24.200.162/32 1 LOCAL 172.24.200.0/24 1/1/1/0/ip 1 LOCAL

Displaying RIP information


To display Routing Information Protocol (RIP) information, use the rip show command:
zSH> rip show RIP Globals ---------------------------------------------------------Route Route Route Admin Update Domain Changes Queries State Time ---------------------------------------------------------1 0 0 disabled 30 ---------------------------------------------------------RIP Interface Statistics -----------------------------------------------------Recv Bad Recv Bad Updates IfName Packets Routes Sent To -----------------------------------------------------1-1-1-0 0 0 0 uplink1 0 0 0 1-8-1-0-adsl-0-35 0 0 0

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1-8-6-0-adsl-0-35 0 0 0 1-8-8-0-adsl-0-35 0 0 0 1-8-3-0-adsl-0-35 0 0 0 RIP Interface Configuration -------------------------------------------------------------------------------Auth Auth Default Src IfName Type Key Talk Listen Metric Address Static Poison -------------------------------------------------------------------------------1-1-1-0 none (write-only) disabled disabled 0 172.24.20 0.162 none disabled uplink1 none (write-only) disabled disabled 0 219.200.1 62.2 none disabled 1-8-1-0-adsl-0-35 none (write-only) disabled disabled 0 192.168.1 1.1 none disabled 1-8-6-0-adsl-0-35 none (write-only) disabled disabled 0 0.0.0.0 none disabled 1-8-8-0-adsl-0-35 none (write-only) disabled disabled 0 0.0.0.0 none disabled 1-8-3-0-adsl-0-35 none (write-only) disabled disabled 0 0.0.0.0 none disabled RIP Peers -------------------------------------------------------------------------------Route IP Last Recv Bad Recv Bad Domain Address Update Version Packets Routes --------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Deleting hosts
Issue the host delete command to delete hosts. The host add, and host delete commands, <slot> and <port> may be replaced with brackets containing numbers in series and/or (dash-separated) ranges; <port> may be replaced with wildcard '*' for all ports on the card.
zSH> host delete 1-11-1-0/adsl vc 0/35 all

Deleting interfaces
Issue the interface delete command to delete interfaces:
zSH> interface delete 1-5-1-0/adsl vc 0/35 Delete complete

Deleting routes
To delete static routes, use the route delete command. The command uses the following syntax:
zSH> route delete destination mask next-hop

The following example deletes the network route to 192.178.21.0 using the gateway 192.172.16.1:

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zSH> route delete 192.178.21.0 255.255.255.0 192.178.16.1

DHCP logging
The MALC provides a logging facility to monitor the DHCP packets it sends and receives. By default, DHCP messages are not displayed.

Enabling DHCP logging


1 Enable the DHCP server log messages:
zSH> log level dhcpserver info Module: dhcpserver at level: info

Enable logging for the session:


zSH> log session on Logging enabled.

As DHCP server messages are sent and received, they are displayed on the console. Note: This setting does not persist across system reboots. You must re-enable DHCP logging after a MALC reboot. 3 These messages can be captured to a file using your terminals capture facility, or sent to a syslog server. For example:
zSH> new syslog-destination 1 Please provide the following: [q]uit. address: --> {0.0.0.0}: 192.200.42.5 syslog server IP address port: -----> {514}: facility: -> {local0}: severity: -> {debug}:info .................... Save new record? [s]ave, [c]hange or [q]uit: s New record saved.

Understanding DHCP server log messages


When a device sends a DHCP server request to the MALC, a message similar to the following is logged:
AUG 13 12:20:48: info : 1/1/1084: dhcpserver: DhcpServerTask: DHCPREQUEST for 155.57.1.21 from 00:b0:d0:98:92:3d via if496

This message indicates that a request for the address 155.57.1.21 was received by the device with the MAC address 00:b0:d0:98:92:3d. The request came in over the interface number 496. To find what physical interface this corresponds to, use the ifxlate command:

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zSH> ifxlate 496 ifIndex: ----------> shelf: ------------> slot: -------------> port: -------------> subport: ----------> type: -------------> adminstatus: ------> physical-flag: ----> iftype-extension: -> ifName: ----------->

{496} {1} {10} {48} {0} {hdsl2} {up} {true} {none} {1-10-48-0}

The MALC sends the following message when it acknowledges the DHCP request packet.
AUG 13 12:20:48: info : 1/1/1084: dhcpserver: DhcpServerTask: DHCPACK on 155.5 7.1.21 to 00:b0:d0:98:92:3d via if496

Viewing client leases


When the MALC issues a DHCP client lease, it creates a dhcp-server-lease. You can view these records to see the status of the lease: 1 List the current leases:
zSH> list dhcp-server-lease dhcp-server-lease 0/155/57/1/10 dhcp-server-lease 0/155/57/1/11 dhcp-server-lease 0/155/57/1/12 dhcp-server-lease 0/155/57/1/13 dhcp-server-lease 0/155/57/1/14 dhcp-server-lease 0/155/57/1/15 dhcp-server-lease 0/155/57/1/17 dhcp-server-lease 0/155/57/1/18 dhcp-server-lease 0/155/57/1/19 dhcp-server-lease 0/155/57/1/16 dhcp-server-lease 0/155/57/1/20 dhcp-server-lease 0/155/57/1/21 dhcp-server-lease 0/155/57/1/22 dhcp-server-lease 0/155/57/1/23 14 entries found.

To view an individual record:


zSH> get dhcp-server-lease 0/155/57/1/10 starts: ------------> {1060700857} ends: --------------> {1060700917} flags: -------------> {0} hardware-address: --> {00:00:c5:90:3b:08} client-identifier: -> {} client-hostname: ---> {} hostname: ----------> {} dns-fwd-name: ------> {} dns-rev-name: ------> {}

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Note that 0/155/57/1/10 represents routing domain 0, and the IP address 155.57.1.10.

IP statistics commands
The following IP commands are available to users with administrative privileges.

ip icmpstat Displays ICMP statistics. ip ifstat Displays interface statistics. ip ifsum Displays a summarized list of known interfaces. ip inetstat Displays the active TCP/UDP/RAW endpoints terminating on the card. ip ipstat Displays IP statistics. ip tcpstat Displays TCP statistics. ip udpstat Displays UDP statistics. ip arpdelete Deletes an entry from the ARP table. ip arpflush Flushes the ARP table of all entries. ip arpshow Displays the ARP table.

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CONFIGURING BRIDGING
This chapter explains how to configure bridging on the MALC. It includes the following sections:

Overview, page 95 Broadcasts and bridging, page 103 VLANs, page 105 Q-in-Q, page 110 Untagged bridging, page 114 Ethernet RPR, page 116 Linear GigaBit Ethernet, page 132 Advanced bridging configurations, page 142 PPPoA - PPPoE Conversion, page 137 PPPoE Intermediate Agent, page 140 Administrative commands, page 149 COS in bridges, page 150 Video bridging, page 152

Overview
Bridges are configured using the bridge add command and the desired bridge type (upl for uplink, dwn for downlink, int for intralink, tls for TLS, hub for hub, and no type for transparent. This command assigns the bridge-interface-record profile to the specified interface.To facilitate bridge setup, the MALC sets the default values for this profile based on the usage of the downlink and uplink command parameters. For VLAN bridges, use the downlink and uplink parameters to create bridges on the interfaces with the default downlink and uplink bridge settings. Refer to the CLI Reference Guide for a complete description of the command options and syntax.

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Note: The MALC ports can support both IP termination or bridging on different virtual circuits. However, each virtual circuit must be configured for either IP termination or bridging and cannot support both at the same time. Note: When routed and bridged traffic is configured for the same uplink interface, VLAN tags must be used between both downlink ports and the uplink interface for traffic differentiation. For routed traffic, use the ip-interface-record profile to specify the VLAN ID. Bridging involves configuring the MALC to direct traffic based on Ethernet MAC addresses. The MALC supports a variety of asymmetrical and symmetrical bridge types which enable different methods to learn, forward, and manipulate traffic.

Asymmetrical bridge types are uplink, downlink, and intralink. Uplink bridges An uplink bridge uses one bridge interface in a VLAN as a default, and traffic from all other interfaces exits the system from this interface. As the default interface, packets entering the system on this interface do not have their source MAC addresses learned and associated with this interface. Traffic coming into this uplink interface is sent to the interface where the address has been learned. If the frame is a broadcast, it is filtered, unless it is an ARP or DHCP message that meets some special criteria. Unicasts received on an uplink port are forwarded to the downlink where the MAC address was learned. Uplink bridge interfaces require an additional bridge-path configuration to set a default path for either a specific VLAN or globally for the system onto the uplink bridge. If an uplink is missing this configuration, traffic will not flow across the asymmetric VLAN. Down link bridges A downlink bridge is used in conjunction with an uplink bridge. where the uplink bridge is the path upstream to the network, and the downlink bridge is the learning interface facing subscribers. Traffic coming into this interface is forwarded to the uplink regardless of the destination MAC address. Broadcasts and unicasts (known and unknown) will be sent out the default interface, which is the uplink bridge for the VLAN. Packets entering the system on this interface have their source MAC addresses learned and associated with this interface. Because this interface is not a default, it is required to learn MAC addresses, so that frames from the network that come in on the uplink bridge can be

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sent to the correct downlink bridge. Broadcasts received on a downlink are sent to the uplink (default) without filtering. Broadcasts will not flow to other downlinks as long as forwardtodefault parameter is set to true. Downlink ports learn MAC addresses.

Intralink bridges An intralink bridge is used in conjunction with an uplink bridge, where the uplink bridge is the path upstream to the network, and the intralink forwards traffic with unknown MAC addresses or multicasts to the configured bridge interface without attempting to learn the addresses of the attached devices or network.. Traffic coming into this interface is forwarded to the uplink regardless of the destination MAC address. Broadcasts, multicasts, and unicasts (known and unknown) will be sent out the default interface, which is the uplink bridge for the VLAN. Packets entering the system on this interface will not have their source MAC addresses learned since this interface is not used when a MAC is known. Intralink bridge interfaces require an additional configuration to take effect, which is a bridge-path. The bridge-path sets a default intralink path for either a specific VLAN or a global intralink for the system onto the intralink bridge. If an intralink is missing this configuration, traffic will not flow across the asymmetric VLAN.

Symmetrical bridge types are transparent, transparent LAN service (TLS), and hub. Transparent bridge Transparent or untagged bridges which forward traffic based on MAC addresses but do not provide segregation of traffic. Traffic is broadcast over the Ethernet port and is either accepted or rejected based on the destination MAC address. There is no VLAN tagging; all ports are learning and forwarding without restriction and without broadcast suppression. Forwarding to a default port is not allowed. Transparent LAN service A TLS bridge is used with only other TLS bridges. This should not be used with any asymmetrical bridges. TLS bridges learn MAC addresses and forward packets to learned destinations. Broadcasts and unknown unicasts are flooded out all interfaces except the ingress interface. Packets entering the system on TLS interface have their source MAC addresses learned and associated with the interface so that frames from the network that come in on other TLS bridges in the VLAN can be sent to the correct interface. Hub bridge

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A hub bridge is used with only other hub bridges. Hub bridges do not learn MAC addresses, but flood packets of all types to every other bridge interface in the VLAN, where all ports receive every frame received on the hub interface. Packets entering the system on this interface do not have their source MAC addresses learned so that frames from the network that come in on other hub bridges in the VLAN can be sent to the correct interface. Bridges also utilize VLAN tagging for tagged and untagged traffic segregation.

Tagged bridging Tagged or Virtual LANs (VLANs) bridging, which forwards traffic based on MAC addresses and allows the segregation of a single Ethernet network into multiple virtual network segments by mapping ATM VCLS to VLAN IDs.

Untagged bridging Untagged or transparent bridging which forwards traffic based on MAC addresses but does not provide segregation of traffic. Traffic is broadcast over the Ethernet port and is either accepted or rejected based on the destination MAC address. There is no VLAN tagging; all ports are learning and forwarding without restriction without broadcast suppression. Forwarding to a default port is not allowed.

Bridges are configured using the bridge add command and the desired bridge type (upl for uplink, dwn for downlink, int for intralink, tls for TLS, hub for hub, and no type for transparent. This command assigns the bridge-interface-record profile to the specified interface.To facilitate bridge setup, the MALC sets the default values for this profile based on the usage of the downlink and uplink command parameters. For VLAN bridges, use the downlink and uplink parameters to create bridges on the interfaces with the default downlink and uplink bridge settings. For transparent bridges, the type parameter is omitted to create bridges on the interfaces with default transparent bridge settings. In the bridge add, bridge delete commands, <slot> and <port> may be replaced with brackets containing numbers in series and/or (dash-separated) ranges; <port> may be replaced with wildcard '*' for all ports on the card. Refer to the CLI Reference Guide for a complete description of the command options and syntax. Note: The MALC ports can support both IP termination or bridging on different virtual circuits. However, each virtual circuit must be configured for either IP termination or bridging and cannot support both at the same time.

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Bridge default settings for asymmetric bridges

Note: When routed and bridged traffic is configured for the same uplink interface, VLAN tags must be used between both downlink ports and the uplink interface for traffic differentiation. For routed traffic, use the ip-interface-record profile to specify the VLAN ID.

Bridge default settings for asymmetric bridges


Table 4 lists the default bridge-interface-record settings for the supported asymmetric bridge options.
Table 4: Default values for asymmetric bridge-interface-record Parameter Uplink Downlink Downlink Tagged Intralink

vpi

0 for Ethernet interfaces. As specified for other interfaces. 0 for Ethernet interfaces. As specified for other interfaces. 0 False True True False False 0 False True True False False False 0 Disable 0 0x8100

0 for Ethernet interfaces. As specified for other interfaces. 0 for Ethernet interfaces. As specified for other interfaces. As specified True False False True True 5 True False False True False False 0 Disable 0 0x8100

0 for Ethernet interfaces. As specified for other interfaces. 0 for Ethernet interfaces. As specified for other interfaces. As specified False False False True True 5 True False False True False False 0 Disable 0 0x8100

0 for Ethernet interfaces. As specified for other interfaces. 0 for Ethernet interfaces. As specified for other interfaces. 0 False False False False False 0 False False False True False False 0 Disable 0 0x8100

vci

vlanId stripAndInsert customARP filterBroadcast learnIP learnUnicast maxUnicast learnMulticast forwardToUnicast forwardToMulticast forwardToDefault floodUnknown floodMulticast valndIdCOS outgoingCOSOption outgoingCOSValue s-tagTPID

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Table 4: Default values for asymmetric bridge-interface-record Parameter Uplink Downlink Downlink Tagged Intralink

s-tagId s-tagStripAndInsert s-tagOutgoingCOSOption s-tagIdCOS s-tagOutgoingCOSValue

0 False s-tagdisable 0 0

0 False s-tagdisable 0 0

0 False s-tagdisable 0 0

0 False s-tagdisable 0 0

Bridge default settings for symmetric bridges


Table 5 lists the default bridge-interface-record settings for the supported symmetric bridge options.
Table 5: Default values for symmetric bridge-interface-record Parameter Tranparent TLS Hub

vpi

0 for Ethernet interfaces. As specified for other interfaces. 0 for Ethernet interfaces. As specified for other interfaces. 0 True False False False Truee 5 False True False False False False

0 for Ethernet interfaces. As specified for other interfaces. 0 for Ethernet interfaces. As specified for other interfaces. As specied True False False False True 100 False True False False True True

0 for Ethernet interfaces. As specified for other interfaces. 0 for Ethernet interfaces. As specified for other interfaces. As specified True False False True False 0 False False False True True True

vci

vlanId stripAndInsert customARP filterBroadcast learnIP learnUnicast maxUnicast learnMulticast forwardToUnicast forwardToMulticast forwardToDefault floodUnknown floodMulticast

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Bridge enhancements to flood unknowns and multicasts

Table 5: Default values for symmetric bridge-interface-record Parameter Tranparent TLS Hub

bridgeIfCustomDHCP bridgeIfConfigGroupIndex valndIdCOS outgoingCOSOption outgoingCOSValue s-tagTPID s-tagId s-tagStripAndInsert s-tagOutgoingCOSOption s-tagIdCOS s-tagOutgoingCOSValue

False 0 0 Disable 0 0x8100 0 False s-tagdisable 0 0

False 0 0 Disable 0 0x8100 0 False s-tagdisable 0 0

False 0 0 Disable 0 0x8100 0 False s-tagdisable 0 0

The bridge show command displays the bridge type.


zSH> bridge show Typ VLAN Bridge State Table Data -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------upl Tagged ethernet1/bridge UP S Global default [U: 3600 sec, M: 150 sec, I: 0 sec] 0 1-8-5-0-adsl-0-32/bridge PENDING 0 1-8-4-0-adsl-0-32/bridge PENDING dwn 0 1-8-10-0-adsl-0-35/bridge PENDING dwn 0 1-8-11-0-adsl-0-35/bridge PENDING dwn 0 1-12-1-0-shdsl-0-35/bridge PENDING dwn 0 1-12-2-0-shdsl-0-35/bridge PENDING dwn 0 1-9-1-0-adsl-0-35/bridge DOWN

Bridge enhancements to flood unknowns and multicasts


Bridges are now enhanced to enable VPN-like services using the floodUnknowns and floodMulticast parameters. These parameters enable the MALC to forward unknown traffic to all bridge interfaces within the VLAN.

FloodUnknown parameter
The FloodUknown parameter provides the ability to toggle the flooding of unknown unicast destination frames. When this parameter is set to true, the MALC always forwards frames with an unknown unicast MAC if the bridge is set for forward to unicast. When this parameter is set to false, the MALC always discards frames with an unknown unicast MAC if the bridge is set for

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forward to unicast. Any frame that does not find a match in the forwarding table will be discarded. For transparent bridges, the default setting for this parameter is true. For uplink bridges, the default setting for this parameter is false.

FloodMulticast parameter
The FloodMulticast parameter allows the MALC to flood all multicast traffic received on a bridge out to all other ports in the VLAN. This is useful for architectures where the MALC is acting as an aggregation point with no user interfaces. By default, this parameter is set to false for all bridge types. When set to true, this parameter causes all multicast frames to be forwarded out all of the bridge interfaces within the VLAN, except the interface where the multicast was received.
zSH> update bridge-interface-record 1-8-1-0-ethernetcsmacd/bridge Please provide the following: [q]uit. vpi: ----------------------> {0}: vci: ----------------------> {0}: vlanId: -------------------> {500}: stripAndInsert: -----------> {false}: customARP: ----------------> {false}: filterBroadcast: ----------> {false}: learnIp: ------------------> {true}: learnUnicast: -------------> {true}: maxUnicast: ---------------> {10000}: learnMulticast: -----------> {true}: forwardToUnicast: ---------> {false}: forwardToMulticast: -------> {false}: forwardToDefault: ---------> {true}: bridgeIfCustomDHCP: -------> {false}: bridgeIfConfigGroupIndex: -> {0}: vlanIdCOS: ----------------> {0}: outgoingCOSOption: --------> {disable}: outgoingCOSValue: ---------> {0}: s-tagTPID: ----------------> {0x8100}: s-tagId: ------------------> {0}: s-tagStripAndInsert: ------> {false}: s-tagOutgoingCOSOption: ---> {s-tagdisable}: s-tagIdCOS: ---------------> {0}: s-tagOutgoingCOSValue: ----> {0}: mcastControlList: ---------> {}: maxVideoStreams: ----------> {0}: isPPPoA: ------------------> {false}: floodUnknown: -------------> {false}: floodMulticast: -----------> {false}: .................... Save new record? [s]ave, [c]hange or [q]uit: s Record created.

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Broadcasts and bridging

Broadcasts and bridging


The MALC supports a modified form of broadcast suppression when configured for bridge mode. The MALC configures ports as the entered bridge type. In general, broadcasts sent from a downlink will traverse the uplink, but will not be sent down other downlinks, even within the same VLAN. This prevents subscribers from maliciously or unintentionally sending or receiving broadcasts between ports on the same system. Ports configured as uplinks will send broadcasts upstream, but by default will not propagate broadcasts sent from the upstream down to the MALC. The filterBroadcast parameter in the bridge-interface-record profile enables this filtering. This mechanism provides security benefits, as well as reducing unnecessary traffic on low bandwidth interfaces. One exception to the operational mode described above is ARP broadcast support. When a MALC receives a broadcast frame, it is checked to determine if it is an ARP protocol packet or not. If it is not, it is treated as above. If it is, then the MALC compares and filters the requested IP address with the current forwarding table. If a match is found, the ARP broadcast is forwarded out the interface that has the appropriate host. This host will then reply to the ARP with a standard response. If a match is not found, then the ARP is filtered and it gets dropped as if it were a non-ARP broadcast. This setting is controlled by the customARP parameter. Another exception to this broadcast filtering is DHCP broadcast support. When a MALC receives a broadcast DHCP OFFER message from a remote DHCP server, if customDHCP is set to true, the broadcast messages are forwarded to the source MAC address. Otherwise, the broadcast DHCP messages are filtered. Note: Ethernet interfaces can be addressed as either eth or ethernetcsmacd. The eth abbreviation is used in command output.

TLS Bridging behavior for untagged, tagged, and s-tagged


Bridges also utilize VLAN and SLAN tagging for tagged, s-tagged, and untagged traffic segregation.

Tagged bridging Tagged or Virtual LANs (VLANs) bridging, accepts single-tagged packets based on MAC addresses and allows the segregation of a single Ethernet network into multiple virtual network segments by mapping packets based on the VLAN ID. If a non-zero VLAN ID is configured, the interface accepts only tagged packets matching this VLAN ID. If a VLAN of 0 (zero) is configured, the interface accepts all VLAN tagged packets not matching any configured VLANs on the same interface.

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A conifgured SLAN tag is inserted into outgoing packets whe bridge forwarding selects a double-tagged egress interface. Only non-zero SLAN values are recommended for tagged bridges.

s-tagged Double-tagged or Service LANs (SLANs) bridging, accepts and sends double-tagged traffic based on MAC addresses and allows the segregation of a single Ethernet network into multiple virtual network segments by mapping packets based on VLAN ID and SLAN ID. If non-zero VLAN ID and SLAN ID are configured, the interface accepts and sends only tagged packets matching both VLAN ID and SLAN ID. If a VLAN of 0 (zero) is configured with a non-zero SLAN ID, the interface accepts and sends only double-tagged packets matching the SLAN and any VLAN tagged packets not destined to another client on the same interface. When both the VLAN and SLAN tags are zero (0), the bridge accepts all single or double tagged packets not destined to another client on the same interface.

Untagged bridging Untagged or transparent bridging accepts and sends traffic based on MAC addresses but does not provide traffic segregation. Traffic is broadcast over the Ethernet port and is either accepted or rejected based on the destination MAC address. There is no VLAN tagging; all ports are learning and forwarding without restriction, without broadcast suppression. Forwarding to a default port is not allowed. If bridge forwarding selects a single or double-tagged egress interface, the configured VLAN and SLAN tags will be inserted in to packets destined for this interface. Only non-zero values are recommended for VLAN and SLAN settings of untagged bridges.

For VLAN tagged (single tagged) bridges, the bridge interface name includes the VLAN ID, even the default VLAN ID of 0. Other examples of a single tagged bridge also show a tagged bridge with VLAN 4000 and a tagged bridge with VLAN 1000 and SLAN 17.
zSH> bridge add 1-3-5-0/eth tagged zSH> bridge add 1-3-5-0/eth vlan 4000 tagged zSH> bridge add 1-3-5-0/eth vlan 1000 slan 17 tagged zSH> bridge show Typ VLAN Bridge State Table Data -----------------------------------------------------------------------------Tagged 1-3-5-0-eth-0/bridge PENDING Tagged 4000 1-3-5-0-eth-4000/bridge PENDING Tg 1000/17 1-3-5-0-eth-1000/bridge PENDING

For VLAN and SLAN tagged (double tagged) bridges, the bridge interface name includes the VLAN ID and SLAN ID, even the default VLAN ID of 0 and the default SLAN of 0. Other examples of doubled tagged bridges also

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show a bridge with VLAN 4094 and SLAN 4094, a bridge with VLAN 0 and SLAN 17, and a bridge with VLAN 500 and default SLAN.
zSH> zSH> zSH> zSH> bridge bridge bridge bridge add add add add 1-3-5-0/eth 1-3-5-0/eth 1-3-5-0/eth 1-3-5-0/eth vlan 4094 slan 4094 s-tagged vlan 0 slan 17 s-tagged s-tagged vlan 500 s-tagged

zSH> bridge show Typ VLAN Bridge State Table Data -----------------------------------------------------------------------------ST 4094/4094 1-3-5-0-eth-4094-4094/bridge PENDING ST 0/17 1-3-5-0-eth-0-17/bridge PENDING s-tagged 1-3-5-0-eth-0-0/bridge PENDING Tagged 500 1-3-5-0-eth-500-0/bridge PENDING

Bridges can be deleted by specified VLAN ID, SLAN ID, type of tagging, and all option. Specifying a VLAN ID all single and double tagged bridges configured for that VLAN. To delete a bride by a specific SLAN tag:
zSH> bridge delete 1-3-5-0/eth slan 17

To delete a bridge by a specific VLAN tag or tag type:


zSH> bridge delete 1-3-5-0/eth vlan 500 zSH> bridge delete 1-3-5-0/eth tagged

To delete all s-tagged bridges on a port:


zSH> bridge delete 1-3-5-0/eth s-tagged all

To delete all VLAN 0 bridges on a port:


zSH> bridge delete 1-3-5-0/eth vlan 0 all

VLANs
Figure 12 shows a typical VLAN configuration. On the access (subscriber) side, VLANs 1 and 2 are separate DSL networks connected to the MALC via Z-Edge devices. On the uplink side, VLANs 1 and 2 are on the same physical Ethernet interface, but the traffic is separated based on the VLAN IDs. The side of the connection closest to the subscriber is called the downlink interface. The upstream egress is called the uplink interface. When the MALC is in VLAN mode, it adds (tags) the VLAN ID to the Ethernet frame on the uplink interface and strips (untags) the ID out on the downlink interface. Although VLAN IDs are not typically required on downlink interfaces, you

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can configure downlink interface as tagged. Tagged downlink interfaces can be used for subtended MALCs or subscribers expecting tagged traffic with Transparent LAN Server (TLS) service. Note: The MALC supports VLAN IDs from 1 to 4096. Multiple VLAN interfaces can be added to the same physical port and VC.

Figure 12: Example VLAN network

You can configure static VLAN bridge paths, which requires that you enter a MAC address for every bridge on the Ethernet. Or, you can set up the MALC Ethernet interface to learn the VLAN IDs when it receives a packet from a downlink device. Note that if the MALC receives a packet from an uplink interface before it has learned the VLAN ID or MAC address, it will not deliver the packet.

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VLANs

Figure 13: Learning a VLAN ID

Configuring a VLAN bridge


To configure a VLAN bridge: 1 Use the bridge add command to add a bridge for the downstream connection. Multiple VLAN interfaces can be added to the same physical port and VC.

zSH> bridge add 1-8-1-0/adsl vc 0/35 td 1 downlink vlan 555 zSH> bridge add 1-8-1-0/adsl vc 0/36 td 1 downlink vlan 777

This example adds downlink VLAN interfaces to the ADSL modem in shelf 1, slot 8, port 1 with VLAN IDs of 555 and 777. It uses the VCLs 0/ 35 and 0/36, traffic descriptor 1 as a transport, sets the parameters to the downlink settings, and assigns port VLAN ID 555 and 777. The following bridge-interface-record is created with the downlink default settings and shows the internal VPI/VCI cross connects. It is recommended not to change the default settings unless advanced bridge configuration is required.
zSH> get bridge-interface-record 1-8-1-0-adsl-0-35-555/bridge vpi: ----------------------> {0} vci: ----------------------> {35} vlanId: -------------------> {555} stripAndInsert: -----------> {true} customARP: ----------------> {false} filterBroadcast: ----------> {false} learnIp: ------------------> {true} learnUnicast: -------------> {true} maxUnicast: ---------------> {5} learnMulticast: -----------> {true} forwardToUnicast: ---------> {false} forwardToMulticast: -------> {false}

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forwardToDefault: ---------> bridgeIfCustomDHCP: -------> bridgeIfConfigGroupIndex: -> vlanIdCOS: ----------------> outgoingCOSOption: --------> outgoingCOSValue: ---------> s-tagTPID: ----------------> s-tagId: ------------------> s-tagStripAndInsert: ------> s-tagOutgoingCOSOption: ---> s-tagIdCOS: ---------------> s-tagOutgoingCOSValue: ----> mcastControlList: ---------> maxVideoStreams: ----------> isPPPoA: ------------------> floodUnknown: -------------> floodMulticast: ----------->

{true} {false} {0} {0} {disable} {0} {0x8100} {0} {false} {s-tagdisable} {0} {0} {0} {0} {false} {false} {false}

zSH> get bridge-interface-record 1-8-1-0-adsl-0-35-777/bridge vpi: ----------------------> {0} vci: ----------------------> {35} vlanId: -------------------> {777} stripAndInsert: -----------> {true} customARP: ----------------> {false} filterBroadcast: ----------> {false} learnIp: ------------------> {true} learnUnicast: -------------> {true} maxUnicast: ---------------> {5} learnMulticast: -----------> {true} forwardToUnicast: ---------> {false} forwardToMulticast: -------> {false} forwardToDefault: ---------> {true} bridgeIfCustomDHCP: -------> {false} bridgeIfConfigGroupIndex: -> {0} vlanIdCOS: ----------------> {0} outgoingCOSOption: --------> {disable} outgoingCOSValue: ---------> {0} s-tagTPID: ----------------> {0x8100} s-tagId: ------------------> {0} s-tagStripAndInsert: ------> {false} s-tagOutgoingCOSOption: ---> {s-tagdisable} s-tagIdCOS: ---------------> {0} s-tagOutgoingCOSValue: ----> {0} mcastControlList: ---------> {0} maxVideoStreams: ----------> {0} isPPPoA: ------------------> {false} floodUnknown: -------------> {false} floodMulticast: -----------> {false}

Use the bridge add command to add a VLAN interface to the upstream Ethernet interface:
zSH> bridge add 1-1-1-0/ethernetcsmacd uplink

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VLANs

This command adds a learning bridge that accepts VLAN traffic and enables VLAN trunking on the MALC units egress Ethernet port. 3 Configure the uplink interface to learn the VLAN IDs of all ingress Ethernet devices or a specific VLAN ID:
zSH> bridge-path add ethernet1/bridge global

The global setting specifies that the MALC should send all VLAN traffic to this port. A VLAN ID can also be used when the MALC should send only traffic from a specific VLAN ID to this port. (The ethernet1 interface is the first Ethernet interface on the MALC.) It is recommended not to change the default settings unless advanced bridge configuration is required.
zSH> get bridge-interface-record ethernet1/bridge vpi: ----------------------> {0} vci: ----------------------> {0} vlanId: -------------------> {0} stripAndInsert: -----------> {false} customARP: ----------------> {true} filterBroadcast: ----------> {true} learnIp: ------------------> {false} learnUnicast: -------------> {false} maxUnicast: ---------------> {0} learnMulticast: -----------> {false} forwardToUnicast: ---------> {true} forwardToMulticast: -------> {true} forwardToDefault: ---------> {false} bridgeIfCustomDHCP: -------> {false} bridgeIfConfigGroupIndex: -> {0} vlanIdCOS: ----------------> {0} outgoingCOSOption: --------> {disable} outgoingCOSValue: ---------> {0} s-tagTPID: ----------------> {0x8100} s-tagId: ------------------> {0} s-tagStripAndInsert: ------> {false} s-tagOutgoingCOSOption: ---> {s-tagdisable} s-tagIdCOS: ---------------> {0} s-tagOutgoingCOSValue: ----> {0} mcastControlList: ---------> {} maxVideoStreams: ----------> {0} isPPPoA: ------------------> {false} floodUnknown: -------------> {false} floodMulticast: -----------> {false}

Verify connectivity by pinging a far end device on the VLAN. Note: To delete a downlink bridge with a VLAN, the VLAN ID must be specified in the bridge delete command.

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Q-in-Q
The IEEE 802.1Q-in-Q VLAN tagging expands the VLAN space in the Ethernet frame to support the tagging of previously tagged packets. This second tag (SLAN) creates a "double-tagged" Ethernet frame. The double-tagged Ethernet frame enables service providers to offer additional services, such as Internet access on specific SLANs for specific customers, while still providing single-tagged VLAN services. The MALC also supports setting COS values in the Ethernet SLAN headers for bridged packets. This service enables you to assign a service level or class of service (COS) to an Ethernet SLAN that is transported across a uplink, intralink, or downlinked s-tagged bridge. The configured COS level specifies the packet priority and queueing methods used to transport the packet through the Ethernet network. The MALC sets and preserves the COS settings to ensure these settings are passed to other Ethernet devices in the network for QOS processing. Note: Ethernet interfaces can be addressed as either eth or ethernetcsmacd. The eth abbreviation is used in command output. Figure 14 illustrates a network of MALC devices configured to support separate SLANs per MALC while also providing individual VLANs per customer port.

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Q-in-Q

Figure 14: Q-in-Q Bridging

Configuring Q-in-Q using the Interface command


For Q-in-Q VLAN tagging, the interface profile supports the following parameters:

s-tagTPID Identifies the type of VLAN ID used. Typically set to 8100. s-tagID Specifies the SLAN ID assigned to an Ethernet frame. s-tagIDCOS Specifies the COS ID associated with the SLAN ID

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The interface command supports adding s-tagIDs from the command line. This example adds interface ethernet1 with VLAN 100, SLAN 200, COS value of 7 and sCOS value of 8.
interface add ethernet1/ip vc 0/35 td 20000 other vlan 100 slan 200 cos 7 scos 8 172.16.88.46 255.255.255.0 zSH> get ip-interface-record ethernet1/ip vpi: ---------------> {0} vci: ---------------> {0} rdindex: -----------> {1} dhcp: --------------> {none} addr: --------------> {172.16.88.46} netmask: -----------> {255.255.255.0} bcastaddr: ---------> {172.16.88.255} destaddr: ----------> {0.0.0.0} farendaddr: --------> {0.0.0.0} mru: ---------------> {1500} reasmmaxsize: ------> {0} ingressfiltername: -> {} egressfiltername: --> {} pointtopoint: ------> {no} mcastenabled: ------> {yes} ipfwdenabled: ------> {yes} mcastfwdenabled: ---> {yes} natenabled: --------> {no} bcastenabled: ------> {yes} ingressfilterid: ---> {0} egressfilterid: ----> {0} ipaddrdynamic: -----> {static} dhcpserverenable: --> {false} subnetgroup: -------> {0} unnumberedindex: ---> {0} mcastcontrollist: --> {} vlanid: ------------> {100} maxVideoStreams: ---> {0} tosOption: ---------> {disable} tosCOS: ------------> {7} vlanCOS: -----------> {0} s-tagTPID: ---------> {0x8100} s-tagId: -----------> {200} s-tagIdCOS: --------> {8}

Configuring Q-in-Q using the Bridge command


For Q-in-Q VLAN tagging, the bridge profile supports the following parameters:

s-tagTPID Identifies the type of VLAN ID used. Typically set to 8100.

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s-tagID Specifies the SLAN ID assigned to an Ethernet frame. s-tagStripAndInsert Specifies whether to strip and insert s-tag values in Ethernet frames received and transmitted on the bridge interface.

s-tagOutgoingCOSOption Specifies whether to insert COS value bits on outgoing s-tag packets. s-tagIDCOS Specifies the COS ID associated with the SLAN ID s-tagOutgoingCOSValue Specifies the value used to overwrite any existing COS value in outgoing s-tag packets.

Syntax bridge add The bridge command supports adding s-tagIDs from the command line. This example adds interface 1-8-22-0/adsl with VLAN 100, SLAN 101, COS value of 7 and sCOS value of 8.
bridge add 1-8-22-0/adsl vc 0/35 td 20000 downlink vlan 100 slan 200 tagged COS 7 scos 8

To display the bridge-record profile, enter the show bridge-interface-record or bridge show command.
zSH> show bridge-interface-record 1-8-22-0-adsl-0-35/bridge vpi: ----------------------> {0} vci: ----------------------> {32} vlanId: -------------------> {100} stripAndInsert: -----------> {true} customARP: ----------------> {false} filterBroadcast: ----------> {false} learnIp: ------------------> {true} learnUnicast: -------------> {true} maxUnicast: ---------------> {5} learnMulticast: -----------> {false} forwardToUnicast: ---------> {false} forwardToMulticast: -------> {false} forwardToDefault: ---------> {true} bridgeIfCustomDHCP: -------> {false} bridgeIfConfigGroupIndex: -> {0} vlanIdCOS: ----------------> {7} outgoingCOSOption: --------> {disable} outgoingCOSValue: ---------> {0} s-tagTPID: ----------------> {0x8100} s-tagId: ------------------> {200} s-tagStripAndInsert: ------> {true} s-tagOutgoingCOSOption: ---> {s-tagdisable} s-tagIdCOS: ---------------> {8}

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s-tagOutgoingCOSValue: ----> mcastControlList: ---------> maxVideoStreams: ----------> isPPPoA: ------------------> floodUnknown: -------------> floodMulticast: ----------->

{0} {0} {0} {false} {false} {false}

zSH> bridge show Typ VLAN Bridge State Table Data ----------------------------------------------------------------100/200 ethernet1/bridge UP D 00:50:04:df:c0:7a Upl Tagged uplink1-0-101/bridge UP S VLAN 100 default [3600 sec]

Bridge path enhancements


For Q-in-Q VLAN tagging, the bridge path profile supports the s-tagID parameter to specifies the SLAN ID assigned to an Ethernet frame in static bridge configurations. The bridge-path command supports adding s-tagIDs from the command line. This example creates a static bridge between an interface and a specific IP address and VLAN 300. It also adds an SLAN of 400
zSH> bridge-path add 1-1-4-0/ds3 vlan 300 slan 400 ip 192.16.80.1

To display bridge-path interface records with vlan and slan values, use the bridge-path show command.
zSH> bridge-path show Typ VLAN/SLAN Bridge Address -------------------------------------------------------------------Upl 300/400 uplink1-0-101/bridge Default

Untagged bridging
Configuring untagged or transparent bridging enables you to forward traffic from a downlink interface through the MALC uplink interface based on the destination MAC address without tagging or modification to the frame. Refer to the CLI Reference Guide for a complete description of the command options and syntax. Note: Ethernet interfaces can be addressed as either eth or ethernetcsmacd. The eth abbreviation is used in command output.

Configuring an untagged bridge


To add an untagged bridge: 1 Add an untagged bridge to the downstream DSL interface:

zSH> bridge add 1-8-2-0/adsl vc 0/101 td 1

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Created bridge-interface-record 1-8-2-0-adsl-0-101/bridge

This example adds a default transparent bridge interface to the ADSL modem in shelf 1, slot 8, port 2. It uses the VCL 0/101 and traffic descriptor 1 as a transport and sets the parameters to the default transparent bridge interface settings. The following examples shows the default bridge-interface-record settings with the internal vpi/vci cross connects. It is recommended not to change the default settings unless advanced bridge configuration is required.
zSH> get bridge-interface-record 1-8-2-0-adsl-0-101/bridge vpi: ----------------------> {0} vci: ----------------------> {101} vlanId: -------------------> {0} stripAndInsert: -----------> {true} customARP: ----------------> {false} filterBroadcast: ----------> {true} learnIp: ------------------> {true} learnUnicast: -------------> {true} maxUnicast: ---------------> {5} learnMulticast: -----------> {true} forwardToUnicast: ---------> {false} forwardToMulticast: -------> {false} forwardToDefault: ---------> {true} bridgeIfCustomDHCP: -------> {false} bridgeIfConfigGroupIndex: -> {0}

Add a transparent bridge to the upstream Ethernet interface:

zSH> bridge add 1-1-1-0/ethernetcsmacd Created bridge-interface-record 1-1-1-0-ethernetcsmacd/bridge

This command adds a bridge that accepts transparent/untagged traffic on the MALC unitss egress Ethernet port. The following shows the default transparent bridge-interface-record settings for the uplink. It is recommended not to change the default settings unless advanced bridge configuration is required.
zSH> get bridge-interface-record ethernet1/bridge vpi: ----------------------> {0} vci: ----------------------> {0} vlanId: -------------------> {0} stripAndInsert: -----------> {false} customARP: ----------------> {true} filterBroadcast: ----------> {true} learnIp: ------------------> {false} learnUnicast: -------------> {false} maxUnicast: ---------------> {0} learnMulticast: -----------> {false} forwardToUnicast: ---------> {true} forwardToMulticast: -------> {true} forwardToDefault: ---------> {false}

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bridgeIfCustomDHCP: -------> bridgeIfConfigGroupIndex: ->

{false} {0}

Verify that both sides of the bridge are present:

zSH> bridge show Typ VLAN Bridge State Table Data ----------------------------------------------------------------dwn 0 1-8-2-0-adsl-0-101/bridge UP upl 0 1-1-1-0-ethernetcsmacd/bridge UP

Test the bridge by pinging a device on the far end network and verifying e that the bridge table is updated:

zSH> bridge show Typ VLAN Bridge State Table Data ----------------------------------------------------------------dwn 0 1-8-2-0-adsl-0-101/bridge UP D 00:01:47:cf:ae:04 upl 0 1-1-1-0-ethernetcsmacd/bridge UP D 00:01:02:70:03:a2

Ethernet RPR
Ethernet Resilient Packet Ring (RPR) provides redundant Ethernet links between MALC RPR nodes and an IP or outside network. Following the IEEE 802.17 standard, Ethernet packets are inserted, stripped, and forwarded between the RPR Uplink and ring nodes to create a resilient architecture with high bandwidth utilization and less than 50ms protection switching.

Overview
An RPR configuration consists of an MALC RPR Uplink node that serves as a gateway between the RPR ring and the Internet or outside network, and a number of RPR ring nodes that process traffic between themselves and the Uplink node. A dual counter-rotating ring is used so traffic can be transmitted and received in both ring directions. The RPR Uplink node must have two 2-port GigE Uplink cards connected with a redundant RPR cable. Each ring node requires one 2-port GigE card with an optional GigE card added for redundancy. Note: See the MALC Hardware Installation Guide for more details about adding redundant GigE-2 cards to the MALC. The 2-port GigE card utilizes Small Form-factor Pluggable (SFPs) for flexible deployment over fiber or copper media for data-only or integrated voice, video, and data connections. SFP modules with the following Gigabit Interface Convertors (GBICs) are available for a variety of transmission choices:

SX for 850nm with multimode fiber (MMF)

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LX for 1310nm with singlemode fiber (SMF) ZX for 1550nm with singlemode fiber (SMF) 1000B-T for copper cable

See the MALC Hardware Installation Guide for more details about the supported SFPs. RPR can be deployed in a variety of topologies including ring, collapsed ring, star, linear and redundant card configurations. This section uses a basic 3-node ring topology as an example topology to demonstrate node functionality and port connections.

RPR ring topology


In RPR ring topologies, two physical ports on the GigE cards are used as the single logical RPR ring port. For redundant GigE cards, including as the two GigE cards used in the RPR uplink node, the physical ports labeled port 1 on the redundant cards form the single logical RPR port. For non-redundant GigE cards, the ports labeled port 1 and port 2 on the single GigE card form the single logical RPR port. Note: The recommended maximum number of nodes in an RPR ring is 16. In RPR configurations, the following logical interfaces are used:

interface 1-1-1-0 /ethernetcsmacd uses the first physical port labeled 10/ 100 for the 10/100 Ethernet physical interface. interface 1-1-1-0/rpr uses the two physical ports assigned to the logical RPR port. In redundant GigE card configurations, the physical ports labeled port 1 on the redundant cards form the single logical RPR port. In non-redundant GigE card configurations, the physical ports labeled port 1 and port 2 on the same card from the single logical RPR port.

interface 1-1-3-0 is assigned to physical port 2 in redundant GigE card configurations for upstream or subtended GigE connections.

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Figure 15: RPR logical ports

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Physical ports are connected around the ring in the east direction so that port 1 on the active RPR Uplink node connects to the port 2 on the adjacent ring node. On the redundant RPR Uplink node card, port 1 connects in the west direction to the port 1 on the adjacent ring node. Traffic to the IP or outside network goes through the interface 1-1-3-0 assigned to physical port 2 on the RPR Uplink nodes active and standby cards. A redundant cable connects the physical RDNT ports between the RPR Uplink nodes active and redundant GigE cards. Neighbor RPR ring nodes with single GigE cards connect in the east direction through physical port 1 to facial port 2. Figure 16 illustrates a 3 node RPR configuration and physical port connections.

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Note: Because the MALC RPR ring uses dual counter-rotating rings, each connecting line in this figure represents two actual fibers. Each fiber transports send and receive traffic in a different direction around the ring.
Figure 16: RPR configuration
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RPR ring topology with redundant GigE cards


Redundant GigE cards can also be used at each ring node to add an additional level of equipment protection. As with the RPR uplink node, redundant cables connect RDNT ports between the RPR ring nodes. Also in the RPR ring nodes, the physical ports labeled port 1 on the active and standy cards form the single logical RPR port interface 1-1-1-0/rpr. Physical port 2 on the active and standby cards in the ring nodes can be unconnected or connected to subtended nodes.

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For the physical connections in this configuration, connect the physical ports so that on the RPR Uplink node the active card port 1 connects in the west direction to the adjacent RPR ring node port 1. On the redundant card in the Uplink node, port 1 connects in the east direction to the adjacent RPR ring node port 1.The neighbor RPR ring nodes connect through the physical ports labeled port 1. Physical ports labeled port 2 are not connected or may be used for GigE connections to subtended devices. Traffic to the IP or upstream network goes through the primary RPR Uplink node on active and standby cards physical port 2. Figure 17 illustrates a basic RPR configuration with redundant cards on the ring nodes. Note: Because the MALC RPR ring uses dual counter-rotating rings, each connecting line in this figure represents two actual fibers. Each fiber transports send and receive traffic in a different direction around the ring. Interface 1-1-1-0/ethernetcsmacd is assigned to the 10/100 Ethernet physical interface.

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Figure 17: RPR configuration with redundant ring nodes


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RPR ring topology with redundant GigE cards and subtended MALCs
In this configuration, redundant cables also connect RDNT ports between the RPR ring nodes. Also in the RPR ring nodes, the physical ports labeled port 1 on the active and standy cards form the single logical RPR port interface 1-1-1-0/rpr. For the physical connections in this configuration, connect the physical ports so that on the RPR Uplink node the active card port 1 connects in the west direction to the adjacent RPR ring node port 1. On the redundant card in the Uplink node, port 1 connects in the east direction to the adjacent RPR ring node port 1.The neighbor RPR ring nodes connect through the physical ports labeled port 1.

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Physical ports labeled 2 on the active and standby cards function as the subtended GigE connection and use interface 1-1-3-0/ethernetcsmacd. Traffic to the IP or upstream network goes through the RPR Uplink node on active and standby cards physical port 2 using interface 1-1-3-0/ ethernetcsmacd. Figure 18 illustrates a basic RPR configuration with redundant cards on the ring nodes and subtended MALCs. Note: Because the MALC RPR ring uses dual counter-rotating rings, each connecting line in this figure represents two actual fibers. Each fiber transports send and receive traffic in a different direction around the ring. Interface 1-1-1-0/ethernetcsmacd is assigned to the 10/100 Ethernet physical interface.

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Figure 18: RPR configuration with redundant ring nodes and subtended MALC
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RPR configuration
RPR basic configuration involves configuring the primary Uplink node with 2 GigE Uplink cards and then configuring each RPR ring node with a single GigE Uplink card. Redundant GigE Uplink cards can also be added to RPR ring nodes for additional card protection. This section contains the following procedures:

Configuring RPR protection switching on page 124 Displaying RPR configuration on page 125

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Displaying RPR topology on page 126 Displaying RPR status on page 128 Displaying RPR statistics on page 129

Configuring RPR protection switching


MALC RPR configurations support less than 50ms protection switching for fiber breaks or ring failures in the RPR ring. RPR nodes support a Wrap protection strategy. This protection strategy determines the timing and type of protection that is used when a span fault occurs. When Wrap is configured as false (the default setting) and a ring protection event occurs, the RPR node does not send traffic in the direction of the ring failure. Instead, traffic is steered or redirected to the destination in the opposite direction of the ring failure. When Wrap is configured as true, the RPR node sends traffic out to the destination even if it is in the direction of a ring failure. When the failure is encountered, traffic wraps or returns in the other direction back through the sending node to the destination. The Wrap false setting offers lower packet latency as packets do not have to travel to the ring failure and then traverse the ring in the opposite direction to get to the destination. However, with this setting more packet loss may occur as packets sent in the direction of a ring failure may be lost. The Wrap true setting helps prevent packet loss, but increases packet latency as packets sent in the direction of a ring failure are rerouted back to the destination in the opposite direction. Other protection switching options include:

reversion mode The reversion mode determines if traffic resumes processing in the normal direction after a protection event is cleared.

wait-to-restore (wtr) time The wtr time determines how long the node waits after a protection event is cleared before traffic processing reverts back to the normal direction.

fast timer This timer indicates how often in milliseconds the node sends out fast status messages when a protection event occurs.

slow timer This timer indicates how often the node sends out slow status messages when a protection event occurs. This value is in 50 millisecond (ms) intervals. For example, a value of 100 equals 5 seconds. To change the protection switching options, update the rpr-config profile.
zSH> update rpr-config 1-1-1-0/rpr Please provide the following: [q]uit.

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reversion-mode: --------> {true}: protection-wtr: --------> {10}: 20 protection-fast-timer: -> {10}: protection-slow-timer: -> {100}: wrap-config: -----------> {false}: .................... Save changes? [s]ave, [c]hange or [q]uit: s Record updated.

Displaying RPR configuration


The MALC rpr show config command displays information about the current RPR node configuration.
zSH> rpr show config sysObject= 0x66bc578, systemId= 0, pParent= 0x7de9ba0, ethDrvNum= 0 rprStarted= 1, bridgeExists= 1 npRprContext= 0x100 (BrgExst,Steer,) rprCtrlSema4= 0x492a740, taskIdSema4= 0x0, lastTaskIdSema4= 0x66b06e8 rprStationSema4= 0x4b43fd0, taskIdStationSema4= 0x0, lastTaskIdStationSema4= 0x66b06e8 NpGigePacketWrap= 4/5, unitPhy= 0/1, outMacPort= 1/0 Encoding= 0xf810/0xf811, rxRegistered= 1/1 txSlowTimeout= 100ms, txFastTimeout= 10ms, ticksPer100ms= 10 atdTimerTimeout= 1000ms, lastAtdSentTime= 2687770 topoChanged= 0, protectChanged= 0 containmentActive= 0, containmentStart= 1055191, containmentDuration= 60ms containmentCnt= 6, containmentTotal= 13310ms newNeighbor= 0/0, revertive= 1, tossWrongRingletIDs= 0 lrttActive= 1, lrttComplete= 1, lrttContextId= 7 lrttTime= 1055197, lrttDuration= 210ms, lrttIncompletionTimeout= 1000ms tvState= tvValid, tvTopoCheck= 3, stabilityTime= 1055192, instabilityTime= 1055191 stabilityTO= 40ms, instabilityTO= 10000ms topologyValid= 1, topologyStable= 1, topologyUnstableTime= 1055191, topologyUnstableDuration= 60ms adminReqProtection= ???/???, spanProtAdmin= IDL/IDL spanOperStatus= IDL/IDL, linkErrCode= UP needSecondaryMacValidation= 1, cleavePt= 1/1 notifyCleavePtChange= 0/0, notifyTopoChange= 0/0 WTR[0]: time= 10541840, timeout= 10000ms, enabled= 1 WTR[1]: time= 237920, timeout= 10000ms, enabled= 1 tcState= tcReturn, puState= puReturn, ptpState= ptpReturn Defect: miscabling= 0/0, Start= 0/0, Duration= 0ms/0ms protMisconfig= 0, Start= 0, Duration= 0ms topoEntryInvalid= 0, Start= 1054951, Duration= 60ms maxStations= 0, Start= 0, Duration= 0ms topoInconsist= 0, Start= 1042700, Duration= 340ms topoInstab= 0, Start= 0, Duration= 0ms nextLogId= 209, totalLogEntrys= 209 current time = 2687864 ticks (26878640ms)

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Displaying RPR topology


MALC RPR topology displays information about an RPR ring for ring diagnostics and management. From an RPR nodes perspective, other nodes to in the west direction or left of the current node are on ringlet 0. Nodes in the east direction or right of the current node are on ringlet 1. The number of hops between nodes is determined by counting the number of nodes in a specified ringlet or direction. The current node is always at hop 0. This illustration shows an example 3-node topology.

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Using ring node B as the current node, ringlet 0 (zero) is in the west direction or left. From node B, traffic on ringlet 0 travels to node A, to node C and back to node B. In ringlet 0, node A is one hop from node B, while node C is two hops away. Ringlet 1 is in east direction or right. From node B, traffic on ringlet 1 travels to node C, to node A and back to node B. In ringlet 1, node C is one hop from node B, while node A is two hops away.

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Use the rpr show topo command to display topology, statistics, configuration, and status information.
zSH> rpr show topo total number of ring nodes= 3 (ringlet 0= 2, ringlet 1= 2) ring protection= STEERING, ring topology= CLOSED ring containment= NOT active, topology valid= true link status: west(PSW)= Signal OK (IDL), east(PSE)= Signal OK (IDL) R=reachable; WE=west/east edge state; PSW/PSE=west/east protect state ring hop R WE PSW PSE -------MAC------- ------IP------0 3 t ff IDL IDL 00:01:47:5a:aa:2a 192.168.50.142 0 2 t ff IDL IDL 00:01:47:5a:aa:22 192.168.50.146 0 1 t ff IDL IDL 00:01:47:5a:aa:1a 192.168.50.144 **** 0 t ff IDL IDL 00:01:47:5a:aa:2a 192.168.50.142 1 1 t ff IDL IDL 00:01:47:5a:aa:22 192.168.50.146 1 2 t ff IDL IDL 00:01:47:5a:aa:1a 192.168.50.144 1 3 t ff IDL IDL 00:01:47:5a:aa:2a 192.168.50.142

This example topology uses node B as the current node. There are a total of 3 nodes in the ring, the current node and 2 nodes in each ringlet. Ring protection is set to Steering (Wrap=false). There are no protection events so the ring is closed and containment is not active. Containment causes data packets that are not strictly ordered to be discarded when a topology change or protection event occurs. The current topology is valid. Causes of invalid topology include miscabling, malfunctioning links, and other connectivity issues. For each node in the ring, the topology displays the following data:
Field Description

ring

0 indicates ringlet 0 and the east direction around ring. 1 indicates ringlet 1 and the west direction around ring. **** indicates the current node. Number of hops upstream and downstream from the current node. The current node is always displayed with a hop count of 0. To validate the passing of traffic through the complete ring and back to the current node, the current node also appears at the last hop in both ringlets. Reachable. t indicates the connection to the node is valid and reachable. f indicates the connection to the node is not valid and is unreachable. West and east span fault status. An edge indicates a span fault occurred. t indicates an edge exists and the edge status is true. f indicates an edge does not exist and the edge status is false.

hop

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Field

Description

PSW/PSE

The protection state on the west (PSW) and east (PSE) span. Values: IDL: Protection status is idle, signal OK. Link is up with neighbor. WTR: Wait-to-restore. The span has recovered from a fault but its been configured to wait a period of time before restoring the cards connection. The wait-to-restore time is configured in the protection-wtr parameter in the rpr-config profile. MS: User has requested the span to deactivate. Not supported. SD: Signal degraded. Not supported. SF: Signal failure. Link is down with neighbor. FS: User has forced span to deactivate. Not supported.

MAC IP

The MAC address of the node. IP address of the node. If the node has multiple IP interfaces on the RPR port, the interface associated with the lowest VLAN ID is displayed.

Displaying RPR status


The MALC rpr show status command displays status information about the RPR ring for ring diagnostics and management.
zSH> rpr show status sysObject= 0x66bc578, systemId= 0, pParent= 0x7de9ba0, ethDrvNum= 0 rprStarted= 1, bridgeExists= 1 npRprContext= 0x100 (BrgExst,Steer,) rprCtrlSema4= 0x492a740, taskIdSema4= 0x0, lastTaskIdSema4= 0x4984b60 rprStationSema4= 0x4b43fd0, taskIdStationSema4= 0x0, lastTaskIdStationSema4= 0x66b06e8 NpGigePacketWrap= 4/5, unitPhy= 0/1, outMacPort= 1/0 Encoding= 0xf810/0xf811, rxRegistered= 1/1 txSlowTimeout= 100ms, txFastTimeout= 10ms, ticksPer100ms= 10 atdTimerTimeout= 1000ms, lastAtdSentTime= 2752070 topoChanged= 0, protectChanged= 0 containmentActive= 0, containmentStart= 1055191, containmentDuration= 60ms containmentCnt= 6, containmentTotal= 13310ms newNeighbor= 0/0, revertive= 1, tossWrongRingletIDs= 0 lrttActive= 1, lrttComplete= 1, lrttContextId= 7 lrttTime= 1055197, lrttDuration= 210ms, lrttIncompletionTimeout= 1000ms tvState= tvValid, tvTopoCheck= 3, stabilityTime= 1055192, instabilityTime= 1055191 stabilityTO= 40ms, instabilityTO= 10000ms topologyValid= 1, topologyStable= 1, topologyUnstableTime= 1055191, topologyUnstableDuration= 60ms adminReqProtection= ???/???, spanProtAdmin= IDL/IDL spanOperStatus= IDL/IDL, linkErrCode= UP needSecondaryMacValidation= 1, cleavePt= 1/1 notifyCleavePtChange= 0/0, notifyTopoChange= 0/0 WTR[0]: time= 10541840, timeout= 10000ms, enabled= 1

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WTR[1]: time= 237920, timeout= 10000ms, enabled= 1 tcState= tcReturn, puState= puReturn, ptpState= ptpReturn Defect: miscabling= 0/0, Start= 0/0, Duration= 0ms/0ms protMisconfig= 0, Start= 0, Duration= 0ms topoEntryInvalid= 0, Start= 1054951, Duration= 60ms maxStations= 0, Start= 0, Duration= 0ms topoInconsist= 0, Start= 1042700, Duration= 340ms topoInstab= 0, Start= 0, Duration= 0ms nextLogId= 209, totalLogEntrys= 209 current time = 2752107 ticks (27521070ms)

Displaying RPR statistics


The MALC rpr show stats command displays both RPR transmit and receive statistics about the RPR ring performance for ring diagnostics and management. The rpr show stats optional argument clear will clear the statistics. The noclr argument (the default) preserves the current statistics.
rpr-node2-zSH> rpr show stats TX: Requests= 3604, Ok= 3604, BadSrcMac= 0, Switch2Bridge= 8 Data: ip= 3596, ucst= 2963, bcst= 633, bridge= 8, ec_so= 0 DstUnreachable= 0, Data_containment= 0 CtLrttReq: ok= 270, fail= 0 CtLrttRsp: ok= 200, fail= 0 CtTC: ok= 3312442, fast= 718, fail= 0, triggers= 290 CtTP: ok= 3312625, fast= 901, fail= 0, triggers= 192 CtATD: ok= 331153, fail= 0, nodata= 30 Idle: ok= 0, fail= 0 Fairness: ok= 0, fail= 0 RX: Data: total= 1306065, bf= 1574, ef= 1304491, containment= 0, ec_so= 1304491 Idle= 0, Fairness= 0 Ct= 17571585, Ct_badType= 0, Ct_badVersion= 0 CtTP: total= 11741085, ignore= 0, ignoreOthers= 0, suspect= 0 CtTP_redundant[ hop=1 ]: 1689268, 3311135 CtTP_redundant[ hop=2 ]: 1684453, 1686970 CtTP_redundant[ hop=3 ]: 1684482, 1684478 CtTC: total= 4997664, bad= 0 CtLrttReq: total= 214, ignore= 14 CtATD: total= 832407, ignore= 0, dup= 0, badType= 0, badLen= 0 ZhOrg= 0, badZhType= 0, badZhLen= 0 CtLrttRsp: total= 215, ignore= 0, exceed= 0, bad= 0 lrtt_starts= 108, lrtt_fails= 0, lrtt_stops= 107, lrtt_multiple= 0 contextChgs= 218, cleavePtChgs= 7/51, topoChgs= 79/57 linkChgs= 52/4, linkChgNotifies= 56 CDT: Add= 29, Add2= 54, Del= 26, Del2=104

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Switches= 54, SwitchTreeHops1/2/3= 1/78/0 MacChgs= 0, Unexp1/2/3/4/5/6= 0/0/0/0/0/0

Adding bridges to RPR ring


Bridges can be configured in a RPR ring so bridged subscriber traffic can be transported across the ring and connected to the destination IP or outside network. The illustration below shows the bridge configurations in a 3-node RPR ring:

Uplink node The RPR Uplink node contains a bridge uplink and global bridge-path on the redundant GigE active and standy card ports labelled port 2 (1-1-3-0/ ethernetcsmacd) to direct all bridged traffic to the outside or IP network. The RPR Uplink node also contains a global-intralink on the GigE active and standby card s logical RPR ports (1-1-1-0/rpr) so unknown traffic is sent to the ring, even though address learning is not enabled.

Ring node 1 This RPR ring node contains a bridge uplink on the redundant GigE cards logical RPR port (1-1-1-0/rpr) to direct all outgoing bridged traffic to the RPR Uplink node. This node also contains a bridge downlink on the ADSL card 1-1-5-0 so VLAN tags can be stripped and inserted for subscriber VLAN participation.

Ring node 2 This RPR ring node contains a bridge uplink on the redundant GigE cards logical RPR port (1-1-1-0/rpr) to direct all outgoing bridged traffic to the RPR Uplink node. This node also contains a bridge intralink on port 2 (1-3-1-0/ethernetcsmacd) to a subtended MALC. A bridge intralink is used in place of a bridge downlink so unknown packets are forwarded to subscribers without the need to learn all downlink subscriber MAC addresses. Note: If a subtended device is configured to request DHCP services from a DHCP server through the IP or outside network, ensure that the CustomDHCP setting is set to true in the bridge-interface-records on the RPR Uplink and ring nodes.

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To configure bridges in an RPR ring: 1 On the Uplink node a Add a bridge interface to the second GigE port (this is the port connected to the external network):
zSH> bridge add 1-1-3-0/ethernetcsmacd uplink

Add a default bridge path for the ring over the second GigE port:
zSH> bridge-path add ethernet3/bridge global

All bridge traffic will be forwarded over this interface. c Add an bridge intralink on the logical RPR port:
zSH> bridge add 1-1-1-0/rpr intralink

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zSH> bridge-path add rpr1/bridge global-intralink

Unlearned traffic received on this interface is forwarded to the external network. d Add a global bridge intralink path:
zSH> bridge-path add rpr1/bridge global-intralink

This interface is the global intralink for the ring. 2 On the RPR ring node to which subscribers are connected: a b c Add an uplink bridged interface on the logical RPR port:
zSH> bridge add 1-1-1-0/rpr uplink

Add a default bridge path that points to the Uplink node:


zSH> bridge-path add rpr1/bridge global

Add a downlink to the remote subscriber:


zSH> bridge add 1-5-1-0/adsl vc 0/37 td 4000 downlink vlan 100

On the other RPR ring node to which a subtended MALC is connected: a b c Add an uplink bridged interface on the logical RPR port:
zSH> bridge add 1-1-1-0/rpr uplink

Add a default bridge path that points to the Uplink node:


zSH> bridge-path add rpr1/bridge global

Add an intralink to the subtended MALC:


zSH> bridge add 1-1-3-0/ethernetcsmacd intralink zSH> bridge-path add ethernet3/bridge global-intralink

On the RPR ring node to which subscribers are connected from the subtended MALC: a b c Add an uplink bridged interface on the logical RPR port:
zSH> bridge add 1-1-1-0/rpr uplink

Add a default bridge path that points to the Uplink node:


zSH> bridge-path add rpr1/bridge global

Add a downlink to the remote subscriber:


zSH> bridge add 1-7-1-0/adsl vc 0/37 td 4000 downlink vlan 200

Linear GigaBit Ethernet


The MALC GigE-2 Uplink card also supports a linear topology in which several MALC devices are daisy-chained together to pass traffic and provide subscriber access. The card type in the card profile is used to differentiate linear configuration from RPR ring configuration. In linear configurations, all

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ports are ethernetcsmacd ports as described below. Single card or redundant card configurations can be used. Figure 19 illustrates the GigE-2 card linear configuration using single GigE-2 Uplink cards. Additional MALC nodes can be added to the daisy-chained linear topology by repeating this pattern of connections. Note: Interface 1-1-1-0 is assigned to the 10/100 Ethernet physical interface. Interface 1-1-2-0 is assigned to physical port 1. Interface 1-1-3-0 is assigned to physical port 2.
Figure 19: GigE linear configuration with single card

Redundant GigE-2 cards can also be used to provide card-level redundancy. Figure 20 illustrates the GigE-2 Uplink card linear configuration using redundant cards.

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Figure 20: GigE linear configuration with redundant cards

GigE-2 Uplink card redundant configuration in linear topology


This section describes the optional configuration procedures for the GigE-2 Uplink redundant card configuration in a linear topology. These procedures should be done before provisioning the system. See the MALC Hardware Installation Guide for more details about adding redundant GigE-2 cards to the MALC.

Configuring GigE-2 card redundancy


The GigE-2 card can be configured for redundancy so the GigE uplink card switches to a standby GigE card when the active Ethernet link goes down. Options for this card switchover include:

switching timeout The amount of time the active card waits when a failure occurs before switching to the standby card.

reversion mode

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The reversion mode determines if traffic reverts back to the initial active card after a protection event is cleared.

restore timeout After a switchover occurs, the amount of time the active card waits after the protection event is cleared before reverting back to the other card.

To configure card redundancy, use the line-red command on the active card.
zSH> line-red set ethernet1/ip timeout 30 revertive timeout 600

This command sets card redundancy between the currently active GigE-2 card and the standby GigE-2 card. The switch timeout is set to 30 seconds with the revertive option set to occur after a 600 second timeout. The standby card must be in a running state for a switchover to occur. 2 Display the redundancy setting.
zSH> line-red show ethernet1/ip redundacy status for ethernet1/ip: REBOOT timeout 30 REVERTIVE revert timeout 600

GigE-2 card bridging


Within the linear topology, bridging can be configured to forward traffic based on MAC address and VLAN ID to an IP or outside network. The node connected to the network contains a bridge uplink and global bridge-path on the GigE-2 cards first port (1-1-2-0) to direct all bridged traffic to the outside or IP network. This card also contains a global-intralink on the GigE-2 cards second port (1-1-3-0) so unknown traffic is sent to the downstream, even though address learning is not enabled. The second node in the daisy-chained linear topology contains a bridge uplink on the GigE-2 cards first port (1-1-2-0) to direct all outgoing bridged traffic to the upstream node. This node also contains a bridge intralink on the second port (1-1-3-0) so unknown traffic is sent to the downstream to another network or subtended Ethernet device, even though address learning is not enabled. Additional MALC nodes can be added to the daisy-chained linear topology by repeating this pattern of connections and bridging. Note: The GigE card on the MALC should be configured with a card-line-type of ds1 for T1, e1 for E1, or t1cas for T1 channel bank support. Figure 21 illustrates the GigE-2 card linear configuration using redundant cards.

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Figure 21: GigE linear configuration with single card and bridging

Configuring GigE-2 card bridging


1 On the node connected to the Ethernet or IP network a Add a bridge interface to the first GigE-2 port (this is the port connected to the external network):
zSH> bridge add 1-1-2-0/ethernetcsmacd uplink

Add a default bridge path over the first GigE-2 port:


zSH> bridge-path add ethernet2/bridge global

All bridge traffic will be forwarded over this interface. c Add an bridge intralink on the second GigE-2 port:
zSH> bridge add 1-1-3-0/ethernetcsmacd intralink zSH> bridge-path add ethernet3/bridge global-intralink

Unlearned traffic received on this interface is forwarded to the external network. This interface is the global intralink for the node. d Add a downlink to the remote subscriber:
zSH> bridge add 1-5-1-0/adsl vc 0/37 td 4000 downlink vlan 100

On the next node in the linear daisy-chain configuration:

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a b c

Add an uplink bridged interface:


zSH> bridge add 1-1-2-0/ethernetcsmacd uplink

Add a default bridge path that points to the Uplink node:


zSH> bridge-path add ethernet2/bridge global

Add an bridge intralink on the second GigE-2 port:


zSH> bridge add 1-1-3-0/ethernetcsmacd intralink zSH> bridge-path add ethernet3/bridge global-intralink

Unlearned traffic received on this interface is forwarded to the external network. This interface is the global intralink for the node. d Add a downlink to the remote subscriber:
zSH> bridge add 1-8-1-0/adsl vc 0/39 td 3000 downlink vlan 200

Continue this configuration for all the nodes in the daisy-chain connection.

PPPoA - PPPoE Conversion


The MALC supports PPPoA to PPPoE internetworking for connections to a Broadband Remote Access Server (BRAS) using a PPP tunnel. Upon detecting PPPoA traffic, the MALC initiates a PPPoE session with the Broadband Remote Access Server (BRAS). PPP traffic between the CPE and the BRAS is tunneled over this PPPoE session. The MALC autosenses the type of PPPoA encapsulation as either VCMUX or LLC. An inactivity timeout occurs when a lack of activity is detected on the PPPoA connection for 30-80 seconds, while upstream PPPoE packets are received. When this occurs, the PPPoE session is terminated.

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Figure 22: PPPoA to PPPoE Internetworking

IP PC PPPoA

MALC PPPoE

BRAS

Radius server

Enabling PPPoA to PPPoE Internetworking


1 Add a downlink bridge using the bridge configuration record with the PPPoA parameter. The bridge command supports enabling PPPoA internet working from the command line. This example adds interface 1-5-24-0/adsl with VLAN 500, and PPPoA to PPPoE internet working enabled.
zSH> bridge add 1-5-24-0/adsl vc 0/35 td 20000 downlink vlan 500 pppoa

This automatically updates the bridge-interface record Note: The following message may appear if the CPE device is not properly configured for PPPoA connections.
FEB 01 15:59:22: error : 1/1/9 : bridge: _afsmChkRcvEncaps(): l=1811: tNetTask: AFSM-6313: port 1-7-2-0-adsl-0-35 misconfigured for PPPoA zSH> get bridge-interface-record 1-5-24-0-adsl-0-35/bridge Please provide the following: [q]uit. vpi: ----------------------> {0}: vci: ----------------------> {35}: vlanId: -------------------> {500}: stripAndInsert: -----------> {true}: customARP: ----------------> {false}: filterBroadcast: ----------> {false}: learnIp: ------------------> {false}: learnUnicast: -------------> {false}: maxUnicast: ---------------> {5}: learnMulticast: -----------> {false}: forwardToUnicast: ---------> {false}:

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forwardToMulticast: -------> forwardToDefault: ---------> bridgeIfCustomDHCP: -------> bridgeIfConfigGroupIndex: -> vlanIdCOS: ----------------> outgoingCOSOption: --------> outgoingCOSValue: ---------> s-tagTPID: ----------------> s-tagId: ------------------> s-tagStripAndInsert: ------> s-tagOutgoingCOSOption: ---> s-tagIdCOS: ---------------> s-tagOutgoingCOSValue: ----> mcastControlList: ---------> maxVideoStreams: ----------> isPPPoA: ------------------>

{false}: {true}: {false}: {0}: {0}: {disable}: {0}: {0x8100}: {0}: {false}: {s-tagdisable}: {0}: {0}: {}: {0}: {true}: (enables the PPPoA session)

Display the bridge data. PPPoA port states are INITIAL (INI), PENDING (PND), DOWN (DWN), READY (RDY), DISCRVY (DSC), and UP. The new states available for PPPoA internet working are: READY (RDY) Waiting for PPPoA packet to initiate PPPoE discovery. DISCVRY (DSC) PPPoE discovery initiated. Waiting for session ID to be obtained. The A indicates that the port is a PPPoA port. When the PPPoA port status is UP, the BRAS MAC address and PPPoE session ID are also displayed.

zSH> bridge show VLAN Bridge State Table Data --------------------------------------------------------------------Tagged ethernet2/bridge UP S Global default [U: 3600 sec, M: 120 sec, I: 60 sec] 500 1-7-48-0-adsl-0-35/bridge UP A 00:19:aa:3b:83:24 51758 500 1-7-1-0-adsl-0-35/bridge PND 500 1-7-2-0-adsl-0-35/bridge RDY A 500 1-7-3-0-adsl-0-35/bridge UP A 00:19:aa:3b:83:24 51768 500 1-7-4-0-adsl-0-35/bridge UP A 00:19:aa:3b:83:24 51788 500 1-7-5-0-adsl-0-35/bridge UP A 00:19:aa:3b:83:24 51756 500 1-7-6-0-adsl-0-35/bridge UP A 00:19:aa:3b:83:24 51796 500 1-7-7-0-adsl-0-35/bridge UP A 00:19:aa:3b:83:24 51759 500 1-7-8-0-adsl-0-35/bridge UP A 00:19:aa:3b:83:24 51754 500 1-7-9-0-adsl-0-35/bridge UP A 00:19:aa:3b:83:24 51789 500 1-7-10-0-adsl-0-35/bridge UP A 00:19:aa:3b:83:24 51755 500 1-7-11-0-adsl-0-35/bridge UP A 00:19:aa:3b:83:24 51774

The bridgeshow ports command displays the following new fields: isPPPoA Indicates if interface is PPPoA or not.

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aHdl For PPPoA interfaces, displays the handle address to PPPoA. Otherwise, 0x0 is displayed.

encapLLC Shows Yes if PPPoA encapsulation is LLC or No for VCMU encapsulation.

zSH> bridgeshow ports isPPPoA Yes, aHdl 0x6e6ac90, encapLLC No ifIndex 6351 externalVpi 0 - externalVci 35 shelf 1 - slot 7 - port 40 - subport 0 isUp Up - ifUnit 0 - ifType 159 - lineRRReg Line Up portGroupIndex 0 - index 45 - *pBridgeCookie 0x31E64D4 flags 5 Attached ValidAAL5 notReady 0, xmitError 0 - xmitOK 0 pktRcvd 1 localPktRcvd 0 mcastPktRcvd 0 bcastPktRcvd 0 ucastPktSent 0 mcastPktSent 0 bcastPktSent 0 pppoeTransitAddFail 0 macLen 6 - macAddr[6] 00.01.47.b1.19.a0 drvName[8] bridge aal5Data vpi 0 vci 273 aal5Port 0 extVpi 0 - extVci 0 netSvcType 2453 encapType 1 - port 40 - pcr 0 txTraffDescrIndex 0 - ifType 0 endPtLineStatus 1 drvHandle 0x6ada2c0, cmd 3, appHandle: 0x4055f68 bindSet 1 - ifaceSet 1 - xlateSet 1 bridgeRec vpi 0 - vci 35 - vlan/SlanId 500/0 - stripAndInsert Yes customARP No - filterBroadcast No learnIp No learnUnicast No maxUnicast 5 learnMcast No forwardToUnicast No forwardToMcast No forwardToDefault Yes vlanIdCOS 0 outgoingCOSOption disable outgoingCOSValue 0 isTkDrv Yes - ifIndexToBindTo 33 pDevice[256] - unit 0 - physIfType 125 - seqNumber 0x000000000 s_vlanInfoSent T, s/vlanIdSent 0/0, outCosValue 0x0 circuitId = 172.24.94.224:1-7-40-0-adsl-0-35 IGMP: initInjectCnt 3, lastInitQueryTick 0, lastQueryTick 0 lastIgmpJoinTick 0, lastIgmpLeaveTick 0

PPPoE Intermediate Agent


The MALC supports inserting port information into PPPoE packets that transit a MALC bridge interface. When the MALC receives a PPPoE Active Discovery Initiation (PADI) packet or a PPPoE Active Discovery Request (PADR) packet, the MALC can be configured to insert a customized string along with default port/slot identification into the vendor-specific portion of the PPPoE packet. The customized identification string can be 0 to 48 characters. The inserted information is TR-101 compliant and formatted as:
<customstring> eth slot/port[[:stagID]:vlan-tag]

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The slot/port values identify the ingress slot/port on the MALC where the packet was received. If the packet is tagged with a VLAN tag, the VLAN tag is also added to the packet on ingress. If the packet is tagged with a SLAN tag, the SLAN tag is also added to the packet on ingress.

Untagged packet no customized string from slot 5 port 2: eth 5/2 VLAN 500 tagged packet no customized string from slot 5 port 2: eth 5/2 :500 VLAN 500 tagged, SLAN 4 tagged packet no customized string from slot 5 port 2: eth 5/2 :4 :500 VLAN 500 tagged, SLAN 4 tagged packet with customized string of 172.42.10.5 from slot 5 port 2: 172.42.10.4 eth 5/2 :4 :500

Note: For configurations with bridge intralinks or subtended MALC/ Raptor devices, ensure that the PPPoE intermediate agent feature is enabled on only the subtended devices.

Configuring bridge configuration records


The MALC supports bridge configuration groups and records so an open-ended number of filter settings can be configured for a bridge interface. The same filter settings can also be easily applied to multiple bridge interfaces. Bridge configuration records for the intermediate agent options are assigned to bridge configuration groups on downlink bridge interfaces. Each bridge configuration record contains settings for type and value. The bridgeConfigType parameter specifies the bridgeinsertpppoevendortag option to enable the intermediate agent feature. The bridgeConfigValue parameter specifies the 0 to 48 character customized string to insert into PADI and PADR packets. Create bridge configuration records using the bridge-config-record profile. Specify group/instance index numbers to assign group and instance identification. 1 Configure a new bridge-config-record for group1/instance1 and specifies the option to insert a PPPoE vendor tag with a customized prefix of Malc123.

zSH> new bridge-config-record 1/1 Please provide the following: [q]uit. bridgeConfigType: --> {bridgeinsertoption82}: bridgeinsertpppoevendortag bridgeConfigValue: -> {}: Malc123 .................... Save changes? [s]ave, [c]hange or [q]uit: s Record updated.

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Use the config parameter of the bridge add command to create a bridge with the assigned bridge-config-record of group 1 instance 1.
zSH>bridge add 1-4-1-0/adsl vc 0/35 td 1 config 1/1

Displaying port information


The bridgeshow ports command displays a new field for pppoeTransitAddFail to help track the data insertion failures. To display port data, use the bridgeshow ports command.
zSH>bridgeshow ports isPPPoA Yes, aHdl 0x6e6ac90, encapLLC No ifIndex 6351 externalVpi 0 - externalVci 35 shelf 1 - slot 7 - port 40 - subport 0 isUp Up - ifUnit 0 - ifType 159 - lineRRReg Line Up portGroupIndex 0 - index 45 - *pBridgeCookie 0x31E64D4 flags 5 Attached ValidAAL5 notReady 0, xmitError 0 - xmitOK 0 pktRcvd 1 localPktRcvd 0 mcastPktRcvd 0 bcastPktRcvd 0 ucastPktSent 0 mcastPktSent 0 bcastPktSent 0 pppoeTransitAddFail 0 macLen 6 - macAddr[6] 00.01.47.b1.19.a0 drvName[8] bridge aal5Data vpi 0 vci 273 aal5Port 0 extVpi 0 - extVci 0 netSvcType 2453 encapType 1 - port 40 - pcr 0 txTraffDescrIndex 0 - ifType 0 endPtLineStatus 1 drvHandle 0x6ada2c0, cmd 3, appHandle: 0x4055f68 bindSet 1 - ifaceSet 1 - xlateSet 1 bridgeRec vpi 0 - vci 35 - vlan/SlanId 500/0 - stripAndInsert Yes customARP No - filterBroadcast No learnIp No learnUnicast No maxUnicast 5 learnMcast No forwardToUnicast No forwardToMcast No forwardToDefault Yes vlanIdCOS 0 outgoingCOSOption disable outgoingCOSValue 0 isTkDrv Yes - ifIndexToBindTo 33 pDevice[256] - unit 0 - physIfType 125 - seqNumber 0x000000000 s_vlanInfoSent T, s/vlanIdSent 0/0, outCosValue 0x0 circuitId = 172.24.94.224:1-7-40-0-adsl-0-35 IGMP: initInjectCnt 3, lastInitQueryTick 0, lastQueryTick 0 lastIgmpJoinTick 0, lastIgmpLeaveTick 0

Advanced bridging configurations


The default settings for bridge interfaces are created based on the usage of the downlink and uplink parameters of the bridge add command. It is recommended not to change the default settings unless advanced bridge configuration is required. Examples of advanced bridge configurations include:

Packet-rule records (Option 82, Forbid OUI, DHCP relay, PPPoE vendor tag) on page 143

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Tagged bridgeVLANs on page 145 Broadcast suppression on page 146 Bridge with DHCP relay on page 147

Refer to the CLI Reference Guide for a complete description of the command options and syntax.

Packet-rule records (Option 82, Forbid OUI, DHCP relay, PPPoE vendor tag)
The MALC now supports packet-rule records so an open-ended number of filter settings can be configured for a bridge interface. The same filter settings can also be easily applied to multiple bridge interfaces. Packet-rule-records are typically assigned to bridge configuration groups on downlink bridge interfaces. Each bridge configuration record contains settings for type and value. The packetRuleValue parameter specifies the variety of filter to be applied to the interface.

bridgeinsertoption82: packetRuleValue contains an identification text used with Insert option 82 to identify the DHCP host. When this option is specified, option82 information is displayed in standard text format.

bridgeddhcprelay packetRuleValue contains the DHCP subnet group ID. If only the DHCP relay option is used, option82 information is displayed in hex format as slot port shelf vlan.

bridgeinsertpppoevendortag packetRuleValue contains optional identification string that is converted to TR101 compliant data.

bridgeforbidoui packetRuleValue contains a 3-byte hexadecimal vendor code used with the Forbid OUI to forbid access on the interface.

zSH> show packet-rule-record packetRuleType:---> bridgeinsertoption82 bridgedhcprelay bridgeinsertpppoevendortag bridgeforbidoui packetRuleValue:--> {260} packetRuleValue2:-> {260} packetRuleValue3:-> {260} packetRuleValue4:-> {260} packetRuleValue5:-> {260}

The bridge-interface-record profile contains new fields to support the packet-rule-record.

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zSH> show bridge-interface-record bridgeIfIngressPacketRuleGroupIndex:-> bridgeIfEgressPacketRuleGroupIndex:-->

{0 - 2147483647} {0 - 2147483647}

Note: Bridge configuration record settings supersede the global filter settings set using the bridge-path add filter command.

Configuring packet rule records


Create bridge configuration records using the packet-rule-record profile. Specify group/instance index numbers to assign group and instance identification. Configure a new packet-rule-record for group1/instance2 and specify the desired type and value settings:
zSH> new packet-rule-record 1/2 Please provide the following: [q]uit. packetRuleType:---> {}:bridgeforbidoui packetRuleValue:--> {}:00:02:02 .................... Save changes? [s]ave, [c]hange or [q]uit: s Record updated.

Configuring bridge interface record


Configure the bridge-interface-record to assign all instances of a given bridge configuration group to a specified interface. Bridge configuration groups are assigned to the interface records by setting the bridgeIfConfigGroupIndex parameter. To configure a bridge configuration group:
zSH> update bridge-interface-record 1-3-1-0-adsl-0-35/bridge Please provide the following: [q]uit. vpi: ----------------------> {0}: vci: ----------------------> {39}: vlanId: -------------------> {46}: stripAndInsert: -----------> {true}: customARP: ----------------> {false}: filterBroadcast: ----------> {false}: learnIp: ------------------> {true}: learnUnicast: -------------> {true}: maxUnicast: ---------------> {5}: learnMulticast: -----------> {true}: forwardToUnicast: ---------> {false}: forwardToMulticast: -------> {false}: forwardToDefault: ---------> {true}: bridgeIfCustomDHCP: -------> {false}: bridgeIfConfigGroupIndex: -> {0}: 1 .................... Save changes? [s]ave, [c]hange or [q]uit: s Record updated.

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Enabling option 82 using bridge-path command


The option82 option is available in the bridge-path command to enable the insertion of the option 82 information into the global DHCP offer requests. To enable option 82 information: 1 Add two bridges, one connecting the remote host, the other connecting to a remote bridge. For example:

zSH> bridge add 1-4-1-0/shdsl vc 0/35 td 1 remote device zSH> bridge add 1-1-1-0/ethernetcsmacd uplink

View the bridges:

zSH> bridge show VLAN Bridge State Table Data ----------------------------------------------------------------0 1-4-1-0-shdsl-0-35/bridge UP S Global default [3600 sec] 0 1-1-1-0-ethernetcsmacd/bridge UP

3
zSH> bridge-path add

Then, create the bridge path with option82 specified:


1-4-1-0-shdsl-0-35/bridge option82

View the bridge path:

zSH> bridge-path show VLAN Bridge Address ----------------------------------------------------------------Global 1-1-1-0-ethernetcsmacd/bridge Default

Tagged bridgeVLANs
In most configurations, VLAN IDs should be stripped for traffic destined to downlink interfaces and inserted for traffic destined for upstream interfaces. Downlink interfaces typically do not need to know the VLAN ID since they are on a single Ethernet. You can, however, specify that a downlink interface be tagged, or an uplink interface be untagged. You might want to do this if you are subtending MALC devices and aggregating Ethernet traffic.

Configuring stripAndInsert
Configure the bridge-interface-record to change the stripping and insert of VLAN tags for a specified interface. To change the stripAndInsert option:
zSH> update bridge-interface-record 1-3-1-0-adsl-0-35/bridge Please provide the following: [q]uit. vpi: ----------------------> {0}: vci: ----------------------> {39}: vlanId: -------------------> {46}: stripAndInsert: -----------> {true}: false customARP: ----------------> {false}:

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filterBroadcast: ----------> {false}: learnIp: ------------------> {true}: learnUnicast: -------------> {true}: maxUnicast: ---------------> {5}: learnMulticast: -----------> {true}: forwardToUnicast: ---------> {false}: forwardToMulticast: -------> {false}: forwardToDefault: ---------> {true}: bridgeIfCustomDHCP: -------> {false}: bridgeIfConfigGroupIndex: -> {0}: .................... Save changes? [s]ave, [c]hange or [q]uit: s Record updated.

Broadcast suppression
Broadcast suppression enables DHCP information to be relayed between DHCP client and host while broadcast filtering is enabled.

CustomDHCP setting
The customDHCP setting enables bridge interfaces to pass DHCP information independent of the filterBroadcast setting. Setting customDHCP to TRUE will cause that bridge interface to pass DHCP OFFER and ACK packets even though the filterBroadcast is set to TRUE. To enable CustomDHCP: For an existing bridge, update the bridge-interface-record.
zSH> update bridge-interface-record 1-3-1-0-adsl-0-35/bridge Please provide the following: [q]uit. vpi: ----------------------> {0}: vci: ----------------------> {39}: vlanId: -------------------> {46}: stripAndInsert: -----------> {true}: customARP: ----------------> {false}: filterBroadcast: ----------> {false}: learnIp: ------------------> {true}: learnUnicast: -------------> {true}: maxUnicast: ---------------> {5}: learnMulticast: -----------> {true}: forwardToUnicast: ---------> {false}: forwardToMulticast: -------> {false}: forwardToDefault: ---------> {true}: bridgeIfCustomDHCP: -------> {false}: true bridgeIfConfigGroupIndex: -> {0}: .................... Save changes? [s]ave, [c]hange or [q]uit: s Record updated.

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Bridge with DHCP relay


The MALC enables bridges to be configured as DHCP relay agents. All DCHP messages on the bridge will have Option 82 information inserted and be passed up through an IP interface to a external DHCP server. Figure 23 illustrates the traffic flow when the MALC is configured with a bridge to support DHCP relay.
Figure 23: Bridge supported DHCP relay

MALC as DHCP relay agent

MALC uplink bridge

MALC downlink bridge

Host

DHCP unicast

External DHCP Server

Configuring bridges to support DHCP relay


This procedure describes how to configure bridges on the MALC to support DHCP relay. This procedure assumes the following configuration has already been performed on the MALC.

Downlink bridge to the host Uplink bridge to network IP interface on the MALC with a route available to the DHCP server

To configure bridge support for DHCP relay: 1 Create a bridge-config-record with the bridgeConfigType set to bridgedhcprelay. This setting causes DHCP relay traffic to be removed from the bridge, inserts Option 82 data, and forwards the DHCP relay traffic out the IP interface to the configured DHCP server. This example uses bridge configuration group 2.

zSH> new bridge-config-record 2/1 Please provide the following: [q]uit.

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bridgeConfigType: --> {bridgeinsertoption82}bridgedhcprelay bridgeConfigValue: -> {1} ............ Save new record? [s]ave, [c]hange or [q]uit: s New record saved.

Verify that the bridge-interface-record contains correct bridge IfConfigGroupIndex value. This value represents the bridge configuration group index specified for the bridge-config-record.

zSH> get bridge-interface-record 1-12-1-0-adsl-0-35/bridge vpi: ----------------------> {0} vci: ----------------------> {35} vlanId: -------------------> {0} stripAndInsert: -----------> {true} customARP: ----------------> {false} filterBroadcast: ----------> {false} learnIp: ------------------> {true} learnUnicast: -------------> {true} maxUnicast: ---------------> {5} learnMulticast: -----------> {true} forwardToUnicast: ---------> {false} forwardToMulticast: -------> {false} forwardToDefault: ---------> {true} bridgeIfCustomDHCP: -------> {false} bridgeIfConfigGroupIndex: -> {2} bridge-config-record 2/1, 2/2, etc. vlanIdCOS: ----------------> {0} outgoingCOSOption: --------> {disable} outgoingCOSValue: ---------> {0} s-tagTPID: ----------------> {0x8100} s-tagId: ------------------> {0} s-tagStripAndInsert: ------> {false} s-tagOutgoingCOSOption: ---> {s-tagdisable} s-tagIdCOS: ---------------> {0} s-tagOutgoingCOSValue: ----> {0}

Verify the dhcp-server-subnet with subnetgroup index matching the bridgeConfigValue is configured to forward DHCP requests to the desired external DHCP server. In this example, the bridgeConfigValue of 1 in the bridge-config-record matches the subnetgroup value specified in the dhcp-server-subnet profile. These values tell the DHCP relay agent to send the DHCP packets to the specified DHCP external server at 172.16.88.73.
zSH> get dhcp-server-subnet 1 network: ---------------> {10.11.1.0} netmask: ---------------> {255.255.255.0} domain: ----------------> {0} range1-start: ----------> {10.11.1.10} range1-end: ------------> {10.11.1.250} range2-start: ----------> {0.0.0.0} range2-end: ------------> {0.0.0.0} range3-start: ----------> {0.0.0.0}

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range3-end: ------------> range4-start: ----------> range4-end: ------------> default-lease-time: ----> min-lease-time: --------> max-lease-time: --------> boot-server: -----------> bootfile: --------------> default-router: --------> primary-name-server: ---> secondary-name-server: -> domain-name: -----------> subnetgroup: -----------> stickyaddr: ------------> external-server: ------->

{0.0.0.0} {0.0.0.0} {0.0.0.0} {-1} {-1} {-1} {0.0.0.0} {} {10.11.1.1} {0.0.0.0} {0.0.0.0} {} {1} matches bridgeConfigValue of 1 in the bridge-config-record {enable} {172.16.88.73}

Administrative commands
The MALC provides the following administrative commands:

bridge delete bridge show bridge showall bridge-path add bridge-path show bridge-path delete bridge stats bridge flush

Refer to the MALC CLI Reference Guide for a detailed explanation of the available bridge commands.

Bridge delete command


The bridge delete command deletes a specific bridge entry from the system.

Bridge show/showall commands


The bridge show and bridge showall commands display either a single bridge path entry or the entire bridge table.

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Bridge stats
The bridge stats command displays and clear bridge interface statistics for all bridges, bridges associated with a specified VLAN ID, and a specified bridge interface.
zSH> bridge stats Interface Name 1-16-8-0-shdsl-0-35-835 1-16-8-0-shdsl-0-35-635 1-16-24-0-shdsl-0-35-835 zSH> bridge stats vlan 835 Interface Name 1-16-8-0-shdsl-0-35-835 1-16-24-0-shdsl-0-35-835 Received Packets UCast MCast BCast 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 Transmitted Packets UCast MCast Bcast 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

Error 0 0 1

Received Packets UCast MCast BCast 0 0 1 0 0 0

Transmitted Packets UCast MCast Bcast 0 0 0 0 0 0

Error 0 1

COS in bridges
The MALC supports setting COS values in Ethernet VLAN headers for bridged packets. This service enables you to assign a service level or class of service (COS) to an Ethernet VLAN interface that is transported across a uplink, intralink, or downlinked tagged bridge. The configured COS level specifies the packet priority and queueing methods used to transport the packet through the Ethernet network. The MALC sets and preserves the COS settings to ensure these settings are passed to other Ethernet devices in the network for QOS processing.

Bridge profile
The following parameters in the bridge interface record are used for Ethernet COS support.

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Parameter

Description

vlanIdCOS

Specifies the value loaded into the COS field of the VLAN header when an untagged packet received on this interface is tagged (VLAN ID inserted) for bridging. Value range is 0 to 7. Default is 0. Specifies whether to insert the VLAN COS bits on packets bridged through this interface. Values: Disable Leave any existing COS values unchanged. This is the default value. All Replace the current COS values in all VLAN headers in tagged and untagged packets originating and transported through this device.

outgoingCOSOption

outgoingCOSValue

For outgoing tagged packets, specifies the value used to overwrite any existing COS value in the VLAN header. Value range is 0 to 7. Default is 0.

To display the bridge-record profile, enter the show bridge-interface-record command.


rpr-uplink-zSH> show bridge-interface-record vpi:----------------------> {0} vci:----------------------> {0} vlanId:-------------------> {0 - 2147483647} stripAndInsert:-----------> false true customARP:----------------> false true filterBroadcast:----------> false true learnIp:------------------> false true learnUnicast:-------------> false true maxUnicast:---------------> {0 - 2147483647} learnMulticast:-----------> false true forwardToUnicast:---------> false true forwardToMulticast:-------> false true forwardToDefault:---------> false true bridgeIfCustomDHCP:-------> false true bridgeIfConfigGroupIndex:-> {0 - 2147483647} vlanIdCOS:----------------> {0 - 7} outgoingCOSOption:--------> disable all outgoingCOSValue:---------> {0 - 7}

Adding an interface
This example adds interface 1-1-1-0/adsl with a COS value of 7.
interface add 1-1-1-0/adsl other vlan 1 cos 7 23.23.23.23 255.255.255.0

This example adds interface 1-1-1-0/adsl with a COS value of 1 and specifies to add this value to all packets originating from this interface.

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interface add 1-1-1-0/adsl other vlan 1 cos 1 tosOrig 1 23.23.23.23 255.255.255.0

This example adds interface 1-1-1-0/adsl with a COS value of 5 and specifies to add the value to all outgoing packets on this interface.
interface add 1-1-1-0/adsl other tos all cos 5 23.23.23.23 255.255.255.0

This example adds interface 1-1-1-0/adsl and disables the TOS feature.
interface add 1-1-1-0/adsl other tosDisable 23.23.23.23 255.255.255.0

Adding a bridge
This example adds interface 1-1-1-0/adsl with a vlanIDCOS value of 7. This value is inserted into the priority field of the VLAN header when an untagged packet received on this interface is tagged (VLAN ID inserted) for bridging.
bridge add 1-1-1-0/adsl downlink vlan 100 tagged COS 7

This example adds interface 1-1-1-0/adsl with a vlanIDCOS value of 7 and enables the overwriting of the VLAN ID in all outgoing packets with the value of 7.
bridge add 1-1-1-0/adsl downlink vlan 100 tagged COS 7 outCOS all 7

Video bridging
Video bridging on the MALC provides the ability to integrate video streams for multiple sources into one conduit. Video bridging enables video packets to be forwarded over a Layer 2 bridge from a host to a subscriber. As a result, the video travels from its source, or head-end device, and passes through the MALC in a passive manner with only one video stream across the backplane, reducing bandwidth required for video packets to traverse a MALC. Video bridging requires you to configure both an uplink bridge and a downlink bridge. On the uplink bridge, the forwardToMulticast function is associated with a location that contains video content and allows the MALC to receive video groups from the network. An interface with this value set to true should only transmit multicast traffic for which a JOIN request has been received. Any bridge interface with the forwardToMulticast parameter set to false discards multicast IP traffic. By default, the forwardToMulticast parameter is set to true on uplink bridges. On the downlink bridge, the learnMulticast function is associated with interfaces that have hosts connected to them and allows the MALC to send video groups from downlink interfaces to the network. By default, the learnMulticast parameter is set to true on downlink bridges. Note that JOIN operations enter on a learnMulticast interface associated with a downlink bridge and pass through on a forwardToMulticast interface associated with an uplink bridge.

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The following table details various video bridge behaviors associated with different combinations of settings for the bridge parameters.
Table 6: learnMulticast-forwardToMulticast Combinations and Behavior learnMulticast False forwardToMultic ast Behavior

False

The interface discards all incoming multicast packets and does not forward any of the packets. The interface forwards both default multicast signaling packets an control multicast packets. The interface discards incoming multicast content groups and forwards requested content groups. The interface forwards control packets received on this interface to all other interfaces that have the learnMulticast field set to true. The interface forwards content groups only to interfaces that have sent JOIN messages for a group. Treat the same as an interface with the learnMulticast field set to false and the forwardToMulticast field set to true.

True

False

True

False

False

True

False

True

True

True

The following video bridge example creates a video bridge on a MALC-Uplink-2-GE uplink card using the first GigE interface as the uplink bridge. It also creates a bridge path on that interface. The downlink bridge uses ADSL interface in shelf 1, slot 3, port 1 and assigns VCI/VPI 0/37 with traffic descriptor 1 and VLAN 800 to the downlink interface. For the uplink bridge:
zSH> bridge add 1-1-2-0/ethernetcsmacd uplink Adding bridge on 1-1-2-0/ethernetcsmacd Created bridge-interface-record 1-1-2-0-ethernet2/bridge

For the uplink bridge path, add a bridge path and a multicast aging period and IGMP query interval.
zSH> bridge-path add ethernet2/bridge global mcastage 90 igmpqueryinterval 30

For the downlink bridge, add a downlink bridge and specify a maximum number of video streams and multicast control list. Members of the multicast control list must be defined to receive the video signal.

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zSH> bridge add 1-3-1-0/adsl vc 0/37 td 1 downlink vlan 800 video maxvideostreams 2 mcastctrl 1 Adding bridge on 1-3-1-0/adsl Created bridge-interface-record 1-3-1-0-adsl-0-37

Verifying bridge settings


To verify bridge settings, use the get bridge-interface-record command for each bridge. This command displays the bridge settings, including the learnMulticast and forwardToMulticast. For the uplink bridge, note that the forwardToMulticast setting is true and the learnMulticast setting is false.
zSH> get bridge-interface-record ethernet2/bridge vpi: ----------------------> {0} vci: ----------------------> {0} vlanId: -------------------> {0} stripAndInsert: -----------> {false} customARP: ----------------> {true} filterBroadcast: ----------> {true} learnIp: ------------------> {false} learnUnicast: -------------> {false} maxUnicast: ---------------> {0} learnMulticast: -----------> {false} forwardToUnicast: ---------> {true} forwardToMulticast: -------> {true} forwardToDefault: ---------> {false} bridgeIfCustomDHCP: -------> {true} bridgeIfConfigGroupIndex: -> {0} vlanIdCOS: ----------------> {0} outgoingCOSOption: --------> {disable} outgoingCOSValue: ---------> {0} s-tagTPID: ----------------> {0x8100} s-tagId: ------------------> {0} s-tagStripAndInsert: ------> {false} s-tagOutgoingCOSOption: ---> {s-tagdisable} s-tagIdCOS: ---------------> {0} s-tagOutgoingCOSValue: ----> {0}

For the downlink bridge, note that the forwardToMulticast setting is false and the learnMulticast setting is true.
zSH> get bridge-interface-record 1-3-1-0-adsl-0-37/bridge vpi: ----------------------> {0} vci: ----------------------> {37} vlanId: -------------------> {800} stripAndInsert: -----------> {true} customARP: ----------------> {false} filterBroadcast: ----------> {false} learnIp: ------------------> {true} learnUnicast: -------------> {true} maxUnicast: ---------------> {5} learnMulticast: -----------> {true}

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forwardToUnicast: ---------> forwardToMulticast: -------> forwardToDefault: ---------> bridgeIfCustomDHCP: -------> bridgeIfConfigGroupIndex: -> vlanIdCOS: ----------------> outgoingCOSOption: --------> outgoingCOSValue: ---------> s-tagTPID: ----------------> s-tagId: ------------------> s-tagStripAndInsert: ------> s-tagIdCOS: ---------------> s-tagOutgoingCOSValue: ----> maxvideostreams: ----------> mcasctrl: ----------------->

{false} {false} {true} {false} {0} {0} {disable} {0} {0x8100} {0} {false} {0} {0} {0} {0}

In addition, you can run a bridge igmp command to determine whether IGMP is running on the system.
zSH> bridge igmp VlanID MAC Address MCAST IP Ifndx Host MAC Last Join ---------------------------------------------------------------------------999 01:00:5e:02:7f:fe 224.2.127.254 921 00:02:02:0b:4a:a0 2 999 01:00:5e:02:7f:fe 224.2.127.254 922 00:02:02:0a:bb:6d 106 999 01:00:5e:02:7f:fe 224.2.127.254 923 00:02:02:0a:c0:b7 87 999 01:00:5e:02:7f:fe 224.2.127.254 924 00:02:02:0b:4e:c5 172 999 01:00:5e:02:7f:fe 224.2.127.254 925 00:02:02:0b:4c:7e 65 999 01:00:5e:02:7f:fe 224.2.127.254 926 00:02:02:0b:4f:08 46 999 01:00:5e:02:7f:fe 224.2.127.254 927 00:02:02:09:c1:7d 90 999 01:00:5e:02:7f:fe 224.2.127.254 928 00:02:02:0b:44:cd 71 999 01:00:5e:02:7f:fe 224.2.127.254 929 00:02:02:0b:4c:ca 61 999 01:00:5e:02:7f:fe 224.2.127.254 930 00:02:02:0b:47:bd 7 999 01:00:5e:02:7f:fe 224.2.127.254 931 00:02:02:0b:47:c7 177 999 01:00:5e:02:7f:fe 224.2.127.254 932 00:02:02:0b:4d:35 181 999 01:00:5e:02:7f:fe 224.2.127.254 933 00:02:02:0b:4d:5b 144 999 01:00:5e:02:7f:fe 224.2.127.254 934 00:02:02:0b:4a:a5 59 999 01:00:5e:02:7f:fe 224.2.127.254 935 00:02:02:0b:4c:9e 3 999 01:00:5e:02:7f:fe 224.2.127.254 936 00:02:02:09:c1:78 6 999 01:00:5e:02:7f:fe 224.2.127.254 937 00:02:02:0a:c0:ca 131

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CONFIGURING ATM
This chapter explains how to configure ATM cross connects on the MALC. It includes the following sections:

Configuration overview, page 157 Overview, page 158 VPI/VCI ranges, page 158 Configuring PCR and SCR values, page 160 Creating traffic descriptors, page 163 Creating VCLs and VPLs, page 166 Creating cross connects, page 170 Subtending, page 172 Tip: For information about configuring ATM management connections, see ATM management connection on page 24. For important background information about ATM on the MALC, see MALC ATM Overview on page 369.

Configuration overview
This section provides an overview of how to configure MALC ATM data connections references to where to find detailed information. 1. Modify the VPI/VCI ranges of the slot card, if necessary. See VPI/VCI ranges on page 158. 2. Modify the allowable PCR and SCR values, if necessary. See Configuring PCR and SCR values on page 160. 3. Create traffic descriptors. See Creating traffic descriptors on page 163. 4. Create VCLs or VPLs, as required. See Creating VCLs (VC switching) on page 168. See Creating VPLs (VP switching) on page 169

5. Create cross connects. See Creating cross connects on page 171.

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Overview
Figure 24 shows an overview of ATM on the MALC.
Figure 24: ATM cell relay on the MALC

ATM

ATM

Local Exchange Switch

Layer 3 IP Layer 2 IP IP SAR ATM VCL/VPL DSL ATM CC ATM VCL/VPL Layer 1 ATM UNI Voice Gateway ATM VCL/VPL TDM

VPI/VCI ranges
The MALC supports configurable VPI/VCI ranges for all ATM-capable cards. VPI/VCI ranges are configured in atm-vpi records. Note the following about VPI/VCIs ranges:

After creating or modifying atm-vpi records, the card must be rebooted. A maximum of 256 VPIs can be created on a port. As atm-vpi records are created, the system allocates connections from the available pool of connections. Each VP-switched VP uses one connection and each VC-switched VP uses one connection per allowable VC.

Changing VPI/VCI ranges


Note that although you can create switched VCs without modifying the VPI/ VCI ranges, if you create the first atm-vpi (to change the VPI/VCI ranges on a card or to create a VP switched connection), the system automatically creates an atm-vpi profile for each VPI used in existing cross connects.

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VPI/VCI ranges

The system determines how many VCIs are assigned to each VPI, then populates the zhoneAtmVpiMaxVci parameter in an atm-vpi record with the value (in the form 2n) closest to that number. For example, if the system has cross connects configured with the following VPI/VCI pairs:
VPI/VCI atm-vpi profile created Comment

VPI 0 VCI 100 VPI 0 VCI 101 VPI 0 VCI 102

atm-vpi interface-name/atm/0 zhoneAtmVpiMaxVci: ---> zhoneAtmVpiSwitched: -> {128} {vc}

zhoneAtmVpiMaxVci = 128 because 128 is the smallest power of 2 that is greater than the highest VCI (102) created using that VPI.

VPI 1 VCI 1001 VPI 1 VCI 1001 VPI 1 VCI 1002 VPI 1 VCI 1003 VPI 1 VCI 1004

atm-vpi interface-name/atm/1 zhoneAtmVpiMaxVci: ---> zhoneAtmVpiSwitched: -> {1024} {vc}

zhoneAtmVpiMaxVci = 1024 because 1024 is the smallest power of 2 that is greater than the highest VCIs (1004) created using that VPI.

After the atm-vpi records have been created, you can update them to change the default VCI values, if desired.

Configuration overview
The following table summarizes the configuration tasks for changing the VPI/ VCI ranges.
Task Command

Create an atm-vpi record. This specifies the maximum number of switched VCs on that connection (or 0 for VP switching) as well as whether the connection is VP or VC switched. Update the atm-vpi records if you want to change the default atm-vpi records the system creates. Reboot the card.

new atm-vpi index/atm/vpi Up to 256 VPIs can be created on a port.

update atm-vpi index/atm/vpi slotreboot slot

Changing VPI/VCI ranges


1 Create an atm-vpi record for the VP: If the VP is going to be switched, leave zhoneAtmVpiMaxVci at 0. If the VC is going to be switched, change zhoneAtmVpiMaxVci to the number of VCs for that VP. Note that the value must be a power of 2 greater than 31. For example, 32, 64, 128, 256, 512, 1028, or 2048.

The following example creates VPI 10 on an OC3-c/STM1 card, with 1024 allowable VCs:

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zSH> new atm-vpi 1-1-1-0-sonet/atm/10 interface-index/atm/ VPI Please provide the following: [q]uit. zhoneAtmVpiMaxVci: ---> {0}: 1024 zhoneAtmVpiSwitched: -> {vc}: zhoneAtmMaxVciPerVp: -> {0}: .................... Save new record? [s]ave, [c]hange or [q]uit: s New record saved.

Note: For VP-switched connections, change the zhoneAtmVpiSwitched parameter to vp. After the first atm-vpi record is saved, the system will automatically create atm-vpi records for all VPIs used in existing cross connects. If you need to modify the atm-vpi records the system has automatically created, update the records as in the following example:
zSH> update atm-vpi 1-1-2-0-sonet/atm/11 interface-index/ atm/VPI Please provide the following: [q]uit. zhoneAtmVpiMaxVci: ---> {1024}: 2048 zhoneAtmVpiSwitched: -> {vc}: zhoneAtmMaxVciPerVp: -> {0}: .................... Save changes? [s]ave, [c]hange or [q]uit: s Record updated.

After the system has finished creating the atm-vpi records and you have finished updating them (if desired), reboot the slot card:
zSH> slotreboot 1

Configuring PCR and SCR values


The atm-vcl-param profile defines the allowable values for the PCR and SCR for certain traffic types. The values in this profile are used as follows:

The SCR for rt-VBR traffic descriptors must use one of the first 16 rates. The PCR for CBR traffic descriptors can use any of the 32 rates. For a UBR traffic descriptor, if usage-parameter-control in an ATM traffic descriptor is set to false, or if PCR is greater than modem trained rate, then the UBR traffic is shaped to one of the 32 rates. The shaper will pick a rate that is equal to or less than the modem trained rate. If there are multiple rates less than the modem trained rate, the one closest to the trained rate will be selected.

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Note: If your device is being managed by ZMS, changes to the atm-vcl-param profile should be made using ZMS. If you use the CLI to change the profile, perform a full config sync update after making the change. Note the following about the values in this profile:

Rates are in cells per second (CPS) Duplicate rates are not permitted Rates must be in ascending order within the first 16 rates and also within the second 16 rates.

To view the default values for the atm-vcl-param profile use the get command:
zSH> get atm-vcl-param 0 vcl-rate-param1: -------> vcl-rate-param2: -------> vcl-rate-param3: -------> vcl-rate-param4: -------> vcl-rate-parma5: -------> vcl-rate-param6: -------> vcl-rate-param7: -------> vcl-rate-param8: -------> vcl-rate-param9: -------> vcl-rate-param10: ------> vcl-rate-param11: ------> vcl-rate-param12: ------> vcl-rate-param13: ------> vcl-rate-param14: ------> vcl-rate-param15: ------> vcl-rate-param16: ------> vcl-rate-grp2-param1: --> vcl-rate-grp2-param2: --> vcl-rate-grp2-param3: --> vcl-rate-grp2-param4: --> vcl-rate-grp2-param5: --> vcl-rate-grp2-param6: --> vcl-rate-grp2-param7: --> vcl-rate-grp2-param8: --> vcl-rate-grp2-param9: --> vcl-rate-grp2-param10: -> vcl-rate-grp2-param11: -> vcl-rate-grp2-param12: -> vcl-rate-grp2-param13: -> vcl-rate-grp2-param14: -> vcl-rate-grp2-param15: -> vcl-rate-grp2-param16: -> {38} {76} {151} {189} {302} {378} {604} {755} {1208} {1510} {3661} {4825} {28302} {37736} {106133} {365567} {2264} {3019} {4151} {7075} {9434} {11792} {14151} {16509} {18868} {23585} {33019} {56604} {75472} {150943} {226415} {301887}

Table 7 explains the atm-vcl-param default settings.

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Table 7: atm-vcl-param settings Setting Application Cells per second

38 76 151 189 302 378 604 755 1208 1510 3661 4825 28302 37736 106133 365567

1 to 2 DS0s at 5:1 to 10:1 oversubscription 2 to 4 DS0s at 5:1 to 10:1 oversubscription 4 to 8 DS0s at 5:1 to 10:1 oversubscription 1 DS0 no oversubscription 8 to 16 DS0s at 5:1 to 10:1 oversubscription 2 DS0 no oversubscription 16 to 32 DS0s at 5:1 to 10:1 oversubscription 4 DS0 no oversubscription 32 to 64 DS0s at 5:1 to 10:1 oversubscription 8 DS0 no oversubscription Full T1 Full E1 8 T1s 8 E1s DS3 O-C3c/STM1

38 CPS 76 CPS 151 CPS 189 CPS 302 CPS 378 CPS 604 CPS 755 CPS 1208 CPS 1510 CPS 3661 CPS 4825 CPS 28,303 CPS 37,736 CPS 106,133 CPS 365,567 CPS

Changing the atm-vcl-param profile values


Caution: Changing the values in the atm-vcl-param profile requires a system reboot. To update the atm-vcl-param profile with new values:
zSH> update atm-vcl-param 0 Please provide the following: [q]uit. vcl-rate-param1: --> {38}: vcl-rate-param2: --> {76}:

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Creating traffic descriptors

vcl-rate-param3: --> {151}: 164 vcl-rate-param4: --> {189}: 196 vcl-rate-parma5: --> {302}: vcl-rate-param6: --> {378}: vcl-rate-param7: --> {604}: vcl-rate-param8: --> {755}: vcl-rate-param9: --> {1208}: vcl-rate-param10: -> {1510}: vcl-rate-param11: -> {3661}: vcl-rate-param12: -> {4825}: vcl-rate-param13: -> {28302}: vcl-rate-param14: -> {37736}: vcl-rate-param15: -> {106133}: vcl-rate-param16: -> {365567}: vcl-rate-grp2-param1: --> {2264} vcl-rate-grp2-param2: --> {3019} vcl-rate-grp2-param3: --> {4151} vcl-rate-grp2-param4: --> {7075} vcl-rate-grp2-param5: --> {9434} vcl-rate-grp2-param6: --> {11792} vcl-rate-grp2-param7: --> {14151} vcl-rate-grp2-param8: --> {16509} vcl-rate-grp2-param9: --> {18868} vcl-rate-grp2-param10: -> {23585} vcl-rate-grp2-param11: -> {33019} vcl-rate-grp2-param12: -> {56604} vcl-rate-grp2-param13: -> {75472} vcl-rate-grp2-param14: -> {150943} vcl-rate-grp2-param15: -> {226415} vcl-rate-grp2-param16: -> {301887} .................... Save changes? [s]ave, [c]hange or [q]uit: s Changing atm-vcl-param 0 will result in a system reboot. Continue? [y]es or [n]o: y Atm configuration changed system is rebooting ...Record updated.

Creating traffic descriptors


When you create a traffic descriptor, specify an index which is used to associate a traffic descriptor with an ATM virtual channel links (VCLs) in an atm-vcl record.

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The following parameters of the default atm-traf-descr profile should be modified to match your network:
Parameter Description

td_type

Traffic descriptor type. Values: atmNoClpNoScr (OID 1.3.6.1.2.1.37.1.1.2) No CLP and no sustained cell rate. atmClpTaggingNoScr (OID 1.3.6.1.2.1.37.1.1.4) CLP with tagging and no sustained cell rate. atmClpNoTaggingScr (OID 1.3.6.1.2.1.37.1.1.6) CLP with no tagging and sustained cell rate. atmClpTaggingScr (OID 1.3.6.1.2.1.37.1.1.7) CLP with tagging and sustained cell rate. atmClpTransparentNoScr (OID 1.3.6.1.2.1.37.1.1.9) CLP transparent with no sustained cell rate. atmClpTransparentScr (OID 1.3.6.1.2.1.37.1.1.10) CLP transparent with sustained cell rate. atmNoClpNoScrCdvt (OID 1.3.6.1.2.1.37.1.1.12) No CLP, no sustained cell rate, and cell delay variation tolerance. atmClpNoTaggingScrCdvt (OID 1.3.6.1.2.1.37.1.1.14) CLP with no tagging, sustained cell rate and cell delay variation tolerance. atmClpTaggingScrCdvt (OID 1.3.6.1.2.1.37.1.1.15) CLP with tagging, sustained cell rate, and cell delay variation tolerance.

td_param1

Peak Cell Rate (PCR), measured in cells per second. For CBR traffic, must match a value configured in the atm-vcl-param profile. Sustainable cell rate (SCR), measured in cells per second. For rt-VBR traffic, must match a value configured in the atm-vcl-param profile. PCR for atmClpTaggingNoScr traffic. CDVT for atmClpTransparentNoScr and atmNoClpNoScrCdvt traffic.

td_param2

td_param3 td_param4

Maximum burst size (MBS), measured in number of cells. Cell delay variation tolerance (CDVT), measured in 10ths of microseconds.

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Parameter

Description

cac-divider

Enables oversubscription for an ATM VCL. During CAC calculations, the system divides the PCR (for CBR VCLs) or SCR (for nrt-VBR or rt-VBR VCLs) bandwidth by the value specified in the cac-divider. It then uses that value to determine if the VCL can be created. For example, to configure a 4:1 oversubscription, set cac-divider to 4. Default: 1

td_service_category

The ATM service category. Values: cbr Constant bit rate ubr - unspecified bit rate rtvbr - Real time variable bit rate nrtvbr Non-real time variable bit rate Default: ubr

td_frame_discard

Enables and disable early-packet-discard (EPD) and partial-packet-discard (PPD). This allows selective discarding of all cells in a frame if one cell is lost or discarded. Values: true Indicates that the network is requested to treat data for this connection, in the given direction, as frames (that is, AAL5 CPCS PDUs) rather than as individual cells. While the precise implementation is network-specific, this treatment may involve discarding entire frames during congestion, rather than a few cells from many frames. false This is the recommended setting for voice connections. Default: false

usage-parameter-control

Enables or disables policing on the traffic descriptor. Note that this must be set to true if the ATM service category is CBR. Values: true false Default: true

Creating a traffic descriptor


1 List the atm-traf-descr records to see what is currently configured on the system:
zSH> list atm-traf-descr

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0 entries found.

Create a traffic descriptor by specifying a traffic descriptor type and the traffic parameters. For example:

zSH> new atm-traf-descr 100 Please provide the following: [q]uit. td_type: ------------- {atmNoClpNoScr}: enter traffic descriptor td_param1: ----------- {0}: enter PCR td_param2: ----------- {0}: enter PCR (for CLP=0 traffic) or SCR td_param3: ----------- {0}: enter MBS td_param4: ----------- {0}: enter CDVT td_param5: ----------- {0}: cac-divider: -------------> {1} td_service_category: - {ubr}: rtvbr | nrtvbr | ubr | cbr td_frame_discard: --------> {false} usage-parameter-control: -> {true} .................... Save new record? [s]ave, [c]hange or [q]uit: s New record saved.

Note: Set the PCR to match the lowest speed in the cross connect.

Creating VCLs and VPLs


VCLs are used for VC switching. VPLs are used for VP switching. The following table describes the supported parameters in the atm-vcl profile:
Parameter Description

vpi

The VPI for this VCL. This must match the remote end of the connection. The VCI for this VCL. This must match the remote end of the connection. Administrative status of the link. Values: up down Default: down

vci

admin_status

receive_traffic_descr_index transmit_traffic_descr_index

The index of the atm-traf-descr profile used for this VCL. The index of the atm-traf-descr profile used for this VCL.

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Parameter

Description

vcc_aal_type

ATM adaption layer type. Values: aal5 for data other For cell relay connections. aal2 for voice Default: aal5

vcc_aal5_encaps_type

The type of data encapsulation used over the AAL5 Service Specific Convergence Sublayer (SSCS) layer. The definitions reference RFC 1483 Multiprotocol Encapsulation over ATM AAL5 and the ATM Forum LAN Emulation specification. Values: llcencapsulation Used for an LLC-encapsulated connection. other Used for a bridged connection.

fault-detection-type

Used to determine faults on the VCL. Values: disabled Fault detection is disabled. oamF5Loopback On POTS-based AAL2 connections, the unit sends an OAM F5 loopback if the CAS does not refresh after 10 seconds. If there is no response to the F5 loopback, the VCL is blocked and a trap is generated. On ISDN-based AAL2 connections, there is no CAS refresh; the unit sends an F5 loopback every 5 seconds. If there is no response to the F5 loopback, the VCL is blocked and a trap is generated. F5 loopbacks on AAL5 connections are not supported. Default: disabled

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The following table describes the supported parameters in the atm-vpl profile:
Parameter Description

atmVplAdminStatus

Administrative status of the VPL. Values: up down Default: down

atmVplReceiveTrafficDescrIndex

Specifies the ATM traffic descriptor which applies to the receive direction of this VPL. Currently this value must be set equal to the value used for the atmVplTransmitTrafficDescrIndex. Values: The index value of an existing atm-traf-descr.

atmVplTransmitTrafficDescrIndex

Specifies the ATM traffic descriptor which applies to the transmit direction of this VPL. Currently this value must be set equal to the value used for the atmVplReceiveTrafficDescrIndex. Values: The index value of an existing atm-traf-descr.

atmVplCastType

Type of connection. Values: p2p Point-to-point.

atmVplConnKind

The use of call control. Values: pvc

Creating VCLs (VC switching)


Create two VCLs for each cross connection. Each atm-vcl record defines an endpoint for an ATM virtual cross connection (VCC). Note: For a cell relay connection, set the vcl_aal_type to other, which treats the connection endpoints as cell relay. The MALC will not perform any segmentation or reassembly (SAR) on the data stream. 1 The following example creates a VCL for a subscriber-side ADSL interface in shelf 1, slot 12, port 1, with a VPI of 0 and a VCI of 35:
zSH> new atm-vcl 1-12-1-0-adsl/atm/0/35 Please provide the following: [q]uit.

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vpi: -----------------------------> {0}: vci: -----------------------------> {0}:35 admin_status: --------------------> {up}:up receive_traffic_descr_index: -----> {0}:100 transmit_traffic_descr_index: ----> {0}:100 vcc_aal_type: --------------------> {aal5}:other vcc_aal5_cpcs_transmit_sdu_size: -> {9188}: vcc_aal5_cpcs_receive_sdu_size: --> {9188}: vcc_aal5_encaps_type: ------------> {llcencapsulation}: vcl_cast_type: -------------------> {p2p}: vcl_conn_kind: -------------------> {pvc}: fault-detection-type: ------------> {disabled} traffic-container-index: ---------> {0}: .................... Save changes? [s]ave, [c]hange or [q]uit: s Record saved.

The following example creates a VCL for the Uplink card interface in shelf 1, slot 1, port 1, with a VPI of 0 and a VCI of 101:
zSH> new atm-vcl uplink1/atm/0/101 Please provide the following: [q]uit. vpi: -----------------------------> {0}: vci: -----------------------------> {0}:101 admin_status: --------------------> {down}:up receive_traffic_descr_index: -----> {0}:100 transmit_traffic_descr_index: ----> {0}:100 vcc_aal_type: --------------------> {aal5}:other vcc_aal5_cpcs_transmit_sdu_size: -> {9188}: vcc_aal5_cpcs_receive_sdu_size: --> {9188}: vcc_aal5_encaps_type: ------------> {llcencapsulation}: vcl_cast_type: -------------------> {p2p}: vcl_conn_kind: -------------------> {pvc}: fault-detection-type: ------------> {disabled} traffic-container-index: ---------> {0}: .................... Save changes? [s]ave, [c]hange or [q]uit: s Record saved.

Creating VPLs (VP switching)


Before creating VPLs, verify that an atm-vpi record exists for the VP you want to switch. For details, see VPI/VCI ranges on page 158. Create two VPLs for each cross connection. Each atm-vpl record defines an endpoint for an ATM virtual cross connection (VCC). Note: For a cell relay connection, set the vcl_aal_type to other, which treats the connection endpoints as cell relay. The MALC will not perform any segmentation or reassembly (SAR) on the data stream.

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Create a VPL for the other end of the cross connect (in this example, an ADSL port in slot 3, using VPI 2):
zSH> new atm-vpl 1-3-1-0-adsl/atm/2 interface-index/atm/VPI Please provide the following: [q]uit. atmVplAdminStatus: ---------------> {down}: up atmVplReceiveTrafficDescrIndex: --> {0}: 1 atmVplTransmitTrafficDescrIndex: -> {0}: 1 atmVplCastType: ------------------> {p2p}: atmVplConnKind: ------------------> {pvc}: atmVplPonTrafficContainerIndex: --> {0}: .................... Save new record? [s]ave, [c]hange or [q]uit: s New record saved.

Create a VPL for one end of the cross connect (in this example, an Uplink card using VPI 3)
zSH> new atm-vpl uplink1/atm/3 interface-index/atm/VPI Please provide the following: [q]uit. atmVplAdminStatus: ---------------> {down}: up atmVplReceiveTrafficDescrIndex: --> {0}: 1 atmVplTransmitTrafficDescrIndex: -> {0}: 1 atmVplCastType: ------------------> {p2p}: atmVplConnKind: ------------------> {pvc}: atmVplPonTrafficContainerIndex: --> {0}: .................... Save new record? [s]ave, [c]hange or [q]uit: s New record saved.

Next, create the cross connect.

Creating cross connects


To connect the two endpoints create a new atm-cc profile and specify an index value (The cc-index is any number you choose.) The atm-cc record uses the low-if-index and high-if-index values for VPI and VCI to bind VCC endpoints. The following parameters of the default atm-cc profile should be modified to match your network:
Parameter Description

cc-index low-if-index

A unique value to identify this cross connect. The index (in the form shelf-slot-port-subport-interface/atm or a user-defined string) of the ATM interface for this cross connect. The low-if-index is arbitrary, but by convention it indicates the ATM interface with a numerically lower ifIndex value than the other ATM interface identified in the same cross connect. The low-if-index and the high-if-index cannot be equal.

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Parameter

Description

low-vpi low-vci high-if-index

The VPI value associated with the interface specified in the low-if-index. The VCI value associated with the interface specified in the low-if-index. For VP switched connections, specify 0. The index (in the form shelf-slot-port-subport-interface/atm or a user-defined string) of the ATM interface for this cross connect. The high-if-index is arbitrary, but by convention it indicates the ATM interface with a numerically higher ifIndex value than the other ATM interface identified in the same cross connect. The low-if-index and the high-if-index cannot be equal.

high-vpi high-vci admin-status

The VPI value associated with the interface specified in the high-if-index The VCI value associated with the interface specified in the high-if-index. For VP switched connections, specify 0. The desired administrative status of the cross connect. Values: up down Default: down

Creating cross connects


To create a VC-switched crossconnect, use the crossconnect command. This command uses the following syntax:
crossconnect add interface1/type1 [vc] vpi1/vci1 interface2/type2 [vc] vpi2/vci2 td_val | txtd txtd_value rxtd rxtd_val

The following example creates a VC switched cross connect between a DSL port and an OC-3c/STM1 port (the VCL were created above):
zSH> crossconnect add 1-3-1-0-adsl/atm vc 1/35 uplink2/atm vc 1/101 100

The following example creates a VP switched cross connect between a DSL port and the Uplink port:
zSH> new atm-cc 1 Please provide the cc-index: ------> low-if-index: --> low-vpi: -------> low-vci: -------> high-if-index: -> high-vpi: ------> high-vci: ------> following: [q]uit. {0}: 1 {0/0/0/0/0}: 1-3-1-0-adsl/atm {0}: 2 {0}: leave at 0 for VP switching {0/0/0/0/0}: uplink2/atm {0}: 3 {0}: leave at 0 for VP switching

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admin-status: --> {down}: up .................... Save new record? [s]ave, [c]hange or [q]uit: s Record saved.

Note: A VCL or VPL can be used in only one cross connect.

Subtending
Subtending allows you aggregate traffic from multiple MALC devices to single MALC devices ATM upstream interface. In a typical subtended configuration, VPLs from downstream devices are VP-switched to an upstream ATM device over a high-speed interface such as OC-3c/STM1.
Figure 25: Example subtending configuration

1
Device A Device B

VPL 1-3-1-0-ds1/atm/1

T1/E1 32 card Device C

ATM VPL uplink1/atm/1 VPL uplink1/atm/2

VPL 1-3-2-0-ds1/atm/2

Subtending example
This example creates a subtended configuration from two downstream MALC devices to a single MALC. The downstream devices are connected to MALC T1/E1 ports and the traffic is VP switched to the Uplink interface (and then to the upstream ATM network). 1 Create a traffic descriptors for the downstream and upstream interfaces: Downstream: (this example uses a UBR connection with a PCR of 3661 CPS (T1 line speed)):

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zSH> new atm-traf-descr 100 Please provide the following: [q]uit. td_type: -----------------> {atmNoClpNoScr}: td_param1: ---------------> {0}: 3661 td_param2: ---------------> {0}: td_param3: ---------------> {0}: td_param4: ---------------> {0}: td_param5: ---------------> {0}: cac-divider: -------------> {1}: td_service_category: -----> {ubr}: td_frame_discard: --------> {false}: usage-parameter-control: -> {true}: .................... Save new record? [s]ave, [c]hange or [q]uit: s New record saved.

Upstream: (this example uses a UBR connection with a PCR of 28,303 CPS (line speed of 8 T1s)):
zSH> new atm-traf-descr 200 Please provide the following: [q]uit. td_type: -----------------> {atmNoClpNoScr}: td_param1: ---------------> {0}: 28303 td_param2: ---------------> {0}: td_param3: ---------------> {0}: td_param4: ---------------> {0}: td_param5: ---------------> {0}: cac-divider: -------------> {1}: td_service_category: -----> {ubr}: td_frame_discard: --------> {false}: usage-parameter-control: -> {true}: .................... Save new record? [s]ave, [c]hange or [q]uit: s New record saved.

Create VPI profiles for each VPI you want to switch. These specify that the MALC should VPI switch all traffic using this VPI: a For the Uplink interface:
zSH> new atm-vpi uplink1/atm/1 interface-index/atm/VPI Please provide the following: [q]uit. zhoneAtmVpiMaxVci: ---> {0}: zhoneAtmVpiSwitched: -> {vc}: vp .................... Save new record? [s]ave, [c]hange or [q]uit: s New record saved. zSH> new atm-vpi uplink1/atm/2 interface-index/atm/VPI Please provide the following: [q]uit. zhoneAtmVpiMaxVci: ---> {0}: zhoneAtmVpiSwitched: -> {vc}: vp .................... Save new record? [s]ave, [c]hange or [q]uit: s New record saved.

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After the first atm-vpi record is saved, the system will automatically create atm-vpi records for all VPIs used in existing cross connects, if any. b For the T1/E1 port connected to device A:
zSH> new atm-vpi 1-3-1-0-ds1/atm/1 interface-index/atm/ VPI Please provide the following: [q]uit. zhoneAtmVpiMaxVci: ---> {0}: zhoneAtmVpiSwitched: -> {vc}: vp .................... Save new record? [s]ave, [c]hange or [q]uit: s New record saved.

For the T1/E1 port connected to device B:


zSH> new atm-vpi 1-3-2-0-ds1/atm/2 interface-index/atm/ VPI Please provide the following: [q]uit. zhoneAtmVpiMaxVci: ---> {0}: zhoneAtmVpiSwitched: -> {vc}: vp .................... Save new record? [s]ave, [c]hange or [q]uit: s New record saved.

After the system has finished creating the atm-vpi records, reboot the card: Note: Rebooting the active Uplink card causes the system to reboot (for a non-redundant system), or switchover to the standby Uplink card (for a redundant system). Uplink card:
zSH> slotreboot 1

T1/E1 32 card:
zSH> slotreboot 3

e 3

If your system is redundant, configure a VPI profile on the second Uplink card.

Create VPLs to each downstream MALC: Device A:


zSH> new atm-vpl 1-3-1-0-ds1/atm/1 interface-index/atm/VPI Please provide the following: [q]uit. atmVplAdminStatus: ---------------> {down}: up atmVplReceiveTrafficDescrIndex: --> {0}: 100 atmVplTransmitTrafficDescrIndex: -> {0}: 100 atmVplCastType: ------------------> {p2p}: atmVplConnKind: ------------------> {pvc}: atmVplPonTrafficContainerIndex:--> {0} ....................

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Save new record? [s]ave, [c]hange or [q]uit: New record saved.

Device B:
zSH> new atm-vpl 1-3-2-0-ds1/atm/2 interface-index/atm/VPI Please provide the following: [q]uit. atmVplAdminStatus: ---------------> {down}: up atmVplReceiveTrafficDescrIndex: --> {0}: 100 atmVplTransmitTrafficDescrIndex: -> {0}: 100 atmVplCastType: ------------------> {p2p}: atmVplConnKind: ------------------> {pvc}: atmVplPonTrafficContainerIndex:--> {0} .................... Save new record? [s]ave, [c]hange or [q]uit: s New record saved.

Create the VPLs for device Cs Uplink interface: For VPI 1 (device A):
zSH> new atm-vpl uplink1/atm/1 interface-index/atm/VPI Please provide the following: [q]uit. atmVplAdminStatus: ---------------> {down}: up atmVplReceiveTrafficDescrIndex: --> {0}: 200 atmVplTransmitTrafficDescrIndex: -> {0}: 200 atmVplCastType: ------------------> {p2p}: atmVplConnKind: ------------------> {pvc}: atmVplPonTrafficContainerIndex:--> {0}: .................... Save new record? [s]ave, [c]hange or [q]uit: s New record saved.

For VPI 2 (device B):


zSH> new atm-vpl uplink1/atm/2 interface-index/atm/VPI Please provide the following: [q]uit. atmVplAdminStatus: ---------------> {down}: up atmVplReceiveTrafficDescrIndex: --> {0}: 200 atmVplTransmitTrafficDescrIndex: -> {0}: 200 atmVplCastType: ------------------> {p2p}: atmVplConnKind: ------------------> {pvc}: atmVplPonTrafficContainerIndex:--> {0}: .................... Save new record? [s]ave, [c]hange or [q]uit: s New record saved.

Create cross connects between the two downstream interfaces and the Uplink interface: From Device A to the Uplink VPL:
zSH> new atm-cc 1 Please provide the following: [q]uit. cc-index: ------> {0}: 1 low-if-index: --> {0/0/0/0/0}: atm-vcl 1-3-1-0/atm

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low-vpi: -------> {0}: 1 low-vci: -------> {0}: leave at 0 for VP switching high-if-index: -> {0/0/0/0/0}: uplink1/atm high-vpi: ------> {0}: 1 high-vci: ------> {0}: leave at 0 for VP switching admin-status: --> {down}: up .................... Save new record? [s]ave, [c]hange or [q]uit: s Record saved.

From Device B to the Uplink VPL:


zSH> new atm-cc 2 Please provide the following: [q]uit. cc-index: ------> {0}: 2 low-if-index: --> {0/0/0/0/0}: atm-vcl 1-3-2-0/atm low-vpi: -------> {0}: 2 low-vci: -------> {0}: leave at 0 for VP switching high-if-index: -> {0/0/0/0/0}: uplink1/atm high-vpi: ------> {0}: 2 high-vci: ------> {0}: leave at 0 for VP switching admin-status: --> {down}: up .................... Save new record? [s]ave, [c]hange or [q]uit: s Record saved.

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CONFIGURING GR-303 OR V5.2 INTERFACE GROUPS


This section explains how to configure GR-303 and V5.2 interface groups on the MALC and how to configure system settings for voice. It includes the following information:

Configuring a GR-303 interface, page 177 Modifying a GR-303 interface group, page 182 Configuring a V5.2 interface, page 183 Modifying the v52-interface-group profile, page 194

After configuring the GR-303 or V5.2 interface, proceed to adding subscribers, as explained in Configuring the Voice Gateway on page 269 or Configuring Voice on page 197. Note: The TDM/ATM Uplink card or the Voice Gateway card is required for GR-303 and V5.2 support on the MALC. Note: This chapter assumes you have configured the TDM/ATM Uplink and the Voice Gateway card as explained in the MALC Hardware Installation Guide. The TDM/ATM Uplink card has 16 T1/E1 ports. The first eight ports are ATM T1/E1 ports; the second eight are TDM T1/E1 ports.

Configuring a GR-303 interface


The following steps are necessary to configure GR-303 interface groups on the MALC. Each step is explained in more detail in the sections that follow: 1. Update the system profile to specify the country the unit is operating in and to enable voice bandwidth check. See Updating system settings on page 198. 2. Find the line group identifier of the communication path (the DS1 interface on the TDM/ATM Uplink card). 3. Create the GR-303 Interface Group (IG). See Creating a GR-303 interface group on page 179.

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4. Activate the GR-303 IG. The following table summarizes the configuration tasks for creating a GR-303 interface.

Configuration Task

Profile

Creating a GR-303 interface group on page 179.

new gr303-interface-group GR303Index Use the same GR303Index for the gr303-interface-group and the CRVs in the gr303-ig-crv profile.

Modifying a GR-303 interface group on page 182 Displaying GR303 interface group status on page 183

update gr303-interface-group GR303Index voice status ig gr303 groupname

Note: The sapi-1-n-200 and sapi-1-max-outstanding-frames parameters automatically take the same values as the sapi-0-n-200 and sapi-0-max-outstanding-frames parameters. The gr303-interface-group profile supports the following parameters.
Parameter Description and options

name-id switch-type

A name assigned by the installer. It must be unique to the system. This value is a string. This is a required field. The name of the switch supplying the GR-303 circuits. This is a required field. Values: lucent5Ess nortelDms100

adminStatus

The administrative status of the IG. This must be set to inservice for the IG to function. Values: inservice outofservice

working-mode

Indicates whether the selected switch can configure the RDT using common management information service (CMIS) over the Embedded Operations Channel (EOC) channel. Values: active the selected switch can configure the RDT for Call Reference Values (CRVs) over the EOC channel. Normally used for 5ESS switches. passive CRVs can only be configured locally. Normally used for DMS switch.

CrtlChannel:

The IG control channel array.

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Parameter

Description and options

ds1LM:array[1..28]:

The array for T1/DS1 circuits. The maximum number of DS1 trunks allowed per IG is 28. This array includes the dsn-lg-id, channel-number, and role parameters. The DS1 line group ID number. This must match the line group ID of the physical interface on which you are provisioning GR-303 IGs. Identifies the DS1 for the channelized DS3. Values: 1 to 28

dsn-lg-id channel-number

role

The role this channel plays in the array. Must be set to primary for the first DS1. One other DS1 must have the role parameter set to secondary. All other DS1s have their role set to payload. Values: payload secondary primary Default: payload

logical-id

Identifies each physical DS1 within an Interface Group between RDT and IDT. The value 1 is reserved for the primary DS1 and cannot be used by any other DS1s. This field is mandatory. Values: 1 to 28

ds1-valid-flag

Whether this DS1 is valid or invalid. Must be set to valid to enable calls over provisioned DS1s. Values: valid invalid

Creating a GR-303 interface group


To create a GR-303 interface group: 1 List the ds1-profiles
zSH> list ds1-profile if-translate 1-1-9-0/ds1 if-translate 1-1-10-0/ds1 if-translate 1-1-11-0/ds1 if-translate 1-1-12-0/ds1 if-translate 1-1-13-0/ds1 if-translate 1-1-14-0/ds1 if-translate 1-1-15-0/ds1 if-translate 1-1-16-0/ds1 ...

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Then enter the lineGroup command to find the line group identifiers for the TDM T1/E1 ports. Make a note of the lineGroupIds of the TDM T1/ E1 ports; they will be used later.
zSH> linegroup 1-1-9-0/ds1 lineGroupId: 13 zSH> linegroup 1-1-10-0/ds1 lineGroupId: 15 zSH> linegroup 1-1-11-0/ds1 lineGroupId: 17 zSH> linegroup 1-1-12-0/ds1 lineGroupId: 19 zSH> linegroup 1-1-13-0/ds1 lineGroupId: 21 zSH> linegroup 1-1-14-0/ds1 lineGroupId: 23 zSH> linegroup 1-1-15-0/ds1 lineGroupId: 25 zSH> linegroup 1-1-16-0/ds1 lineGroupId: 27

Create a new GR-303 interface group. For example:

zSH> new gr303-interface-group 1 1 is a user-defined Index for this IG Please provide the following: [q]uit. name-id: -----------------------> {}: zhone switch-type: -------------------> {lucent5ess}: lucent5ess | norteldms100 adminStatus: -------------------> {outofservice}: inservice working-mode: ------------------> {passive}: active | passive ctrlChannel: control-channel-t303: ----------> {700}: control-channel-t396: ----------> {14700}: sapi-0-max-outstanding-frames: -> {7}: sapi-0-n-200: ------------------> {3}: sapi-0-t-200: ------------------> {150}: sapi-0-t-203: ------------------> {30}: sapi-0-pps-mode: ---------------> {notinhibited}: sapi-1-max-outstanding-frames: -> {7}: sapi-1-n-200: ------------------> {3}: sapi-1-t-200: ------------------> {150}: sapi-1-t-203: ------------------> {30}: sapi-1-pps-mode: ---------------> {notinhibited}: ds1LM has 28 elements. Modify [a]ll, [n]one, a [s]ubset, or [q]uit? s Enter the array element to start: 1 ds1LM[1]: dsn-lg-id: ---------------------> {1}: 13 linegroup ID of the first port on the TDM/ATM Uplink channel-number: ----------------> {1}:

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role: --------------------------> {payload}: primary logical-id: --------------------> {28}: 1 1 is reserved for primary channels. Use numbers 2 to 28 for other types of channels. ds1-valid-flag: ----------------> {invalid}: valid ds1LM[3]: dsn-lg-id: ---------------------> {1}: 15 linegroup ID of the second port on the TDM/ATM Uplink channel-number: ----------------> {1}: role: --------------------------> {payload}: secondary logical-id: --------------------> {28}: 2 ds1-valid-flag: ----------------> {invalid}: valid ds1LM[4]: dsn-lg-id: ---------------------> {1}: 17 linegroup ID of the third port on the TDM/ATM Uplink channel-number: ----------------> {1}: role: --------------------------> {payload}: logical-id: --------------------> {28}: 3 ds1-valid-flag: ----------------> {invalid}: valid ds1LM[5]: dsn-lg-id: ---------------------> {1}: q .................... Save record? [s]ave, [c]hange or [q]uit: s New record saved.

Activate the GR-303 interface group (IG):

zSH> update gr303-interface-group 1 Please provide the following: [q]uit. name-id: -----------------------> {zhone}: switch-type: -------------------> {lucent5ess}: adminStatus: -------------------> {outofservce}: inservice working-mode: ------------------> {passive}: ctrlChannel: control-channel-t303: ----------> {700}: control-channel-t396: ----------> {14700}: sapi-0-max-outstanding-frames: -> {7}: sapi-0-n-200: ------------------> {3}: sapi-0-t-200: ------------------> {150}: sapi-0-t-203: ------------------> {30}: sapi-0-pps-mode: ---------------> {notinhibited}: sapi-1-max-outstanding-frames: -> {7}: sapi-1-n-200: ------------------> {3}: sapi-1-t-200: ------------------> {150}: sapi-1-t-203: ------------------> {30}: sapi-1-pps-mode: ---------------> {notinhibited}: ds1LM has 28 elements. Modify [a]ll, [n]one, a [s]ubset, or [q]uit? n Using default values for elements 1-28 .................... Save record? [s]ave, [c]hange or [q]uit: s Record updated.

After the GR-303 IG is activated, proceed to configuring GR-303 subscribers. For information, see Configuring Voice on page 197.

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Modifying a GR-303 interface group


Caution: Removing an IG from service will cause all active calls to be dropped. To remove service from the IG:
zSH> update gr303-interface-group 1 Please provide the following: [q]uit. name-id: -----------------------> {zhone}: switch-type: -------------------> {lucent5ess}: adminStatus: -------------------> {inservice}: outofservice working-mode: ------------------> {passive}: ctrlChannel: control-channel-t303: ----------> {700}: control-channel-t396: ----------> {14700}: sapi-0-max-outstanding-frames: -> {7}: sapi-0-n-200: ------------------> {3}: sapi-0-t-200: ------------------> {150}: sapi-0-t-203: ------------------> {30}: sapi-0-pps-mode: ---------------> {notinhibited}: sapi-1-max-outstanding-frames: -> {7}: sapi-1-n-200: ------------------> {3}: sapi-1-t-200: ------------------> {150}: sapi-1-t-203: ------------------> {30}: sapi-1-pps-mode: ---------------> {notinhibited}: ds1LM has 28 elements. Modify [a]ll, [n]one, a [s]ubset, or [q]uit? n Using default values for elements 1-28 .................... Save record? [s]ave, [c]hange or [q]uit: s Record updated.

To restore service to the IG:


zSH> update gr303-interface-group 1 Please provide the following: [q]uit. name-id: -----------------------> {zhone}: switch-type: -------------------> {lucent5ess}: adminStatus: -------------------> {outofservce}: inservice working-mode: ------------------> {passive}: ctrlChannel: control-channel-t303: ----------> {700}: control-channel-t396: ----------> {14700}: sapi-0-max-outstanding-frames: -> {7}: sapi-0-n-200: ------------------> {3}: sapi-0-t-200: ------------------> {150}: sapi-0-t-203: ------------------> {30}: sapi-0-pps-mode: ---------------> {notinhibited}: sapi-1-max-outstanding-frames: -> {7}: sapi-1-n-200: ------------------> {3}: sapi-1-t-200: ------------------> {150}: sapi-1-t-203: ------------------> {30}: sapi-1-pps-mode: ---------------> {notinhibited}:

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ds1LM has 28 elements. Modify [a]ll, [n]one, a [s]ubset, or [q]uit? n Using default values for elements 1-28 .................... Save record? [s]ave, [c]hange or [q]uit: s Record updated.

Displaying GR303 interface group status


The voice status command can be used to display GR303 IG status.
zSH> voice status ig gr303 test Status for gr303 interface group test: Admin status = in service Oper status = inoperable Active calls = 0 Switch type = norteldms100 TMC primary state = out of service TMC secondary state = out of service EOC primary state = out of service EOC secondary state = out of service

Configuring a V5.2 interface


The following steps are necessary to configure V5.2 interface groups on the MALC. Each step is explained in more detail in the sections that follow: 1. Update the system profile to specify the country the unit is operating in and to enable voice bandwidth check. See Updating system settings on page 198. 2. Find the line group identifier of the communication path (the E1 interface on the TDM/ATM Uplink card). 3. Create the V5.2 IG. See Creating a V5.2 interface group on page 187. 4. Provision the V5.2 links. See Provisioning V5.2 links on page 189. 5. Add C-channels within links. See Adding C-channels within links on page 190. 6. Provision C-paths. See Provisioning C-paths on page 192. 7. Activate the V5.2 IG. See Activating the V5.2 IG on page 194. The following table summarizes the tasks for configuring the V5.2 interface.

Configuration task

Commands

Creating a V5.2 interface group on page 187

new v52-interface-group v52IgIndex

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Configuration task

Commands

Finding the line group identifiers of the physical connection on page 188 Provisioning V5.2 links on page 189 Adding C-channels within links on page 190 Provisioning C-paths on page 192 Activating the V5.2 IG on page 194 Displaying V5.2 interface group status on page 195

update v52-interface-group v52IgIndex

voice status ig v52 groupname

The following sections describe in further detail each step necessary in the configuration process. Note: Although the v52-link, v52-c-channel and v52-c-path arrays can be provisioned at the same time the v52-interface-group is created, the steps are separated for clarity. The following table describes the supported V5.2 parameters in the v52-interface-group. The V5.2 interface group (IG) is configured using one profile.
Parameter Options

name-id

The name of the IG. Must be unique in the system. Use the same name for the voice-v52-interface-name parameter in the subscriber-voice-v52 profile. This value is a string. The interface ID of the IG. Must be unique across the system. This value must match the value on the switch. Values: 0 to 16777215

local-interface-id

local-prov-variant

The prov(isioning) variant describes a type of provisioning. This value must match the value on the switch. Values: 0 to 127

admin-status

The administrative status of the profile. Values: inservice outofservice deferredoutofservice restart

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Parameter

Options

pstn-layer-3-start-address

The start address for PSTN users. When PSTN users are added, they must have an address greater or equal to this one. This value must match the value on the switch. Values: 0 to 65535

isdn-env-func-start-address

The start address for ISDN users. When ISDN users are added, they must have an address greater or equal to this one. This value must match the value on the switch. Values: 0 to 8175

national-pstn-region switch-vendor

Country setting. Sets up PSTN values for the specific country. The switch vendor for the IG. Values: lucent, nortel, alcatel, ericsson, nokia, siemens, samsung.

protocol-spec

Specifies which variation of the V5.2 protocol is to be used by this interface group. This value must match the value on the switch. Values: edition1 edition2

v52-ig-lapv

An array of V5.2 Lapv timer parameters. These configure retries and other functions over the management links. This value must match the value on the switch. This array is used to provision the E1circuits between the LE and the MALC unit. There can be up to sixteen links. Each E1 link has 32 channels. Describes the line group ID associated with the E1 link. Use the lineGroup command to find the line group ID. Values: 1 to 16

v52-link[1..16] dsn-lg-id

id

The V5.2 link identifier. Assigned by the Local Exchange (LE).

v52-c-channel: array [1..3]

This array describes up to three control channels per link (E1). There can be up to 3 of them on each of the16 links for a maximum of 48. C-channels are used to pass management information between then LE and the MALC system. The channel that the C-channel is running over. This value must match the value on the switch. Values: 15 16 31

time-slot-index

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Parameter

Options

logical-channel-id

C-channels carry a group of one or more C-paths, excluding the C-paths used for the protection protocol. A V5.2 interface may contain up to 44 logical C-channels. Each logical C-channel on an interface is uniquely identified with a 16 bit logical C-channel identifier. This value must match the value on the switch. Values: 0 to 65535

protection-group

The protection protocol ensures that other protocols can continue to operate in case of equipment failure. This value must match the value on the switch. Values: none group1 onetoonegroup2 mtongroup2

role

The C-channel role. This value must match the value on the switch. Values: active standby switchtostandby Default: active

link-valid-flag

Activates the E1 circuit. Values: valid invalid

v52-c-path: array [1..48]

This array describes communications paths. C-paths are used to specify the type of information running between the MALC system and the LE. C-paths run inside C-channels. There can be up to 48 C-paths inside each C-channel. Values: Use the logical-channel-id numbers created for the C-channels.

id

The ID number of the communications path. Values: 0 to 255

type

The type of communications path. This tells the system how the management information is communicated. Values: unknown pstn POTS ctrl control protocol bcc bearer channel connection lctl link control protocol isdnds BRI voice data

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Parameter

Options

logical-channel-id

The logical C-channel ID that the C-path is using. This number must match the logical-channel-id value of the C-channel that the C-path is running over. Values: 0 to 65535

c-path-valid-flag

When this parameter is set to valid, the C-path is active. Values: valid invalid

Creating a V5.2 interface group


Note: While provisioning is being performed on the V5.2 interface, the IG should be kept out of service. The following example shows how to create a V5.2 IG named zhone.
zSH> new v52-interface-group 1 Please provide the following: [q]uit. name-id: ---------------------> {}: zhone local-interface-id: ----------> {0}: 1 local-prov-variant: ----------> {0}: 1 prov-variant-request: --------> {norequest}: admin-status: ----------------> {outofservice}: pstn-layer-3-start-address: --> {0}: 1 isdn-env-func-start-address: -> {0}: 1 port-alignment-request: ------> {norequest}: national-pstn-region: --------> {etsi}: germany match the country in the system profile switch-vendor: ---------------> {ericsson}: siemens match switch protocol-spec: ---------------> {edition2}: startup-check-link-id: -------> {false}: startup-unblock-user-ports: --> {false}: link-oos-timer: --------------> {2500}: link-is-timer: ---------------> {200}: v52-ig-lapv: max-outstanding-frames: ------> {7}: ** read-only ** n200: ------------------------> {3}: ** read-only ** n201: ------------------------> {260}: ** read-only ** t200: ------------------------> {1000}: ** read-only ** t203: ------------------------> {10}: ** read-only ** v52-link has 16 elements. Modify [a]ll, [n]one, a [s]ubset, or [q]uit? n Using default values for elements 1-16 v52-c-path has 48 elements. Modify [a]ll, [n]one, a [s]ubset, or [q]uit? n Using default values for elements 1-48 .................... Save new record? [s]ave, [c]hange or [q]uit: s New record saved.

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Note: After creating the IG, certain parameters in the v52-interface-group can only be modified with the v52config command. For details, see Modifying the v52-interface-group profile on page 194.

Finding the line group identifiers of the physical connection


List the ds1-profiles:
zSH> list ds1-profile if-translate 1-1-9-0/ds1 if-translate 1-1-10-0/ds1 if-translate 1-1-11-0/ds1 if-translate 1-1-12-0/ds1 if-translate 1-1-13-0/ds1 if-translate 1-1-14-0/ds1 if-translate 1-1-15-0/ds1 if-translate 1-1-16-0/ds1 ...

Then enter the lineGroup command to find the line group identifiers for the TDM T1/E1 ports. Make a note of the lineGroupIds of the TDM T1/E1 ports; they will be used later.
zSH> linegroup 1-1-9-0/ds1 lineGroupId: 13 zSH> linegroup 1-1-10-0/ds1 lineGroupId: 15 zSH> linegroup 1-1-11-0/ds1 lineGroupId: 17 zSH> linegroup 1-1-12-0/ds1 lineGroupId: 19 zSH> linegroup 1-1-13-0/ds1 lineGroupId: 21 zSH> linegroup 1-1-14-0/ds1 lineGroupId: 23 zSH> linegroup 1-1-15-0/ds1 lineGroupId: 25 zSH> linegroup 1-1-16-0/ds1 lineGroupId: 27

Make a note of the lineGroupIds of the TDM T1/E1 ports; they will be used later.

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Provisioning V5.2 links


This section explains how to provision individual E1 circuits or V5.2 links.

To create V5.2 links, enter s for subset at the v52-link has 16 elements Modify [a]ll, [n]one, a [s]ubset, or [q]uit? prompt For each E1 circuit, enter a unique dsn-lg-id number. Refer to Finding the line group identifiers of the physical connection on page 188. Enter a link id number. Enter valid at the link-valid-flag prompt to turn the link up.

This example configures three links:


zSH> update v52-interface-group 1 the IG created earlier Please provide the following: [q]uit. name-id: ---------------------> {zhone}: ** read-only ** local-interface-id: ----------> {1}: local-prov-variant: ----------> {1}: prov-variant-request: --------> {norequest}: admin-status: ----------------> {outofservice}: pstn-layer-3-start-address: --> {1}: isdn-env-func-start-address: -> {1}: port-alignment-request: ------> {norequest}: national-pstn-region: --------> {germany}: switch-vendor: ---------------> {siemens}: protocol-spec: ---------------> {edition2}: startup-check-link-id: -------> {false}: startup-unblock-user-ports: --> {false}: link-oos-timer: --------------> {2500}: link-is-timer: ---------------> {200}: v52-ig-lapv: max-outstanding-frames: ------> {7}: ** read-only ** n200: ------------------------> {3}: ** read-only ** n201: ------------------------> {260}: ** read-only ** t200: ------------------------> {1000}: ** read-only ** t203: ------------------------> {10}: ** read-only ** v52-link has 16 elements. Modify [a]ll, [n]one, a [s]ubset, or [q]uit? Modify [a]ll, [n]one, a [s]ubset, or [q]uit? s to modfy the V5.2 links Enter the array element to start: 1 v52-link[1]: dsn-lg-id: -------------------> {1}: 13 linegroup ID of the first port on the TDM/ ATM Uplink ds1-channel-number: ----------> {1}: id: --------------------------> {0}: 1 identifier for first link, must match switch check-id: --------------------> {notactivated}: block: -----------------------> {unblocked}: v52-c-channel has 3 elements. Modify [a]ll, [n]one, a [s]ubset, or [q]uit? n Using current values for elements 1-3 link-valid-flag: -------------> {invalid}: valid v52-link[2]: dsn-lg-id: -------------------> {1}: 15 linegroup ID of the second port on the TDM/ ATM Uplink

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ds1-channel-number: ----------> {1}: id: --------------------------> {0}: 2 identifier for second link, must match switch check-id: --------------------> {notactivated}: block: -----------------------> {unblocked}: v52-c-channel has 3 elements. Modify [a]ll, [n]one, a [s]ubset, or [q]uit? n Using current values for elements 1-3 link-valid-flag: -------------> {invalid}: valid v52-link[3]: dsn-lg-id: -------------------> {1}: 17 linegroup ID of the third port on the TDM/ ATM Uplink ds1-channel-number: ----------> {1}: id: --------------------------> {0}: 3 identifier for third link, must match switch check-id: --------------------> {notactivated}: block: -----------------------> {unblocked}: v52-c-channel has 3 elements. Modify [a]ll, [n]one, a [s]ubset, or [q]uit? n Using current values for elements 1-3 link-valid-flag: -------------> {invalid}: valid v52-link[4]: dsn-lg-id: -------------------> {1}: q Using current values for elements 4-16 v52-c-path has 48 elements. Modify [a]ll, [n]one, a [s]ubset, or [q]uit? n Using current values for elements 1-48 .................... Save changes? [s]ave, [c]hange or [q]uit: s Record updated.

Adding C-channels within links


This example shows how to configure control channels for links you created in Provisioning V5.2 links on page 189. Control channels (C-channels) to pass management information between the switch and the MALC. There can be up to three C-channels per E1 link, on channel numbers 15, 16 and 31.

Enter 15, 16 or 31 for the time-slot-index option. Enter the logical-channel-id. Each C-channel must have a unique numerical identifier. Enter a protection-group name (optional). Specify the role. Set the c-channel-valid-flag to valid.

The following example shows one C-channel provisioned in v52-link number one, one in link number two, and two C-channels provisioned in link number three.
zSH> update v52-interface-group 1 Please provide the following: [q]uit. name-id: ---------------------> {zhone}: ** read-only ** local-interface-id: ----------> {1}: local-prov-variant: ----------> {1}: prov-variant-request: --------> {norequest}: admin-status: ----------------> {outofservice}:

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pstn-layer-3-start-address: --> {1}: isdn-env-func-start-address: -> {1}: port-alignment-request: ------> {norequest}: national-pstn-region: --------> {germany}: switch-vendor: ---------------> {siemens}: protocol-spec: ---------------> {edition2}: startup-check-link-id: -------> {false}: startup-unblock-user-ports: --> {false}: link-oos-timer: --------------> {2500}: link-is-timer: ---------------> {200}: v52-ig-lapv: max-outstanding-frames: ------> {7}: ** read-only ** n200: ------------------------> {3}: ** read-only ** n201: ------------------------> {260}: ** read-only ** t200: ------------------------> {1000}: ** read-only ** t203: ------------------------> {10}: ** read-only ** v52-link has 16 elements. Modify [a]ll, [n]one, a [s]ubset, or [q]uit? s Enter the array element to start: 1 v52-link[1]: dsn-lg-id: -------------------> {2}: ds1-channel-number: ----------> {1}: id: --------------------------> {1}: check-id: --------------------> {notactivated}: block: -----------------------> {unblocked}: v52-c-channel has 3 elements. Modify [a]ll, [n]one, a [s]ubset, or [q]uit? s Enter the array element to start: 1 v52-c-channel[1]: time-slot-index: -------------> {16}: logical-channel-id: ----------> {0}: 1 protection-group: ------------> {none}: group1 role: ------------------------> {active}: c-channel-valid-flag: --------> {invalid}: valid v52-c-channel[2]: time-slot-index: -------------> {16}: q Using current values for elements 2-3 link-valid-flag: -------------> {valid}: v52-link[2]: dsn-lg-id: -------------------> {4}: ds1-channel-number: ----------> {1}: id: --------------------------> {2}: check-id: --------------------> {notactivated}: block: -----------------------> {unblocked}: v52-c-channel has 3 elements. Modify [a]ll, [n]one, a [s]ubset, or [q]uit? s Enter the array element to start: 1 v52-c-channel[1]: time-slot-index: -------------> {16}: logical-channel-id: ----------> {0}: 2 protection-group: ------------> {none}: group1 role: ------------------------> {active}: standby c-channel-valid-flag: --------> {invalid}: valid v52-c-channel[2]: time-slot-index: -------------> {16}: q Using current values for elements 2-3 link-valid-flag: -------------> {valid}:

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v52-link[3]: dsn-lg-id: -------------------> {6}: ds1-channel-number: ----------> {1}: id: --------------------------> {3}: check-id: --------------------> {notactivated}: block: -----------------------> {unblocked}: v52-c-channel has 3 elements. Modify [a]ll, [n]one, a [s]ubset, or [q]uit? s Enter the array element to start: 1 v52-c-channel[1]: time-slot-index: -------------> {16}: logical-channel-id: ----------> {0}: 3 protection-group: ------------> {none}: role: ------------------------> {active}: c-channel-valid-flag: --------> {invalid}: valid v52-c-channel[2]: time-slot-index: -------------> {16}: q Using current values for elements 2-3 link-valid-flag: -------------> {valid}: q Using current values for elements 4-16 v52-c-path has 48 elements. Modify [a]ll, [n]one, a [s]ubset, or [q]uit? n Using current values for elements 1-48 .................... Save changes? [s]ave, [c]hange or [q]uit: s Record updated.

Provisioning C-paths
You can set how the management information in the C-channel is communicated by provisioning the communication path (C-path). The C-path array is provisioned within the C-channel array. The C-path logical-channel-id number must match the logical-channel-id value you assigned for the C-channel in the Adding C-channels within links on page 190. For each C-path, follow these steps:

Assign a unique id number for each C-path. Enter a type value. To communicate ISDN BRI management data for voice calls, use the isdnds option. Assign the logical-channel-id number for the C-channel that the C-path is running over. Each c-path-valid-flag must be set to valid to activate the C-path.

This example shows how to configure seven communications paths. The first four are in C-channel number one, the fifth and sixth are created in channel three, and the seventh is created in channel four.
zSH> update v52-interface-group 1 Please provide the following: [q]uit. name-id: ---------------------> {zhone}: ** read-only ** local-interface-id: ----------> {1}: local-prov-variant: ----------> {1}: prov-variant-request: --------> {norequest}:

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admin-status: ----------------> {outofservice}: pstn-layer-3-start-address: --> {1}: isdn-env-func-start-address: -> {1}: port-alignment-request: ------> {norequest}: national-pstn-region: --------> {germany}: switch-vendor: ---------------> {siemens}: protocol-spec: ---------------> {edition2}: startup-check-link-id: -------> {false}: startup-unblock-user-ports: --> {false}: link-oos-timer: --------------> {2500}: link-is-timer: ---------------> {200}: v52-ig-lapv: max-outstanding-frames: ------> {7}: ** read-only ** n200: ------------------------> {3}: ** read-only ** n201: ------------------------> {260}: ** read-only ** t200: ------------------------> {1000}: ** read-only ** t203: ------------------------> {10}: ** read-only ** v52-link has 16 elements. Modify [a]ll, [n]one, a [s]ubset, or [q]uit? n Using current values for elements 1-16 v52-c-path has 48 elements. Modify [a]ll, [n]one, a [s]ubset, or [q]uit? s Enter the array element to start: 1 v52-c-path[1]: id: --------------------------> {1}: type: ------------------------> {unknown}: bcc bear channel connection logical-channel-id: ----------> {0}: 1 c-path-valid-flag: -----------> {invalid}: valid v52-c-path[2]: id: --------------------------> {1}: 2 type: ------------------------> {unknown}: ctrl control protocol logical-channel-id: ----------> {0}: 1 c-path-valid-flag: -----------> {invalid}: valid v52-c-path[3]: id: --------------------------> {1}: 3 type: ------------------------> {unknown}: lctl link control protocol logical-channel-id: ----------> {0}: 1 c-path-valid-flag: -----------> {invalid}: valid v52-c-path[4]: id: --------------------------> {1}: 4 type: ------------------------> {unknown}: pstn POTS signalling logical-channel-id: ----------> {0}: 1 c-path-valid-flag: -----------> {invalid}: valid v52-c-path[5]: id: --------------------------> {1}: 5 type: ------------------------> {unknown}: isdnds ISDN data signaling logical-channel-id: ----------> {0}: 1 c-path-valid-flag: -----------> {invalid}: valid v52-c-path[6]: id: --------------------------> {1}: q Using current values for elements 6-48 .................... Save changes? [s]ave, [c]hange or [q]uit: s Record updated

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Activating the V5.2 IG


Activate the interface after provisioning is finished. The example activates an IG number 1:
zSH> update v52-interface-group 1 V5.2 interface group number Please provide the following: [q]uit. name-id: ---------------------> {zhone}: ** read-only ** local-interface-id: ----------> {1}: local-prov-variant: ----------> {1}: prov-variant-request: --------> {norequest}: admin-status: ----------------> {outofservice}: inservice pstn-layer-3-start-address: --> {1}: isdn-env-func-start-address: -> {1}: port-alignment-request: ------> {norequest}: national-pstn-region: --------> {germany}: switch-vendor: ---------------> {siemens}: protocol-spec: ---------------> {edition2}: startup-check-link-id: -------> {false}: startup-unblock-user-ports: --> {false}: link-oos-timer: --------------> {2500}: link-is-timer: ---------------> {200}: v52-ig-lapv: max-outstanding-frames: ------> {7}: ** read-only ** n200: ------------------------> {3}: ** read-only ** n201: ------------------------> {260}: ** read-only ** t200: ------------------------> {1000}: ** read-only ** t203: ------------------------> {10}: ** read-only ** v52-link has 16 elements. Modify [a]ll, [n]one, a [s]ubset, or [q]uit? n Using current values for elements 1-16 v52-c-path has 48 elements. Modify [a]ll, [n]one, a [s]ubset, or [q]uit? n Using current values for elements 1-48 .................... Save changes? [s]ave, [c]hange or [q]uit: s Record updated.

After the V5.2 IG is activated, proceed to configuring V5.2 subscribers. For information, see Configuring Voice on page 197.

Modifying the v52-interface-group profile


If you need to modify the following parameters in the v52-interface-group profile, it can only be done using the v52config command:

prov-variant-request admin-status (to set to restart only) port-alignment-request cchannelrole (to set to switchtostandby only)

The syntax of the command is as follows

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v52config checklinkid/switchchan/restart/variant/block/ unblock INTERFACE_ID linkid/cchan/aligntype

The following table describes the arguments for the v52config command:
Argument Description

INTERFACE_ID linkid cchan aligntype

The local interface ID number. This is the value of the name-id parameter in the v52-interface-group profile. Used with the checklinkid argument. Used with the switchchan argument. Used with the block and unblock arguments. Can be isdn, pstn or all.

For example, to restart the interface (local-interface-id) named 100:


zSH> v52config restart 100

To run a check link id on the interface named 100, with a linkid of 4:


zSH> v52config checklinkid 100 4

Displaying V5.2 interface group status


The voice status command can be used to display V5.2 IG status.
zSH> voice status ig v52 one Status for v52 interface group one: Admin status = in service Oper status = inoperable Oper status cause = local disable Active calls = 0 Switch vendor = ericsson LinkId 0 TS 15 Channel status failed LinkId 0 TS 16 Channel status failed LinkId 1 TS 15 Channel status failed LinkId 1 TS 16 Channel status failed CPath 1 Oper status down CPath 2 Oper status down CPath 3 Oper status down CPath 4 Oper status down CPath 5 Oper status down zSH>

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CONFIGURING VOICE
This chapter explains how to configure voice connections between subscriber endpoints and remote gateways and how to customize the voice parameters when required. It includes the following sections:

Overview, page 197 Updating system settings, page 198 Creating voice connections, page 200 Additional VoIP features, page 215 Configuring CES connections, page 233 Additional voice features, page 249 Emergency StandAlone (ESA) SIP and TDM support, page 256 Configuring T.38 fax service, page 263

Overview
The following types of voice connections between subscriber and remote endpoints are supported: Note: The voice gateway card requires MALC software version 1.11.1 or higher on the Uplink cards.

Subscriber endpoints

Gateway endpoints

MALC Uplinks

POTS

AAL2 DS1 GR303 VoIP V5.2

All TDM, Gigabit Ethernet TDM, Gigabit Ethernet All TDM, Gigabit Ethernet All TDM, Gigabit Ethernet

ISDN

AAL2 V5.2

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Subscriber endpoints

Gateway endpoints

MALC Uplinks

VoIP

GR303 V5.2

All TDM IP (voice gateway card required) All TDM IP (voice gateway card required) All TDM ATM (voice gateway card required) All TDM ATM (voice gateway card required) All TDM ATM (voice gateway card required)

AAL2

GR303 V5.2

AAL2 ELCP

V5.2

Note: This chapter assumes you have configured the required TDM/ ATM Uplink, POTS, and ISDN physical interfaces as explained in the MALC Hardware Installation Guide.

Updating system settings


Prior to configuring a voice connection, ensure the system settings are configured to support desired type of voice connection. The system profile contains settings that configure country-specific settings for voice calls and determines whether the system will reject incoming calls if there isnt enough bandwidth available.

Setting a-law or mu-law and DSP settings


Note: The MALC supports A-Law or Mu-Law encoding, but they cannot both be used simultaneously in a single chassis. Modifying the countryregion parameter of the system profile ensures that the ring frequency and voice encoding (A-law/Mu-law) are correctly set. The A-law and Mu-law settings can also be set using the optional alaw and mulaw parameters in the voice add command. See Creating voice connections on page 200. The show system command displays the available system profile settings. The voice add command does not allow the alaw/mulaw argument with POTS voice connections. If it is entered for a POTS voice connection, it is ignored. However, the alaw/mulaw argument can be used for the AAL2 remote end of a voice connection. For VoIP calls, if codec argument is not specified, the country code settings determines the default preferred-codec as g711mu or g711a.

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Checking bandwidth before accepting a voice call (AAL2)


In voice over ATM (VoATM) networks, the MALC is capable of oversubscribing on AAL2 connections. If voice bandwidth checking is enabled, the system will reject a call if there is not enough bandwidth. If a call is rejected, the MALC sends a fast busy to the caller over the POTS line. Bandwidth checking is recommended for voice connections. Note: Bandwidth calculations are enabled or disabled for the entire system. The bandwidth check is based on the configuration of the transmit and receive ATM traffic descriptors for the ATM VC used by the call. The system uses the following parameters to calculate the required bandwidth:

rt-VBR traffic: SCR CBR traffic: PCR All other traffic types: calls are always accepted, there are no voice-quality guarantees.

The system will reject calls if: [Receive or transmit cell rate - (180*number of active calls on the VC)] < 180 (The bandwidth calculations assume that approximately 180 AAL2 cells per second are used for each voice call.)

Updating the system profile


To update the system profile:
zSH> update system 0 Please provide the following: [q]uit. syscontact: ----------> {Zhone Global Services and Support 7001 Oakport Road Oa kland Ca. (877) Zhone20 (946-6320) Fax (510)777-7113 support@zhone.com}: sysname: -------------> {Zhone Malc}: syslocation: ---------> {Oakland}: enableauthtraps: -----> {disabled}: setserialno: ---------> {0}: zmsexists: -----------> {false}: zmsconnectionstatus: -> {inactive}: zmsipaddress: --------> {0.0.0.0}: configsyncexists: ----> {false}: configsyncoverflow: --> {false}: configsyncpriority: --> {high}: configsyncaction: ----> {noaction}: configsyncfilename: --> {}: configsyncstatus: ----> {syncinitializing}: configsyncuser: ------> {}: configsyncpasswd: ----> {}: numshelves: ----------> {1}: shelvesarray: --------> {}:

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numcards: ------------> {3}: ipaddress: -----------> {0.0.0.0}: alternateipaddress: --> {0.0.0.0}: countryregion: -------> {us}: enter the country, if different from the default primaryclocksource: --> {0/0/0/0/0}: ringsource: ----------> {internalringsourcelabel}: revertiveclocksource: -> {true} voicebandwidthcheck: --> {false} true if bandwidth checking is desired .................... Save changes? [s]ave, [c]hange or [q]uit: s Record updated.

Creating voice connections


Voice connections provide voice signaling connections between subscriber endpoints and voice gateway endpoints. The voice command can be used to add, delete, and show voice connection settings. When a voice connection is added or deleted, the voice command creates or deletes the related profiles for both the subscriber and remote endpoints. Refer to the CLI Reference Guide for a complete description of the command options and syntax. The voice command uses the following syntax
voice add subscriber-info remote-info [sub descr] [enable]

This command automatically creates all the subscriber and ATM profiles required by the voice connection. For POTS and AAL2 voice connections, this command also optionally sets the PCM-encoding parameter to the specified encoding method and enables the voice connection. Note that in some cases the profiles with voice configuration parameters may have to be updated to customize the voice configuration. The voice show command can be used to display voice connection status for all calls or only voice connection data for a specific endpoint. This section describes the procedures for configuring the following types of gateway voice connections:

DS1 voice gateway connections on page 200 Voice over IP (VoIP) connections on page 203 AAL2 connections on page 228 DS1 to POTS connections on page 230

DS1 voice gateway connections


DS1 voice connections use a direct channel map between the subscriber signals and the voice uplink.

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Note: DS1 voice connections are only supported with line type D4.

This section explains how to configure the following types of connections:

Configuring POTS to GR303 connections on page 202 ISDN to V5.2 connections on page 201 Configuring POTS to V.52 connections on page 203

ISDN to V5.2 connections


For ISDN-to-V5.2 configurations, the MALC interconnects ISDN terminal equipment directly to V.52 switches. The V5.2 IG must already exist before the voice connection can be configured. The elcp-trap parameter is available in the aal2-vcl profile. This parameter allows operators to turn ELCP traps on/off for particular AAL2 VCLs. All users on the provisioned AAL2 VCL will have their ELCP trap alerts turned either on or off. 1 Use the voice command to add the ISDN to V5.2 connection. This example uses the 1-3-1-0/isdnu physical interface and sets the required fields in the atm-vcl, aal2-vcl-profile, and the aal2-cid-profile.
zSH> voice add isdn 1-3-1-0/isdnu v52 1/1 cpath 5 enable Created subscriber-voice 1/13/25 Created subscriber-voice-isdn 49 Created v52-user-port 1/1/3 Created subscriber-voice-v52 50 Created subscriber-voice 1/13/26 Created subscriber-voice-isdn 51 Created subscriber-voice-v52 52 Created subscriber-voice 1/13/27 Created subscriber-voice-isdn 53 Created subscriber-voice-v52 54

View the voice connection.


Voice Prof Id -------------3/32/13011 3/32/13012 3/32/13013 STA --ENA ENA ENA

zSH> voice show 1-3-1-0/isdnu Subscriber end-point Remote end-point --------------------------- --------------------------1-3-1-0/isdnu V52 1/1 1-3-1-0/isdnu V52 1/1 1-3-1-0/isdnu V52 1/1

Configuring POTS to DS1 connections


POTS to DS1 voice connections. 1 Use the voice command to add the POTS to DS1 connection.

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The voice ring command can be used to verify a POTS voice connection without placing a call. The voice status command can be used to display runtime voice port status and to verify the phones ring status if the ringing cannot be heard.
zSH> voice add pots 1-5-24-0/voicefxs ds1 1-1-9-0/ds1 ds0 24 Created subscriber-voice 1/21/25 Created subscriber-voice-pots 83 Created subscriber-voice-ds1 84

View the voice connections:

zSH> voice show Subscriber end-point Remote end-point Voice Prof Id STA ------------------------------ ------------------------------ -------------- --1-5-24-0/voicefxs 1-1-9-0/ds1 DS0 24 1/21/25 ENA

Configuring POTS to GR303 connections


For GR303 voice connections, the GR303 interface with IG must already exist. For POTS-to-GR303 configurations, the MALC interconnects POTS equipment directly to GR-303 switches. This example creates a POTS to GR303 subscriber profile with IG 1 and CRV 2. It also sets the administrative status interface to up. The voice ring command can be used to verify a POTS voice connection without placing a call. The voice status command can be used to display runtime voice port status, verify the phones ring status if the ringing cannot be heard, and display interface group status. The voice add command supports an gnd option for POTS endpoints to set the groundstart option for voice connections using the POTS ULCS card with pots subtype. If the farend of the voice connection is GR303, this option also sets the groundstart setting in the gr303-ig-crv profile. If the farend of the voice connection is AAL2, this option also sets the groundstart setting in the aal2-vcl profile. When the gnd option is not used for the Global POTS or ULCS cards with pots subtype, the groundstart setting in the analog-fxs-cfg-profile is used. The default is loopstart. 1 Use the voice command to add the POTS to GR303 connection.
zSH> voice add pots 1-8-1-0/voicefxs gr303 1/2 enable Created subscriber 1/13 Created subscriber-voice 1/13/1 Created subscriber-voice-pots 20 Created gr303-ig-crv 1/2 Created subscriber-voice-gr303 21 zSH> voice add pots 1-5-2-0/voicefxs Created subscriber-voice 1/13/21 Created subscriber-voice-pots 41 Created gr303-ig-crv 1/4 gr303 1/4

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Created subscriber-voice-gr303 42 zSH> voice add pots 1-5-3-0/voicefxs gnd aal2 uplinkima3/atm vc 0/36 td 1/1 cid 16 Created subscriber-voice 1/34/2 Created subscriber-voice-pots 45 Created atm-vcl uplinkima3/atm/0/36 Created aal2-cid-profile 43/0/36/16 Created subscriber-voice-aal2 46

View the voice connection:

zSH> voice show 1-8-1-0/voicefxs Subscriber end-point Remote end-point Voice Prof Id STA ------------------------------ ------------------------------ -------------- --1-8-1-0/voicefxs GR303 Zhone/2 1/13/1 ENA Total number of voice connections : 1

Configuring POTS to V.52 connections


The MALC interconnects POTS equipment directly to V5.2 switches. For POTS subscriber to V5.2 voice gateway connections, the V5.2 IG must exist before the voice connection can be configured. The voice ring command can be used to verify a POTS voice connection without placing a call. The voice status command can be used to display runtime voice port status, verify the phones ring status if the ringing cannot be heard, and display interface group status. 1 Use the voice command to add the POTS to V5.2 connection.
zSH> voice add pots 1-8-1-0/voicefxs v52 1/28 type pots Created subscriber 1/13 Created subscriber-voice 1/13/1 Created subscriber-voice-pots 10013 Created v52-user-port 1/28/2 Created subscriber-voice-v52 10014

View the voice connection.

zSH> voice show Subscriber end-point Remote end-point Voice Prof Id STA ------------------------------ ------------------------------ -------------- --1-8-1-0/voicefxs V52 1/28 1/13/1 ENA Total number of voice connections : 1

Voice over IP (VoIP) connections


The following procedures describe how to configure POTS to VoIP subscriber voice connections. POTS subscribers can be connected to VoIP remote endpoints.

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For VoIP voice connections, several optional arguments such as codec are supported in the remote information of the voice add command. Supported codecs are:

g711mu (the default setting) g711a g726 g729a g723

The MALC G.729A VoIP compression provides an optional fallback mode to G.711. The parameter for the fallback mode is g711-fallback and is set in the subscriber-voice-voip profile.The default settings for the subscriber-voice-voip profile are:

preferred-codec: g711mu g711-fallback: true frames-per-packet: 4 g726-byte-order: bigendian voip-password: password

The following VoIP remote information is available: voip IpIfname dn dir-num [name username] [pw password] [plar dest-ipaddr] [reg serverId] [codec pref-codec] Note: For MGCP and Megaco calls, the MALC ignores the preferred-codec setting and selects the codec from a list provided by the MGCP server or media gateway controller. Before creating VoIP connections, ensure that the IP interface, VoIP system, and VoIP server settings are configured properly. This section contains the following procedures:

Configuring VoIP interface on page 205 Configuring SIP and SIP PLAR servers on page 206 Configuring MGCP on page 209 Configuring MEGACO (H.248) on page 211 Creating POTS to VoIP connections on page 215 Note: Communication with SIP phones is only possible over one interface of the MALC. Communication with SIP phones that are in the same network as other interfaces on the MALC is not supported.

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Configuring VoIP interface


1 Configure an IP interface for VoIP. For example:
zSH> new ip-interface-record 1-1-1-0/ip Please provide the following: [q]uit. vpi: ---------------> {0}: vci: ---------------> {0}: rdindex: -----------> {1}: dhcp: --------------> {none}: ** read-only ** addr: --------------> {0.0.0.0}: 192.168.87.2 netmask: -----------> {0.0.0.0}: 255.255.255.0 bcastaddr: ---------> {0.0.0.0}: 192.168.87.255 destaddr: ----------> {0.0.0.0}: farendaddr: --------> {0.0.0.0}: mru: ---------------> {1500}: reasmmaxsize: ------> {0}: ingressfiltername: -> {}: egressfiltername: --> {}: pointtopoint: ------> {no}: mcastenabled: ------> {yes}: ipfwdenabled: ------> {yes}: mcastfwdenabled: ---> {yes}: natenabled: --------> {no}: bcastenabled: ------> {yes}: ingressfilterid: ---> {0}: egressfilterid: ----> {0}: ipaddrdynamic: -----> {static}: dhcpserverenable: --> {false}: subnetgroup: -------> {0}: unnumberedindex: ---> {0}: mcastcontrollist: --> {}: vlanid: ------------> {0}: maxVideoStreams: ---> {0}: .................... Save new record? [s]ave, [c]hange or [q]uit: s Record updated.

Configure a system IP address:


zSH> update system 0 Please provide the following: [q]uit. syscontact: -----------> {Zhone Technologies 7001 Oakport Street Oakland CA 94621}: sysname: --------------> {Zhone Malc}}: syslocation: ----------> {}: enableauthtraps: ------> {disabled}: setserialno: ----------> {0}: zmsexists: ------------> {false}: zmsconnectionstatus: --> {inactive}: zmsipaddress: ---------> {0.0.0.0}: configsyncexists: -----> {false}: configsyncoverflow: ---> {false}: configsyncpriority: ---> {high}: configsyncaction: -----> {noaction}:

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configsyncfilename: ---> {}: configsyncstatus: -----> {syncinitializing}: configsyncuser: -------> {}: configsyncpasswd: -----> {** private **}: ** read-only ** numshelves: -----------> {1}: shelvesarray: ---------> {}: numcards: -------------> {1}: ipaddress: ------------> {0.0.0.0}: 192.168.7.45 alternateipaddress: ---> {0.0.0.0}: countryregion: --------> {us}: primaryclocksource: ---> {0/0/0/0/0}: ringsource: -----------> {internalringsourcelabel}: revertiveclocksource: -> {true}: voicebandwidthcheck: --> {false}: .................... Save changes? [s]ave, [c]hange or [q]uit: s Record updated.

SIP server configuration


Configuring SIP and SIP PLAR servers
The VOIP protocol setting can be configured as either Media Gateway Control Protocol (MGCP) or Session Initiation Protocol (SIP) signaling. By default, the MALC uses SIP signaling. Note: Redundant SIP server support is implemented through DNS lookups for only BroadSoft software configurations. SIP signalling identifies callers and callees by SIP addresses and allows signals to be redirected to proxy servers. The MALC supports single softswitch configurations. Note: If all SIP calls do not register after a system reboot, increase the server-max-timer value in the voice-system profile to a higher value, for example 180 seconds. The default value is 20 seconds. To configure SIP: 1 Create the voip-server-entry profiles to specify the VOIP server groups and IDs. The voip-server-entry profiles is specified with server group and server ID numbers. This example configures a SIP server in server group 1 with server ID 1.
zSH> new voip-server-entry 1/1 zhoneVoipServerAddrType: ----------> zhoneVoipServerAddr: --------------> zhoneVoipServerUdpPortNumber: -----> zhoneVoipServerId: ----------------> {ipv4}: {0.0.0.0}: {5060}: {generic}:

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protocol: -------------------------> {sip}: sendCallProceedingTone: -----------> {false}: rtcpEnabled: ----------------------> {false}: rtcpPacketInterval: ---------------> {5000}: interdigitTimeOut: ----------------> {10}: ipTos: ----------------------------> {0}: systemDomainName: -----------------> {}: expires-invite-value: -------------> {3600}: expires-register-value: -----------> {3600}: expires-header-method: ------------> {register}: session-timer: --------------------> {off}: session-expiration: ---------------> {180}: session-min-session-expiration: ---> {180}: session-caller-request-timer: -----> {no}: session-callee-request-timer: -----> {no}: session-caller-specify-refresher: -> {omit}: session-callee-specify-refresher: -> {uac}: dtmf-mode: ------------------------> {rfc2833}: .................... Save new record? [s]ave, [c]hange or [q]uit: s Record created.

SIP PLAR voice connections require the entry of the profile voip-server-entry 255/255. This entry serves as the default server entry. The zhoneVoipServerAddr must be 0.0.0.0.
zSH> new voip-server-entry 255/255 zhoneVoipServerAddrType: ----------> {ipv4}: zhoneVoipServerAddr: --------------> {0.0.0.0}: zhoneVoipServerUdpPortNumber: -----> {5060}: zhoneVoipServerId: ----------------> {generic}: protocol: -------------------------> {sip}: sendCallProceedingTone: -----------> {false}: rtcpEnabled: ----------------------> {false}: rtcpPacketInterval: ---------------> {5000}: interdigitTimeOut: ----------------> {10}: ipTos: ----------------------------> {0}: systemDomainName: -----------------> {}: expires-invite-value: -------------> {3600}: expires-register-value: -----------> {3600}: expires-header-method: ------------> {register}: session-timer: --------------------> {off}: session-expiration: ---------------> {180}: session-min-session-expiration: ---> {180}: session-caller-request-timer: -----> {no}: session-callee-request-timer: -----> {no}: session-caller-specify-refresher: -> {omit}: session-callee-specify-refresher: -> {uac}: dtmf-mode: ------------------------> {rfc2833}: .................... Save new record? [s]ave, [c]hange or [q]uit: s Record created.

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Note: The voip-system profile is no longer used. 2 Verify that the voip-server-entry profile configuration:

zSH> get voip-server-entry 255/255 Please provide the following: [q]uit. zhoneVoipServerAddrType: ----------> zhoneVoipServerAddr: --------------> zhoneVoipServerUdpPortNumber: -----> zhoneVoipServerId: ----------------> protocol: -------------------------> sendCallProceedingTone: -----------> rtcpEnabled: ----------------------> rtcpPacketInterval: ---------------> interdigitTimeOut: ----------------> ipTos: ----------------------------> systemDomainName: -----------------> expires-invite-value: -------------> expires-register-value: -----------> expires-header-method: ------------> session-timer: --------------------> session-expiration: ---------------> session-min-session-expiration: ---> session-caller-request-timer: -----> session-callee-request-timer: -----> session-caller-specify-refresher: -> session-callee-specify-refresher: -> dtmf-mode: ------------------------> zSH>

{ipv4}: {0.0.0.0}: {5060}: {generic}: {sip}: {false}: {false}: {5000}: {10}: {0}: {}: {3600}: {3600}: {register}: {off}: {180}: {180}: {no}: {no}: {omit}: {uac}: {rfc2833}:

Table 8 specifies the IP TOS settings used in the voip-server-entry profile based on IP Precedence bits. For IP TOS details, see IP TOS support on page 29.
Table 8: IP TOS settings and IP Precedence bits Precedence Bits TOS value

0 (Routine) 1 (Priority) 2 (Immediate) 3 (Flash) 4 (Flash override) 5 (CRITIC/ECP.) 6 (Internetwork control) 7 (Network control)

0 32 64 96 128 160 192 224

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Create a SIP dialplan for the SIP server. In each dialplan, specify the desired call parameters and use the voip-server-entry parameter to identify the server group for which the dialplan is used. This example references server group 1.
zSH> new sip-dialplan 1 Please provide the following: [q]uit. match-string: ----------------> {}: xT sip-ip-address: --------------> {0.0.0.0}: 192.16.88.199 destination-name: ------------> {}: number-of-digits: ------------> {0}: 31 prefix-strip: ----------------> {0}: prefix-add: ------------------> {}: dialplan-type: ---------------> {normal}: voip-server-entry-index: -----> {0}: 1 override-interdigit-timeout:--> {0}: 3 .................... Save new record? [s]ave, [c]hange or [q]uit: s Record created.

MGCP configuration
Configuring MGCP
The protocol setting can be configured as either Media Gateway Control Protocol (MGCP), Megaco (H.248), or Session Initiation Protocol (SIP) signaling. By default, the MALC uses SIP signaling. For H.248 procedures, see Configuring MEGACO (H.248) on page 211. MGCP signalling establishes call control elements or call agents to handle call control. MGCP devices execute the commands sent by the call agents. The MALC supports the voice message waiting indicator (VMWI) for MGCP connections. The MALC supports two MGCP servers per VoIP system. In order to support multiple MGCP servers, the servers must be configured as redundant MGCP servers with redundant peer support enabled. During the MALC system boot up, the MALC determines which redundant MGCP server to use. Then, during operations the MALC sends data to both the primary and the standy MGCP servers so that both MGCP servers are properly configured should a switch-over occur. To support multiple MGCP servers, create a voip-server-entry profile with a server group and server ID for each MGCP server.The first number in the ifIndex is for server group id and the second number is for the server ID. For example, 1/2 means server group 1 and server ID 2. The voip-server-entry profiles must use the same server group.

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Note: Redundant MGCP softswitch configuration for Metaswitch ESA is configured by creating voip-server-entry profiles for each softswitch This example creates voip-server-entry profiles for two MGCP servers using server group 1 and server IDs 1 and 2. Note: The MGCP max call limiter is set at 288 calls. When the maximum number of allowable active calls is reach, the outgoing caller hears a congestion tone. For the incoming call, the phone does not ring. To change the setting to MGCP: 1 Create the voip-server-entry profiles to enable MGCP:

zSH> new voip-server-entry 1/1 Please provide the following: [q]uit. zhoneVoipServerAddrType: ----------> {ipv4}: zhoneVoipServerAddr: --------------> {}: 172.16.60.1 zhoneVoipServerUdpPortNumber: -----> {5060}: 2727 zhoneVoipServerId: ----------------> {generic}: metaswitch protocol: -------------------------> {sip}: mgcp sendCallProceedingTone: -----------> {false}: rtcpEnabled: ----------------------> {false}: rtcpPacketInterval: ---------------> {5000}: interdigitTimeOut: ----------------> {10}: ipTos: ----------------------------> {0}: systemDomainName: -----------------> {}: expires-invite-value: -------------> {3600} expires-register-value: -----------> {3600} expires-header-method: ------------> {register} session-expiration: ---------------> {80} session-min-SE: -------------------> {180} session-caller-request-timer: -----> {no} session-callee-request-timer: -----> {no} session-caller-specify-refresher: -> {omit} session-callee-specify-refresher: -> {uac} dtmf-mode:------------------------> (rfc2833) .................... Save new record? [s]ave, [c]hange or [q]uit: s Record created. zSH> new voip-server-entry 1/2 Please provide the following: [q]uit. zhoneVoipServerAddrType: --------> {ipv4}: zhoneVoipServerAddr: ------------> {}: 172.16.60.3 zhoneVoipServerUdpPortNumber: ---> {5060}: 2727 zhoneVoipServerId: --------------> {generic}: metaswitch protocol: -------------------------> {sip}: mgcp sendCallProceedingTone: -----------> {false}: rtcpEnabled: ----------------------> {false}: rtcpPacketInterval: ---------------> {5000}:

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interdigitTimeOut: ----------------> {10}: ipTos: ----------------------------> {0}: systemDomainName: -----------------> {}: expires-invite-value: -------------> {3600} expires-register-value: -----------> {3600} expires-header-method: ------------> {register} session-expiration: ---------------> {80} session-min-SE: -------------------> {180} session-caller-request-timer: -----> {no} session-callee-request-timer: -----> {no} session-caller-specify-refresher: -> {omit} session-callee-specify-refresher: -> {uac} dtmf-mode:------------------------> (rfc2833) .................... Save new record? [s]ave, [c]hange or [q]uit: s Record created.

The system will automatically reboot if the voice protocol is changed. After the reboot, verify that the voip-server-entry profile is configured for MGCP:

zSH> get voip-server-entry 1/1 Please provide the following: [q]uit. zhoneVoipServerAddrType: ----------> {ipv4}: zhoneVoipServerAddr: --------------> {172.16.60.1}: zhoneVoipServerUdpPortNumber: -----> {2472}: zhoneVoipServerId: ----------------> {tekelec-t6000}: protocol: -------------------------> {mgcp}: sendCallProceedingTone: -----------> {false}: rtcpEnabled: ----------------------> {false}: rtcpPacketInterval: ---------------> {5000}: interdigitTimeOut: ----------------> {10}: ipTos: ----------------------------> {0}: systemDomainName: -----------------> {}: expires-invite-value: -------------> {3600} expires-register-value: -----------> {3600} expires-header-method: ------------> {register} session-expiration: ---------------> {0} session-min-SE: -------------------> {-606348325} session-caller-request-timer: -----> {no} session-callee-request-timer: -----> {no} session-caller-specify-refresher: -> {omit} session-callee-specify-refresher: -> {uac} omitsession-callee-specify-refresher:-> (uac) dtmf-mode:------------------------> (inband)

Configuring MEGACO (H.248)


The protocol setting can be configured as either Media Gateway Control Protocol (MGCP), MEGACO (H2.48), or Session Initiation Protocol (SIP) signaling. By default, the MALC uses SIP signaling. The MEGACO protocol is used between elements of a physically decomposed multimedia gateway. The distributed multimedia gateway

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sub-components create a general framework used for gateways, multipoint control units and interactive voice response units (IVRs). Redundant Megaco servers are supported. The MALC supports two VoIP servers per VoIP system. In order to support multiple VoIP servers, the servers must be configured as redundant VoIP servers with redundant peer support enabled. During the MALC system boot up, the MALC determines which redundant VoIP server to use. Then, during operations the MALC sends data to both the primary and the standy VoIP servers so that both servers are properly configured should a switch-over occur. To support multiple VoIP servers, create a voip-server-entry profile with a server group and server ID for each server.The first number in the ifIndex is for server group id and the second number is for the server ID. For example, 1/2 means server group 1 and server ID 2. The voip-server-entry profiles must use the same server group. This example creates voip-server-entry profiles for two VoIP servers using server group 1 and server IDs 1 and 2. To change the setting to MEGACO: 1 Create the voip-server-entry profiles to enable Megaco:

zSH> new voip-server-entry 1/1 Please provide the following: [q]uit. zhoneVoipServerAddrType: ----------> {ipv4}: zhoneVoipServerAddr: --------------> {}: 172.16.60.1 zhoneVoipServerUdpPortNumber: -----> {5060}: 2944 zhoneVoipServerId: ----------------> {generic}: protocol: -------------------------> {sip}: megaco sendCallProceedingTone: -----------> {false}: rtcpEnabled: ----------------------> {false}: rtcpPacketInterval: ---------------> {5000}: interdigitTimeOut: ----------------> {10}: ipTos: ----------------------------> {0}: systemDomainName: -----------------> {}: expires-invite-value: -------------> {3600} expires-register-value: -----------> {3600} expires-header-method: ------------> {register} session-expiration: ---------------> {0} 180 session-min-SE: -------------------> {-606348325} 180 session-caller-request-timer: -----> {no} session-callee-request-timer: -----> {no} session-caller-specify-refresher: -> {omit} session-callee-specify-refresher: -> {uac} omitsession-callee-specify-refresher:-> (uac) dtmf-mode:------------------------> (inband) rfc2833 .................... Save new record? [s]ave, [c]hange or [q]uit: s Record created. zSH> new voip-server-entry 1/2

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Please provide the following: [q]uit. zhoneVoipServerAddrType: --------> {ipv4}: zhoneVoipServerAddr: ------------> {}: 172.16.60.3 zhoneVoipServerUdpPortNumber: ---> {5060}: 2944 zhoneVoipServerId: --------------> {generic}: protocol: -------------------------> {sip}: megaco sendCallProceedingTone: -----------> {false}: rtcpEnabled: ----------------------> {false}: rtcpPacketInterval: ---------------> {5000}: interdigitTimeOut: ----------------> {10}: ipTos: ----------------------------> {0}: systemDomainName: -----------------> {}: expires-invite-value: -------------> {3600} expires-register-value: -----------> {3600} expires-header-method: ------------> {register} session-expiration: ---------------> {0} 180 session-min-SE: -------------------> {-606348325} 180 session-caller-request-timer: -----> {no} session-callee-request-timer: -----> {no} session-caller-specify-refresher: -> {omit} session-callee-specify-refresher: -> {uac} omitsession-callee-specify-refresher:-> (uac) dtmf-mode:------------------------> (inband) rfc2833 .................... Save new record? [s]ave, [c]hange or [q]uit: s Record created.

The system will automatically reboot if the voice protocol is changed. After the reboot, verify that the voip-server-entry profile is configured for MEGACO:

zSH> get voip-server-entry 1/1 Please provide the following: [q]uit. zhoneVoipServerAddrType: ----------> {ipv4}: zhoneVoipServerAddr: --------------> {172.16.60.1}: zhoneVoipServerUdpPortNumber: -----> {2944}: zhoneVoipServerId: ----------------> {generic}: protocol: -------------------------> {megaco}: sendCallProceedingTone: -----------> {false}: rtcpEnabled: ----------------------> {false}: rtcpPacketInterval: ---------------> {5000}: interdigitTimeOut: ----------------> {10}: ipTos: ----------------------------> {0}: systemDomainName: -----------------> {}: expires-invite-value: -------------> {3600} expires-register-value: -----------> {3600} expires-header-method: ------------> {register} session-expiration: ---------------> {180} session-min-SE: -------------------> {180} session-caller-request-timer: -----> {no} session-callee-request-timer: -----> {no} session-caller-specify-refresher: -> {omit} session-callee-specify-refresher: -> {uac} omitsession-callee-specify-refresher:-> (uac)

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dtmf-mode:------------------------>

(rfc2833)

Set the keep alive timer for VoIP servers in the voice-system profile. The server-max-timer specifies the period between ServiceChange request messages. The keep alive timer specifies how often the MALC expects keep alive messages from the Gateway Controller. If the MALC does not receive a keep alive message from the Gateway Controller in this interval, it sends an empty NTFY message to the controller. This should cause the controller to send a response. If the MALC still does not receive a response to the NTFY message in a period equal to 4 times the keep-alive-timer, it will send a ServiceChange message to the Gateway Controller at an interval equal to the keep-alive-timer.
zSh> update voice-system 0 Please provide the following: [q]uit. hookflash-min-timer: -------> {100}: hookflash-max-timer: -------> {1550}: partial-dial-timeout: ------> {16}: critical-dial-timeout: -----> {4}: busy-tone-timeout: ---------> {30}: dial-tone-timeout: ---------> {16}: msg-wait-tone-timeout: -----> {16}: offhook-warn-tone-timeout: -> {0}: ringing-timeout: -----------> {180}: ringback-timeout: ----------> {180}: reorder-tone-timeout: ------> {30}: stutter-tone-timeout: ------> {16}: server-max-timer: ----------> {20}: config-max1: ---------------> {5}: config-max2: ---------------> {7}: max1-enable: ---------------> {true}: max2-enable: ---------------> {true}: max-waiting-delay: ---------> {600}: disconnection-wait-timer: --> {15}: disconnection-min-timer: ---> {15}: disconnection-max-timer: ---> {600}: max-retransmit-timer: ------> {4}: init-retransmit-timer: -----> {200}: keep-alive-timer: ----------> {60}: no-response-timer: ---------> {30}: call-wait-max-repeat: ------> {2}: call-wait-delay: -----------> {10}: pulse-inter-digit-timer: ---> {100}: min-make-pulse-width: ------> {25}: max-make-pulse-width: ------> {55}: min-break-pulse-width: -----> {45}: max-break-pulse-width: -----> {75}: server-max-timer: ----------> {20} keep-alive-timer: ----------> {60} 90 .................... Save changes? [s]ave, [c]hange or [q]uit: s

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Record updated.

Creating POTS to VoIP connections


This example creates a POTS to VoIP subscriber. 1 Use the voice command to add the POTS to VoIP connection. This examples creates a connection with a directory number 510-522-0401 and the name smith. The VoIP endpoint user name is case sensitive and must match the voice switch requirements, for example AAL/1 for MGCP with the Tekelec T6000 or TP/0001 for Megaco with Nortel CS2K. Note: For MGCP and Megaco calls, the MALC ignores the preferred-codec setting and selects the codec from a list provided by the MGCP server or media gateway controller.
zSH> voice add pots 1-3-1-0/voicefxs voip ethernet3-100/ip DN 5105220401 name smith Created subscriber-voice 1/2/1 Created subscriber-voice-pots 1004 Created subscriber-voice-voip 1005

View the voice connection.


STA --ENA

zSH> voice show Subscriber end-point Remote end-point Voice Prof Id ------------------------------ ------------------------------ ----------1-3-1-0/voicefxs ethernet3-100/ip DN 5105220401 1/2/1 Total number of voice connections : 1

Caution: Avoid changes or deletions to the ip-interface-record profile after creating a voice connection on that interface.

Additional VoIP features


This section describes the configurable VoIP features for VoIP-enabled services.

Setting VoIP features on page 216 Changing the hookflash timer values on page 216 Configuring always offhook on page 217 Configuring huntgroups on page 219 SIP dialing plans on page 223 Malicious caller on page 225 Call conferencing on page 225

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Setting VoIP features


To configure VoIP features:
zSH> update subscriber-voice 1/2/1 Please provide the following: [q]uit. voice-connection-type: --------> {voiptopots}: ** read-only ** voice-endpoint1-addr-index: ---> {1}: ** read-only ** voice-endpoint2-addr-index: ---> {1001}: ** read-only ** voice-connection-description: -> {}: voice-admin-status: -----------> {enabled}: huntgroup: --------------------> {false}: ** read-only ** features: ---------------------> {hookflash+onhooksignaling}: hookflash. Save changes? [s]ave, [c]hange or [q]uit: s Record updated.

Changing the hookflash timer values


The hookflash timer values can be configured to a specified range between minimum and maximum values. If hookflash is enabled on a VoIP subscriber, a hookflash is considered only if the onhook time is between the minimum and maximum timer values. Any time less than the minimum time setting is ignored and any time more than the maximum time setting is considered to be onhook. Modify the following parameters in the subscriber-voice profile to change hookflash timer settings.
Parameter Description

hookFlashTimerMin

Specifies the minimum hookflash timer value in milliseconds. Values: 0 to 2147483647 Default: 100 milliseconds

hookFlashTimerMax

Specifies the maximum hookflash timer value in milliseconds. Values: 0 to 2147483647 Default: 1550 milliseconds

To change the hookflash timer values:


zSH> update voice-system 0 Please provide the following: [q]uit. hookflash-max-timer: -> {1550}: 2000 hookflash-min-timer: -> {100}: 500 partial-dial-timeout: ------> {16}:

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critical-dial-timeout: -----> busy-tone-timeout: ---------> dial-tone-timeout: ---------> msg-wait-tone-timeout: -----> offhook-warn-tone-timeout: -> ringing-timeout: -----------> ringback-timeout: ----------> reorder-tone-timeout: ------> stutter-tone-timeout: ------> server-max-timer: ----------> config-max1: ---------------> config-max2: ---------------> max1-enable: ---------------> max2-enable: ---------------> max-waiting-delay: ---------> disconnection-wait-timer: --> disconnection-min-timer: ---> disconnection-max-timer: ---> max-retransmit-timer: ------> init-retransmit-timer: -----> keep-alive-timer: ----------> no-response-timer: ---------> call-wait-max-repeat: ------> call-wait-delay: -----------> pulse-inter-digit-timer: ---> min-make-pulse-width: ------> max-make-pulse-width: ------> min-break-pulse-width: -----> max-break-pulse-width: -----> .................... Save changes? [s]ave, [c]hange Record updated.

{4}: {30}: {16}: {16}: {0}: {180}: {180}: {30}: {16}: {20}: {5}: {7}: {true}: {true}: {600}: {15}: {15}: {600}: {4}: {200}: {60}: {30}: {2}: {10}: {100}: {25}: {55}: {45}: {75}: or [q]uit: s

Configuring always offhook


Some subscribers require circuits to remain permanently offhook to enable VoIP services such as two-way radio. Provision always offhook for MALC E&M TO subscribers to enable receiving two-way radio calls. Any incoming calls to this subscriber will be established right away. Note: After setting always offhook, users cannot make outgoing calls.

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Modify the following parameter to configure always offhook:


Parameter Description

features

Shows the set of VoIP features that are enabled for the subscriber. Hookflash is supported only on VoIP SIP POTS subscribers. Onhook is supported on all VoIP subscribers. Always offhook is supported on FXS and E&M (Z-Edge 6200) subscribers. Values: hookflash hookflash detection. onhooksignaling onhook signaling. alwaysoffhook call is established as soon as incoming call initiation is made. Default: hookflash+onhooksignaling Options: + This parameter allows multiple settings by using the + option.

Disable the subscriber and set always offhook:

zSH> update subscriber-voice 1/2/1 Please provide the following: [q]uit. voice-connection-type: --------> {voiptopots}: ** read-only ** voice-endpoint1-addr-index: ---> {1}: ** read-only ** voice-endpoint2-addr-index: ---> {1001}: ** read-only ** voice-connection-description: -> {}: voice-admin-status: -----------> {enabled}: disabled huntgroup: --------------------> {false}: ** read-only ** features: ---------------------> {hookflash+onhooksignaling}: hookflash+onhooksignaling+alwaysoffhook .................... Save changes? [s]ave, [c]hange or [q]uit: s Record updated.

Re-enable the subscriber

zSH> update subscriber-voice 1/2/1 Please provide the following: [q]uit. voice-connection-type: --------> {voiptopots}: ** read-only ** voice-endpoint1-addr-index: ---> {1}: ** read-only ** voice-endpoint2-addr-index: ---> {1001}: ** read-only ** voice-connection-description: -> {}: voice-admin-status: -----------> {disabled}: enabled huntgroup: --------------------> {false}: ** read-only ** features: ---------------------> {hookflash+onhooksignaling+alwaysoffhook}: .................... Save new record? [s]ave, [c]hange or [q]uit: s Record updated.

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Configuring huntgroups
Huntgroups are used to specify a group of people to receive incoming calls and determine which phone within that group will ring when a call comes in. For example, a companys technical support phone number is 555-8000 and there are three members of the technical support team. Each one of the technical support members has a separate phone number, which is not 555-8000. With huntgroups, incoming calls to 555-8000 are directed to one of the technical support team. When a call comes in on 555-8000, calls will be placed on E&M ports 1, 2, or 3 in a round-robin fashion: The first time a call comes in, the phone on port 1 will ring; the second time a call comes in, the phone on port 2 will ring; the third time a call comes in, the phone on port 3 will ring, and fourth time a call comes in, the phone on port 1 will ring again. Each subscriber can belong to three huntgroups. Modify the huntgroup parameter in the subscriber-voice profile to enable huntgroups:
Parameter Description

huntgroup

Can be set to true only if the voice-connection-type is siptopots or siptods1. If it is set to true only subscriber-voice-endpt1 gets automatically created, but not subscriber-voice-endpt2. Values: true false Default: false

Modify the following parameters in the subscriber-voice-pots profile to enable huntgroups:


Parameter Description

hunt-group-index-1

The subscriber is part of this huntgroup. The hunt group endpoint index is derived from the voice-endpoint2-addr-index of the subscriber-voice connection which has huntgroup set to true.

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Parameter

Description

hunt-group-index-2

The subscriber is part of this huntgroup. The hunt group endpoint index is derived from the voice-endpoint2-addr-index of the subscriber-voice connection which has huntgroup set to true. The subscriber is part of this huntgroup. The hunt group endpoint index is derived from the voice-endpoint2-addr-index of the subscriber-voice connection which has huntgroup set to true.

hunt-group-index-3

Modify the following parameters in the subscriber-voice-voip profile to enable huntgroups:


Parameter Description

sip-uri

A uniform resource identifier (URI) which acts as a unique SIP identity for the subscriber. The phone number assigned to this endpoint. Index of the interface through which the SIP signalling and real time protocol (RTP) traffic will flow.

directory-number1 ip-interface-index

Creating huntgroups on already existing subscribers built with no huntgroups


To enable huntgroups on already-existing subscribers that do not have huntgroups: 1 Create a subscriber-voice profile which can support huntgroups:

zSH> new subscriber-voice 1/132/1 subId/lineGroupId/subVoiceId Please provide the following: (q=quit) voice-connection-type: ---------->[NONE(0)]: siptopots voice-endpoint1-addr-index: ----->[0]: 1 index for the subscriber-voice-voip profile voice-endpoint2-addr-index: ----->[0]: 99 index for the huntgroup voice-connection-description: --->[]: voice-admin-status: ------------->[disabled]: huntgroup:--------------------> [false]: true ....................... Save new record? (s=save/c=change/q=quit): s New record saved.

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After creating the subscriber-voice-profile with the huntgroup parameter set to true, the system automatically creates the associated subscriber-voice-voip profile. 2 Update the SIP voice endpoint:
zSH> update subscriber-voice-voip 1 Please provide the following: [q]uit. sip-uri: ------------> {}: support directory-number: ---> {}: 5558000 ip-interface-index: -> {0/0/0/0/0}: 1/1/1/0/ip preferred-code: -----> {g711mu}: g711-fallback: ------> {true}: frames-per-packet: --> {4}: g726-byte-order: ----> {bigendian}: sip-password: -------> {}: .................... Save changes? [s]ave, [c]hange or [q]uit: s Record updated.

Update one of the pre-existing subscriber-voice-pots profiles:

zSH> update subscriber-voice-pots 2 Please provide the following: [q]uit. voice-pots-line-group-id: -> {2} hunt-group-index-1: -------> {} 99 matches the voice-endpoint2-addr-index from subscriber-voice profile hunt-group-index-2: -------> {0} hunt-group-index-3: -------> {0} .................... Save changes? [s]ave, [c]hange or [q]uit: s Record updated.

Creating subscribers built with pre-existing huntgroups


To enable huntgroups on already-existing subscribers that already have huntgroups created in the subscriber-voice-pots profile: 1 Find the huntgroup index from the pre-existing subscriber-voice-pots profile. After creating the subscriber-voice-profile with the huntgroup parameter is set to true, the system automatically creates the associated subscriber-voice-voip profile. 2 Update the SIP voice endpoint:

zSH> update subscriber-voice-voip 2 Please provide the following: [q]uit. sip-uri: ------------> {}: support directory-number: ---> {}: 5558000 ip-interface-index: -> {0/0/0/0/0}: 1/1/1/0/ip preferred-code: -----> {g711mu}: g711-fallback: ------> {true}: frames-per-packet: --> {4}: g726-byte-order: ----> {bigendian}:

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sip-password: -------> {}: .................... Save changes? [s]ave, [c]hange or [q]uit: s Record updated.

Creating new subscribers with huntgroups enabled


To create new subscribers with huntgroups enabled: Create a subscriber-voice profile which can support huntgroups: After creating the subscriber-voice-profile with the huntgroup parameter set to true, the system automatically creates the associated subscriber-voice-voip profile. 1 Update the SIP voice endpoint:
zSH> update subscriber-voice-voip 3 Please provide the following: [q]uit. sip-uri: ------------> {}: support3 directory-number: ---> {}: 5559000 ip-interface-index: -> {0/0/0/0/0}: 1/1/1/0/ip preferred-code: -----> {g711mu}: g711-fallback: ------> {true}: frames-per-packet: --> {4}: g726-byte-order: ----> {bigendian}: sip-password: -------> {}: .................... Save changes? [s]ave, [c]hange or [q]uit: s Record updated.

Create a subscriber-voice profile without huntgroups:

zSH> new subscriber-voice 1/132/99 Please provide the following: (q=quit) voice-connection-type: ---------->{aal2togr303}: siptopots voice-endpoint1-addr-index: ----->{0}: 8 index for the subscriber-voice-voip profile voice-endpoint2-addr-index: ----->{0}: 9 index for the subscriber-voice-pots profile voice-connection-description: --->{}: voice-admin-status: ------------->{disabled}: huntgroup:--------------------> {false}: ....................... Save new record? (s=save/c=change/q=quit): s New record saved.

Update the subscriber-voice-voip profile:


zSH> update subscriber-voice-voip 9 Please provide the following: [q]uit. sip-uri: ------------> {}: johnsmith directory-number: ---> {}: 5559999 ip-interface-index: -> {0/0/0/0/0}: 1/1/1/0/ip preferred-code: -----> {g711mu}: g711-fallback: ------> {true}: frames-per-packet: --> {4}:

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g726-byte-order: ----> {bigendian}: sip-password: -------> {}: .................... Save changes? [s]ave, [c]hange or [q]uit: s Record updated.

Update the subscriber-voice-pots profile to match the huntgroup created:

zSH> update subscriber-voice-pots 9 Please provide the following: [q]uit. voice-pots-line-group-id: -> {9} hunt-group-index-1: -------> {} 88 matches the voice-endpoint2-addr-index from subscriber-voice profile hunt-group-index-2: -------> {0} hunt-group-index-3: -------> {0} .................... Save changes? [s]ave, [c]hange or [q]uit: s Record updated.

SIP dialing plans


A dialing plan for POTS-to-SIP outgoing calls consists of a series of acceptable dial strings and the corresponding IP addresses to which SIP control messages are sent to initiate the call. Each dial string is represented as digits, wildcards, and regular-expression-like patterns according to the following rules:

Digits 0 to 9 are allowed as well as * and #. A wildcard ? represents any digit 0 to 9 The character x to indicate a wildcard for 0 or more digits between 0-9. A dial-string character T can be used in the override-interdigit-timeout parameter value in the SIP dialplan. Examples: 0T for the number zero and nothing else. 011T for numbers 011 then any number of digits before the interdigit time out. 9T for the number 9 and any number of digits before the interdigit time out. #T anything followed by a # and an interdigit time out.

A digit range can be specified using brackets [ ], as follows: [135] means digits 1, 3, or 5. [1-4] means digits 1, 2, 3, or 4.

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Create a sip-dialplan profile for outgoing VoIP calls by modifying the following parameters:
Parameter Description

match-string sip-ip-address

A dial string against which collected digits are matched. Upon detecting a match between the collected digits and the dial string, this IP address is used for SIP negotiations to initiate the call. User-specified name of the destination for the dial string. Number of digits to wait for before initiating the call. Number of prefix digits to strip from dialled digits. String to be added to the beginning of the dialled digits before call initiation. Type of the dial plan. Dialplan types are:

destination -name number-of-digits prefix-strip prefix-add dialplan-type


voip-server-entry-index

Normal Call Park

An index to associated voip-server-entry for this sip-dialplan. This index references the registration server specified in the voip-server-entry profile. Override the partial-dial-timeout value in voice-system profile.

override-interdigit-timeout

zSH> new sip-dialplan 1 Please provide the following: [q]uit. match-string: ----------------> {}: 510555101[1-9] sip-ip-address: --------------> {0.0.0.0}: 192.16.88.199 destination-name: ------------> {}: caller number-of-digits: ------------> {0}: 10 prefix-strip: ----------------> {0}: 1 prefix-add: ------------------> {}: 0 dialplan-type: ---------------> {normal}: voip-server-entry-index: -----> {0}: 1 override-interdigit-timeout:--> {0}: 22 .................... Save new record? [s]ave, [c]hange or [q]uit: s Record created.

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Malicious caller
The malicious caller feature enables you to configure caller uniform resource identifiers (URIs) so that incoming calls with the configured URIs will be rejected. The URI can be configured as either a telephone number (RFC 2806) or an alphanumeric identification (RFC 2806). URI entries are case sensitive, should not contain visual separations and must be the exact length as they appear in incoming session notifications (SIP INVITE) calling users address-of-record (AOR).

Specifying a malicious caller


Configure malicious caller URIs in the malicious-caller profile. The following parameters are supported in this profile:
Parameter Description

malicious-caller-uri

The URI for which incoming calls will be rejected. The network operator is responsible for provisioning the URI exactly as per appearance in the incoming session notification (SIP INVITE) the calling user's address-of-record (AOR) formatted as a SIP URI. Enables and disables the rejection of calls matching the configured malicious caller URI. Default: true

reject-enabled

To specify a malicious caller: Create a new malicious-caller profile to reject a particular caller:
zSH> new malicious-caller 1 Please provide the following: [q]uit. malicious-caller-uri: -> {}: caller@172.55.34.60 reject-enabled: -------> {true}: Save changes? [s]ave, [c]hange or [q]uit: s Record updated.

Call conferencing
The MALC call conferencing feature enables three-way conference calls during which three parties can use one calling session to communicate. The MALC POTS-TDM-/PKT-48 card and the ADSL+POTS TDM/PKT-48A-2S combination cards support call conferencing. These cards work with any VOIP-enabled uplink card installed in the MALC.

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The MALC call conferencing feature deploys an efficient end-mixing conference call technology, avoiding the overhead of the centralized conference server. Three-way call conferencing follows the Telcordia (Bellcore) three-way calling standard called Telcordia - TR - TSY - 000577, Three-Way Calling. Configuring call conferencing on the MALC. The call conference feature is enabled through the features parameter in the subscriber-voice profile for callers using the specified port on a MALC POTS-TDM-/PKT-48 card or ADSL+POTS TDM/PKT-48A-2S card. By default, this feature is disabled. To enable conferencing, use the voice show command to identify voice ID for the desired voice subscriber. Then, update the subscriber-voice profile for the desired subscriber with support for hookflash and conference. Additional features such as onhooksignaling and call waiting can also be added. The following example configures call conferencing along with onhooksignaling and call waiting for the voice subscriber 1/3/1.
zSH> voice show Subscriber end-point Remote end-point Voice Prof Id STA ---------------------------- ------------------------------ -------------- --1-10-1-0/voicefxs ethernet1-2/ip DN 2408881694 1/3/1 ENA

zSH> update subscriber-voice 1/3/1 Please provide the following: [q]uit. voice-connection-type: --------> {voiptopots}: ** read-only ** voice-endpoint1-addr-index: ---> {2}: ** read-only ** voice-endpoint2-addr-index: ---> {1}: ** read-only ** voice-connection-description: -> {}: voice-admin-status: -----------> {enabled}: huntgroup: --------------------> {false}: ** read-only ** features: ---------------------> {hookflash+onhooksignaling+callwait}: hookflash+onhooksignaling+callwait+conference .................... Save changes? [s]ave, [c]hange or [q]uit: s

Connecting three-way conference calls. The process of connecting a three-way conference call involves the following steps:

Caller dials the phone number of the first conference participate. This establishes a two-way speech path between the caller and the first participate.

After establishing the call, the caller presses the Flash button or provides hookflash. This place the first participate on hold and sends a hookflash signal to the MALC for a second dial tone.

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Call conferencing

Caller dials the phone number of the second conference participate. This establishes a two-way speech path between the caller and the second participate.

After establishing the second call, the caller presses the Flash button or provides hookflash. This establishes the three-way conference call. Note: If the call conference features is not enabled on the MALC and a caller issues a hookflash signal while on an established call, the MALC places the current call on hold and provides a dial-tone for a second call. Subsequent hookflash signals, toggle between the two established calls. If a hookflash signal is issued during a three-way conference call, the last conference participate is dropped and the call becomes a two-way call.

To disconnect from a three-way conference call:

The originating caller hangs up, all members of the conference call are disconnected. A caller other than the originating caller hangs up, a two-way call between the originating caller and the other caller remains in progress.

Current call conferencing limitations. The following are current limitations to the call conferencing feature:

Only SIP is supported for conferencing. For resource utilization, three-party call conferencing divides the available 48 port resources in to 8 groups of 6 sequential port resources based on physical port number (1-6, 7-12, ... ,43-48). Within a port resource group, any idle port resource may be used for a call, including conference sessions. For a two-way call, one port resource is used. For a three-way conference call, two port resources are used. If an idle port resource is unavailable because of an on-going conference call within a port resource group, any new two-way call attempts receive a fast-busy tone and any three-way conference call attempts will not succeed. Three-way conference call attempts are restricted to toggling between the established two-way calls. To minimize call blockage, configure ports in sequence leaving three ports idle in each port resource group. For example: Activate ports: 1,2,3,7,8,9,13,14,15,19,20,21,25,26,27,31,32,33,37,38,39,43,44,45,

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Idle ports: 4,5,6,10,11,12,16,17,18,22,23,24,28,29,30,34,35,36,40,41,42,46,47, 48

As more ports are required, add an additional port from each sequential port resource group until all necessary ports are configured.

AAL2 connections
This section explains the following:

Creating an ATM traffic descriptor on page 228 Configuring ISDN to AAL2 connections on page 228 Configuring POTS to AAL2 connections on page 229

Creating an ATM traffic descriptor


Before configuring ISDN or POTS subscriber voice connections that utilize remote ATM connections to an AAL2 voice gateway, the ATM traffic descriptor must exist. Note: See Configuring ATM on page 157 for more information on ATM traffic descriptors and parameters. Create a new atm-traf-descr with a unique index for a voice connection.
zSH> new atm-traf-descr 1 index can be any value Please provide the following: [q]uit. td_type: -----------------> {atmNoClpNoScr}: atmClpNoTaggingScrCdvt td_param1: ---------------> {0}: 4826 PCR . td_param2: ---------------> {0}: 4825 SCR td_param3: ---------------> {0}: 20 MBS td_param4: ---------------> {0}: 15000 CDVT td_param5: ---------------> {0}: cac-divider: -------------> {1}: 10 td_service_category: -----> {ubr}: rtvbr for voice td_frame_discard: --------> {false}: usage-parameter-control: -> {true}: .................... Save new record? [s]ave, [c]hange or [q]uit: s New record saved.

Configuring ISDN to AAL2 connections


This type of voice connection requires a ULC card. For ISDN-to-AAL2 configurations, either a voice gateway (such as the MALC Voice Gateway card) or a TDM/ATM Uplink card converts AAL2-derived voice into TDM signaling. For AAL2 connections, the ATM traffic descriptor is required before the voice connection can be configured.

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The voice add command automatically creates the required VPI/VCI, CID, and uplink VCL and sets the following ISDN parameters:

atm-vcl profile: vcc aal5 cpcs transmit and receive sdu sizes aal2-vcl-profile: timer-cu, frame-mode-data, cas, trunk-type, pcm-encoding, and ras-timer, elcp trap aal2-cid-profile: frame-mode-data, cas, and pcm-encoding

This voice add command example uses the ISDN interface 1-3-1-0/isdnu, sets the VPI/VCI to 0/38, sets the CID to 127. 1 To configure a ISDN to AAL2 voice connection:

zSH> voice add isdn 1-3-1-0/isdnu aal2 uplink1/atm vc 0/38 cid 127 enable Created subscriber-voice 1/5/4 Created subscriber-voice-isdn 65 Created aal2-cid-profile 38/0/38/127 Created subscriber-voice-aal2 66 Created subscriber-voice 1/5/5 Created subscriber-voice-isdn 67 Created subscriber-voice-aal2 68 Created subscriber-voice 1/5/6 Created subscriber-voice-isdn 69 Created subscriber-voice-aal2 70

View the voice connection


Voice Prof Id -------------1/5/4 1/5/5 1/5/6 STA --ENA ENA ENA

zSH> voice show Subscriber end-point Remote end-point ------------------------------ -----------------------------1-3-1-0/isdnu 1-1-1-0/ds1 VC 0/38 CID 127 1-3-1-0/isdnu 1-1-1-0/ds1 VC 0/38 CID 158 1-3-1-0/isdnu 1-1-1-0/ds1 VC 0/38 CID 159 Total number of voice connections : 3

Configuring POTS to AAL2 connections


For POTS-to-AAL2 configurations, either a voice gateway (such as the MALC Voice Gateway card) or a TDM/ATM Uplink card can be used to convert AAL2-derived voice into TDM signaling. For AAL2 connections, the ATM traffic descriptor is required before the voice connection can be configured. The voice add command automatically creates the required VPI/ VCI, CID, and uplink VCL. This example adds a POTS to AAL2 connection over an ATM VCL with a VPI/VCI of 0/38 and a CID of 16: The PCM-encoding is set to Alaw and the the interface 1-5-24-0/voicefxs is enabled. The voice ring command can be used to verify a POTS voice connection without placing a call. The voice status command can be used to display runtime voice port status and to verify the phones ring status if the ringing cannot be heard. 1 Use the voice command to add the POTS to AAL2 connection.

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zSH> voice add pots 1-5-24-0/voicefxs alaw aal2 uplink1/atm vc 0/39 td 11/11 cid 16 enable Created subscriber-voice 1/32/2 Created subscriber-voice-pots 10017 Created atm-vcl uplink1/atm/0/39 Created aal2-cid-profile 38/0/39/16 Created subscriber-voice-aal2 10018

View the voice connection.

zSH> voice show Subscriber end-point Remote end-point Voice Prof Id STA ------------------------------ ------------------------------ -------------- --1-5-24-0/voicefxs 1-2-1-0/atmima VC 0/39 CID 16 1/32/2 ENA Total number of voice connections : 1

DS1 to POTS connections


The MALC can act as a channel bank, interconnecting POTS channels to DS0s on the TDM T1/E1 card or the T1/E1 interface on the OC12-c/STM4 Uplink card. Note that T1 CAS, GR-303, and V5.2 signaling cannot be active on a card at the same time.

Adding a POTS to DS1 connection


To enable a POTS to DS1 connection, you must reset the line type on the T1/ E1 TDM card or OC12-c/STM4 Uplink card. Caution: Changing the line type for the Uplink card requires a system reboot and deletes the system configuration. Back up your configuration using the dump command before changing the line type. 1 Change the line type on the T1/E1 TDM card or OC12-c/STM4 Uplink card. Note: If there is a redundant Uplink card in the system, change that line type for the redundant card before changing it for the active card. For the T1/E1 TDM card: a Verify you are at the root of the flash card:
zSH> cd /card1 zSH> pwd /card1/

Back up the current configuration file to the flash card and store it in the onreboot directory:
zSH> mkdir onreboot

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zSH> cd onreboot zSH> dump file restore

This file will be used to restore the system configuration or revert to a previous release, if desired. c If desired, save the configuration file to a host on the network. For example:
zSH> dump network 192.168.8.21 malc.cfg

Change directories to the root of the flash card:


zSH> cd /card1 zSH> pwd /card1/

Delete the Uplink card-profile:


zSH> delete card-profile 1/1/5114 shelf/slot/type

Create a new Uplink card-profile and change the card-line-type:

zSH> card add 1/1/5114 linetype t1-uni-t1cas

or
zSH> new card-profile 1/1/5114 Please provide the following: [q]uit. sw-file-name: ---------> {}: malcT1E1Tdmf.bin admin-status: ---------> {operational}: upgrade-sw-file-name: -> {}: upgrade-vers: ---------> {}: admin-status-enable: --> {operational}: sw-upgrade-admin: -----> {reloadcurrrev}: sw-enable: ------------> {false}: true sw-upgrade-enable: ----> {false}: card-group-id: --------> {1}: hold-active: ----------> {false}: weight: ---------------> {nopreference}: card-line-type: -------> {unknowntype}: t1-uni-t1cas card-atm-configuration: -> {notapplicable} .................... Save new record? [s]ave, [c]hange or [q]uit: s New record saved.

After saving the Uplink card-profile, the card will reboot and restore the configuration saved to the onreboot directory. If this is a redundant system, the standby card will take over. You must also change the line type on the redundant card. For the OC12-c/STM4 Uplink card: a Verify you are at the root of the flash card:
zSH> cd /card1 zSH> pwd

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/card1/

Back up the current configuration file to the flash card and store it in the onreboot directory:
zSH> mkdir onreboot zSH> cd onreboot zSH> dump file restore

This file will be used to restore the system configuration or revert to a previous release, if desired. c If desired, save the configuration file to a host on the network. For example:
zSH> dump network 192.168.8.21 malc.cfg

Change directories to the root of the flash card:


zSH> cd /card1 zSH> pwd /card1/

Delete the Uplink card-profile:


zSH> delete card-profile 1/1/5029 shelf/slot/type

Create a new Uplink card-profile and change the card-line-type:

zSH> card add 1/1/5114 linetype t1-uni-t1cas

or
zSH> new card-profile 1/1/5029 Please provide the following: [q]uit. sw-file-name: ---------> {}: malcoc12.bin admin-status: ---------> {operational}: upgrade-sw-file-name: -> {}: upgrade-vers: ---------> {}: admin-status-enable: --> {operational}: sw-upgrade-admin: -----> {reloadcurrrev}: sw-enable: ------------> {false}: true sw-upgrade-enable: ----> {false}: card-group-id: --------> {1}: hold-active: ----------> {false}: weight: ---------------> {nopreference}: card-line-type: -------> {unknowntype}: t1-uni-t1cas card-atm-configuration: -> {notapplicable} .................... Save new record? [s]ave, [c]hange or [q]uit: s New record saved.

After saving the Uplink card-profile, the card will reboot and restore the configuration saved to the onreboot directory. If this is a redundant system, the standby card will take over. You must also change the line type on the redundant card.

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After the system has finished booting, create the voice connection. The following example maps POTS port 24 to DS0 24 on the T1/E1 TDM card:

zSH> voice add pots 1-5-24-0/voicefxs ds1 1-1-9-0/ds1 ds0 24 Created subscriber-voice 1/21/25 Created subscriber-voice-pots 83 Created subscriber-voice-ds1 84

3
zSH> voice show

View the voice connection:

Subscriber end-point Remote end-point Voice Prof Id STA ------------------------------ ------------------------------ -------------- --1-5-24-0/voicefxs 1-1-9-0/ds1 DS0 24 1/21/25 ENA Total number of voice connections : 1

Configuring CES connections


Circuit Emulation Service (CES) circuit configuration involves:

Creating IP interface and unnumbered IP interface on page 233 Creating CES connections on page 234 Deleting cross connections and CES over ATM circuits on page 248

Creating IP interface and unnumbered IP interface


If using CES over IP, an IP interface and unnumbered IP interface record are required before the CES over IP connection can be created: Note: CES over IP is only supported on RPR GigE uplinks.

Create the IP interface record.


zSH> new ip-interface-record ces/ip Please provide the following: [q]uit. vpi: ---------------> {0}: vci: ---------------> {0}: rdindex: -----------> {1}: dhcp: --------------> {none}: ** read-only ** addr: --------------> {0.0.0.0}: 192.168.100.1 netmask: -----------> {0.0.0.0}: 255.255.255.0 bcastaddr: ---------> {0.0.0.0}: 192.168.100.255 destaddr: ----------> {0.0.0.0}: farendaddr: --------> {0.0.0.0}: mru: ---------------> {1500}: reasmmaxsize: ------> {0}: ingressfiltername: -> {}: egressfiltername: --> {}:

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pointtopoint: ------> {no}: mcastenabled: ------> {yes}: ipfwdenabled: ------> {yes}: mcastfwdenabled: ---> {yes}: natenabled: --------> {no}: bcastenabled: ------> {yes}: ingressfilterid: ---> {0}: egressfilterid: ----> {0}: ipaddrdynamic: -----> {static}: dhcpserverenable: --> {false}: subnetgroup: -------> {0}: unnumberedindex: ---> {0}: mcastcontrollist: --> {}: vlanid: ------------> {0}: maxVideoStreams: ---> {0}: .................... Save new record? [s]ave, [c]hange or [q]uit: s Could not find an appropropriate interface on which to bind the IP record. Could not automatically bind this IP Interface New record saved.

Create IP unnumbered record.


zSH> new ip-unnumbered-record 1 Please provide the following: [q]uit. ipUnnumberedInterfaceName: -> { }: ces/ip .................... Save new record? [s]ave, [c]hange or [q]uit: s New record saved.

Creating CES connections


The CES add command specifies the parameters for one side of the CES over IP connection. Generally, each CES over IP endpoint resides on a different MALC system and must be configured and deleted separately for each side for the circuit. The cross connect command specifies the parameters for one side of the CES connection over an ATM circuit.The traffic descriptor is used for internal ATM processing. Generally, each CES connection endpoint resides on a different MALC system and must be configured and deleted separately for each side for the circuit.

CES signaling
CES connections support both Channel Associated Signaling (CAS) and Common Channel Signaling (CCS) depending on the connection mode and type. For structured T1 circuits, the CES card supports CAS (robbedbit signaling) for in-band signaling. CAS uses one bit out of every channel in the sixth T1 frame in order to transmit signaling messages. Unstructured T1 circuits

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support CCS for out-of-band signaling that uses an entire channel of each T1 frame to transmit signaling. For structured E1 circuits, CAS can be used to extract signaling information from timeslot 16 and then reinsert signaling data at the other end of the connection. Unstructured E1 circuits transmit all 32 timeslots transparently. Signal mode is set in the ds1-profile.
zSH> update ds1-profile 1-4-1-0/ds1 Please provide the following: [q]uit. line-type: ----------------------> {esf}: line-code: ----------------------> {b8zs}: send-code: ----------------------> {sendnocode}: circuit-id: ---------------------> {ds1}: loopback-config: ----------------> {noloop}: signal-mode: --------------------> {robbedbit}: bitoriented fdl: ----------------------------> {fdlnone}: dsx-line-length: ----------------> {dsx0}: line-status_change-trap-enable: -> {enabled}: channelization: -----------------> {enabledds0}: ds1-mode: -----------------------> {csu}: csu-line-length: ----------------> {csu00}: clock-source-eligible: ----------> {eligible}: transmit-clock-source: ----------> {looptiming}: cell-scramble: ------------------> {true}: coset-polynomial: ---------------> {true}: protocol-emulation: -------------> {network}: signal-type: --------------------> {loopstart}: ds1-group-number: ---------------> {0}: line-power: ---------------------> {disabled}: .................... Save changes? [s]ave, [c]hange or [q]uit: s Record updated.

CES clocking
The CES card supports two timing modes:

Loop timing Through timing

Loop timing indicates that the timing source is coming from the line. Through timing indicates that the timing sources is from the backplane. The backplane can be set to receive its clocking signal from a port on an uplink card or ports on a line card. When through timing is used, the other side of the CES circuit should be set to loop timing. If loop timing is used and the card loses its received clock signal, clocking switches to the clock on the board. Clock mode is set in the DS1-profile. Refer to the MALC Hardware Installation Guide for the procedures on how configure MALC timing.
zSH> update ds1-profile 1-4-1-0/ds1

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Please provide the following: [q]uit. line-type: ----------------------> {esf}: line-code: ----------------------> {b8zs}: send-code: ----------------------> {sendnocode}: circuit-id: ---------------------> {ds1}: loopback-config: ----------------> {noloop}: signal-mode: --------------------> {robbedbit}: fdl: ----------------------------> {fdlnone}: dsx-line-length: ----------------> {dsx0}: line-status_change-trap-enable: -> {enabled}: channelization: -----------------> {enabledds0}: ds1-mode: -----------------------> {csu}: csu-line-length: ----------------> {csu00}: clock-source-eligible: ----------> {eligible}: transmit-clock-source: ----------> {looptiming}: throughtiming cell-scramble: ------------------> {true}: coset-polynomial: ---------------> {true}: protocol-emulation: -------------> {network}: signal-type: --------------------> {loopstart}: ds1-group-number: ---------------> {0}: line-power: ---------------------> {disabled}: .................... Save changes? [s]ave, [c]hange or [q]uit: s Record updated.

CES configuration
This section shows configuration examples for the following CES procedures:

Adding an unstructured T1/E1 CES over IP circuit on page 237 Adding a structured T1/E1 CES over IP circuit with ds1esfcas signaling on page 240 Adding unstructured T1 CES circuits on page 242 Adding a structured T1 CES circuit with ds1esfcas signaling on page 243 Adding a second DS0 bundle to a structured T1 CES circuit with ds1esfcas signaling on page 244 Adding unstructured E1 CES circuits on page 245 Adding a structured E1 CES circuit with e1cas signaling on page 246 Adding a second cross connect to a structured E1 CES circuit with e1cas signaling on page 247 Deleting cross connections and CES over ATM circuits on page 248

The CES circuit signaling type is specified in the cross connect command used to create the connection. After cross connect configuration, the signaling type can be modified by updating the ces-config profile.

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Note: When required, CES virtual circuits (VCs) are auto-generated from the cross connect command. The default virtual circuit ranges are VPI 0-3 and VCI 32-127.
Table 9: Supported CES signaling types Signaling Type Description

basic e1cas ds1esfcas ds1sfcas

No CAS bits with a single 125 usec frame. Default. Required for unstructured channels. CAS bits used in E1 multiframe structure. CAS bits used in DS1 ESF multiframe structure. CAS bits used in DS1 SF multiframe structure.

After the cross connect command is issued, the system automatically creates the required ces-config profile with the specified signaling type and other settings. The default signaling type basic is required for unstructured, single channel signaling and is used if a signalling type is not specified in the cross connect command. Table 9 on page 237 lists the supported signaling types. Note: Structured DS0 bundles in cross connects are specified by start and length values and therefore contain contiguous DS0s. To use non-contiguous DS0s, modify the DS0-bundle parameter in the ces-config profile. For the first DS0 bundle in a structured DS1 circuit, the frame type specified in the cross connect command is written to the DS1 profile and becomes the default frame type for that DS1 circuit. Subsequent DS0 bundles in the same DS1 circuit use the default frame type regardless of the line type specified in the cross connect command. If line type is not specified in the cross connect command, the line type in the DS1 profile is used. Note: A maximum of 4 structured DS0 bundles can be configured per CES port.

Adding an unstructured T1/E1 CES over IP circuit


Note: This procedure assumes that the T1E1CES12 card is installed and running on the current device, a valid traffic descriptor has been configured, and the unnumbered IP interface record has been created. To add a CES connection for an unstructured T1/E1 CES over IP circuit, repeat these configuration steps for each endpoint of the circuit.

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Specify ces add command with the desired settings for each side for the CES circuit. This example specifies an unstructured T1 circuit (single channel). No signaling type or line type are specified. Unstructured channels required basic signaling so the basic signaling type is used. The line type in the DS1-profile is set to ds1unframed. Because no line type is specified in this command, the line type from the DS1-profile is used. The traffic descriptor 102 is autocreated and used for internal processing. Using slot 8, port 2 on the CES card, the static IP addressing is source IP address 10.2.2.82. and destination IP address is 10.2.3.83. The source UDP port number is 48001. The destination UDP port number is 48201. Note: Ensure the IP routes between the source and destination subnetworks have been configured and are available. UPD port numbers must be between 48000 and 48300.

zSH> ces add 1-8-2-0-ds1/atm ds0 1/24 unstr td 102 llc static 10.2.2.82 10.2.3.83 48001 48002 zSH> ces add 1-8-3-0-ds1/atm ds0 1/24 unstr td 102 llc static 10.2.3.83 10.2.2.82 48002 48001

Change the administrative status of the ports to up.


zSH> update if-translate 1-8-2-0/ds1 Please provide the following: [q]uit. ifIndex: -----------> {200}: shelf: -------------> {1}: slot: --------------> {7}: port: --------------> {1}: subport: -----------> {0}: type: --------------> {ds1}: adminstatus: -------> {down}: up physical-flag: -----> {true}: iftype-extension: --> {none}: ifName: ------------> {1-7-1-0}: redundancy-param1: -> {0}: .................... Save changes? [s]ave, [c]hange or [q]uit: s Record updated.zSH> zSH> update if-translate 1-8-3-0/ds1 Please provide the following: [q]uit. ifIndex: -----------> {200}: shelf: -------------> {1}: slot: --------------> {7}: port: --------------> {1}: subport: -----------> {0}: type: --------------> {ds1}: adminstatus: -------> {down}: up physical-flag: -----> {true}: iftype-extension: --> {none}: ifName: ------------> {1-7-1-0}: redundancy-param1: -> {0}: ....................

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Save changes? [s]ave, [c]hange or [q]uit: s Record updated.zSH>

3
zSH> cc show CES

Display the configured cross connection.

CONNECTION CC CONNECTION --------------------------------------------------------------------------1-1-1-0-aal5proxy/atm 0/33 Up 2 Up 1-8-2-0/ds1 1/24 Up 1-1-1-0-aal5proxy/atm 0/34 Up 3 Up 1-8-3-0/ds1 1/24 Up

Display the DS1 profile for the configured T1/E1 CES unstructured circuit over IP.
zSH> get ds1-profile 1-8-2-0/ds1 line-type: ----------------------> line-code: ----------------------> send-code: ----------------------> circuit-id: ---------------------> loopback-config: ----------------> signal-mode: --------------------> fdl: ----------------------------> dsx-line-length: ----------------> line-status_change-trap-enable: -> channelization: -----------------> ds1-mode: -----------------------> csu-line-length: ----------------> clock-source-eligible: ----------> transmit-clock-source: ----------> cell-scramble: ------------------> coset-polynomial: ---------------> protocol-emulation: -------------> signal-type: --------------------> ds1-group-number: ---------------> line-power: ---------------------> {ds1unframed} {b8zs} {sendnocode} {ds1} {noloop} {none} {fdlnone} {dsx0} {enabled} {disabled} {csu} {csu00} {eligible} {throughtiming} {true} {true} {network} {loopstart} {0} {disabled}

Display the ces-config profile for the configured T1/E1 CES unstructured circuit. Note: The default number of UDP ports available for the source-port and destination-port in ces-config profile are 48000 48300. The number of available ports does not impact the CES behavior or provisioning.
zSH> get ces-config 1-8-2-0-ds1-1/ds0bundle vpi: --------------------------> {1} vci: --------------------------> {33} cas: --------------------------> {basic} partial-fill: -----------------> {0} buf-max-size: -----------------> {128} cell-loss-integration-period: -> {2500} ds0-bundle: ------------------->

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{1+2+3+4+5+6+7+8+9+10+11+12+13+14+15+16+17+18+19+20+21 +22+23+24} source-ip-address: ------------> {10.2.4.82} destination-ip-address: -------> {10.2.4.83} source-port: ------------------> {48001} destination-port: -------------> {48002}

Adding a structured T1/E1 CES over IP circuit with ds1esfcas signaling


To add a CES cross connection for a structured T1/E1 CES circuit with esfcas signaling, repeat these configuration steps for each endpoint of the circuit. 1 Specify cross connect command with the desired settings for each side of the CES circuit. This example command creates a structured T1 circuit using 6 DS0s starting at DS0 1 with ds1esfcas signaling. No line type is specified so the default esf line type from the DS1-profile is used. Traffic descriptor 1 is used. Using slot 7, port 1 on the CES card, the source IP address is 192.168.11.101. The destination IP address is 192.168.12.102. The source UDP port number is 48002. The destination UDP port number is 48202. Note: Ensure the IP routes between the source and destination subnetworks have been configured and are available. UPD port numbers must be between 48000 and 48300.
zSH> ces add 1-7-1-0-ds1/atm ds0 1/6 struct ds1esfcas td 1 llc static 192.168.11.101 192.168.100.12 48003 48004 zSH> ces add 1-7-2-0-ds1/atm ds0 1/6 struct ds1esfcas td 1 llc static 192.168.12.102 192.168.11.101 48004 48003

Change the admin status of the ports to up:


zSH> update if-translate 1-7-1-0/ds1 Please provide the following: [q]uit. ifIndex: -----------> {200}: shelf: -------------> {1}: slot: --------------> {7}: port: --------------> {1}: subport: -----------> {0}: type: --------------> {ds1}: adminstatus: -------> {down}: up physical-flag: -----> {true}: iftype-extension: --> {none}: ifName: ------------> {1-7-1-0}: redundancy-param1: -> {0}: .................... Save changes? [s]ave, [c]hange or [q]uit: s Record updated. zSH> update if-translate 1-7-2-0/ds1 Please provide the following: [q]uit. ifIndex: -----------> {200}:

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shelf: -------------> {1}: slot: --------------> {7}: port: --------------> {1}: subport: -----------> {0}: type: --------------> {ds1}: adminstatus: -------> {down}: up physical-flag: -----> {true}: iftype-extension: --> {none}: ifName: ------------> {1-7-1-0}: redundancy-param1: -> {0}: .................... Save changes? [s]ave, [c]hange or [q]uit: s Record updated.zSH>

Display the configured cross connections.

zSH> cc show CES CONNECTION CC CONNECTION --------------------------------------------------------------------------1-1-1-0-aal5proxy/atm 0/35 Up 1 Up 1-7-1-0/ds1 1/6 Up 1-1-1-0-aal5proxy/atm 0/36 Up 2 Up 1-7-2-0/ds1 1/6 Up

Display the DS1 profile for the configured structured CES circuit over IP.
zSH> get ds1-profile 1-7-1-0/ds1 line-type: ----------------------> line-code: ----------------------> send-code: ----------------------> circuit-id: ---------------------> loopback-config: ----------------> signal-mode: --------------------> fdl: ----------------------------> dsx-line-length: ----------------> line-status_change-trap-enable: -> channelization: -----------------> ds1-mode: -----------------------> csu-line-length: ----------------> clock-source-eligible: ----------> transmit-clock-source: ----------> cell-scramble: ------------------> coset-polynomial: ---------------> protocol-emulation: -------------> signal-type: --------------------> ds1-group-number: ---------------> line-power: ---------------------> {esf} {b8zs} {sendnocode} {ds1} {noloop} {robbedbit} {fdlnone} {dsx0} {enabled} {disabled} {csu} {csu00} {eligible} {throughtiming} {true} {true} {network} {loopstart} {0} {disabled}

Display the ces-config profile for the configured structured CES circuit over IP. Note: The default number of UDP ports available for the source-port and destination-port in ces-config profile are 48000 48300. The number of available ports does not impact the CES behavior or provisioning.

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zSH> get ces-config 1-7-1-0-ds1-1/ds0bundle vpi: --------------------------> {1} vci: --------------------------> {35} cas: --------------------------> {ds1esfcas} partial-fill: -----------------> {0} buf-max-size: -----------------> {128} cell-loss-integration-period: -> {2500} ds0-bundle: -------------------> {1+2+3+4+5+6} source-ip-address: ------------> {10.2.4.82} source-port: ------------------> {140} destination-ip-address: -------> {10.2.4.83} destination-port: -------------> {48004}

Adding unstructured T1 CES circuits


To add a CES cross connection for an unstructured T1 CES circuit, repeat these configuration steps for each endpoint of the circuit. 1 Specify cross connect command with the desired settings. This example specifies an unstructured circuit (single channel). No signaling type or line type are specified. Unstructured single channels require basic signaling so the basic signaling type is used. The ds1unframed line type from the DS1-profile is used.

zSH> cc add uplink2/atm 0/53 1-12-3-0/ds1 vc 1/33 ds0 1/24 unstr td 1

Display the configured cross connection.

zSH> cc show CES ATM VCL CC ATM VCL -------------------------------------------------------------------------uplink2/atm 0/53 Up 1 Up 1-12-3-0-ds1/atm 1/33 Up

Display the DS1 profile for the configured T1 CES unstructured circuit.
zSH> get ds1-profile 1-12-3-0/ds1 line-type: ----------------------> line-code: ----------------------> send-code: ----------------------> circuit-id: ---------------------> loopback-config: ----------------> signal-mode: --------------------> fdl: ----------------------------> dsx-line-length: ----------------> line-status_change-trap-enable: -> channelization: -----------------> ds1-mode: -----------------------> csu-line-length: ----------------> clock-source-eligible: ----------> transmit-clock-source: ----------> cell-scramble: ------------------> coset-polynomial: ---------------> protocol-emulation: -------------> signal-type: --------------------> {ds1unframed} {b8zs} {sendnocode} {ds1} {noloop} {none} {fdlnone} {dsx0} {enabled} {disabled} {csu} {csu00} {eligible} {throughtiming} {true} {true} {network} {loopstart}

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ds1-group-number: ---------------> line-power: --------------------->

{0} {disabled}

Display the ces-config profile for the configured T1 CES unstructured circuit.
zSH> get ces-config 1-12-3-0-ds1-1/ds0bundle vpi: --------------------------> {1} vci: --------------------------> {33} cas: --------------------------> {basic} partial-fill: -----------------> {0} buf-max-size: -----------------> {128} cell-loss-integration-period: -> {2500} ds0-bundle: -------------------> {1+2+3+4+5+6+7+8+9+10+11+12+13+14+15+16+17+18+19+20+21 +22+23+24}

Adding a structured T1 CES circuit with ds1esfcas signaling


To add a CES cross connection for a structured T1 CES circuit with esfcas signaling, repeat these configuration steps for each endpoint of the circuit. 1 Specify cross connect command with the desired settings. This example command creates a structured circuit using 6 DS0s starting at DS0 1 with ds1esfcas signaling. No line type is specified so the esf line type from the DS1-profile is used.

zSH> cc add uplink2/atm 0/54 1-12-4-0/ds1 vc 1/34 ds0 1/6 str ds1esfcas td 1

Display the configured cross connections.

zSH> cc show CES ATM VCL CC ATM VCL -------------------------------------------------------------------------uplink2/atm 0/53 Up 1 Up 1-12-3-0-ds1/atm 1/33 Up uplink2/atm 0/54 Up 3 Up 1-12-4-0-ds1/atm 1/34 Up

Display the DS1 profile for the configured structured CES circuit.
zSH> get ds1-profile 1-12-4-0/ds1 line-type: ----------------------> line-code: ----------------------> send-code: ----------------------> circuit-id: ---------------------> loopback-config: ----------------> signal-mode: --------------------> fdl: ----------------------------> dsx-line-length: ----------------> line-status_change-trap-enable: -> channelization: -----------------> ds1-mode: -----------------------> csu-line-length: ----------------> clock-source-eligible: ----------> transmit-clock-source: ----------> cell-scramble: ------------------> {esf} {b8zs} {sendnocode} {ds1} {noloop} {robbedbit} {fdlnone} {dsx0} {enabled} {disabled} {csu} {csu00} {eligible} {throughtiming} {true}

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coset-polynomial: ---------------> protocol-emulation: -------------> signal-type: --------------------> ds1-group-number: ---------------> line-power: --------------------->

{true} {network} {loopstart} {0} {disabled}

Display the ces-config profile for the configured CES circuit.


zSH> get ces-config 1-12-4-0-ds1-1/ds0bundle vpi: --------------------------> {1} vci: --------------------------> {34} cas: --------------------------> {ds1esfcas} partial-fill: -----------------> {0} buf-max-size: -----------------> {128} cell-loss-integration-period: -> {2500} ds0-bundle: -------------------> {1+2+3+4+5+6}

Adding a second DS0 bundle to a structured T1 CES circuit with ds1esfcas signaling
To add a second DS0 bundle to a CES cross connection for a structured T1 CES circuit with ds1esfcas signaling, repeat these configuration steps for each endpoint of the circuit. 1 Specify cross connect command with the desired settings. This example command specifies 6 DS0s starting at DS0 7 in a structured circuit using ds1esfcas signaling type. The line type for secondary DS0 bundles must match the line type of the first bundle or be left unspecified so the esf line type from the DS1-profile is used.

zSH> cc add uplink2/atm 0/55 1-12-5-0/ds1 vc 1/35 ds0 7/6 str ds1esfcas td 1

Display the configured cross connections.

zSH> cc show CES ATM VCL CC ATM VCL -------------------------------------------------------------------------uplink2/atm 0/53 Up 1 Up 1-12-3-0-ds1/atm 1/33 Up uplink2/atm 0/54 Up 2 Up 1-12-4-0-ds1/atm 1/34 Up uplink2/atm 0/55 Up 3 Up 1-12-5-0-ds1/atm 1/35 Up

Display the DS1 profile for the configured structured CES circuit.
zSH> get ds1-profile 1-12-5-0/ds1 line-type: ----------------------> line-code: ----------------------> send-code: ----------------------> circuit-id: ---------------------> loopback-config: ----------------> signal-mode: --------------------> fdl: ----------------------------> dsx-line-length: ----------------> line-status_change-trap-enable: -> channelization: -----------------> {esf} {b8zs} {sendnocode} {ds1} {noloop} {robbedbit} {fdlnone} {dsx0} {enabled} {disabled}

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ds1-mode: -----------------------> csu-line-length: ----------------> clock-source-eligible: ----------> transmit-clock-source: ----------> cell-scramble: ------------------> coset-polynomial: ---------------> protocol-emulation: -------------> signal-type: --------------------> ds1-group-number: ---------------> line-power: --------------------->

{csu} {csu00} {eligible} {throughtiming} {true} {true} {network} {loopstart} {0} {disabled}

Display the ces-config profile for the configured CES circuit.


zSH> get ces-config 1-12-5-0-ds1-2/ds0bundle vpi: --------------------------> {1} vci: --------------------------> {35} cas: --------------------------> {ds1esfcas} partial-fill: -----------------> {0} buf-max-size: -----------------> {128} cell-loss-integration-period: -> {2500} ds0-bundle: -------------------> {7+8+9+10+11+12}

Adding unstructured E1 CES circuits


To add a CES cross connection for an unstructured E1 CES circuit, repeat these configuration steps for each endpoint of the circuit. 1 Specify cross connect command with the desired settings. This command specifies an unstructured channel. Unstructured channels require the basis signaling type. No line type is specified so the e1unframed line type from the DS1-profile is used.
td 1

zSH> cc add uplink1/atm 0/61 1-6-1-0/ds1 vc 1/32 ds0 0/32 unstr

Display the configured cross connection.

zSH> cc show CES ATM VCL CC ATM VCL -------------------------------------------------------------------------uplink2/atm 0/61 Up 1 Up 1-6-1-0-ds1/atm 1/32 Up

Display the DS1 profile for the configured structured CES circuit.
zSH> get ds1-profile 1-6-1-0/ds1 line-type: ----------------------> line-code: ----------------------> send-code: ----------------------> circuit-id: ---------------------> loopback-config: ----------------> signal-mode: --------------------> fdl: ----------------------------> dsx-line-length: ----------------> line-status_change-trap-enable: -> channelization: -----------------> ds1-mode: -----------------------> {e1unframed} {hdb3} {sendnocode} {e1} {noloop} {none} {fdlnone} {dsx0} {enabled} {disabled} {other}

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csu-line-length: ----------------> clock-source-eligible: ----------> transmit-clock-source: ----------> cell-scramble: ------------------> coset-polynomial: ---------------> protocol-emulation: -------------> signal-type: --------------------> ds1-group-number: ---------------> line-power: --------------------->

{csu00} {eligible} {throughtiming} {true} {true} {network} {loopstart} {0} {disabled}

Display the ces-config profile for the configured CES circuit.


zSH> get ces-config 1-6-1-0-ds1-1/ds0bundle vpi: --------------------------> {1} vci: --------------------------> {32} cas: --------------------------> {basic} partial-fill: -----------------> {0} buf-max-size: -----------------> {128} cell-loss-integration-period: -> {2500} ds0-bundle: -------------------> {0+1+2+3+4+5+6+7+8+9+10+11+12+13+14+15+16+17+18+19+20+ 21+22+23+24+25+26+27+28+29+30+31}

Adding a structured E1 CES circuit with e1cas signaling


To add a CES cross connection for a structured E1 CES circuit with e1cas signaling, repeat these configuration steps for each endpoint of the circuit. 1 Specify cross connect command with the desired settings. This example specifies 6 DS0s starting at DS0 1 in a structured circuit with e1case signaling type e1cas. The line type is unspecified so the e1 line type from the DS1-profile is used.

zSH> cc add uplink1/atm 0/62 1-6-2-0/ds1 vc 1/33 ds0 1/6 str e1cas td 1

Display the configured cross connections.

zSH> cc show CES ATM VCL CC ATM VCL -------------------------------------------------------------------------uplink2/atm 0/62 Up 2 Up 1-6-2-0-ds1/atm 1/33 Up

Display the DS1 profile for the configured structured CES circuit.
zSH> get ds1-profile 1-6-2-0/ds1 line-type: ----------------------> line-code: ----------------------> send-code: ----------------------> circuit-id: ---------------------> loopback-config: ----------------> signal-mode: --------------------> fdl: ----------------------------> dsx-line-length: ----------------> line-status_change-trap-enable: -> channelization: -----------------> {e1} {hdb3} {sendnocode} {e1} {noloop} {bitoriented} {fdlnone} {dsx0} {enabled} {disabled}

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ds1-mode: -----------------------> csu-line-length: ----------------> clock-source-eligible: ----------> transmit-clock-source: ----------> cell-scramble: ------------------> coset-polynomial: ---------------> protocol-emulation: -------------> signal-type: --------------------> ds1-group-number: ---------------> line-power: --------------------->

{other} {csu00} {eligible} {throughtiming} {true} {true} {network} {loopstart} {0} {disabled}

Display the ces-config profile for the configured CES circuit.


zSH> get ces-config 1-6-2-0-ds1-1/ds0bundle vpi: --------------------------> {1} vci: --------------------------> {33} cas: --------------------------> {e1cas} partial-fill: -----------------> {0} buf-max-size: -----------------> {128} cell-loss-integration-period: -> {2500} ds0-bundle: -------------------> {1+2+3+4+5+6}

Adding a second cross connect to a structured E1 CES circuit with e1cas signaling
To add a second CES cross connection for a structured E1 CES circuit with e1cas signaling, repeat these configuration steps for each endpoint of the circuit. 1 Specify cross connect command with the desired settings. This example specifies 6 DS0s starting at DS0 7 in a structured circuit using e1cas signaling type. The line type for secondary DS0 bundles must match the line type of the first bundle or be left unspecified so the e1 line type from the DS1-profile is used.

zSH> cc add uplink2/atm 0/63 1-6-3-0/ds1 vc 1/34 ds0 7/6 str e1cas td 1

Display the configured cross connections.

zSH> cc show CES ATM VCL CC ATM VCL -------------------------------------------------------------------------uplink2/atm 0/61 Up 1 Up 1-6-1-0-ds1/atm 1/32 Up uplink2/atm 0/62 Up 2 Up 1-6-2-0-ds1/atm 1/33 Up uplink2/atm 0/63 Up 3 Up 1-6-3-0-ds1/atm 1/34 Up

Display the DS1 profile for the configured structured CES circuit.
zSH> get ds1-profile 1-6-3-0/ds1 line-type: ----------------------> line-code: ----------------------> send-code: ----------------------> circuit-id: ---------------------> loopback-config: ----------------> {e1} {hdb3} {sendnocode} {e1} {noloop}

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signal-mode: --------------------> fdl: ----------------------------> dsx-line-length: ----------------> line-status_change-trap-enable: -> channelization: -----------------> ds1-mode: -----------------------> csu-line-length: ----------------> clock-source-eligible: ----------> transmit-clock-source: ----------> cell-scramble: ------------------> coset-polynomial: ---------------> protocol-emulation: -------------> signal-type: --------------------> ds1-group-number: ---------------> line-power: --------------------->

{bitoriented} {fdlnone} {dsx0} {enabled} {disabled} {other} {csu00} {eligible} {throughtiming} {true} {true} {network} {loopstart} {0} {disabled}

Display the ces-config profile for the configured CES circuit.


zSH> get ces-config 1-6-3-0-ds1-2/ds0bundle vpi: --------------------------> {1} vci: --------------------------> {34} cas: --------------------------> {e1cas} partial-fill: -----------------> {0} buf-max-size: -----------------> {128} cell-loss-integration-period: -> {2500} ds0-bundle: -------------------> {7+8+9+10+11+12}

Deleting CES over IP circuits


To delete a configured CES over IP circuit, repeat this command on each circuit endpoint. This command deletes only one endpoint of a CES over IP circuit. Repeat this command on each endpoint to remove the entire circuit.
ZSH>ces delete 1-7-1-0-ds1/atm ds0 1/6 static 192.168.100.101

Deleting cross connections and CES over ATM circuits


To delete a configured CES over ATM cross connection, specify the delete cross connect command. This command uses either both sides of the cross connect or the cross connect number to remove the entire cross connection. Repeat this command on each circuit endpoint.
zSH> cc delete uplink2/atm 0/61 1-6-1-0-ds1/atm 1/32 Delete complete zSH> cc delete cc 1 Delete complete

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Additional voice features


This section describes additional voice settings you might need to configure, depending on your network.

Changing the jitter buffer


The type and size of the jitter buffer in the MALC can be configured. The jitter buffer accommodates the AAL2 packets received, so that the inter-arrival jitter of the packets received does not degrade the voice quality. Without a jitter buffer, some inter-arrival jitter changes would be late, which would have the same effect as lost packets. The jitter buffer also reorders the out-of-order packets received.

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Modify the following parameters in the voice-dsp-default-profile to change jitter buffer:


Parameter Description

jitter-buffer-type

There are two types of jitter algorithms: static and dynamic. Values: static A static jitter buffer does not change to compensate for inter-arrival jitter changes. Default jitter buffer type is static for VoATM applications. dynamic Allows the jitter buffer to grow and shrink as inter-arrival jitter changes. Default jitter buffer type is dynamic for VoIP applications.

jitter-buffer-size

Specifies the size of the jitter buffer. Values: 1 to 160 Note that changes to the jitter buffer are based on 5 ms frame sizes. For example: 1 to 5 = 5 ms 6 to 10 = 10 ms 11 to 15 = 15 ms 16 to 20 = 20 ms ... 146 to 150 = 150 ms 151 to 155 = 155 ms 156 to 160 = 160 ms Default: 10

Note: Any changes made to jitter buffer size and jitter buffer type take effect in the next call. To change the type and size of the jitter buffer:
zSH> update voice-dsp-default-profile 0 Please provide the following: [q]uit. redundancy-over-subscription-type: -> {high}: jitter-buffer-type: ----------------> {dynamic}: static jitter-buffer-size:----------------> {10}: 22 inter-arriv-jit-threshold: ---------> {80}: pkts-lost-threshold: ---------------> {600}: echo-cancellation-type: ------------> {g165echotl16}: silence-supression-type: -----------> {silsupoff}: .................... Save changes? [s]ave, [c]hange or [q]uit: s Record updated.

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Setting country-specific dialing features for VoIP


Certain features on the POTS card are designed for use in telephone systems located outside of North America. These features are available on the MALC-POTS-TDM/PKT-48, MALC-POTS-GLB-TDM/PKT, and MALC-ADSL+POTS-PKT cards. For more information about this card, contact your Zhone Technologies sales representative. Caution: Changing the countryregion setting for the Global POTS card requires a system reboot. When you specify another country, such as South Africa, in the system profile, you have the option of modifying the following dialing parameters in the voice-system profile: hookflash-min-timer hookflash-max-timer pulse-inter-digit-timer min-make-pulse-width min-break-pulse-width max-break-pulse-width

These options are read only after they have been set. To specify another country, such as South Africa, in the system profile:
zSH> update system 0 Please provide the following: [q]uit. syscontact: -----------> {Zhone Global Services and Support 7001 Oakport Street Oakland Ca. (877) Zhone20 (946-6320) Fax (510)777-7113 support@zhone.com}: sysname: --------------> {malc-201}: syslocation: ----------> {Oakland}: enableauthtraps: ------> {disabled}: setserialno: ----------> {0}: zmsexists: ------------> {true}: zmsconnectionstatus: --> {inactive}: zmsipaddress: ---------> {192.168.89.12}: configsyncexists: -----> {false}: configsyncoverflow: ---> {false}: configsyncpriority: ---> {high}: configsyncaction: -----> {noaction}: configsyncfilename: ---> {192.168.175.201_4_1115314335218}: configsyncstatus: -----> {synccomplete}: configsyncuser: -------> {zmsftp}: configsyncpasswd: -----> {** private **}: ** read-only ** numshelves: -----------> {1}: shelvesarray: ---------> {}: numcards: -------------> {3}: ipaddress: ------------> {192.168.175.201}: alternateipaddress: ---> {0.0.0.0}: countryregion: --------> {us}: southafrica

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primaryclocksource: ---> {0/0/0/0/0}: ringsource: -----------> {internalringsourcelabel}: revertiveclocksource: -> {true}: voicebandwidthcheck: --> {false}: .................... countryregion changed to southafrica Load country's pulse dialing parameters in voice-system profile ? [y]es or [n]o: y voice-system profile updated with pulse dialing parameters for southafrica sysMinBreakPulseWidth... 35 ms, sysMaxBreakPulseWidth... 75 ms sysMinMakePulseWidth.... 100 ms, sysPulseInterDigitTimer. 25 ms minHookFlash............ 80 ms, maxHookFlash............ 230 ms southafrica uses a different PCM encoding type (ALAW) from us (MULAW). Please reboot the system for this change to take effect. Record updated.

Setting ring cadence and call progress parameters


The MALC enables the ring cadence and other call progress parameters to be set for customized signal timing for VoIP MGCP and SIP calls. By default, ring cadences are set to standard United States settings. For Japan, other ring cadences are used that are not user-configurable. For other country-specific ring cadences, manually configure the ring cadences R0-R7 based on the countrys requirements. Table 10 lists the parameters that can be set. The following types of alert signal are used for on-hook signaling to wake up the caller ID device:

During Ringing The first ring is the alert signal, meaning the caller ID device is woken up to receive CLID data, when MALC provides the first ring.

Prior Ring with Dual Tone (DT) Wake Up (WU) A particular dual tone (2130Hz+2750Hz for 100ms) wakes up the caller ID CPE device for caller ID transmission. The tone and the caller ID signal are sent to prior to ringing.

Prior Ring with Ring Pulse (RP) Wake Up (WU) A short ring pulse (between 200ms and 300ms) wakes up the caller ID CPE device. Then, the caller ID signal transmission follows.

Prior Ring with Line Reversal (LR) Wake Up (WU) A line reversal (polarity change in DC voltage of the line, wakes up the caller ID device. Then, the caller ID signal transmission follows.

No Ring with Dual Tone (DT) Wake Up (WU) A particular dual tone (2130Hz+2750Hz for 100ms) wakes up the caller ID CPE device for caller ID transmission. Not associated with ringing.

No Ring with Ring Pules (RP) Wake Up (WU)

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A short ring pulse (between 200ms and 300ms) wakes up the caller ID CPE device. Not associated with ringing.

No Ring with Line Reversal (LR) Wake Up (WU) A line reversal (polarity change in DC voltage of the line, wakes up the caller ID device. Not associated with ringing.

Table 10: Ring cadence and call progress parameters Parameter Description

callerid-dig-protocol

Identifies the subscriber line protocol used for signaling on-hook caller id information.Different countries define different caller id signaling protocols to support caller identification. Supported protocols are Frequency Shift Keying (FSK) and Dual-Tone Multi-Frequency (DTMF). Customized ring cadences. Ring cadence is required for the L line package. Normal ring cadence

r0-ring-cadence to r7-ring-cadence ring cadence


ring-splash-cadence power-ring frequency

the frequency at which the sinusoidal voltage must travel down the twisted pair to make terminal equipment ring. Different countries define different electrical characteristics to make terminal equipment ring. The f##Hz setting corresponds to a power ring frequency of ## Hertz. For example, the f25Hz setting corresponds to a power ring frequency of 25 Hertz. The f33Point33Hz setting corresponds to a power ring frequency of 33.33 Hertz. The method of caller ID for on-hook caller ID. The Frequency Shift Keying (FSK) containing the Caller ID information is sent between the first and second ring pattern. For the dtas, rpas, and lr methods, the FSK containing the Caller ID information is sent before the first ring pattern. For the dtas method, the FSK is sent after the Dual Tone Alert Signal. For the rpas method, the FSK is sent after a Ring Pulse. For the lr method, the Line Reversal occurs first, then the Dual Tone Alert Signal, and finally the FSK is sent.
The delay between the first ringing pattern and the start of the transmission of the FSK containing the Caller ID information. It is only used when CIDMode is duringRingingETS. The default value is 550 ms. The delay between the end of the Dual Tone Alert Signal (DT-AS) and the start of the transmission of the FSK containing the Caller ID information. It is only used when CIDMode is dtas or lr. The default value is 50 ms.

clid-mode

delay-before-clid-afterring

delay-before-clid-afterdtas

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Table 10: Ring cadence and call progress parameters Parameter Description The delay between the end of the Ring Pulse Alert Signal (RP-AS) and the start of the transmission of the FSK containing the Caller ID information. It is only used when CIDMode is rpas. The default value is 650 ms. The delay between the end of the complete transmission of the FSK containing the Caller ID information and the start of the first ring pattern. It is only used when CIDMode is dtas, rpas or lr. The default value is 250 ms. The delay between the end of the Line Reversal and the start of the Dual Tone Alert Signal (DT-AS). It is only used when CIDMode is lr. The default value is 250 ms. The delay between the end of the Dual Tone Alert Signal (DT-AS) and the start of the transmission of the FSK containing the VMWI information. It is only used when VmwiMode is dtas or lr. The default is 50 ms. The delay between the end of the Ring Pulse Alert Signal (RP-AS) and the start of the transmission of the FSK containing the VMWI information. It is only used when VmwiMode is rpas. The default is 650 ms. The delay between the end of the Line Reversal and the start of the Dual Tone Alert Signal (DT-AS) for VMWI information. It is only used when VmwiMode is lr. The default is 250 ms.

delay-before-clid-afterrpas

delay-after-clid-beforering

delay-before-dtas-afterlr delay-before-vmwi-afte r-dtas

delay-before-vmwi-afte r-rpas

vmwi-delay-before-dtas -after-lr

Customizing ring cadence and changing call progress parameters


To customize ring cadence or change call progress parameters for SIP and MGCP VoIP calls. For MGCP systems, The MGCP switch determines which ring cadence to use. For SIP systems, normal ring cadence or ring splash are used. For SIP PLAR systems, the class 5 switch determines the ring cadences, directly for GR303 and indirectly for V5.2 calls.
zSH> update voice-call-progress-config 0 Please provide the following: [q]uit. callerid-sig-protocol: -----------> {fsk}: dtmf r0-ring-cadence: -----------------> {r-2000:on-4000:off}: r1-ring-cadence: -----------------> {r-2000:on-4000:off}: r2-ring-cadence: -----------------> {r-800:on-400:off-800:on-4000:off}: r3-ring-cadence: -----------------> {r-400:on-200:off-400:on-200:off-800:on-4000:off}: r4-ring-cadence: -----------------> {r-300:on-200:off-1000:on-200:off-300:on-4000:off}: r5-ring-cadence: -----------------> {nr-500:on}: r6-ring-cadence: -----------------> {r-2000:on-4000:off}: r7-ring-cadence: -----------------> {r-2000:on-4000:off}: ring-cadence: --------------------> {r-2000:on-4000:off}: ring-splash-cadence: -------------> {nr-500:on}:

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power-ring-frequency: ------------> {f20hz}: clid-mode: -----------------------> {duringringingets}: delay-before-clid-after-ring: ----> {550}: delay-before-clid-after-dtas: ----> {50}: delay-before-clid-after-rpas: ----> {650}: delay-after-clid-before-ring: ----> {250}: delay-before-dtas-after-lr: ------> {250}: vmwi-mode: -----------------------> {dtasets}: delay-before-vmwi-after-dtas: ----> {50}: delay-before-Vmwi-after-rpas: ----> {650}: vmwi-delay-before-dtas-after-lr: -> {250}: .................... Save changes? [s]ave, [c]hange or [q]uit: s Record updated.

Call progress tones for Canada


The MALC now includes support for call progress tones and ring frequencies for Canada as specified in ITU E.180 Supp.2. Common call progress tones are dial tone, busy tone, call waiting tone, ring tone, and special information tone. To change the call progress tones to Canada:
zSH> update system 0 Please provide the following: [q]uit. syscontact: -----------> {}: sysname: --------------> {MALC}: syslocation: ----------> {Oakland}: enableauthtraps: ------> {disabled}: setserialno: ----------> {0}: zmsexists: ------------> {false}: zmsconnectionstatus: --> {inactive}: zmsipaddress: ---------> {172.24.84.80}: configsyncexists: -----> {false}: configsyncoverflow: ---> {false}: configsyncpriority: ---> {high}: configsyncaction: -----> {noaction}: configsyncfilename: ---> {172.24.200.191_4_1129917707613}: configsyncstatus: -----> {synccomplete}: configsyncuser: -------> {cfgsync}: configsyncpasswd: -----> {** private **}: ** read-only ** numshelves: -----------> {1}: shelvesarray: ---------> {}: numcards: -------------> {3}: ipaddress: ------------> {172.24.200.191}: alternateipaddress: ---> {0.0.0.0}: countryregion: --------> {us}: canada primaryclocksource: ---> {0/0/0/0/0}: ringsource: -----------> {internalringsourcelabel}: revertiveclocksource: -> {true}: voicebandwidthcheck: --> {false}:

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....................Save changes? [s]ave, [c]hange or [q]uit: s New record saved.

Emergency StandAlone (ESA) SIP and TDM support


For VoIP SIP or SIP PLAR and POTS to GR303 voice connections, the MALC provides emergency calling services during network or equipment failures that cause a loss of connection to the configured TDM switch or SIP server. For VoIP SIP or SIP PLAR connections, the ESA feature enables numbers configured within ESA dialplans to communicate with any residences or businesses specified as the destination of the dialplans in an ESA cluster of MALC devices. For POTS to GR303 connections, the ESA feature enables numbers configured within the same dialplan using the same MALC device to communicate with any residences or businesses sharing that dialplan. Incoming calls from outside the ESA group and outgoing calls to numbers outside the SIP dialplan receive a fast-busy signal. When ESA is activated, call features, such as call waiting, are not supported. Note: After a loss of connection to the SIP server, there may be a delay up to 5 minutes before ESA notification is received and ESA features are accessible. There maybe a similar delay before resuming normal calling after the outage is restored. Figure 26 illustrates ESA support for VoIP SIP or SIP PLAR connections.

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Figure 26: ESA for VoIP SIP or SIP PLAR connections

IP Packet Transport

Figure 27 illustrates ESA support for POTS to GR303 or V5.2 connections.

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Figure 27: ESA for POTS to GR303 connections

ESA

Configuring VoIP ESA clusters


To configure ESA clusters for VoIP connections, configure a VoIP server and create a dialplan for the VOIP server. Also, create an ESA dialplan for each of the MALC devices participating in the ESA cluster. For each ESA dialplan, enter the IP addresses of the desired MALC in the sip-ip-address field and change the dialplan-type to esa. Also, if desired, change the destination-name to the target MALC. When in ESA mode, the MALC sequentially checks the configured dialplans for a matching string starting with the lowest number to the highest number dialplan. If a match is found, the call connection process is initiated immediately. If a match is not found, the next sequential dialplan is checked until all configured dialplans have been checked. Calls with unmatched strings are then terminated. It is recommended to configure lower number dialplans for more frequently called nodes and higher number dialplans for less frequently called nodes.

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Emergency StandAlone (ESA) SIP and TDM support

This example creates VoIP server 1/1 and creates SIP dialplan O for the VoIP server. SIP dialplan 1 is used on MALC 1 with IP address 172.24.94.219; SIP dialplan 2 is used on MALC 2 with IP address 172.24.94.222. SIP dialplan 3 is used on MALC 3 with IP address 172.24.94.223.It also sets the match-string to x to accept all numbers, the number of digits to 7, and the dialplan type to ESA. This dialplan enables ESA calls to connect to other subscribers within the same MALC. Additional dialplans are created for each of the neighboring MALC nodes. Note: A SIP dialplan of type normal should be configured and connected to a VoIP SIP server for non-ESA calls.
zSH> new voip-server-entry 1/1 Please provide the following: [q]uit. zhoneVoipServerAddrType: ----------> {ipv4}: zhoneVoipServerAddr: --------------> {}: 172.16.60.1 zhoneVoipServerUdpPortNumber: -----> {5060}: zhoneVoipServerId: ----------------> {generic}: protocol: -------------------------> {sip}: sendCallProceedingTone: -----------> {false}: rtcpEnabled: ----------------------> {false}: rtcpPacketInterval: ---------------> {5000}: interdigitTimeOut: ----------------> {10}: ipTos: ----------------------------> {0}: systemDomainName: -----------------> {}: expires-invite-value: -------------> {3600} expires-register-value: -----------> {3600} expires-header-method: ------------> {register} session-expiration: ---------------> {0} session-min-SE: -------------------> {-606348325} session-caller-request-timer: -----> {no} session-callee-request-timer: -----> {no} session-caller-specify-refresher: -> {omit} session-callee-specify-refresher: -> {uac} omitsession-callee-specify-refresher:-> (uac) dtmf-mode:------------------------> (inband) .................... Save new record? [s]ave, [c]hange or [q]uit: s Record created. zSH> new sip-dialplan 0 match-string: ----------------> sip-ip-address: --------------> destination-name: ------------> number-of-digits: ------------> prefix-strip: ----------------> prefix-add: ------------------> dialplan-type: ---------------> voip-server-entry-index: -----> override-interdigit-timeout: -> zSH> new sip-dialplan 1 match-string: ---------------->

{x} {0} 172.16.60.1 {}VoIP Server {0}7 {0} {} {normal} {0} 1 {0}

{x}

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sip-ip-address: --------------> destination-name: ------------> number-of-digits: ------------> prefix-strip: ----------------> prefix-add: ------------------> dialplan-type: ---------------> voip-server-entry-index: -----> override-interdigit-timeout: ->

{0} 172.24.94.219 {}MALC#1 {0}7 {0} {} {normal}esa {0} {0}

Create additional SIP dialplans for so ESA calls can connect to subscribers on other MALC devices. This dialplan allows ESA calls to connect to subscribers on MALC 2.
zSH> new sip-dialplan 2 match-string: ----------------> sip-ip-address: --------------> destination-name: ------------> number-of-digits: ------------> prefix-strip: ----------------> prefix-add: ------------------> dialplan-type: ---------------> voip-server-entry-index: -----> override-interdigit-timeout: -> {x} {0} 172.24.94.222 {} MALC#2 {0}7 {0} {} {normal}esa {0} {0}

This dialplan allows ESA calls to connect to subscribers on MALC 3.


zSH> new sip-dialplan 3 match-string: ----------------> sip-ip-address: --------------> destination-name: ------------> number-of-digits: ------------> prefix-strip: ----------------> prefix-add: ------------------> dialplan-type: ---------------> voip-server-entry-index: -----> override-interdigit-timeout: -> {x} {0} 172.24.94.223 {} MALC#3 {0}7 {0} {} {normal}esa {0} {0}

Configuring ESA for 911 calls


To configure ESA for VoIP connections for 911 calls, create an ESA dialplan with a match-string of 911 and the IP address of the MALC shelf in the sip-ip-address field. Also, change the number of digits and prefix-strip to 3. The prefix-strip setting deletes the dialed 911 numbers. Enter the desired phone number to be called in the prefix-add field. This number must be a valid voicefxs line in the same MALC shelf. Change the dial-plan type to esa. This example creates a SIP dialplan called 911on the MALC with IP address 172.24.94.219. It replaces the dialed 911 number with the phone number 7281001 and changes the dialplan type to ESA.
zSH> new sip-dialplan 911 match-string: ----------------> sip-ip-address: --------------> {}911 {0} 172.24.94.219

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destination-name: ------------> number-of-digits: ------------> prefix-strip: ----------------> prefix-add: ------------------> dialplan-type: ---------------> voip-server-entry-index: -----> override-interdigit-timeout: ->

{} {0}3 {0}3 {}7280004 {normal}esa {0} {0}

Verifying ESA
To verify whether ESA support is in-use, enter the voice status command. This command lists the voice port, destination, call state, and ESA state along with other status information.
zSH> voice status port term state ------------1-6-1-0/voicefxs UP 1-6-2-0/voicefxs UP 1-6-3-0/voicefxs UP destination call state hook -------------------- ---VoIP:69:VoIP EndPtIdx-152 No call ON VoIP:69:VoIP EndPtIdx-154 No call ON GR303:IG-one:CRV-3 No call ON ring ESA -----NoRing ON NoRing ON NoRing N/A

Configuring TDM ESA Voice add command for TDM ESA


The voice add command allows the configuration of a Emergency Stand Alone (ESA) endpoint for POTS to GR303 voice connections. For these POTS voice connections, the MALC enables a VoIP endpoint for emergency calling services during network or equipment failures that cause a loss of connection to a configured GR-303 interface. The ESA feature enables numbers configured within the same ESA dialplan using the same MALC shelf to communicate with any residences or businesses sharing that dialplan. Incoming calls from outside the ESA group and outgoing calls to numbers outside the SIP dialplan receive a fast-busy signal.
Syntax Voice add pots subscriberinterface gr303|v52 remoteinterface voip [ESAinterface] Example 1 zSH> voice add pots 1-4-4-0/voicefxs gr303 1/4 esa ethernet1/ip dn 7821004 Created subscriber-voice 1/378/5 Created subscriber-voice-pots 88 Created gr303-ig-crv 1/4 Created subscriber-voice-gr303 89 Created subscriber-voice 1/3/15 Created subscriber-voice-voip 90 zSH> zSH> voice show

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Subscriber end-point Remote end-point ----------------------------- ----------------------------1-4-4-0/voicefxs GR303 one/4 1-4-4-0/voicefxs ethernet1/ip DN 7281004 1 Total number of voice connections : 2

Voice Prof Id -------------1/378/5 1/3/15

STA --ENA ENA

zSH> voice delete pots 1-4-4-0/voicefxs Deleted gr303-ig-crv 1/4 Deleted subscriber-voice 1/378/5 and its subscriber-voice-xxx profiles Deleted subscriber-voice 1/3/15 and its subscriber-voice-xxx profiles zSH> voice show Total number of voice connections: 0 zSH> Example 2 zSH> voice show esa ethernet1/ip DN 7281005 INPUT: profile type: subscriber-voice-voip logical address: LGId: 69 EndPtIdx: 103 profile address: 103 subscriber-voice INFO: voice-connection-type = VoIPTOPOTS voice-endpoint1-addr-index = 103 voice-endpoint2-addr-index = 101 voice-admin-status = Enabled subscriber-voice addr: subId: 1 LGId: 3 subVoiceId: 19 MATCHING: profile type: subscriber-voice-pots logical address: LGId: 195 PotsNumber: 1 profile address: 101 Notes The voice show and voice delete commands display and remove the ESA

endpoint along with the primary voice connections.

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T.38 fax

T.38 fax
T.38 fax service enables fax messages to be transported across VoIP networks between G3 fax terminals. When configured for SIP or SIP PLAR and T.38, MALC provides a T.38 fax relay service between two devices configured for the same VoIP protocol. If one side of the T.38 connection is not configured for T.38 support, the fax call reverts to g.711 pass through when this option is configured. Otherwise, the fax may not go through. By default, T.38 fax service is disabled. This section contains the following procedures;

T.38 fax using SIP T.38 fax using SIP PLAR to PSTN T.38 using SIP PLAR to POTS fax Note: The T.38 fax service can also be configured on VoIP connections using the voicegateway card.

T.38 fax using SIP


The MALC supports T.38 fax streams across a VoIP network. The MALC can be connected to another MALC or a VoIP IAD device. Figure 28 illustrates the T.38 fax streams using SIP between MALC devices, and between a MALC and aVoIP IAD configured for T.38.
Figure 28: SIP T.38 between MALC devices or VoIP IAD

POTS Fax MALC

VoIP T.38 Fax Stream using SIP MALC

POTS Fax

POTS Fax MALC

VoIP T.38 Fax Stream using SIP VoIP IAD

POTS Fax

Configuring T.38 fax service


The MALC supports T.38 service options for either t38udptl or t38none. The t38udptl options enables T.38 service using UDP IP packets. The t38none option disables the service. To enable T.38 fax service for SIP connections:

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Note: The t38rtp option is currently not supported.

Specify the T.38 option when configuring a voice call with the voice add command for the POTS and SIP connections. The subscriber-voice-voip profile settings are updated based on the command options.
voice add pots 1-voice add pots 1-5-3-0/voicefxs voip 1/6 ethernet1/ip dn 5105330203 name 5105330203 codec g729a t38fax t38udptl reg 1

Caution: Avoid changes or deletions to the ip-interface-record profile after creating a voice connection on that interface. The subscriber-voice-voip profile can also be updated to enable the T.38 fax service. After updating the subscriber-voice-voip profile, the voice subscriber must be disabled and then re-enabled for the changes to be effective.
zSH> list subscriber-voice subscriber-voice 1/2/26 subscriber-voice 1/2/27 2 entries found. zSH> update subscriber-voice 1/2/26 Please provide the following: [q]uit. voice-connection-type: --------> {voiptopots}: ** read-only ** voice-endpoint1-addr-index: ---> {52}: ** read-only ** voice-endpoint2-addr-index: ---> {51}: ** read-only ** voice-connection-description: -> {}: voice-admin-status: -----------> {enabled}: disabled huntgroup: --------------------> {false}: ** read-only ** features: ---------------------> {hookflash+onhooksignaling+callwait}: .................... Save changes? [s]ave, [c]hange or [q]uit: s Record updated. zSH> update subscriber-voice-voip 52 (the endpoint1-addr-index in subscriber-voice profile.) Please provide the following: [q]uit. voip-username: -------------> {9990002}: directory-number: ----------> {9990002}: ip-interface-index: --------> {ethernet2-2/ip}: preferred-codec: -----------> {g729a}: g711-fallback: -------------> {true}: frames-per-packet: ---------> {4}: g726-byte-order: -----------> {bigendian}: voip-password: -------------> {}: voip-plar: -----------------> {false}:** read-only ** voip-plar-dest-ipaddrtype: -> {ipv4}: voip-plar-dest-ipaddr: -----> {}: voip-plar-udp-port: --------> {5060}: registration-server: -------> {0}:

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t38-fax: -------------------> {t38none}:t38udptl .................... Save new record? [s]ave, [c]hange or [q]uit: s Record created. zSH> update subscriber-voice 1/2/26 Please provide the following: [q]uit. voice-connection-type: --------> {voiptopots}: ** read-only ** voice-endpoint1-addr-index: ---> {52}: ** read-only ** voice-endpoint2-addr-index: ---> {51}: ** read-only ** voice-connection-description: -> {}: voice-admin-status: -----------> {disabled}: enabled huntgroup: --------------------> {false}: ** read-only ** features: ---------------------> {hookflash+onhooksignaling+callwait}: .................... Save changes? [s]ave, [c]hange or [q]uit: s Record updated.

T.38 fax using SIP PLAR to PSTN


The MALC supports T.38 fax streams across a VoIP network using SIP PLAR. In this configuration, the fax signal is sent to the MALC with the voicegateway card, and then forwarded to the PSTN as either an GR-303 or V5.2 fax signal. Figure 29 illustrates the T.38 fax stream using SIP PLAR between MALC devices with the voicegateway card connected to a class V switch and the PSTN.
Figure 29: SIP PLAR T.38 between MALC and MALC Voicegateway to PSTN

POTS Fax MALC

VoIP PSTN T.38 Fax Stream using SIP PLAR MALC with voicegateway Fax

Class V switch

Configuring T.38 using SIP PLAR to PSTN


The MALC supports T.38 fax streams across a VoIP network using SIP PLAR. In this configuration, one MALC converts the POTS signal to VoIP and sends the T.38 fax signal across the VoIP network. Another MALC with the voicegateway card receives the T.38 signal and sends it to the Class V switch for processing across the PSTN. 1 On the MALC converting the POTS to VOIP signal, specify the T.38 option when configuring a voice call with the voice add command for the POTS and SIP connections. The subscriber-voice-voip profile settings are updated based on the command options.

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voice add pots 1-voice add pots 1-5-3-0/voicefxs voip 1/6 ethernet1/ip dn 5105330203 name 5105330203 codec g729a t38fax t38udptl reg 1

On the MALC with the voicegateway card, use the voice add command to configure the connection for VoIP to GR303 or VoIP to V5.2. For GR303 connections:

voice add voip voip-1-3/ip dn 7350025 name m143-301 plar 172.24.200.143 t38fax t38udptl gr303 1/25

For V5.2 connections:


voice add voip voip-1-3/ip dn 5107777428 name caller plar 172.24.200.143 t38fax t38udptl v52 4/99 type pots

T.38 using SIP PLAR to POTS fax


The MALC supports T.38 fax streams across a VoIP network using SIP PLAR to another MALC device in the network. In this configuration, the fax signal is sent to the MALC with the voicegateway card, and then forwarded to the Class V switch, which routes the call back through the VoIP network to another MALC. Figure 30 illustrates the T.38 fax stream using SIP PLAR between a MALC connected to a MALC with the voicegateway card. When the signal reaches the MALC with the voicegateway card, the Class V switch routes the signal to another MALC in the VoIP network to process the POTS fax.
Figure 30: SIP PLAR T.38 between MALC and MALC Voicegateway to POTS fax

POTS Fax MALC

VoIP T.38 Fax Stream using SIP PLAR MALC with voicegateway

GR303/ V5.2

Class V switch

MALC POTS

Fax

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T.38 fax

Configuring T.38 using SIP PLAR to POTS fax


1 On the MALC devices converting the POTS to VOIP signal, specify the T.38 option when configuring a voice call with the voice add command for the POTS and voice connections. The subscriber-voice-voip profile settings are updated based on the command options.

voice add pots 1-voice add pots 1-5-3-0/voicefxs voip 1/6 ethernet1/ip dn 5105330203 name 5105330203 codec g729a t38fax t38udptl reg 1

On the MALC with the voicegateway card, use the voice add command to configure the T.38 connection for VoIP to GR303 or VoIP to V5.2. For GR303 connections:

voice add voip voip-1-3/ip dn 7350025 name 7350025 plar 172.24.200.143 t38fax t38udptl gr303 1/25

For V5.2 connections:


voice add voip voip-1-3/ip dn 5107777428 name 5107777428 plar 172.24.200.143 t38fax t38udptl v52 4/99 type pots

Caution: Avoid changes or deletions to the ip-interface-record profile after creating a voice connection on that interface.

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CONFIGURING THE VOICE GATEWAY


This chapter describes how to configure the MALC voice gateway. It includes:

Overview, page 269 Configuring voice gateway connections, page 270 POTS cards running POTS to VoIP in same chassis as voicegateway card, page 293 Configuring SIP-PRI media gateway, page 297

Overview
The MALC voice gateway card (VG-T1/E1-32-2S) enables voice connections from an ATM and IP voice network to a TDM local exchange switch using GR-303 or V5.2 protocols. The following connection types are supported.

Voice over IP: SIP-PLAR to GR-303 or V5.2 Voice over ATM: BLES to GR-303 or V5.2 ELCP to V5.2

Figure 31: Voice gateway overview

TDM
GR303 V5.2

Packet

MALC with voice gateway

Local Exchange Switch

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The MALC voice gateway card can also serve as an aggregation point for multiple downstream MALC or IAD systems aggregating multiple services (PON, SHDSL, T1/E1 ATM) or multiple voice lines on residential services (ADSL, ADSL2+, VDSL) over a single uplink connection. All the ATM/IP uplink cards can be used to connect VoIP traffic to the voice gateway card.
Figure 32: Voice gateway aggregation point

IAD

IP Network
MALC with voice gateway Local Exchange Switch

The MALC now supports a feature bit used to optimize voice gateway performance. When this feature bit is enabled, the MALC supports up to 4 redundant voice gateway cards.

Configuring voice gateway connections


The voice gateway card configuration involves validating voice configuration prerequisites, configuring the voice VPIs and VCIs as required, and adding the desired voice connections. Procedures for verifying the voice connections are also provided. These configuration procedures require the MALC uplink and voice gateway cards to be physically installed and running in the current system with properly configured card profiles. Note: The voice gateway card requires MALC software version 1.11.1 or higher on the uplink cards. This section contains procedures for:

Verifying voice configuration prerequisites on page 271 VoIP to voice gateway connections on page 272 Subtended MALC POTS VoIP voice gateway connections on page 277

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AAL2 voice gateway connections on page 280 Subtended MALC ISDN or POTS voice gateway connections on page 290

Verifying voice configuration prerequisites


Before configuring the voice gateway connection, use the following procedures to ensure that the configuration prerequisites have been configured. 1 Use the slots command to verify the desired uplink and voice gateway card installation and status. This example shows the Uplink-T1/E1-ATM/ TDM/IP-16 card running in slot 1 and the MALC voice gateway card running in slot 3. Other line cards can be inserted and running in other slots as desired.
zSH> slots 1: MALC UPLINK T1/E1 TDMF (RUNNING) 3: MALC T1E132VG (RUNNING) 13: MALC GSHDSL (RUNNING) 17: MALC ADSL + POTS AC6 (RUNNING)

Check the system settings to ensure the appropriate country coding and other system-level settings are configured. See Updating system settings on page 198 for details. Create and activate a V5.2 or GR-303 interface group (IG). See Configuring GR-303 or V5.2 Interface Groups on page 177 for details. Note: Up to 8 interface groups can be supported on each voice gateway card.

4 5

Ensure there is an active system clock source. See the MALC Hardware Installation Guide. Create a new atm-traf-descr with a unique index for a voice connection. For ELCP to V5.2 voice connections, both the VPL and VCL traffic descriptors are required. See Configuring ATM on page 157 for more information on ATM traffic descriptors and parameters.

zSH> new atm-traf-descr 1 index can be any value Please provide the following: [q]uit. td_type: -----------------> {atmNoClpNoScr}: atmClpNoTaggingScrCdvt td_param1: ---------------> {0}: 4826 PCR . td_param2: ---------------> {0}: 4825 SCR td_param3: ---------------> {0}: 20 MBS td_param4: ---------------> {0}: 15000 CDVT td_param5: ---------------> {0}: cac-divider: -------------> {1}: 10 td_service_category: -----> {ubr}: rtvbr for voice td_frame_discard: --------> {false}: usage-parameter-control: -> {true}: ....................

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Save new record? [s]ave, [c]hange or [q]uit: s New record saved.

VoIP to voice gateway connections


This section contains the following procedures:

Overview on page 272 Creating an unnumbered interface for VoIP on page 273 Configuring voice gateway host for VoIP connections Configuring voice connections for VoIP to GR303 Configuring voice connections for VoIP to V5.2 Configuring T.38 service on the voicegateway connections Deleting voice gateway host and voice connection

Overview
For VoIP to TDM voice connections, the MALC voice gateway card supports multiple incoming VoIP voice lines going out a single TDM connection to a local voice switch.
Figure 33: Voice gateway VoIP to TDM

IP Network
MALC with voice gateway Local Exchange Switch

For VoIP to TDM connections on the voice gateway card, VoIP packets destined for the voice gateway card enter through one of the MALC uplink card interfaces (GigE, SONET, IP) and are terminated on the voice gateway card. The voice signal is converted to TDM T1/E1 channels and sent to the local switch for TDM voice processing. For traffic coming from the local switch, the TDM voice signals are converted to VoIP packets by the voice gateway card and routed back out the MALC uplink card to the configured VoIP destination. Configuring a VoIP to TDM voice gateway connection involves configuring the voice gateway for a VoIP host and adding a VoIP to TDM voice connection.

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Note: Only one IP interface can be configured on the voice gateway card.

Creating an unnumbered interface for VoIP


Before configuring a VoIP to TDM connection, create a new ip-interface-record and unnumbered interface. 1 To create an IP interface record, use the new ip-interface-record command.
zSH> new ip-interface-record vg/ip vpi: ---------------> {0}: vci: ---------------> {0}: rdindex: -----------> {1}: dhcp: --------------> {none}: ** read-only ** addr: --------------> {0.0.0.0}: 10.10.10.1 netmask: -----------> {0.0.0.0}: 255.255.255.0 bcastaddr: ---------> {0.0.0.0}: 10.10.10.255 destaddr: ----------> {0.0.0.0}: farendaddr: --------> {0.0.0.0}: mru: ---------------> {1500}: reasmmaxsize: ------> {0}: ingressfiltername: -> {}: egressfiltername: --> {}: pointtopoint: ------> {no}: mcastenabled: ------> {yes}: ipfwdenabled: ------> {yes}: mcastfwdenabled: ---> {yes}: natenabled: --------> {no}: bcastenabled: ------> {yes}: ingressfilterid: ---> {0}: egressfilterid: ----> {0}: ipaddrdynamic: -----> {static}: dhcpserverenable: --> {false}: subnetgroup: -------> {0}: unnumberedindex: ---> {0}: mcastcontrollist: --> {}: vlanid: ------------> {0}: maxVideoStreams: ---> {0}: .................... Save new record? [s]ave, [c]hange or [q]uit: s Could not find an appropropriate interface on which to bind the IP record. Could not automatically bind this IP Interface New record saved.

To create an unnumbered IP interface record, use the new ip-unnumbered-record command.


zSH> new ip-unnumbered-record 1 ipUnnumberedInterfaceName: -> { }: vg/ip

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.................... Save new record? [s]ave, [c]hange or [q]uit: s New record saved.

Configuring voice gateway host for VoIP connections


The voice gateway VoIP to GR-303 and V5.2 configurations require configuring the voice gateway as an AAL5 proxy on the voice gateway card before adding a VoIP to GR-303 or VoIP to V5.2 voice connection. 1 Locate the if-translate record.
zSH> list if-translate 1-3-1-0/aal5proxy if-translate 1-3-1-0/aal5proxy 1 entry found.

Verify that the desired ATM traffic descriptor is configured.


zSH> list atm-traf-descr atm-traf-descr 1 1 entry found.

Use the voicegateway add command to create the voice gateway host using the available physical interface or slot number of the voicegateway card and traffic descriptor.
zSH> voicegateway add 3 td 1 10.10.10.2 zSH> voicegateway add 1-3-1-0/aal5proxy td 1 10.10.10.2

This adds an IP host on the voice gateway card in slot 3 and assigns the IP address 10.10.10.2. The connection uses traffic descriptor 1 and an AAL5 physical interface of aal5proxy. Use the new voip-server-entry command to add the voip-server-entry 255/255 for SIP binding group and multiple SIP server support if that voip-server-entry profile does not already exist. Note: The voicegateway add command automatically creates the required ATM VCLs if they do not already exist. 4 Use the voicegateway show command to display the voice gateway host using the slot number of the voicegateway card or the AAL5 physical interface.
T Host Address S 10.10.10.2

zSH> voicegateway show 3 Rd/Address Interface Group ----------------------------------------------------1 10.10.10.1 1-3-1-0-aal5proxy-0-32 0/32 0 zSH> voicegateway show 1-3-1-0/aal5proxy Rd/Address Interface Group ----------------------------------------------------1 10.10.10.1 1-3-1-0-aal5proxy-0-32 0/32 0

T Host Address S 10.10.10.2

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Configuring voice gateway connections

Configuring voice connections for VoIP to GR303


After configuring the voice gateway as an AAL5 proxy on the voice gateway card, the voice connection for VoIP to GR-303 requires adding a VoIP to GR-303 voice connection. This example uses the IP interface voip-1-3/ip with the number 735-0025, name m143-301, destination IP address 172.24.200.143, GR-303 switch protocol, IG 1 and CRV 25. This command also sets the VoIP password in the subscriber-voice-voip profile to password. 1 Use the voice add command to add a VoIP to GR-303 voice connection between the voice gateway card and the switch. An optional password is used.

zSH> voice add voip voip-1-3/ip dn 7350025 name m143-301 plar 172.24.200.143 gr303 1/25 pw password Created subscriber-voice 1/330/48 Created subscriber-voice-voip 173 Created gr303-ig-crv 1/25 Created subscriber-voice-gr303 174

Display the configured voice connection with the voice show command.

ZSH>voice show Subscriber end-point Remote end-point Voice Prof Id STA ---------------------------- ----------------------------- -------------voip-1-3/ip DN 7350025 GR303 one/25 1/330/25 ENA Total number of voice connections : 1

Configuring voice connections for VoIP to V5.2


After configuring the voice gateway as an AAL5 proxy on the voice gateway card, the voice connection VoIP to V5.2 requires adding a VoIP to V5.2 voice connection. 1 Use the voice add command to add a VoIP to V5.2 voice connection between the voice gateway card and the switch using IG 4 and user port 99. By default, the registration server is set to 0 and the preferred codec is G.711a. An option password is used.

zSH> voice add voip voip-1-3/ip dn 5107777428 name caller pw password v52 4/ 99 type pots Created subscriber 1/2 Created subscriber-voice 1/2/1 Created subscriber-voice-voip 11 Created v52-user-port 4/99/2 Created subscriber-voice-v52 12

Display the configured voice connection with the voice show command.

zSH> voice show Subscriber end-point Remote end-point Voice Prof Id STA ------------------------------ ------------------------ -------------- --voip-1-3/ip DN 5107777428 V52 four/99/pots 1/2/1 ENA Total number of voice connections : 1

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Configuring T.38 service on the voicegateway connections


Specify the T.38 option when configuring a voice call with the voice add command. The subscriber-voice-voip profile settings are updated based on the command options.

voice add voip voip-1-3/ip dn 7350025 name m143-301 plar 172.24.200.143 t38fax t38udptl gr303 1/25 voice add voip voip-1-3/ip dn 5107777428 name caller plar 172.24.200.143 t38fax t38udptl v52 4/99 type pots

Caution: Avoid changes or deletions to the ip-interface-record profile after creating a voice connection on that interface. The subscriber-voice-voip profile can also be updated to enable the T.38 fax service. After updating the subscriber-voice-voip profile, the voice subscriber must be disabled and then re-enabled for the changes to be effective.
zSH> list subscriber-voice subscriber-voice 1/2/26 subscriber-voice 1/2/27 2 entries found. zSH> update subscriber-voice 1/2/26 Please provide the following: [q]uit. voice-connection-type: --------> {voiptopots}: ** read-only ** voice-endpoint1-addr-index: ---> {52}: ** read-only ** voice-endpoint2-addr-index: ---> {51}: ** read-only ** voice-connection-description: -> {}: voice-admin-status: -----------> {enabled}: disabled huntgroup: --------------------> {false}: ** read-only ** features: ---------------------> {hookflash+onhooksignaling+callwait}: .................... Save changes? [s]ave, [c]hange or [q]uit: s Record updated. zSH> update subscriber-voice-voip 52 (the endpoint1-addr-index in subscriber-voice profile.) Please provide the following: [q]uit. voip-username: -------------> {9990002}: directory-number: ----------> {9990002}: ip-interface-index: --------> {ethernet2-2/ip}: preferred-codec: -----------> {g729a}: g711-fallback: -------------> {true}: frames-per-packet: ---------> {4}: g726-byte-order: -----------> {bigendian}: voip-password: -------------> {}: voip-plar: -----------------> {false}:** read-only ** voip-plar-dest-ipaddrtype: -> {ipv4}: voip-plar-dest-ipaddr: -----> {}:

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voip-plar-udp-port: --------> {5060}: registration-server: -------> {0}: t38-fax: -------------------> {t38none}:t38udptl .................... Save new record? [s]ave, [c]hange or [q]uit: s Record created. zSH> update subscriber-voice 1/2/26 Please provide the following: [q]uit. voice-connection-type: --------> {voiptopots}: ** read-only ** voice-endpoint1-addr-index: ---> {52}: ** read-only ** voice-endpoint2-addr-index: ---> {51}: ** read-only ** voice-connection-description: -> {}: voice-admin-status: -----------> {disabled}: enabled huntgroup: --------------------> {false}: ** read-only ** features: ---------------------> {hookflash+onhooksignaling+callwait}: .................... Save changes? [s]ave, [c]hange or [q]uit: s Record updated.

Deleting voice gateway host and voice connection


To remove the configured voice gateway connection, use the voicegateway delete command with the slot number of the voicegateway card or the AAL5 physical interface.
zSH> voicegateway delete 3 zSH> voicegateway delete 1-3-1-0/aal5proxy

Deleting voice connection


To remove the configured voice connection, use the voice delete command. Do not attempt to manually remove or edit the related subscriber-voice profiles.
zSH> voice delete voip ethernet1/ip DN 5107777428 Deleted v52-user-port 4/99/2 Deleted subscriber-voice 1/2/1 and its subscriber-voice-xxx profiles

Subtended MALC POTS VoIP voice gateway connections


This section contains the following procedures:

Overview on page 278 Configuring subtended POTS to VoIP voice connection on page 278 Deleting subtended voice connection on page 279

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Overview
Using a subtended MALC, with an optional IAD, enables the MALC voice gateway card to function as an aggregation point for multiple downstream systems aggregating multiple services (PON, SHDSL, T1/E1 ATM) or multiple voice lines on residential services (ADSL, ADSL2+, VDSL) over a single MALC uplink and voice gateway connection.
Figure 34: Voice gateway VoIP to TDM with subtended IAD

IAD

IP Network
MALC with voice gateway Local Exchange Switch

In a subtended MALC configuration, subscriber traffic passes through the subtended MALCs uplink card and is sent as VoIP packets to the MALC with the voice gateway card. VoIP packets destined for the voice gateway card enter through one of the MALC uplink card interfaces (GigE, SONET, IP) and are terminated on the voice gateway card. The voice signal is converted to TDM T1/E1 channels and sent to the local switch for TDM voice processing. For traffic coming from the local switch, the TDM voice signals are converted to VoIP packets by the voice gateway card and routed back out the MALCs uplink card, sent to the subtended MALC, and then routed to the configured VoIP destination. To configure the voice gateway card with a downstream MALC system, first ensure the voice gateway card is configured for a VoIP to TDM connection. See VoIP to voice gateway connections on page 272. Then, use the voice add command to add a POTS to VoIP voice connection on the subtended MALC. This voice connection transports the voice signals between the subtended MALC and the VoIP interface on the voice gateway card.

Configuring subtended POTS to VoIP voice connection


Configure a POTS to VoIP voice connection on the subtended MALC to send its VoIP signals to the voice gateway card. The subtended MALC must have a working Ethernet IP connection and an available IP route to the voice

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gateway IP address. Also, a subscriber line POTS card should be installed with the required ports enabled. 1 Create a non-subscriber VCL 0/34 on the MALC uplink card. The VCL 0/ 34 is required for internal voice processing and must be configured once for each uplink card that will connect to a voice connection from a subtended MALC.
zSH> new atm-vcl 1-1-2-0-dspproxy/atm/0/34 vpi: -----------------------------> {0} vci: -----------------------------> {34} admin_status: --------------------> {up} receive_traffic_descr_index: -----> {1} transmit_traffic_descr_index: ----> {1} vcc_aal_type: --------------------> {aal5} vcc_aal5_cpcs_transmit_sdu_size: -> {9188} vcc_aal5_cpcs_receive_sdu_size: --> {9188} vcc_aal5_encaps_type: ------------> {llcencapsulation} vcl_cast_type: -------------------> {p2p} vcl_conn_kind: -------------------> {pvc} fault-detection-type: ------------> {disabled} traffic-container-index: ---------> {0}

2 3

Reboot the MALC. Use the voice add command on the subtended MALC to add the POTS to VoIP connection. This example connects a POTS subscriber with interface 1-3-1-0/voicefxs to VoIP interface ethernet1/ip with number 735-0025, name of m143-301, and destination IP address 10.177.1.2.

zSH> voice add pots 1-3-1-0/voicefxs voip ethernet1/ip dn 7350025 name m143-301 plar 10.177.1.2 Created subscriber-voice 1/2/1 Created subscriber-voice-pots 1004 Created subscriber-voice-voip 1005

Verify the voice connection with the voice show command.

zSH> voice show Subscriber end-point Remote end-point Voice Prof Id STA ------------------------------ ------------------------------ -------------- --1-3-1-0/voicefxs ethernet1/ip DN 7350025 1/2/1 ENA Total number of voice connections : 1

Deleting subtended voice connection


To remove the configured voice connection, use the voice delete command.
zSH> voice delete pots 1-3-1-0/voicefxs Deleted subscriber-voice 1/2/1 and its subscriber-voice-xxx profiles

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AAL2 voice gateway connections


This section contains the following information:

Overview on page 280 Configuring voice gateway for VoATM BLES to GR-303 (VC-switched) on page 282 Configuring voice gateway for VoATM BLES to GR303 (VP-switched) on page 283 Configuring voice gateway for VoATM BLES to V5.2 (VC-switched) on page 284 Configuring voice gateway for VoATM BLES to V5.2 (VP-switched) on page 285 Configuring voice gateway for VoATM ELCP to V5.2 (VC-switched) ISDN signal on page 286 Configuring voice gateway for VoATM ELCP to V5.2 (VP-switched) on page 288 Configuring subtended AAL2 voice connection on page 291

Overview
For VoATM to TDM voice connections, the MALC voice gateway supports multiple ATM voice lines over the voice gateway card to a local TDM (GR-303 or V5.2) switch.
Figure 35: Voice gateway VoATM to TDM

ATM
MALC with voice gateway Local Exchange Switch

For VoATM traffic, ATM traffic destined for the voice gateway card enters through one of the MALC uplink cards ATM interfaces and is terminated on the voice gateway card. The ATM voice signals are converted to TDM T1/E1 channels and sent to the local TDM switch for processing. For traffic coming from the local switch, the TDM voice signals are converted to VoATM signals by the voice gateway card and sent back out the MALC uplink card to configured ATM destination.

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Note: The voice gateway card does not support connection admission control (CAC). All uplink cards can be used for connecting VoATM traffic to the voice gateway card. The voice gateway card supports VoATM BLES to GR-303 or V5.2 and VoATM ELCP to V5.2 connection types. The MALC voice gateway card enables a combination of VP and VC switching for flexible VoATM voice gateway configurations and maximum subscriber support.

VC-switched In VC-switching, VCs are switched independently of each other based on VPI and VCI value. The VP range of 0-7 is reserved for VC-switching on the voice gateway card. The VCs in each VC-switched VP must start with 32 and can contain any number up to the maximum number of 448 VCs. The maximum number of VCs that can be allocated to an individual VC-switched VPI is determined by the zhoneAtmVpiMaxVci parameter in the atm-vpi profile.

VP-switched In VP-switching, VCs are switched collectively in groups or Virtual Paths (VPs) based on VPI value. The VP range of 16 to 63 is reserved for VP-switching on the voice gateway card. Up to 48 VPs can be switched from the MALC uplink card to a voice gateway card. The VCs in each VP-switched VP must start with 32 and can contain any number up to the maximum number of 7,680 VCs. The maximum VCI value that can be allocated to an individual VP-switched VP is determined by the zhoneAtmMaxVciPerVp parameter in the atm-vpi profile. For example, if this parameter is set to 1023 for VPI 16, a VC with VPI/VCI 16/1024 will not be allowed even if it is the only VC configured on the voice gateway card. The sum of this parameter in all VP-switched atm-vpi profiles on the voice gateway card cannot exceed 7,680. The voice vpladd command automatically increments the assigned VP starting at 16.

Figure 36 illustrates the voice gateway support for VC-switching and VP-switching.

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Figure 36: Voice gateway VoATM VP/VC support

VP0-7 (VC Switched) VC32-x VC32-x VC32-x


Total VCs in VC-switched VPs is 448.

VP0 VP ... VP7


Maximum number of VCs in each VC-switched VP is set using the atm-vpi profile paramter ZhoneAtmVpiMaxVci.

TDM

VP16-63 (VP Switched) VC32-x VC32-x VC32-x


Total VCs in VP-switched VP is 7680

VP16 VP ... VP63


Maximum VCI value that can be allocated in each VP-switched VP is set using the atm-vpi profile paramter ZhoneAtmMaxVciPerVp.

Total VCs supported on the voice gateway card is 8128.

The voice gateway card supports up to 8,128 virtual circuits (VCs). Each VC represents a single IAD and supports from 1 to 8 physical or logical telephones. With 32 DS1 ports, a maximum of 768 (32DS1s x 24 DS0s) voice subscribers are supported. With 32 E1 ports, a maximum or 960 (32 E1s x 31 DS0s) voice subscribers are supported. For VC-switching, configuring the voice gateway AAL2 voice connection involves using the voicegateway add command to add the required VP, VC, and AAL2 to GR-303 or V5.2 voice connection on the voice gateway card. For VP-switching, configuring the voice gateway AAL2 voice connection involves using the following commands:

voice addvpi command builds the VPs on the uplink card interface and voice gateway aal2proxy. voice addvpl command builds the VP links and ATM cross connect voice add command builds the shared VC and establishes the AAL2 to GR-303 or V5.2 voice connection on the voice gateway card.

Configuring voice gateway for VoATM BLES to GR-303 (VC-switched)


This procedure explains how to configure a VC-switched VoATM BLES to GR-303 voice connection on the voice gateway card. 1 Use the voice add command on the voice gateway card to add the voice connection for the specified VC and CID to the GR-303 IG.
zSH> voice add aal2 1-4-1-0/ds1 vc 0/139 cid 48 gr303 1/131 Created subscriber-voice 1/266/6 Created aal2-cid-profile 340/0/32/48

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Created subscriber-voice-aal2 171 Created gr303-ig-crv 1/131 Created subscriber-voice-gr303 172

This adds an ATM to GR-303 voice connection with the AAL2 interface 1-4-1-0 and assigns the virtual connection VPI 0, VCI 139 and CID 48. The TDM connection uses GR-303 protocol and interface group 1 with CRV 131. 2 Display the ATM to GR-303 voice connection with the voice show command.

zSH> voice show Subscriber end-point Remote end-point Voice Prof Id STA -------------------------- --------------------------- ------------- --1-4-1-0/ds1 VC 0/139 CID 48 GR303 one/131 1/266/6 ENA Total number of voice connections : 1 zSH>

Configuring voice gateway for VoATM BLES to GR303 (VP-switched)


This procedure explains how to configure a VP-switched VoATM BLES to V5.2 voice connection on the voice gateway card. Use the voice vpiadd and voice vpladd commands to build the ATM VP between the uplink card VP and the voice gateway card aal2proxy using the same VC. Then, use the voice add command to build the VCL on the aal2proxy with the same VC that was configured on the uplink card. The allowed VP range on aal2proxy is 16 to 63. Note: In addition to the GR-303 interface group, the required VPL traffic descriptor and VCL traffic descriptor must be built before performing this procedure. 1 Use the voice vpiadd command to build the ATM VPI for the uplink card and the voice gateway card aal2proxy.
zSH> voice vpiadd uplink/atm 0 gr303 1 501 Created atm-vpi 1-3-3-0-aal2proxy/atm/16 Created atm-vpi uplink1/atm/0

This example uses the uplink interface uplink/atm with VP 0. The MALC uplink cards support up 256 (0-255) VPs. The voice call type is GR-303 with IG 1. The maximum number of VCs allocated for the specified VP-switched VPI is 512. 2 Reboot the system to install the configured VPIs.
zSH>systemreboot

Use the voice vpladd command to build the VPLs and cross connects between the uplink card and aal2proxy.
zSH>voice vpladd uplink/atm 0 td 1/1 gr303 1

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Created atm-vpl 1-3-3-0-aal2proxy/atm/16 Created atm-vpl uplink1/atm/0 Created atm-cc 6

This command builds atm-vpl uplink1/atm/0 on the uplink card using traffic descriptor tx and rx 1/1 with atm-vpl 1-3-3-0-aal2proxy/atm/16 on the voice gateway card. VP 16 is the first available VP in the allowed VP range on the voice gateway card. 4 Use the voice add command on the voice gateway card to add the voice connection for the desired VC and CID to the GR-303 IG.
zSH> voice add atm uplink1/atm vp 0/101 td 1/1 cid 1 alaw gr303 1/1 type pots Created subscriber-voice 1/51/2 Created aal2-cid 109/16/101/1/1 Created subscriber-voice-aal2 15 Created gr303-cid 1/1/2 Created subscriber-voice-gr303 16

This command creates a POTS to GR-303 voice connection between the uplink interface uplink1 with VP 0 and VC 101 to the voice gateway card CID 1 with VP 16 and shared VC 101. 5 Display the ATM to GR-303 voice connection with the voice show command.

zSH> voice show Subscriber end-point Remote end-point Voice Prof Id STA -------------------------- --------------------------- ------------- --1-1-1-0/sonet VC 0/101 port 1 GR303 100 100/11/35/1 ENA Total number of voice connections : 1 zSH>

Configuring voice gateway for VoATM BLES to V5.2 (VC-switched)


This procedure explains how to configure a VC-switched VoATM BLES to V5.2 voice connection on the voice gateway card. 1 Use the voice add command on the voice gateway card to add the voice connection for the specified VC and user port to the V5.2 IG.

zSH> voice add aal2 uplink1/atm vc 6/39 td 1/1 cid 16 v52 4/39 type pots Created subscriber 1/57 Created subscriber-voice 1/57/1 Created atm-vcl uplink1/atm/6/39 Created atm-vcl 1-5-3-0-aal2proxy/atm/0/32 Created atm-cc 2 Created aal2-vcl-profile 1-5-3-0-aal2proxy/atm/0/32 Created aal2-cid-profile 99/0/32/16Created subscriber-voice-aal2 1 Created v52-user-port 4/39/2 Created subscriber-voice-v52 2

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This adds an ATM to V5.2 voice connection with the uplink1 AAL2 interface and assigns the virtual connection VPI 6, VCI 39 and CID 16. 2 Display the ATM to V5.2 voice connection with the voice show command.

zSH> voice show Subscriber end-point Remote end-point Voice Prof Id STA ------------------------------ ------------------------ -------------- --1-1-1-0/sonet VC 6/39 CID 16 V52 four/39/pots 1/57/1 ENA

Delete the voice connection.


zSH> voice delete aal2 1-1-1-0/sonet VC 6/39 CID 16 Deleted aal2-cid-profile 99/0/32/16 Deleted v52-user-port 4/39/2 Deleted subscriber-voice 1/57/1 and its subscriber-voice-xxx profiles Deleted atm-vcl 99/0/32 Deleted atm-vcl 15/6/39 Deleted atm-cc 2

Configuring voice gateway for VoATM BLES to V5.2 (VP-switched)


This procedure explains how to configure a VoATM BLES to V5.2 voice connection on the voice gateway card. Use the voice vpiadd and voice vpladd commands to build the ATM VP between the uplink card VP and the voice gateway card aal2proxy using the same VC. Then, use the voice add command to build the VCL on the aal2proxy using the same VC that was configured on the uplink card. The allowed VP range on aal2proxy is 16 to 63. Note: In addition to the V5.2 interface group, the required VPL traffic descriptor and VCL traffic descriptor for ELCP lines must be built before performing this procedure. 1 Use the voice vpi add command to build the ATM VPI for the uplink card VP and the voice gateway card aal2proxy.
zSH>voice vpiadd uplink/atm 0 v52 1 2000 Created atm-vpi 1-3-3-0-aal2proxy/atm/16 Created atm-vpi uplink1/atm/0

This example uses the uplink interface uplink/atm with VP 0. The MALC uplink cards support up 256 (0-255) VPs. The voice call type is V5.2 with IG 1. The maximum VCs allocated to the specified VP-switched VPI is 2048. 2 Reboot the system to install the configured VPIs.
zSH>systemreboot

Use the voice vpladd command to build the VPLs and cross connects.

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zSH>voice vpladd uplink/atm 0 td 1/1 v52 1 Created atm-vpl 1-3-3-0-aal2proxy/atm/16 Created atm-vpl uplink1/atm/0 Created atm-cc 6

This command builds atm-vpl uplink1/atm/0 on the uplink card using traffic descriptor 1 and atm-vpl 1-3-3-0-aal2proxy/atm/16 on the voice gateway card. VP 16 is the first available VP in the allowed VP range on the voice gateway card. 4 Use the voice add command with the VPL option on the voice gateway card to add the voice connection for the specified VC and CID/port to the V5.2 IG.
zSH> voice add atm uplink1/atm vp 0/101 td 1/1 port 1 alaw v52 1/1 type pots Created subscriber-voice 1/51/2 Created aal2-port-profile 109/16/101/1/1 Created subscriber-voice-elcp-aal2 15 Created v52-user-port 1/1/2 Created subscriber-voice-v52 16

This command creates a voice connection between the uplink interface uplink1 with VP 0 and VC 101 to the voice gateway card user port 1. 5 Display the ATM ELCP to V5.2 voice connection with the voice show command.

zSH> voice show Subscriber end-point Remote end-point Voice Prof Id STA -------------------------- --------------------------- ------------- --1-1-1-0/sonet VC 0/101 port 1 V52 100 100/11/35/1 ENA Total number of voice connections : 1

Configuring voice gateway for VoATM ELCP to V5.2 (VC-switched) ISDN signal
This procedure explains how to configure an ISDN signal over a VoATM ELCP to V5.2 voice connection on the voice gateway card. Note: The elcp-trap parameter is available in the aal2-vcl profile. This parameter allows operators to turn ELCP traps on/off for particular AAL2 VCLs. All users on the provisioned AAL2 VCL will have their ELCP trap alerts turned either on or off. 1 Use the cc add command on the voice gateway card to add the cross connect for the specified VC and ISDN connection information using IG 4 and user port 41.
zSH> cc add elcp uplink2/atm vc 6/41 td 1/1 port 1 alaw v52 4/41 type isdn cpath 4

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This adds a cross connect between the uplink2 interface and the voice gateway card using VC 7/111. The voice protocol is V5.2 and the connection type is ISDN with Cpath 5. 2 Use the voice add command to specific the voice connection.
zSH> voice add elcp uplink1/atm vc 6/41 td 1/1 port 1 alaw v52 4/41 type isdn cpath 4 Created subscriber-voice 1/57/2 Created atm-vcl uplink1/atm/6/41 Created atm-vcl 1-5-3-0-aal2proxy/atm/0/32 Created atm-cc 2 Created aal2-vcl-profile 1-5-3-0-aal2proxy/atm/0/32 Created aal2-elcp-port 99/0/32/1/2 Created subscriber-voice-elcp-aal2 3 Created v52-user-port 4/41/3 Created subscriber-voice-v52 4 Created subscriber-voice 1/57/3 Created subscriber-voice-elcp-aal2 5 Created subscriber-voice-v52 6 Created subscriber-voice 1/57/4 Created subscriber-voice-elcp-aal2 7 Created subscriber-voice-v52 8

Display the ISDN to V5.2 voice connection with the voice show command.

zSH> voice show Subscriber end-point Remote end-point Voice Prof Id STA ------------------------- ----------------------------- ------------ --1-1-1-0/sonet VC 6/41 port 1 V52 four/41/isdn 1/57/2 ENA 1-1-1-0/sonet VC 6/41 port 1 V52 four/41/isdn 1/57/3 ENA 1-1-1-0/sonet VC 6/41 port 1 V52 four/41/isdn 1/57/4 ENA Total number of voice connections : 3

Configuring voice gateway for VoATM ELCP to V5.2 (VC-switched) POTS signal
This procedure explains how to configure an POTS signal over a VoATM ELCP to V5.2 voice connection on the voice gateway card. Note: The elcp-trap parameter is available in the aal2-vcl profile. This parameter allows operators to turn ELCP traps on/off for particular AAL2 VCLs. All users on the provisioned AAL2 VCL will have their ELCP trap alerts turned either on or off. 1 Use the cc add command on the voice gateway card to add the cross connect for the specified VC and POTS connection information. using IG 4 and user port 40.
zSH> cc add elcp uplink2/atm vc 6/40 td 1/1 port 1 alaw v52 4/40 type pots

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This adds a cross connect between the uplink2 interface and the voice gateway card using VC 7/111. The voice protocol is V5.2 and the connection type is POTS. 2 Use the voice add command to specific the voice connection.
zSH> voice add elcp uplink1/atm vc 6/40 td 1/1 port 1 alaw v52 4/40 type pots Created subscriber-voice 1/57/5 Created atm-vcl uplink1/atm/6/40 Created atm-vcl 1-5-3-0-aal2proxy/atm/0/32 Created atm-cc 2 Created aal2-vcl-profile 1-5-3-0-aal2proxy/atm/0/32 Created aal2-elcp-port 99/0/32/1/1 Created subscriber-voice-elcp-aal2 9 Created v52-user-port 4/40/2 Created subscriber-voice-v52 10

Display the POTS to V5.2 voice connection with the voice show command.

zSH> voice show Subscriber end-point Remote end-point Voice Prof Id STA ------------------------------ ------------------------- -------------- --1-1-1-0/sonet VC 6/40 port 1 V52 four/40/pots 1/57/5 ENA Total number of voice connections : 1

Configuring voice gateway for VoATM ELCP to V5.2 (VP-switched)


This procedure explains how to configure a VoATM ELCP to V5.2 voice connection on the voice gateway card. Note: The elcp-trap parameter is available in the aal2-vcl profile. This parameter allows operators to turn ELCP traps on/off for particular AAL2 VCLs. All users on the provisioned AAL2 VCL will have their ELCP trap alerts turned either on or off. Use the voice vpiadd and voice vpladd commands to build the ATM VP between the uplink card VP and the voice gateway card aal2proxy using the same VC. Then, use the voice add command to build the VCL on the aal2proxy using the same VC that was configured on the uplink card. The allowed VP range on aal2proxy is 16 to 63. Note: In addition to the V5.2 interface group, the required VPL traffic descriptor and VCL traffic descriptor for ELCP lines must be built before performing this procedure. 1 Use the voice vpi add command to build the ATM VPI for the uplink card VP and the voice gateway card aal2proxy.
zSH>voice vpiadd uplink/atm 0 v52 1 2004 Created atm-vpi 1-3-3-0-aal2proxy/atm/20

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Created atm-vpi uplink1/atm/7

This example uses the uplink interface uplink/atm with VP 0. The MALC uplink cards support up 256 (0-255) VPs. The voice call type is V5.2 with IG 1. The maximum number of VCs allocated to the specified VP-switched VPI is 2048. 2 Reboot the system to install the configured VPIs.
zSH>systemreboot

Use the voice vpladd command to build the VPLs and cross connects.
zSH>voice vpladd uplink/atm 0 td 1/1 v52 1 Created atm-vpl 1-3-3-0-aal2proxy/atm/20 Created atm-vpl uplink1/atm/7 Created atm-cc 6

This command builds atm-vpl uplink1/atm/0 on the uplink card using traffic descriptor 1/1 and atm-vpl 1-3-3-0-aal2proxy/atm/16 on the voice gateway card. VP 16 is the first available VP in the allowed VP range on the voice gateway card. 4 Use the voice add command with the VPL option on the voice gateway card to add the voice connection for the specified VP/VC, V5.2 IG and user port.
zSH> voice add elcp uplink1/atm vp 0/101 td 1/1 port 1 alaw v52 1/1 type pots Created subscriber-voice 1/51/2 Created aal2-elcp-port 109/16/101/1/1 Created subscriber-voice-elcp-aal2 15 Created v52-user-port 1/1/2 Created subscriber-voice-v52 16

Display the ATM ELCP to V5.2 voice connection with the voice show command.

zSH> voice show Subscriber end-point Remote end-point Voice Prof Id STA -------------------------- --------------------------- ------------- --1-1-1-0/sonet VC 0/101 port 1 V52 100 100/11/35/1 ENA Total number of voice connections : 1 zSH>

Deleting voice connection


To remove the configured voice connection, use the voice delete command.
zSH> voice delete elcp 1-1-1-0/sonet VC 6/41 port 1 Deleted aal2-elcp-port 99/0/32/12 Deleted v52-user-port 4/41/3

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Deleted subscriber-voice 1/57/2 and its subscriber-voice-xxx profiles Deleted subscriber-voice 1/57/3 and its subscriber-voice-xxx profiles Deleted subscriber-voice 1/57/4 and its subscriber-voice-xxx profiles Deleted atm-vcl 99/0/32 Deleted atm-vcl 15/6/41

To remove the configured VP, use the voice vp delete command.


zSH> voice vpdelete uplink/atm/0

Subtended MALC ISDN or POTS voice gateway connections


In a subtended MALC configuration, subscriber traffic passes through the subtended MALC uplink card and is sent as AAL2 packets to the MALC with the voice gateway card. The MALC functions as an aggregation point for multiple downstream MALC systems aggregating multiple ATM services (PON, SHDSL, T1/E1 ATM) or multiple ATM voice lines on residential services (ADSL, ADSL2+, VDSL) over a single uplink and voice gateway connection.
Figure 37: Voice gateway VoATM to TDM with subtended IAD

IAD

ATM
MALC with voice gateway Local Exchange Switch

In subtended MALC configuration, subscriber traffic passes through the subtended MALC uplink card and is sent as AAL2 cells to the MALC with the voice gateway card. AAL2 cells destined for the voice gateway card enter through one of the MALC uplink card interfaces (GigE, SONET, IP) and are terminated on the voice gateway card. The voice signal is converted to TDM T1/E1 channels and sent to the local switch for TDM voice processing. For traffic coming from the local switch, the TDM voice signals are converted to AAL2 cells by the voice gateway card and sent back out the MALC uplink card to the subtended MALC and then to the configured AAL2 destination.

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Before configuring the AAL2 to TDM voice connection on the subtended MALC, ensure the voice gateway AAL2 to GR-303 connection is configured correctly. See AAL2 voice gateway connections on page 280. Use these procedures to configure the voice connection on the subtended MALC. For AAL2 connections to a voice gateway card, the subtended MALC supports subscriber voice connections for ISDN to AAL2 and POTS to AAL2.

Configuring subtended AAL2 voice connection Deleting subtended voice connection

Configuring subtended AAL2 voice connection


Configure the subtended MALC AAL2 to sends its AAL2 signals to the voice gateway. The AAL2 shelf should have a working ATM connection and an available ATM circuit to the voice gateway card. Also, either a subscriber line POTS or ISDN card should be installed with all the required ports enabled. For subtended voice connections, the MALC voice card supports POTS to AAL2 or ISDN to AAL2 voice connections. For more details about configuring voice connections, see Configuring Voice on page 197. For these voice configurations, the ATM traffic descriptor is required before the voice connection can be configured. The ISDN to AAL2 type of voice connection requires an ULC card.

Configuring POTS or ISDN to AAL2 voice connections


The voice add command automatically creates the required VPI/VCI, CID, and uplink VCL. 1 Create a new atm-traf-descr with a unique index for a voice connection. See Configuring ATM on page 157 for more information on ATM traffic descriptors and parameters.
zSH> new atm-traf-descr 1 index can be any value Please provide the following: [q]uit. td_type: -----------------> {atmNoClpNoScr}: atmClpNoTaggingScrCdvt td_param1: ---------------> {0}: 4826 PCR . td_param2: ---------------> {0}: 4825 SCR td_param3: ---------------> {0}: 20 MBS td_param4: ---------------> {0}: 15000 CDVT td_param5: ---------------> {0}: cac-divider: -------------> {1}: 10 td_service_category: -----> {ubr}: rtvbr for voice td_frame_discard: --------> {false}: usage-parameter-control: -> {true}: .................... Save new record? [s]ave, [c]hange or [q]uit: s New record saved.

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Use the voice add command on the subtended MALC to configure an ISDN to AAL2 or POTS to AAL2 voice connection. For ISDN to AAL2:

zSH> voice add isdn 1-3-1-0/isdnu aal2 uplink1/atm vc 0/38 td 1/1 cid 127 Created subscriber-voice 1/5/4 Created subscriber-voice-isdn 65 Created aal2-cid-profile 38/0/38/127 Created subscriber-voice-aal2 66 Created subscriber-voice 1/5/5 Created subscriber-voice-isdn 67 Created subscriber-voice-aal2 68 Created subscriber-voice 1/5/6 Created subscriber-voice-isdn 69 Created subscriber-voice-aal2 70

This example adds an ISDN to AAL2 connection over an ATM VCL with a VPI/VCI of 0/38, traffic descriptor 1, user port 1, and a CID of 16. For POTS to AAL2:
zSH> voice add pots 1-5-24-0/voicefxs aal2 uplink1/atm vc 0/39 td 1/1 cid 16 Created subscriber-voice 1/32/2 Created subscriber-voice-pots 10017 Created atm-vcl uplink1/atm/0/39 Created aal2-cid-profile 38/0/39/16 Created subscriber-voice-aal2 10018

This example adds a POTS to AAL2 connection over an ATM VCL with a VPI/VCI of 0/38, traffic descriptor 1, user port 1,and a CID of 16. 3 Display the voice connection with the voice show command.
Voice Prof Id -------------1/32/2 1/5/4 STA --ENA ENA

zSH> voice show Subscriber end-point Remote end-point ------------------------------ -----------------------------1-5-24-0/voicefxs 1-2-1-0/atmima VC 0/39 CID 16 1-3-1-0/isdnu 1-1-1-0/ds1 VC 0/38 CID 127 Total number of voice connections : 2

Deleting subtended voice connection


To remove a configured voice connection on the subtended MALC, use the voice delete command.
zSH> voice delete isdn 1-3-1-0/isdnu zSH> voice delete pots 1-5-24-0/voicefxs

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POTS cards running POTS to VoIP in same chassis as voicegateway card

POTS cards running POTS to VoIP in same chassis as voicegateway card


ADSL+POTS cards can run POTS to VoIP connections in the same chassis as the voicegateway card running VOIP to GR-303 or V5.2.

Voicegateway configuration
Voicegateway card configuration contains the same steps used when this card is configured in a separate system.

Creating an unnumbered interface for VoIP on page 273 Configuring voice gateway host for VoIP connections on page 274 Configuring voice connections for VoIP to GR303 on page 275 Configuring voice connections for VoIP to V5.2 on page 275

Creating an unnumbered interface for VoIP


Before configuring a VoIP to TDM connection, create a new ip-interface-record and unnumbered interface. 1 To create an IP interface record, use the new ip-interface-record command.
zSH> new ip-interface-record vg/ip vpi: ---------------> {0}: vci: ---------------> {0}: rdindex: -----------> {1}: dhcp: --------------> {none}: ** read-only ** addr: --------------> {0.0.0.0}: 10.10.10.1

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netmask: -----------> {0.0.0.0}: 255.255.255.0 bcastaddr: ---------> {0.0.0.0}: 10.10.10.255 destaddr: ----------> {0.0.0.0}: farendaddr: --------> {0.0.0.0}: mru: ---------------> {1500}: reasmmaxsize: ------> {0}: ingressfiltername: -> {}: egressfiltername: --> {}: pointtopoint: ------> {no}: mcastenabled: ------> {yes}: ipfwdenabled: ------> {yes}: mcastfwdenabled: ---> {yes}: natenabled: --------> {no}: bcastenabled: ------> {yes}: ingressfilterid: ---> {0}: egressfilterid: ----> {0}: ipaddrdynamic: -----> {static}: dhcpserverenable: --> {false}: subnetgroup: -------> {0}: unnumberedindex: ---> {0}: mcastcontrollist: --> {}: vlanid: ------------> {0}: maxVideoStreams: ---> {0}: .................... Save new record? [s]ave, [c]hange or [q]uit: s Could not find an appropropriate interface on which to bind the IP record. Could not automatically bind this IP Interface New record saved.

To create an unnumbered IP interface record, use the new ip-unnumbered-record command.


zSH> new ip-unnumbered-record 1 ipUnnumberedInterfaceName: -> { }: vg/ip .................... Save new record? [s]ave, [c]hange or [q]uit: s New record saved.

Configuring voice gateway host for VoIP connections


The voice gateway VoIP to GR-303 and V5.2 configurations require configuring the voice gateway as an AAL5 proxy on the voice gateway card before adding a VoIP to GR-303 or VoIP to V5.2 voice connection. 1 Locate the if-translate record.
zSH> list if-translate 1-3-1-0/aal5proxy if-translate 1-3-1-0/aal5proxy 1 entry found.

Verify that the desired ATM traffic descriptor is configured.

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POTS cards running POTS to VoIP in same chassis as voicegateway card

zSH> list atm-traf-descr atm-traf-descr 1 1 entry found.

3 4

Create and activate a V5.2 or GR-303 interface group (IG). See Configuring GR-303 or V5.2 Interface Groups on page 177 for details. Use the voicegateway add command to create the voice gateway host using the available physical interface or slot number of the voicegateway card and traffic descriptor.
zSH> voicegateway add 3 td 1 10.10.10.2 zSH> voicegateway add 1-3-1-0/aal5proxy td 1 10.10.10.2

This adds an IP host on the voice gateway card in slot 3 and assigns the IP address 10.10.10.2. The connection uses traffic descriptor 1 and an AAL5 physical interface of aal5proxy. Use the new voip-server-entry command to add the voip-server-entry 255/255 for SIP binding group and multiple SIP server support if that voip-server-entry profile does not already exist. The logical VoIP interface of voip-1-3/ip is created. Note: The voicegateway add command automatically creates the required ATM VCLs if they do not already exist. Voicegateway connections created from ZMS create a logical VoIP interface with AAL5 proxy in the name, 1-3-1-0-aal5proxy-0-32. 5 Use the voicegateway show command to display the voice gateway host using the slot number of the voicegateway card or the AAL5 physical interface.
T Host Address S 10.10.10.2

zSH> voicegateway show 3 Rd/Address Interface Group ----------------------------------------------------1 10.10.10.1 1-3-1-0-aal5proxy-0-32 0/32 0 zSH> voicegateway show 1-3-1-0/aal5proxy Rd/Address Interface Group ----------------------------------------------------1 10.10.10.1 1-3-1-0-aal5proxy-0-32 0/32 0

T Host Address S 10.10.10.2

Configuring voice connections for VoIP to GR303


After configuring the voice gateway as an AAL5 proxy on the voice gateway card, the voice connection for VoIP to GR-303 requires adding a VoIP to GR-303 voice connection. This example uses the IP interface voip-1-3/ip with the number 735-0025, name m143-301, destination IP address 172.24.200.143, GR-303 switch protocol, IG 1 and CRV 25. This command also sets the VoIP password in the subscriber-voice-voip profile to password.

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Use the voice add command to add a VoIP to GR-303 voice connection between the voice gateway card and the switch. Specify the logical VoIP interface (voi-1-3/ip) created with the voicegateway add command. For the PLAR connection, enter the IP address of the GigE port on the uplink card, 172.24.200.143. An optional password is used.

zSH> voice add voip voip-1-3/ip dn 7350025 name m143-301 plar 172.24.200.143 gr303 1/25 pw password Created subscriber-voice 1/330/48 Created subscriber-voice-voip 173 Created gr303-ig-crv 1/25 Created subscriber-voice-gr303 174

Display the configured voice connection with the voice show command.

ZSH>voice show Subscriber end-point Remote end-point Voice Prof Id STA ---------------------------- ----------------------------- -------------voip-1-3/ip DN 7350025 GR303 one/25 1/330/25 ENA Total number of voice connections : 1

Configuring voice connections for VoIP to V5.2


After configuring the voice gateway as an AAL5 proxy on the voice gateway card, the voice connection VoIP to V5.2 requires adding a VoIP to V5.2 voice connection. 1 Use the voice add command to add a VoIP to V5.2 voice connection between the voice gateway card and the switch using IG 4 and user port 99. By default, the registration server is set to 0 and the preferred codec is G.711a. An option password is used.

zSH> voice add voip voip-1-3/ip dn 5107777428 name caller pw password v52 4/ 99 type pots Created subscriber 1/2 Created subscriber-voice 1/2/1 Created subscriber-voice-voip 11 Created v52-user-port 4/99/2 Created subscriber-voice-v52 12

Display the configured voice connection with the voice show command.

zSH> voice show Subscriber end-point Remote end-point Voice Prof Id STA ------------------------------ ------------------------ -------------- --voip-1-3/ip DN 5107777428 V52 four/99/pots 1/2/1 ENA Total number of voice connections : 1

POTS to VOIP connections


Configure VoIP server and other VoIP feautures as specified in the Voice over IP (VoIP) connections on page 203. Then, create the POTS to VoIP

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connection sending calls to the IP address of the voicegateway card (in this example 10.10.10.2)

Creating POTS to VoIP connections


This example creates a POTS to VoIP subscriber. 1 Use the voice command to add the POTS to VoIP connection. This examples creates a connection with a directory number 510-522-0401 and the name smith. The POTS calls are mapped to the GigE port (ethernet-3) on the uplink card using VLAN100. The VoIP endpoint user name is case sensitive and must match the voice switch requirements, for example AAL/1 for MGCP with the Tekelec T6000 or TP/0001 for Megaco with Nortel CS2K. The PLAR address refers to the unnumbered IP address configured for the voicegateway card. Note: For MGCP and Megaco calls, the MALC ignores the preferred-codec setting and selects the codec from a list provided by the MGCP server or media gateway controller.
zSH> voice add pots 1-8-1-0/voicefxs voip ethernet3-100/ip DN 5105220401 name smith plar 10.10.10.2 reg 0 enable Created subscriber-voice 1/2/1 Created subscriber-voice-pots 1004 Created subscriber-voice-voip 1005

View the voice connection.


STA --ENA

zSH> voice show Subscriber end-point Remote end-point Voice Prof Id ------------------------------ ------------------------------ ----------1-8-1-0/voicefxs ethernet3-100/ip DN 5105220401 1/2/1 Total number of voice connections : 1

Caution: Avoid changes or deletions to the ip-interface-record profile after creating a voice connection on that interface. When running POTS and voicegateway cards in the same chassis, delete all local voice connections before deleting any cards. .

Configuring SIP-PRI media gateway


The MALC SIP-PRI media gateway feature enables you to convert TDM call signals from a T1/E1 PRI trunk into SIP (Session Initiation Protocol) VOIP packets. This feature leverages the emergence of SIP networking to unify multiple voice and packet network functions into one entity, providing a more tightly integrated voice and data network.

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The SIP-PRI feature can be configured over a T1 or E1 connection. On a T1 connection, SIP-to-PRI is configured with 23 B (Bearer) channels and one D (Data) channel. On an E1 connection, it is configured with 31 B channels and 1 D channel. On an T1 connection, it is configured with 23 bi-directional B (Bearer) channels and one D (Data) channel. SIP-to-PRI is unique in its ability to designate the D channel to handle all of the signaling and call control requirements and leave the remaining B channels free for any mix of voice and either virtual private line or circuit-switched data. SIP-to-PRI uses the Voice Gateway (VG) card on the MALC to connects two entities:

VOIP endpoint SIP-to-PRI endpoint

The VOIP endpoint can be a SIP phone or soft switch on the other side of the IP network. The SIP-to-PRI endpoint is the far side of the PBX switch where the TDM call signal is converted to an IP packet. The ISDN portion of the entity specifies the PBX endpoint to which the call is connected. The softswitch running VOIP translates the PBX phone number to the IP address targeted for the SIP phone, enabling a phone session over the Internet. The TDM call data that has been converted into IP packets now is sent to a soft switch instead of the traditional Class V switch. The soft switch treats this data as an VOIP endpoint, instead of a POTS call.

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Figure 38: SIP to PRI environment

Soft Switch IP Network

GigE

PRI o

ver T

1/E1

MALC with Uplink-2-GigE card and MALC-VG-T1/E1-32-2S card

lin k s

PBX switch SIP phone

SIP phone PBX phones

SIP-PRI configuration involves the following procedures:

Configuring ISDN signaling and DS1 profiles on page 301 Verifying voice configuration prerequisites on page 302 Configure SIP, voicegateway and voice connections on page 302

About the VoIP Endpoint


The primary task in creating a SIP-to-ISDN-PRI network is to create a VOIP endpoint on the MALC. Use both the vg add and voice add commands to create a VOIP endpoint on the MALC. The vg add command specifies an IP address that acts as the identifier for the card. This information is forwarded either to a soft switch or a SIP phone. This vg command creates connections between the SIP-to-PRI entity and the VOIP interface on the card. The voice add command includes a directory number, a name, an ISDN signalling profile index, and VoIP server index. The voice add command links the DN on a VOIP connection to a specific SIP-to-PRI port. It correlates a specified value on the VOIP network with a specific SIP-to-PRI. There are

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up to 32 physical ports on a VG card. Each port can represent a specific SIP-to-PRI.

ISDN Signaling profile


An ISDN signaling profile is used to specified the type of ISDN signaling used between the MALC and a PBX switch. The isdn-signaling record contains the setting for the switch type. A unique ISDN signaling profile should be configured for each voicegateway card in the MALC. The ISDN signaling profile is specified in the voice add command to map the PRIs on the PBX to a the voicegateway card. The ds1-group-number field in the ds1-profile record corresponds to the ISDN signaling profile record. Note: The MALC currently supports SIP to PRI for NI2 switches.

SIP trunks
SIP-to-ISDN-PRI involves the concept of SIP trunking. The logical voice channel established between carrier voice equipment and an enterprise voice device is called a SIP trunk. SIP trunks enable enterprises to create a single IP connection to carrier networks. An enterprise TDM PBX peers with a carrier SIP server (soft switch) with the appropriate groupings and security between them. SIP sets up and tears down voice calls to and from the enterprise PBX, converting the Q.931 ISDN call setup and release messages to SIP over the IP data network. A distinguishing characteristic of a PRI trunk is that it has multiple numbers associated with it. This enables you to aggregate more information than was possible using the standard POTS method that associated only one number per connection.

Hardware requirements
For SIP-to-PRI configurations on a MALC, you need a Voice Gateway (VG) card (for example, MALC-VG-T1/E1-32-2S) installed and an Uplink card with GigE support (for example, MALC-UPLINK-2-GE). Use a TelcoT1 cable to connect the ports on the PBX card to the ports on the VG card. The following messages appears on the MALC console when the ports are connected:
SEP 06 13:23:31: alert : 1/14/1025: alarm_mgr: alarmMgr.c: _laMgrLogMsg(): l=273 : tLineAlarm: 01:14:02 Critical T1 Up Line 1:14:2:0 (Alarm Cleared)

The showline and showlinestatus commands can also be used to verify the line status.

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Configuring ISDN signaling and DS1 profiles


1 Using the new isdn-signaling command, create an ISDN signaling profile for each type of ISDN signaling used between the MALC and the PBX. The MALC currently supports NI2 switch type. The following example creates a signaling value of 1. The isdn-signaling profile ID is used as the isdnsig value in the voice add voip command.
zSH> new isdn-signaling 1 Please provide the following: [q]uit. active-dchannel-location: -> {1}: ** read-only ** switch-type: --------------> {NONE(0)}: ni2 calling-address: ----------> {}: "" sub-address: --------------> {}: "" number-of-bchannels: ------> {24}: enable-traps: -------------> {disabled}: .................... Save new record? [s]ave, [c]hange or [q]uit: s New record saved.

Associate each DS1 profile to a ISDN signal profile based on the ds1-group-number in the ds1-profile. This association maps the PRIs on the PBX to the configured voice gateway card.

zSH> new ds1-profile 1-3-1-0/ds1 line-type: ----------------------> {esf} line-code: ----------------------> {b8zs} send-code: ----------------------> {sendnocode} circuit-id: ---------------------> {ds1} loopback-config: ----------------> {noloop} signal-mode: --------------------> {robbedbit} messageoriented fdl: ----------------------------> {fdlnone} dsx-line-length: ----------------> {dsx0} line-status_change-trap-enable: -> {enabled} channelization: -----------------> {enabledds0} ds1-mode: -----------------------> {csu} csu-line-length: ----------------> {csu00} clock-source-eligible: ----------> {eligible} noteligible transmit-clock-source: ----------> {looptiming} cell-scramble: ------------------> {true} coset-polynomial: ---------------> {true} protocol-emulation: -------------> {network} signal-type: --------------------> {loopstart} ds1-group-number: ---------------> {0} 1 (maps to ISDN signal profile) line-power: ---------------------> {disabled} timeslot-assignment: ------------> {0+1+2+3+4+5+6+7+8+9+10+11+12+13+14+15+16+17+18+19+20+21+22+23} .................... Save new record? [s]ave, [c]hange or [q]uit: s New record saved.

Verify D channel status.

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zSH> isdnsigctrp show dchan 1 unit 1: D-Channel UP [ifIndex 683]

Verifying voice configuration prerequisites


Before configuring the voice gateway connection, use the following procedures to ensure that the configuration prerequisites have been configured. 1 Use the slots command to verify the desired uplink and voice gateway card installation and status. This example shows the Uplink-T1/E1-ATM/ TDM/IP-16 card running in slot 1 and the MALC voice gateway card running in slot 3. Other line cards can be inserted and running in other slots as desired.
zSH> slots 1: MALC UPLINK T1/E1 TDMF (RUNNING) 3: MALC T1E132VG (RUNNING) 13: MALC GSHDSL (RUNNING) 17: MALC ADSL + POTS AC6 (RUNNING)

Check the system settings to ensure the appropriate country coding and other system-level settings are configured. See Updating system settings on page 198 for details. Ensure there is an active system clock source. See the MALC Hardware Installation Guide. Create a new atm-traf-descr with a unique index for a voice connection.

3 4

zSH> new atm-traf-descr 1 index can be any value Please provide the following: [q]uit. td_type: -----------------> {atmNoClpNoScr}: atmClpNoTaggingScrCdvt td_param1: ---------------> {0}: 4826 PCR . td_param2: ---------------> {0}: 4825 SCR td_param3: ---------------> {0}: 20 MBS td_param4: ---------------> {0}: 15000 CDVT td_param5: ---------------> {0}: cac-divider: -------------> {1}: 10 td_service_category: -----> {ubr}: rtvbr for voice td_frame_discard: --------> {false}: usage-parameter-control: -> {true}: .................... Save new record? [s]ave, [c]hange or [q]uit: s New record saved.

Configure SIP, voicegateway and voice connections


This procedure creates the voip-server-entry, SIP dialplans, and configures the voicegateway and voice connections.

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Create a VOIP server ID, using the new voip-server-entry command. A VOIP server entry describes a particular soft switch which handles a VOIP protocol like SIP, MGCP, or Megaco. The following example assumes an entry of 255/255 for a SIP binding group.

zSH> new voip-server-entry 255/255 Please provide the following: [q]uit. zhoneVoipServerAddrType: ----------> {ipv4}: zhoneVoipServerAddr: --------------> {}: 172.16.88.9 zhoneVoipServerUdpPortNumber: -----> {5060}: zhoneVoipServerId: ----------------> {generic}: metaswitch protocol: -------------------------> {sip}: sendCallProceedingTone: -----------> {false}: rtcpEnabled: ----------------------> {false}: rtcpPacketInterval: ---------------> {5000}: interdigitTimeOut: ----------------> {10}: ipTos: ----------------------------> {0}: systemDomainName: -----------------> {}: expires-invite-value: -------------> {3600}: expires-register-value: -----------> {3600}: expires-header-method: ------------> {register}: session-timer: --------------------> {off}: session-expiration: ---------------> {180}: session-min-session-expiration: ---> {180}: session-caller-request-timer: -----> {no}: session-callee-request-timer: -----> {no}: session-caller-specify-refresher: -> {omit}: session-callee-specify-refresher: -> {uac}: dtmf-mode: ------------------------> {rfc2833}: .................... Save new record? [s]ave, [c]hange or [q]uit: s New record saved.

Create a SIP dial plan using the new sip-dialplan command. A SIP dial plan maps incoming digits to a particular VOIP server. The dial plans allow the MALC to establish the VOIP end of the call. Based on the dial plan, the MALC also rejects digit strings that dont match those specified in the dial plan. The dial plan also enables communication between the SIP phone and the provisioned soft switch. The following example uses 1 as the ID of the SIP dial plan and specifies a voip-server-entry-index of 0 to reference the SIP binding group.

zSH> new sip-dialplan 1 Please provide the following: [q]uit. match-string: ----------------> {}: 0 sip-ip-address: --------------> {0.0.0.0}: 172.16.88.9 destination-name: ------------> {}: number-of-digits: ------------> {0}: 10 prefix-strip: ----------------> {0}: prefix-add: ------------------> {}: 510777395 dialplan-type: ---------------> {normal}: voip-server-entry-index: -----> {0}: (0 indicates SIP binding group) override-interdigit-timeout: -> {0}:

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.................... Save new record? [s]ave, [c]hange or [q]uit: s New record saved.

To create an IP interface record, use the new ip-interface-record command.


zSH> new ip-interface-record vg/ip vpi: ---------------> {0}: vci: ---------------> {0}: rdindex: -----------> {1}: dhcp: --------------> {none}: ** read-only ** addr: --------------> {0.0.0.0}: 10.10.10.1 netmask: -----------> {0.0.0.0}: 255.255.255.0 bcastaddr: ---------> {0.0.0.0}: 10.10.10.255 destaddr: ----------> {0.0.0.0}: farendaddr: --------> {0.0.0.0}: mru: ---------------> {1500}: reasmmaxsize: ------> {0}: ingressfiltername: -> {}: egressfiltername: --> {}: pointtopoint: ------> {no}: mcastenabled: ------> {yes}: ipfwdenabled: ------> {yes}: mcastfwdenabled: ---> {yes}: natenabled: --------> {no}: bcastenabled: ------> {yes}: ingressfilterid: ---> {0}: egressfilterid: ----> {0}: ipaddrdynamic: -----> {static}: dhcpserverenable: --> {false}: subnetgroup: -------> {0}: unnumberedindex: ---> {0}: mcastcontrollist: --> {}: vlanid: ------------> {0}: maxVideoStreams: ---> {0}: .................... Save new record? [s]ave, [c]hange or [q]uit: s Could not find an appropropriate interface on which to bind the IP record. Could not automatically bind this IP Interface New record saved.

To create an unnumbered IP interface record, use the new ip-unnumbered-record command.


zSH> new ip-unnumbered-record 1 ipUnnumberedInterfaceName: -> { }: vg/ip .................... Save new record? [s]ave, [c]hange or [q]uit: s New record saved.

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Assign an address and add values to the VG card by issuing the vg add command. The following example uses an VG IP address of 10.10.10.1 and a TD of 1.
zSH> vg add -v 14 td 1 10.10.10.1 Reading unnumbered profile 1 Reading ip-interface profile ifIndex 773 Reading unnumbered profile 2 Reading ip-interface profile ifIndex 1053 Using UNI record 2, ip interface record IfIndex 1053 Created proxy atm-vcl 1-1-1-0-aal5proxy VC 0/34 Created remote atm-vcl 1-14-1-0-aal5proxy VC 0/32 Created cross connect index 5 IP record IfIndex is 1054 Created near end ip-interface-record 1-14-1-0-aal5proxy-0-34/ip Stack bind near end i/f 1-14-1-0-aal5proxy-0-34/ip to RFC1483 1-1-1-0-aal5proxy successful Checking to see if 1-14-1-0-aal5proxy-0-34-1/ip exists. Interface 1-14-1-0-aal5proxy-0-34-1/ip does not exist IfIndex <= 0 IP record IfIndex is 1055 Stack binding of 1-14-1-0-aal5proxy-0-34-1/ip interface was successful. IP record IfIndex is 1056

Add the voice connection using the voice add voip command. This command creates the VOIP connection and enables the PRI-ISDN endpoint to communicate to the VOIP endpoint. The example assumes a directory number of 5107773950.
zSH> voice add voip voip-1-14/ip dn 5107773950 name 5107773950 reg 0 isdnsig 1 Created subscriber 1/642 Created subscriber-voice 1/642/1 Created subscriber-voice-voip 11 Created subscriber-voice-isdnsig 12

Display the subscriber voice ISDN signature by issuing the get subscriber-voice-isdnsig command. The following example assumes a subscriber voice ISDN signature of 12. The ISDN signature is displayed in the output of the voice add voip command.
zSH> get subscriber-voice-isdnsig 12 voice-isdn-sig-index: -> {1} directory-number: -----> {5107773950 hunt-group-index-1: ---> {0} hunt-group-index-2: ---> {0} hunt-group-index-3: ---> {0}

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Configuring the Voice Gateway

The SIP-to-PRI feature enables you to convert TDM call signals from a T1/E1 PRI trunk into SIP (Session Initiation Protocol) VOIP packets. It takes advantage of the emergence of SIP networking and how it can achieve new efficiencies in network use and application deployment.

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CONFIGURING GPON DATA,VOICE, AND VIDEO


This chapter explains how to configure voice, video, and data connections between the MALC-GPON-SC1 card and the Zhone zNID. It includes the following sections:

GPON configuration
The MALC supports configuring GPON voice, data, and video connections between the MALC-GPON-SC-1 card and the Zhone zNID CPE. By default, the following VLANs are configured on the Zhone zNID:

VLAN 100 for video traffic VLAN 200 for data traffic VLAN 300 for VoIP and management traffic

Example GPON configurations specifying the gponport 502:


zSH> host add 1-8-1-502/gponport vlan 100 dynamic 43 5 video 1/5 Adding host for 1-8-1-502/gponport zSH> bridge add 1-8-1-502/gponport downlink vlan 200 tagged Adding bridge on 1-8-1-502/gponport Created bridge-interface-record 1-6-1-564-gponport-200/bridge zSH> host add 1-8-1-502/gponport vlan 300 static 172.25.44.64 Adding host for 1-8-1-502/gponport

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DIAGNOSTICS AND ADMINISTRATION


This chapter describes tasks you might need to perform to administer the MALC. It includes the following information:

Log message format, page 310 SNMP, page 319 Statistics and alarms, page 322 System maintenance, page 337 Testing, page 353

Logging
This section explains how to use logging on the MALC. It includes:

Overview on page 309 Enabling/disabling logging on page 310 Log message format on page 310 Modifying logging levels on page 312 Using the log cache on page 313 Sending messages to a syslog server on page 314 Specifying different log formats for system and syslog messages on page 316 Example log messages on page 318 Log filter command on page 318

Overview
Logging enables administrators to monitor system events by generating system messages. It sends these message to:

A management session (either on the serial craft port or over a telnet session) A log file on the device

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A syslog server (optional)

The type of information sent in these messages can be configured using the log command. By default, the system sends the same type of information to all log message destinations. If you want to send different types of messages to the syslog daemon, use the syslog command.

Enabling/disabling logging
By default, log messages are enabled on the serial craft port. Use the log session command and the log serial command to enable/disable logging: The log session command enables/disables logging messages for that session only. If the user logs out, the logging setting returns to the default. To enable logging for the current session only:
zSH> log session on

To disable logging for the session:


zSH> log session off

The log serial command enables/disables logging messages for all sessions on the serial craft port. This setting persists across system reboots. To enable/ disable logging for the serial craft port:
zSH> log serial on

To disable logging for the serial port:


zSH> log serial off

Log message format


Log messages contain the following information:
Table 11: Default log message fields Option Description

Date Time Ticks Level Address Taskname

Date stamp of log message. Enabled by default. Time stamp of log message. Enabled by default. Current tick count. When the tick option is used, the date and time fields are not displayed. Logging level of the message. Enabled by default. The shelf and slot of the card causing the alarm, Name of task that generated the log message. This is generally useful only for Zhone development engineers. Enabled by default. Function that generated the log message. This is generally useful only for Zhone development engineers.

Function

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Table 11: Default log message fields (Continued) Option Description

Line Port Category System All Default Message text

Line in code that generated the log message. This is generally useful only for Zhone development engineers. Port related to the log message. Category of the log message. System related to the log message. Controls all log message options. Controls the default log message options. A description of the error that caused the alarm.

To change the information displayed in the log messages, use the log option command. First, display the available options:
< time | 1 > < on | off > < date | 2 > < on | off > < level | 3 > < on | off > < taskname | 4 > < on | off > < taskid | 5 > < on | off > < file | 6 > < on | off > < function | 7 > < on | off > < line | 8 > < on | off > < port | 9 > < on | off > < category | 10 > < on | off > < system | 11 > < on | off > < ticks | 12 > < on | off > < all | 13 > < on | off > < default | 14 > < on | off > time: date: level: address: log: port: category: system: zSH> log option Usage: log option

(0x707)

Then, turn the option on or off. For example, the following command will turn the task ID off in log messages:
zSH> log option taskid off time: date: level: address: log: taskname: (0xf)

The following commands will turn ton/off the tick count display in log messages:
zSH> log option ticks on time: date: level: address: log: port: category: system: ticks: (0xf07) zSH> log option ticks off time: date: level: address: log: port: category: system: (0x707)

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The following command will turn all options on in log messages:


zSH> log option all on time: date: level: address: log: taskname: taskid: file: function: line: port: category: system: ticks: (0xfff)

Modifying logging levels


To modify logging, use the log command. To modify syslog messages, use the syslog command. To display the current levels for all logging modules, use the log show command:
zSH> log show MODULE aal2approv aal2aprec aal2rp aal2rpzccapi aal2rpvcc alarm_mgr assert atm_cc_mib_hdlr atmmgr atmmgragnt bds bds_client callcontrolregistry card card_resource carddeletehdlr ccrp cli ... ... ... LEVEL error error error error error error error error error error error error error error error error error error STATUS enabled enabled enabled enabled enabled enabled enabled enabled enabled enabled enabled enabled enabled enabled enabled enabled enabled enabled

Logging levels determine the number of messages that are displayed on the console. The higher the log level, the more messages are displayed. The MALC supports the following log levels:

1: emergency 2: alert 3: critical 4: error 5: warning 6: notice 7: information

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8: debug

To change the log level, use the log module level command. For example, the following command changes the card module logging level to emergency:
zSH> log level card emergency Module: card at level: emergency

To enable or disable log levels for a module, use the log enable or log disable commands. For example:
zSH> log disable card Module: card is now disabled

Using the log cache


The log cache command displays the non-persistent log messages. It uses the following syntax:
log cache

Displays the log cache.


log cache max length

Sets the maximum number of log messages to store. The maximum log cache size is 2147483647, depending in the amount of memory available.
log cache grep pattern

Searches through the log cache for the specified regular expression.
log cache clear

Clears the log cache.


log cache size

Sets the maximum amount of memory for the log cache. Without options, displays the current log size.
log cache help

Displays help on the log cache command.

Examples
To change the current configured log cache size:
zSH> log cache max 200 Maximum number of log messages that can be saved: 200

The following example searches through the log cache for the string Major:
zSH> log cache grep Major Searching for: "Major" [1]: FEB 07 11:18:42: alert : 1/1/1025: alarm_mgr: tLineAlarm: 01:01:01 Major D S1 Down Line 1:1:1:0 (FarEnd Rx LOF)[2]: FEB 07 11:18:42: alert : 1/1/1025: alarm_mgr: tLineAlarm: 01:01:02 Major D

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S1 Down Line 1:1:2:0 (FarEnd Rx LOF)[3]: FEB 07 11:18:42: alert : 1/1/1025: alarm_mgr: tLineAlarm: 01:01:03 Major D S1 Down Line 1:1:3:0 (FarEnd Rx LOF) ... ... ...

Viewing the persistent logs


Use the log cache command to view the persistent logs. For example:
zSH> log cache [1]: JAN 13 17:23:40: alert SL Down DSL line [2]: JAN 13 17:23:40: alert SL Down DSL line [3]: JAN 13 17:23:40: alert SL Down DSL line [4]: JAN 13 17:23:40: alert SL Down DSL line [5]: JAN 13 17:23:41: alert SL Down DSL line [6]: JAN 13 17:23:41: alert SL Down DSL line [7]: JAN 13 17:23:41: alert SL Down DSL line [8]: JAN 13 17:23:41: alert SL Down DSL line [9]: JAN 13 17:23:41: alert SL Down DSL line [10]: JAN 13 17:23:41: alert DSL Down DSL line [11]: JAN 13 17:23:42: alert DSL Down DSL line ... ... ... : 1/6/1025: alarm_mgr: tLineAlarm: 01:06:18 Minor D : 1/5/1025: alarm_mgr: tLineAlarm: 01:05:26 Minor D : 1/5/1025: alarm_mgr: tLineAlarm: 01:05:27 Minor D : 1/6/1025: alarm_mgr: tLineAlarm: 01:06:20 Minor D : 1/6/1025: alarm_mgr: tLineAlarm: 01:06:21 Minor D : 1/6/1025: alarm_mgr: tLineAlarm: 01:06:22 Minor D : 1/6/1025: alarm_mgr: tLineAlarm: 01:06:25 Minor D : 1/6/1025: alarm_mgr: tLineAlarm: 01:06:29 Minor D : 1/6/1025: alarm_mgr: tLineAlarm: 01:06:32 Minor D : 1/6/1025: alarm_mgr: tLineAlarm: 01:06:31 Minor : 1/6/1025: alarm_mgr: tLineAlarm: 01:06:37 Minor

Sending messages to a syslog server


Modify the following parameters in the syslog-destination profile to send messages to a syslog server.

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Parameter

Description

address

The IP address of the machine hosting the syslog server. Default: 0.0.0.0

port

The UDP port to which the syslog messages will be sent. Default: 514

facility

The syslog facility to which the syslog messages will be sent. Values: local0 local1 local2 local3 local4 local5 local6 local7 no-map Default: local0

severity

The severity level used to filter messages being set to the syslog server. Values: emergency alert critical error warning notice info debug Default: debug

zSH> new syslog-destination 1 Please provide the following: [q]uit. address: --> {0.0.0.0}: 192.200.42.5 IP address of the syslog server port: -----> {514}: leave at default facility: -> {local0}: severity: -> {debug}: .................... Save new record? [s]ave, [c]hange or [q]uit: s New record saved.

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Specifying different log formats for system and syslog messages


The log-module profile supports the configuration of persistent log messages, syslog messages, and persistent storage levels by module. You only need to modify this profile if you want to send different messages to admin sessions, the persistent logs, and the syslog server.
Parameter Description

name

The name of the module whose logging is controlled by this profile. Default: logtest

display

Controls the display of messages on the system. Messages logged at this level and above will be displayed. Values: emergency alert critical error warning notice info debug Default: error

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Parameter

Description

syslog

Controls the format of messages sent to the syslog server described in the syslog-destination profile. This field is similar to the display field, except for the trackdisplay value. Values: emergency alert critical error warning notice info debug trackdisplay Messages logged at, and above, the level set in the display parameter will also be recorded in the syslog server. Default: trackdisplay

store

Controls the persistent storage of messages. This field is similar to the display field, except for the trackdisplay value. Values: emergency alert critical error warning notice info debug trackdisplay Messages logged at, and above, the level set in the display parameter will also be recorded in the syslog server. Default: trackdisplay

zSH> new log-module 1 Please provide the following: [q]uit. name: ----> {logtest}: test1 display: -> {error}: warning syslog: --> {trackdisplay}: store: ---> {trackdisplay}: .................... Save new record? [s]ave, [c]hange or [q]uit: s New record saved.

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Example log messages


This section provides examples of how to interpret log messages.

DSL line down message


The following message appears when a DSL line comes up or goes down. .
Log level physical address (shelf/slot) task name function name line number

Date and time

[1]: JAN 07 09:25:42: alert : 1/8/1025: alarm_mgr: _laMgrLogMsg(): l=261 : tLin eAlarm: 01:08:03 Minor DSL Down DSL line

Message text

The most important parts of the message are the date and time the event occurred, the shelf/slot of the event, and the message text. The remainder of the information is only useful for Zhone development engineers.

Slot card up message


The next message appears after a slot card has finished loading its software and is ready to be provisioned.
Date and time Log level physical address (shelf/slot) task name function name line number

[24]: JAN 05 20:12:28: notice : 1/2/12 : shelfctrl: _CardUpdateMsgProcess(): l= 381 : tShelfCtrl: Card in slot 1 changed state to RUNNING.

Message text

The most important parts of the message are the date and time the event occurred, the shelf/slot of the event, and the message text. The remainder of the information is only useful for Zhone development engineers.

Log filter command


The log filter command is available as part of the log command functionality. This command enables users to show, set and delete log filters. Log filters limit the scope of log messages to a specific entity for troubleshooting and diagnostics. When a log filter is set, the filter is assigned an index number and

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only messages relate the specified entity are displayed. Filters can be set for an specific ifindex, slot/port, VCL, or subscriber.

log filter
Restrict the display of log messages to only the log messages for a specified entity.
Syntax log filter show | set (ifindex|port slotport|vcl ifindex vpi vci|subscriber endpoint)| delete zSH> log filter set ifindex 12 New filter saved. zSH> log filter set port 5 24 New filter saved. zSH> log filter set vcl 100 0 1 New filter saved. zSH> log filter set subscriber 22 New filter saved. zSH> log filter show Index Type Filter Parameters ------ ---------------------------------------1 Port slot=1, port=1 2 Port slot=1, port=4 3 IfIndex IfIndex=12 4 Port slot=5, port=24 5 ATM VCL IfIndex=100, vpi=0, vci=1 6 IfIndex IfIndex=100 7 IfIndex IfIndex=104 8 IfIndex IfIndex=109 9 IfIndex IfIndex=103 10 IfIndex IfIndex=107 zSH> log filter delete 10 Log filter 10 deleted

SNMP
This section describes the following:

Creating SNMP community names and access lists, page 320 Configuring traps, page 321

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Creating SNMP community names and access lists


Note: By default, the MALC has a single SNMP community defined with the name ZhonePrivate. This community has admin access to the system. Zhone recommends that you configure community names and access lists to prevent unauthorized access to the system. The community-profile specifies the community name and an access level for SNMP manager to access the system. It can also optionally specify a community-access-profile which is used to verify the source IP address of the SNMP manager. The system supports up to 50 different access lists. The following community access levels are supported:

noaccessthe community has no access. readthe community has read-only access to the system, with the exception of information in the community-profile and community-access-profile. readandwritethe community has read/write access to the system, with the exception of information in the community-profile and community-access-profile. adminthe community has read and write access to the entire system, including information in the community-profile and community-access-profile. Note that the ZMS requires admin access to manage the system.

Creating a community profile


Note: Configuring a community profile disables the ZhonePrivate default community name. If you do change the community name, you must change the name in ZMS or the device will become unmangeable. The following example defines a community name public with read-only privileges:
zSH> new community-profile 1 Please provide the following: [q]uit. community-name: -----> {}: public permissions: --------> {read}: access-table-index: -> {0}: .................... Save new record? [s]ave, [c]hange or [q]uit: s New record saved.

Creating community access lists


The following example defines a community name private with read/write privileges and also creates an access list to verify that the SNMP managers

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attempting to access the MALC are coming from known IP addresses 192.168.9.10 and 192.168.11.12: First, create an access list for the first IP address:
zSH> new community-access-profile 2 Please provide the following: [q]uit. access-table-index: -> {0}: 1 ip-address: ---------> {0.0.0.0}: 192.168.9.10 .................... Save new record? [s]ave, [c]hange or [q]uit: s New record saved.

Then, create an access list for the second IP address with the same access-table-index (1):
zSH> new community-access-profile 3 Please provide the following: [q]uit. access-table-index: -> {0}: 1 ip-address: ---------> {0.0.0.0}: 192.168.11.12 .................... Save new record? [s]ave, [c]hange or [q]uit: s New record saved.

Finally, create a community-profile that specifies the community name, and uses the same access-table-index (1) as defined in the two community-access-profiles you just created:
zSH> new community-profile 4 Please provide the following: [q]uit. community-name: -----> {}: private ZMS must include this name permissions: --------> {read}: readandwrite access-table-index: -> {0}: 1 .................... Save new record? [s]ave, [c]hange or [q]uit: s New record saved.

Configuring traps
The trap-destination profile defines a trap recipient the MALC will send traps to. To configure a trap destination you need to know:

the IP address of the SNMP manager workstation the community name the trap recipient expects

Note that the resendseqno and ackedseqno parameters are set by the ZMS. The other parameters in the trap-destination profile can be left at their default values. The following example configures a trap recipient with the IP address 192.168.3.21:
zSH> new trap-destination 32 Please provide the following: [q]uit. trapdestination: -> {0.0.0.0}: 192.168.3.21 communityname: ---> {}: public

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resendseqno: -----> {0}: ackedseqno: ------> {0}: traplevel: -------> {low}: traptype: --------> {(null)}: 0 trapadminstatus: -> {enabled}: .................... Save new record? [s]ave, [c]hange or [q]uit: s New record saved.

Statistics and alarms


This section describes the following:

Bulk statistics on page 322 Alarm manager on page 327 Alarm suppression on page 336

Bulk statistics
The MALC can be configured to collect statistics and transfer them to an FTP server. Any supported SNMP OID can be collected. 1. Every 15 minutes, the MALC gathers the specified statistics. If a statistic is not collected, the MALC sends a ZhoneBulkStatisticsIndividualStatFailure trap to the designated trap recipient. 2. The statistics files are stored on the local flash card with the following filename: Device-IP_timestamp where timestamp is in the form YYYY.DD.MM.HH.MM in the device local time. For example:192.168.80.291_2002.11.06.14.37 3. The MALC compresses the files and attempts to send them to the FTP server. If the files transfer is successful, the files on the local flash card are deleted. If the file transfer is not successful, the MALC will:

a. Send a ZhoneBulkStatisticsIntervalFailure trap to the designated trap recipient. b. Periodically attempt to reach the FTP server. c. Continue to collect statistics every 15 minutes, writing a new statistics file to the flash card for every interval, if there is sufficient space on the flash disk. d. When the FTP server is available, the MALC transfers all remaining files to the FTP server and deletes them from the flash card.

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Bulk statistics file format


If the statistics collected include children, the bulk statistic file uses the following format:
#Version# #SysObjectOID #BeginCollectionRecord* <CollectionId><space><CollectionInterval><space><OID><space><InstanceId> 1=value1 2=value2 ... ... ... n=valuen #EndCollectionRecord #EndFile

where value1, value2, and so on are the SNMP instances for the OID. If the statistics collected does not include children, the bulk statistic file uses the following format:
#Version# #SysObjectOID #BeginCollectionRecord* <CollectionId><space><CollectionInterval><space><OID><space><InstanceId> #EndCollectionRecord #EndFile

For example, if you set up the system collect statistics for an ATM VCL with an Ifindex of 123 and a VPI/VCI of 0/36 and include the child objects, the statistic file would look similar to the following:
#VersionNumber# #Device 1.3.6.1.4.1.5504.4.2.2.5.1 #BeginCollectionRecord 1000 ZhoneAtmStatsExtEntry 123.0.36 1=135 2=15 3=8309 4=83209 5=23 6=787 7=843 8=38209 #EndCollectionRecord #EndFile

Where values 1 to 8 are the ZhoneAtmStatsExtEntry entries: zhoneAtmStatsTotalInitialCellsRx zhoneAtmStatsTotalFabricCellsRx zhoneAtmStatsTotalFinalCLP0CellsRx

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zhoneAtmStatsTotalFinalCLP1CellsRx zhoneAtmStatsTotalInitalCellsTx zhoneAtmStatsTotalFabricCellsTx zhoneAtmStatsTotalFinalCLP0CellsTx zhoneAtmStatsTotalFinalCLP1CellsTx

Configuring bulk statistics


Note: You must configure the FTP password used by bulk statistics using ZMS or the Zhone genSystem MIB. To configure bulk statistics: 1 Create a bulk-statistic record for the statistics you want to gather. For example, to collect ATM VCL statistics:
zSH> new bulk-statistic 1 Please provide the following: [q]uit. enabled: ----------> {true}: oid: --------------> {}: ZhoneAtmStatsExtEntry instance: ---------> {}: 136 ifIndex of ATM interface include-children: -> {false}: true .................... Save new record? [s]ave, [c]hange or [q]uit: s New record saved.

Update the bulk-statistics-config 0 profile to specify the FTP server information:

zSH> update bulk-statistics-config 0 Please provide the following: [q]uit. bulk-statistics-enabled: -> {false}: true ftp-server-address: ------> {0.0.0.0}: 192.168.8.100 ftp-login: ---------------> {}: zhoneuser ftp-password: ------------> {**private**}:**read-only** must be configured using SNMP or ZMS ftp-directory-path: ------> {}: /stats .................... Save new record? [s]ave, [c]hange or [q]uit: s New record saved.

Bulk statistics example


This example explains how to configure bulk statistics to gather the following SNMP statistics: ZhoneAtmStatsExtEntry object in the comAtm MIB: 1: zhoneAtmStatsTotalInitialCellsRx 2: zhoneAtmStatsTotalFabricCellsRx

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3: zhoneAtmStatsTotalFinalCLP0CellsRx 4: zhoneAtmStatsTotalFinalCLP1CellsRx 5: zhoneAtmStatsTotalInitalCellsTx 6: zhoneAtmStatsTotalFabricCellsTx 7: zhoneAtmStatsTotalFinalCLP0CellsTx 8: zhoneAtmStatsTotalFinalCLP1CellsTx zhoneDslPerfDataTotalEntry in the phyDsl MIB: 1: zhoneDslPerfTotalLofs 2: zhoneDslPerfTotalLoss 3: zhoneDslPerfTotalLols 4: zhoneDslPerfTotalInits 5: zhoneDslPerfTotalES 6: zhoneDslPerfTotalSES 7: zhoneDslPerfTotalCRCAnomalies 8: zhoneDslPerfTotalLOSWS 9: zhoneDslPerfTotalUAS To get these statistics: 1 Get the ifIndex for the trunking interface:
zSH> ifxlate 1-1-1-0-sonet/atm ifIndex: ----------> {8} shelf: ------------> {1} slot: -------------> {2} port: -------------> {1} subport: ----------> {0} type: -------------> {sonet} adminstatus: ------> {up} physical-flag: ----> {true} iftype-extension: -> {none} ifName: -----------> {1-1-1-0}

Get the ifIndex for the subscriber interface:


zSH> ifxlate 1-7-1-0/adsl ifIndex: ----------> {136} shelf: ------------> {1} slot: -------------> {7} port: -------------> {1} subport: ----------> {0} type: -------------> {adsl} adminstatus: ------> {up} physical-flag: ----> {true} iftype-extension: -> {none} ifName: -----------> {1-7-1-0}

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Update the bulk-statistics-config profile to specify the FTP server:

zSH> update bulk-statistics-config 0 Please provide the following: [q]uit. bulk-statistics-enabled: -> {false}: true ftp-server-address: ------> {0.0.0.0}: 192.168.80.201 ftp-login: ---------------> {}: username ftp-password: ------------> {** private **}: ** read-only ** ftp-directory-path: ------> {}: stats .................... Save changes? [s]ave, [c]hange or [q]uit: s Record updated.

4 5

Modify the zhoneBulkStatsSystemFtpPassword object in the genSystem MIB to change the FTP password. Create a bulk-statistic profile for the trunking interface. Set include-children to true to gather all the child statistics for this object:
zSH> new bulk-statistic 1 Please provide the following: [q]uit. enabled: ----------> {true}: oid: --------------> {}: zhoneAtmStatsExtEntry instance: ---------> {}: 1635 ifIndex of the ATM interface include-children: -> {false}: true .................... Save new record? [s]ave, [c]hange or [q]uit: s New record saved.

Create a bulk-statistic profile for the subscriber interface. Set include-children to true to gather all the child statistics for this object:
zSH> new bulk-statistic 2 Please provide the following: [q]uit. enabled: ----------> {true}: oid: --------------> {}: zhoneDslPerfDataTotalEntry instance: ---------> {}: 136 ifIndex of DSL interface include-children: -> {false}: true .................... Save new record? [s]ave, [c]hange or [q]uit: s New record saved.

IF-Name in bulk stats (32 character limit)


The MALC supports customized interface names using up to 32 characters. The customized name appears in bulk statistics and other output displaying interface names. To customize an interface name, update the ifName parameter in the if-translate profile for the interface.
zSH> update if-translate 1-1-1-0/eth if-translate 1-1-1-0/eth Please provide the following: [q]uit. ifIndex: -----------> {1}:

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shelf: -------------> {1}: slot: --------------> {1}: port: --------------> {1}: subport: -----------> {0}: type: --------------> {eth}: adminstatus: -------> {up}: physical-flag: -----> {true}: iftype-extension: --> {none}: ifName: ------------> {1-1-1-0}:[interfacename upto 32 characters] redundancy-param1: -> {0}: .................... Save changes? [s]ave, [c]hange or [q]uit: s Record updated.

Example bulk statistics with 1-1-1-0/eth interface name.


1.0 1.3.6.1.4.1.5504.1.6.2 #BeginCollectionRecord 1 15 ifHCOutUcastPkts 1(1-1-1-0/eth)=0,29154 #EndCollectionRecord #BeginCollectionRecord 2 15 ifHCInUcastPkts 1(1-1-1-0/eth)=0,23837 #EndCollectionRecord #BeginCollectionRecord 3 15 ifHCInOctets 1(1-1-1-0/eth)=0,2814554 #EndCollectionRecord

Alarm manager
The MALC central alarm manager includes the ability to view the active alarms on the system (using the alarm command) and the ability to store active alarms on the device. ZMS can use the alarms stored on the device to recreate the state of the alarms if it becomes disconnected. The alarm command uses the following syntax:
alarm show [summary]

For example, the following command displays the number of current active alarms, the total number of alarms, the number of cleared alarms, as well as each active alarm and its severity:
zSH> alarm show ************ Central Alarm Manager ActiveAlarmCurrentCount ActiveAlarmTotalCount ClearAlarmTotalCount OverflowAlarmTableCount ResourceId ---------1-5-2-0/adsl 1-5-3-0/adsl 1-5-4-0/adsl AlarmType --------linkDown linkDown linkDown ************ :21 :42 :21 :0 AlarmSeverity ------------minor minor minor

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1-5-5-0/adsl 1-5-6-0/adsl 1-5-7-0/adsl 1-5-8-0/adsl 1-5-17-0/adsl 1-5-18-0/adsl 1-5-19-0/adsl 1-5-20-0/adsl 1-5-21-0/adsl 1-5-22-0/adsl 1-5-23-0/adsl 1-5-24-0/adsl 1-2-1-0/sonet 1-2-2-0/sonet 1-2-1-0/sonet 1-2-2-0/sonet 1-2-1-0/sonet 1-2-2-0/sonet

linkDown linkDown linkDown linkDown linkDown linkDown linkDown linkDown linkDown linkDown linkDown linkDown linkDown linkDown sonetSectionStatusChange sonetSectionStatusChange sonetLineStatusChange sonetLineStatusChange

minor minor minor minor minor minor minor minor minor minor minor minor critical critical major major major major

The summary option displays the number of current active alarms, the total number of alarms, the number of cleared alarms:
zSH> alarm show summary ************ Central Alarm Manager ActiveAlarmCurrentCount ActiveAlarmTotalCount ClearAlarmTotalCount OverflowAlarmTableCount ************ :3 :3 :0 :0

Supported alarms
The alarms reported by the alarm show command are based on traps. When these traps are received by ZMS, they generate ZMS alarms. The following alarms are supported.
Table 12: Supported alarms Alarm Description

aal2ExternalAIS aal2ExternalRAI aal2InternalAIS aal2InternalRDI aal2PerfCellLossThreshTrap

Alarm Indication Signal associated with a maintenance alarm detected. Remote Alarm Indication detected to constitute a received signal failure. Alarm Indication Signal detected affecting the AAL type 2 connection. Remote Defect Indication detected affecting the AAL type 2 connection. A bad sequence error is detected when some cells have been lost.

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Table 12: Supported alarms (Continued) Alarm Description

aal2PerfCongestionThreshTrap aal2PvcDown adslAtucInitFailureTrap adslAtucPerfESsThreshTrap adslAtucPerfLofsThreshTrap adslAtucPerfLolsThreshTrap adslAtucPerfLossThreshTrap adslAtucPerfLprsThreshTrap adslAtucRateChangeTrap

The number of congestion events exceed the congestion threshold. The status of AAL type 2 PVC has gone down. Near end modem (ATUC) failure during initialization. Errored Second 15-minute interval threshold reached on near end modem (ATUC) Loss of Framing 15-minute interval threshold reached on near end modem (ATUC) Loss of Link 15-minute interval threshold reached on near end modem (ATUC) Loss of Signal 15-minute interval threshold reached on near end modem (ATUC) Loss of Power 15-minute interval threshold reached on near end modem (ATUC) Near end modem (ATUC) transmit rate changed from adslAtucChanPrevTxRate to adslAtucChanCurrTxRate Errored Second 15-minute interval threshold reached on far end modem (ATUR) Loss of Framing 15-minute interval threshold reached on far end modem (ATUR) Loss of Signal 15-minute interval threshold reached on far end modem (ATUR) Loss of Power 15-minute interval threshold reached on far end modem (ATUR) Far end modem (ATUR) transmit rate changed from adslAturChanPrevTxRate to adslAturChanCurrTxRate An APS channel mismatch between the transmitted K1 channel and the received K2 channel has occurred. An APS Far-End Protection-Line Failure (FEPLF) has occurred. This condition is declared based on receiving signal failure (SF) on the protection line in the K1 byte.

adslAturPerfESsThreshTrap adslAturPerfLofsThreshTrap adslAturPerfLossThreshTrap adslAturPerfLprsThreshTrap adslAturRateChangeTrap

apsEventChannelMismatch

apsEventFEPLF

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Table 12: Supported alarms (Continued) Alarm Description

apsEventModeMismatch

An APS event mode mismatch has occurred. A conflict between the current local mode and the received K2 mode information constitutes a mode mismatch.

apsEventPSBF

An APS Protection Switch Byte Failure (PSBF) has occurred. This condition occurs when either an inconsistent APS byte or an invalid code is detected. An inconsistent APS byte occurs when no three consecutive K1 bytes of the last 12 successive frames are identical, starting with the last frame containing a previously consistent byte. An invalid code occurs when the incoming K1 byte contains an unused code or a code irrelevant for the specific switching operation (that is., Reverse Request while no switching request is outstanding) in three consecutive frames. An invalid code also occurs when the incoming K1 byte contains an invalid channel number in three consecutive frames.

apsEventSwitchover atmDsx3PlcpAlarmStatusChan ge atmInterfaceTCAlarmStateCha nge atmOamF4PingStatus atmOamF5PingStatus atmVclBandwidthUnavailable

The number of times this channel has switched to the protection line. The DS3 Physical Layer Convergence Procedure (PLCP) has received an alarm. ATM Interface TC Sublayer is currently in the Loss of Cell Delineation defect maintenance state. Indicates whether an OAM F4 ping has succeeded or failed. Indicates whether an OAM F5 ping has succeeded or failed. Bandwidth specified in an ATM traffic descriptor is not available. This alarm is sent when either of the following conditions occurs:

A VCL is activated with a traffic descriptor that specifies a higher than available rate. A VCL is activated with a traffic descriptor that specifies a vcl-rate value which will cause available bandwidth to run out.

atmVclOperStatusChange

Subscriber (Id: SubscriberID, Name: SubscriberName) on Vcl (IfIndex: IfIndex, Vpi: VPI, Vci: VCI) is affected

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Table 12: Supported alarms (Continued) Alarm Description

atmVpiAutoCreateComplete

Indicates the system has completed creating VPIs. The system automatically creates VPIs for pre-existing VPLs and VCLs if the VPI/VCI ranges for a card are changed. A VPL has changed state. An IP address is being offered to a Zhone CPE device via DHCP. The system Object ID of an attached Zhone CPE device that has obtained its address via DHCP. An IP address has been assigned or modified via DHCP. An SNMP entity on the system has reinitialized and its configuration may have changed. An IP address is being offered to a Zhone CPE device Status change for the DS3 interface. Fan A is in a fault state. Fan A operating normally. Fan B is in a fault state. Fan B operating normally. Fan A power supply is in a fault state. Fan A power supply is operating normally. Fan B power supply is in a fault state. Fan B power supply is operating normally. There is an irregular fan speed. Fan speed is normal. Fan tray added to device. Fan tray removed from device. A remote GR-303 all reference value (CRV) has changed state. A GR-303 timeslot management channel CRV (TMC) has changed state. A primary GR-303 embedded operations channel (EOC) has changed state.

atmVplOperStatusChange dhcpTrapZhoneCpeDetected dhcpTrapZhoneCpeSysObjectI D dhcpTrapZhoneIpAddressUpda te coldStart dhcpTrapZhoneCpeDetected dsx3LineStatusChange fan_a_failure fan_a_ok fan_b_failure fan_b_ok fan_power_supply_a_failure fan_power_supply_a_ok fan_power_supply_b_failure fan_power_supply_b_ok fan_speed_error fan_speed_ok fan_tray_added fan_tray_removed igCrvRemoteStateChange igCrvTmcStateChange igEocPrimaryStateChange

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Table 12: Supported alarms (Continued) Alarm Description

igEocSecondaryStateChange igOperStatusChange igSystemTimeChange igTmcPrimaryStateChange igTmcSecondaryStateChange isdnMibCallInformation

A secondary GR-303 embedded operations channel (EOC) has changed state. A GR-303 interface group (IG) has changed state. A GR-303 IG system time has changed. A primary GR-303 TMC has changed state. A secondary GR-303 TMC has changed state. This trap indicates the status of a connection request. It is sent whenever:

an incoming call is rejected an outgoing call attempt fails (if the call is configured for retries, this trap is sent after all retires fail) a call connects

Note that only one trap is sent for successful or unsuccessful call attempts between two neighbors; subsequent call attempts result in no trap. isdnTrapAmiViolations isdnTrapFECV isdnTrapFrameSynchLoss isdnTrapUnbalancedFrame left_outlet_temp_normal left_outlet_temp_over_limit linkDown power_supply_a_failure power_supply_a_ok power_supply_b_failure power_supply_b_ok power_supply_c_failure power_supply_c_ok Bad Ami violation. Far end code violation. Driver receives three successive out of sync frames. The number of unbalanced ISDN frames has been exceeded. The system is reporting a the temperature on the left outlet is within temperature specifications. The system is reporting a high temperature on the left outlet. Communication link is about to enter the down state. Power supply A is in a fault state. Power supply A is operating normally. Power supply B is in a fault state. Power supply B is operating normally. Power supply C is in a fault state. Power supply C is operating normally.

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Table 12: Supported alarms (Continued) Alarm Description

power_supply_d_failure power_supply_d_ok right_outlet_temp_normal right_outlet_temp_over_limit sechtor100FanStatusChange sechtor100ThermoStatusChang e shelf_controller_fault sipStatusCodeNotif

Power supply D is in a fault state. Power supply D is operating normally. The system is reporting a the temperature on the left outlet is within temperature specifications. The system is reporting a high temperature on the right outlet. The fan on a Zhone Sechtor 100 device has changed state. The temperature sensor in a Zhone Sechtor 100 device has changed state. Shelf controller fault. Indicates a session initiation protocol (SIP) status code has been sent or received by the system. Indicates that a specific SIP status code was found to have been sent or received by the system enough to exceed the configured threshold. Indicates the SONET clock external recovery or clock transmit settings have been changed.This could be caused by a change to the MALC clocking configuration or a line failure. A SONET line has changed state. A SONET path has changed state. A SONET section has changed state. The temperature of the device is within specifications. The temperature of the device is over specifications. The temperature of the device is under specifications. The V5.2 C channel has changed state. The V5.2 path has changed state. The V5.2 IG has changed state. A request has been initiated by the operator.

sipStatusCodeThreshExceeded Notif

sonetClockTransmitSourceCha nge

sonetLineStatusChange sonetPathStatusChange sonetSectionStatusChange temp_normal temp_over_limit temp_under_limit v52CChannelStatusChange v52CPathOperStatusChange v52IgOperStatusChange v52IgPortAlignmentNotificatio n

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Table 12: Supported alarms (Continued) Alarm Description

v52IgProvVariantRequestNotif ication v52LinkBlockNotification v52LinkCheckIdNotification v52ProtectionCPathOperStatus Change voiceDspChannelInterArrvJitte rTrigger voiceDspChannelPktsLoss

A request has been initiated from the AN side. A V5.2 link block request has been sent. A V5.2 check link ID request has been received. A V5.2 protection C path has changed state. This trap is sent whenever the channelInterArrvJitter exceeds the default setting. This trap is sent whenever the channelPktsPktsLost exceeds the default setting. Indicates a voice DSP has reset. An SNMP entity on the system has reinitialized and its configuration may have changed. Sent when a BAN detects a MALC or Raptor device. Sent when a Zhone CPE device is disconnected. Sent when a Zhone CPE is detected for the first time. A Zhone MALC device has been disconnected. A Zhone MALC has been detected for the first time. Automatic provisioning is completed. A DSL bypass relay has changed state. This trap is sent on a per-port basis and only applies to the MALC ADSL 32 + splitter cards. Bulk statistics were not successfully gathered for the current interval. This could be caused by the statistics periods overlapping (due to network congestion or too many statistics being gathered), no disk space, file write error, or an FTP error.

voiceDspReset warmStart zapTrapZhoneBanDetected zapTrapZhoneCpeConnection Down zapTrapZhoneCpeDetected zapTrapZhoneMalcConnection Down zapTrapZhoneMalcDetected zapTrapZhoneProvisioningDon e zhoneAdslPotsBypassRelayCh angeNotification zhoneBulkStatisticsIntervalFail ure

zhoneCardRedundancyStatusC hange

The specified card has become active.

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Table 12: Supported alarms (Continued) Alarm Description

zhoneCardServicesStatusChan ge zhoneDslLineAlarmStatusCha nge zhoneExternalAlarmTrap zhoneImaGroupDown zhoneLineStatusChange zhonePingTestCompleted zhoneTraceRoutePathChange zhoneTraceRouteTestFailed zhoneTrapCardMemStatus

Card service is inactive or unavailable (slot SlotNumber) The SDSL and SHDSL interface has changed state. External relay is open or is not connected. IMA group has gone down. The DS1 interface has changed stated. A ping command has been successful. The path for a traceroute has been changed. A traceroute command has failed. The memory on a device has changed. This could indicate RAM or flash memory is low or not available. Indicates a card state has changed. This could indicate the card was added, removed, is in a fault state, or has been reset. Card version CardVersion (SlotNumber) is incompatible with that of active InfoServ card. (BAN only) A partial config sync update has failed Zhone CPE connection is down Indicates the flash card in the system has changed state. A shelf has changed state. The SNMP subagent on the system has timed out. At least one CLI session has been unblocked or all CLI sessions are blocked. Indicates the state of onboard ZRG battery.

zhoneTrapCardStatusChange

zhoneTrapCardVersionCheck

zhoneTrapConfigSyncChange zhoneTrapCpeConnectionDow n zhoneTrapFlashCardStatusCha nge zhoneTrapShelfStatusChange zhoneTrapSnmpSATimeout zhoneZmsBlockCliChange zrgBatteryRelayNotification

ADSL low power alarm


When the MALC detects the ADSL card is in a low power state, it sets all the active DSL ports to admin_down state. When the low power alarm is cleared, the DSL ports are set back to admin_up state. This feature saves back-up battery power until the chassis main power recovers.

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To enable this feature, configure one of the alarm contacts (1 to 12) to detect low-power alarms in the num2str-profile. The num2str-profile uses an index in the form:
shelf/slot/282/alarm-contact

For example:
zSH> update num2str-profile 1/12/282/1 Please provide the following: [q]uit. name: -> {Relay 1}: low-power .................... Save changes? [s]ave, [c]hange or [q]uit: s Record updated.

Alarm suppression
The alarm suppression feature allows alarm/LED notification and output to be disabled based on alarm severity level for existing and future alarms. When an alarm level is disabled, all existing alarms of that type are cleared from the system. Future alarms of that type do not set LEDs or alarm relays and are not displayed in alarm output. Alarm suppression is also supported in ZMS. Table 13 lists the alarm suppression options and the resulting behaviors. By default, alarms for all severity levels are enabled.
Table 13: Alarm suppression options Alarm Levels Enabled Setting Alarm Behavior

critical+major+minor+warning critical+major+minor critical+major critical+major+warning critical+minor+warning critical+minor critical+warning critical major major+minor+warning major+minor major+warning minor minor+warning

Enables all alarm levels. The default setting. Disables all warning alarms. Disables all minor, and warning alarms. Disables all minor alarms. Disables all major alarms. Disables all major and warning alarms. Disables all major and warning alarms. Disables all major, minor, and warning alarms. Disables all critical, minor, and warning alarms. Disables all critical alarms. Disables all critical and warning alarms. Disables all critical and minor alarms. Disables all critical, major, and warning alarms. Disables all critical and major alarms.

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Table 13: Alarm suppression options (Continued) Alarm Levels Enabled Setting Alarm Behavior

(no levels)

Disables all alarm levels.

This example disables alarm/LED notification and output for all current and future alarms with the severity levels minor and warning.
zSH> update system 0 Please provide the following: [q]uit. syscontact: -----------> {Zhone Global Services and Support 7001 Oakport Street Oakland Ca. (877) Zhone20 (946-6320) Fax (510)777-7113 support@zhone.com}: sysname: --------------> {Malc-M22}: syslocation: ----------> {Oakland}: enableauthtraps: ------> {disabled}: setserialno: ----------> {0}: zmsexists: ------------> {true}: zmsconnectionstatus: --> {inactive}: zmsipaddress: ---------> {172.16.80.160}: configsyncexists: -----> {false}: configsyncoverflow: ---> {true}: configsyncpriority: ---> {high}: configsyncaction: -----> {noaction}: configsyncfilename: ---> {172.16.80.160_4_1149144921639}: configsyncstatus: -----> {synccomplete}: configsyncuser: -------> {zmsftp}: configsyncpasswd: -----> {** private **}: ** read-only ** numshelves: -----------> {1}: shelvesarray: ---------> {}: numcards: -------------> {3}: ipaddress: ------------> {172.16.80.160}: alternateipaddress: ---> {0.0.0.0}: countryregion: --------> {us}: primaryclocksource: ---> {0/0/0/0/0}: ringsource: -----------> {internalringsourcelabel}: revertiveclocksource: -> {true}: voicebandwidthcheck: --> {false}: alarm-levels-enabled: -> {critical+major+minor+warning}: critical+major .................... Save changes? [s]ave, [c]hange or [q]uit: s Record updated. zSH>

System maintenance
This section describes the following:

MALC file system on page 338 Accessing the flash card on page 338 Deleting card profiles on page 340

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Manually binding interfaces on page 341 Renaming interfaces on page 342 Saving and restoring configurations on page 343 SNTP on page 344 User accounts on page 344 Viewing chassis and slot information on page 350 Controlling Telnet access on page 352

MALC file system


The Uplink card flash memory contains DOS file system that stores the system boot code, software images, and the configuration. During system startup, the software images on the flash are decompressed and loaded into memory. The following commands can be used to access the file system:

cd. Changes directory. dir. Lists the contents of the directory. pwd. Displays the current working directory. ata. Used to format or initialize a flash card. This is typically done only for new cards or if you want to completely erase the flash card. image. Verifies software images and downloads software images on the flash to system memory.

Accessing the flash card


Use the cd, dir, and pwd commands to list the contents of the file system, as in the following example:
zSH> dir Listing Directory .: -rwxrwxrwx 1 0 -rwxrwxrwx 1 0 -rwxrwxrwx 1 0 drwxrwxrwx 1 0 -rwxrwxrwx 1 0 -rwxrwxrwx 1 0 -rwxrwxrwx 1 0 -rwxrwxrwx 1 0 -rwxrwxrwx 1 0

0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

639836 3321852 1032722 2048 1682204 3301097 639756 1510173 1441233 75399168

Nov 27 07:00 Nov 27 07:00 Nov 27 07:00 Nov 28 12:50 Nov 27 07:01 Nov 27 07:01 Nov 27 07:01 Nov 27 07:00 Dec 6 20001 bytes free

malct1imaraw.bin malct1ima.bin malcmtac.bin datastor/ malcadslpots.bin malcds3.bin malcds3raw.bin malcgshdsl.bin malcadslac5.bin

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Using the ata command


The ata command formats and initializes flash cards. Formatting formats the files system, but leaves the boot partition on the card intact. Initialization reinitializes the boot partitions on the cards and formats the file system. The following example formats flash card:
zSH> ata format 1

The following example initializes the flash card:


zSH> ata init 1

Using the image command


The MALC contains a TFTP server that enables you to download files from a network to the flash card file system using the image command. The image command uses the following syntax:
image download tftphost image-file destination

The following example downloads the image for the Uplink card (malcoc3.bin) from host 192.168.8.21 to the root directory of the first flash card:
image download 192.168.8.21 malcoc3.bin malcoc3.bin

The image command can also verify image files on the flash card. It reads the contents of the file, verifies the file header, and verifies the file checksum. For example:
zSH> image verify malcoc3.bin File: malcoc3.bin Size: 3186874 bytes Header Version: 1 Load Type: MALC OC3 Load Address: 0x00010000 Checksum: 0x0c847b68 Image verify successful

The command reports any errors it finds in the file. Note that files are also verified as part of the download process.

Changing the serial craft port settings


Tip: You only need to modify an rs232-profile if you want to change the default configuration of the serial craft port. The MALC rs232-profile can be used to configure serial craft ports on the system. The default settings for the MALC serial control ports are:

9600bps

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8 data bits No parity 1 stop bit No flow control

Changing the serial control port settings


Caution: The serial craft port supports speeds of 9600, 19200, 38400, and 57600 bps. Do not set the speed to an unsupported value. Doing so could render the serial craft port inaccessible. Update an rs232-profile for the shelf and slot that contains the serial craft port. The following example updates the profile for the serial craft port in slot 1:
zSH> update rs232-profile 1-1-1-0/rs232 shelf-slot-port-subport/type Please provide the following: [q]uit. rs232PortInSpeed: -------> {9600}: 57600 rs232PortOutSpeed: ------> {9600}: 57600 rs232PortInFlowType: ----> {none}: rs232PortOutFlowType: ---> {none}: rs232AsyncPortBits: -----> {8}: rs232AsyncPortStopBits: -> {one}: rs232AsyncPortParity: ---> {none}: rs232AsyncPortAutobaud: -> {disabled}: .................... Save new record? [s]ave, [c]hange or [q]uit: Record created.

The settings take effect after the profile is saved. Note: If the rs232-profile is deleted, the port speed is set to the last configured value.

Deleting card profiles


Caution: Before deleting card profiles, perform the following:

Back up the MALC configuration. See the release notes for


information.

Delete the ATM cross connects associated with the card. For voice cards, ensure all subscribers and voice profiles are
deleted before deleting the card.

Remove the card from the system as explained in the MALC


Hardware Installation Guide.

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Delete the card-profile for a card to delete all the profiles associated with a card. After deleting a card-profile, the specified card reboots. Caution: A delete card-profile command deletes profiles associated with the card and may disrupt service until the system is reprovisioned. The delete command uses the following syntax:
delete card-profile 1/slot/type

Where slot is the location of the card and type is the Zhone type for the card. the card. The following example deletes an ADSL card (Zhone type 5004) in slot 13:
zSH> delete card-profile 1/13/5004 Delete card-profile 1/13/5004? [y]es, [n]o, [q]uit : y card-profile 1/13/5004 deleted.

You can only delete one card-profile at a time. Wildcards are not supported when deleting card profiles.

Manually binding interfaces


When creating ip-interface-record profiles, the syntax is name/type. The name of the IP interface can be user-defined or match the naming of the if-translate record for the physical interface. The system automatically binds interfaces if the name of the new IP record matches the name of the if-translate profile or if the syntax shelf/slot/port/subport/type is used. Enter a list if-translate command to determine what if-translate records are available on your system. The example below shows a new ip-interface-record being created with a user-defined name.
zSH> new ip-interface-record myip/ip Please provide the following: [q]uit. vpi: ---------------> {0}: vci: ---------------> {0}: rdindex: -----------> {1}: dhcp: --------------> {none}: ** read-only ** addr: --------------> {0.0.0.0}: 192.168.88.200 netmask: -----------> {0.0.0.0}: 255.255.255.0 bcastaddr: ---------> {0.0.0.0}: 192.168.88.255 destaddr: ----------> {0.0.0.0}: farendaddr: --------> {0.0.0.0}: mru: ---------------> {1500}: reasmmaxsize: ------> {0}: ingressfiltername: -> {}: egressfiltername: --> {}: pointtopoint: ------> {no}: mcastenabled: ------> {yes}: ipfwdenabled: ------> {yes}:

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mcastfwdenabled: ---> {yes}: natenabled: --------> {no}: bcastenabled: ------> {yes}: ingressfilterid: ---> {0}: egressfilterid: ----> {0}: ipaddrdynamic: -----> {static}: dhcpserverenable: --> {false}: .................... Save new record? [s]ave, [c]hange or [q]uit: s Cannot determine binding for this IP interface. Could not automatically bind this IP Interface. New record saved.

Since the system did not automatically bind the new IP interface, manually bind the interface with the stack bind command:
zSH> stack bind Enter the upper layer: myip/ip the IP interface created Enter the lower layer: 1-1-1-0-ethernetcsmacd/other the line group associated with Ethernet Stack bind successful.

Note: The stack bind command does not allow binding directly to physical interfaces. You must bind two logical interfaces. Enter the stack show command (with name/type syntax) to see interface binding:
zSH> stack show myip/ip Line Group: 1-1-1-0-ethernetcsmacd/other Physical: 1/1/1/0/ethernetcsmacd

Renaming interfaces
Interfaces on the MALC can be renamed using the ifName parameter in the if-translate profile for the interface. For example, to rename an Uplink card T1 interface:
zSH> update if-translate 1-1-1-0/ds1 Please provide the following: [q]uit. ifindex: -----> {1}: . shelf: -------> {1}: slot: --------> {1}: port: --------> {1}: subport: -----> {0}: type: --------> {ds1}: adminstatus: -> {up}: physical-flag: ----> {true}: iftype-extension: -> {0}: ifName: -----------> {1-1-1-0}: uplink_ds1_1 redundancy-param1: -> {0}: .................... Save changes? [s]ave, [c]hange or [q]uit: s

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Record updated.

Saving and restoring configurations


The dump and restore commands enable you to save and restore the system configuration. You can save the configuration to the console, a local file, or the network. The command uses the following syntax:
dump [console] [file filename] [network host filename ]

Passwords are encrypted when they are saved to the configuration file. The encrypted passwords are used to restore the correct password, but cannot be used to log in. Note: The dump and restore commands use TFTP to transfer files to the network. Set the TFTP server time-out value to at least 5 seconds, and 5 retries to help prevent TFTP timeout or retry errors.

To save the configuration to a console:


1 Configure your terminal emulation software as follows: 2 3 9600bps 8 data bits No parity 1 stop bit No hardware flow control VT100 Set Line Delay and Character Delay to 40 milliseconds

Turn on the file capture utility of your terminal emulation software. Save the configuration by entering:
dump console

Do not press the Enter key. 4 5 Start the capture utility on your terminal emulation software and enter a name for the file (use a .txt extension). Press the Enter key. The configuration file will be displayed on the screen. 6 When configuration file is finished, stop the capture utility.

Backing up the configuration to a local file


To dump the configuration to a local file: Specify a file name for the configuration:

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zSH> dump file filename

The file is saved on the MALC filesystem.

Backing up the configuration to the network


To back up the configuration to the network: 1 2 Create the file in the destination location of the TFTP server and make it writeable. Save the configuration. The following example saves the configuration to a file named device.cfg on the host 192.168.8.21:
zSH> dump network 192.168.8.21 device.cfg

Restoring the configuration


For information on restoring your configuration, refer to the release notes for your release.

SNTP
To set up the system to use SNTP: Update the ntp-client-config profile. For example:
zSH> update ntp-client-config 0 Please provide the following: [q]uit. primary-ntp-server-ip-address: ---> {0.0.0.0}: 192.168.8.100 secondary-ntp-server-ip-address: -> {0.0.0.0}: local-timezone: ------------------> {gmt}: pacific daylight-savings-time: -----------> {false}: .................... Save changes? [s]ave, [c]hange or [q]uit: s Record updated.

User accounts
MALC users have access to the CLI and are able to configure and administer the system.

Adding users
Every administrative user on the system must have a user account. The account specifies their username and password, as well as their privilege level, which determines their access to commands. Users with admin privileges have access to all the administrative commands. Users with user privileges have access to a very limited set of commands. The highest level of access is useradmin, which allows the creation of user accounts.

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Note: When entering access level responses, enter yes completely or the CLI interprets the response as no. To add a user, enter the following commands:
zSH> adduser Please provide the following: [q]uit. User Name: jjsmith User Prompt[zSH>]: Please select user access levels. admin: -------> {no}: yes zhonedebug: --> {no}: voice: -------> {no}: data: --------> {no}: manuf: -------> {no}: database: ----> {no}: systems: -----> {no}: tool: --------> {no}: useradmin: ---> {no}: yes .................................. User name:(jjsmith) User prompt:(zSH>) Access Levels: (admin)(useradmin) Save new account? [s]ave, [c]hange or [q]uit: s User record saved. TEMPORARY PASSWORD: hmj4mxFU

Commands with zhonedebug privilege levels are intended for use by Zhone development only. Immediately after activating the user account, you should change the password something you can remember, as explained in the next section.

Changing default user passwords


When adding users, the system automatically assigns a temporary password to each user. Most users will want to change their password. The changepass command changes the password for the current logged in user. The following is an example of changing a password:
zSH> changepass Current Password: New Password: Confirm New Password: Password change successful.

Deleting users
To delete a user, enter the deleteuser command and specify the username:
zSH> deleteuser jsmith OK to delete this account? [yes] or [no]: yes

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User record deleted.

Deleting the admin user account


In addition to deleting regular user accounts, you can also delete the admin user account. This account is automatically created by the system and provides full access to the CLI. Note: You cannot delete the admin account (or any other user account with useradmin privileges) if you are currently logged into it. To delete the admin account:
zSH> deleteuser admin

If desired, you can recreate an account named admin after deleting it:
zSH> adduser admin Please provide the following: [q]uit. User Name: admin User Prompt[zSH>]: Please select user access levels. admin: -------> {no}: yes zhonedebug: --> {no}: voice: -------> {no}: yes data: --------> {no}: yes manuf: -------> {no}: yes database: ----> {no}: yes systems: -----> {no}: yes tool: --------> {no}: yes useradmin: ---> {no}: yes .................................. User name:(admin) User prompt:(zSH>) Access Levels: (admin)(voice)(data)(manuf)(database)(systems)(tools)(use radmin) Save new account? [s]ave, [c]hange or [q]uit: s User record saved. TEMPORARY PASSWORD: hmj4mxFU

Resetting passwords
If a user forgets their password, an administrative user can reset the password and generate a new one using the resetpass command, as in the following example:
zSH> resetpass jsmith Password:

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Radius support
The MALC supports local and RADIUS (Remote Authentication Dial In User Service) access authentication. The MALC can be configured for local authentication, RADIUS authentication, or RADIUS then local authentication. RADIUS users are configured with the Service-Type attribute as Administrative-User or NAS-Prompt-User. RADIUS is used for only login authentication, not severity levels. Table 14 shows the mapping of service-type to MALC permissions.
Table 14: Service type mapping to MALC permissions Service-Type Attribute MALC permissions

Administrative-User NAS-Prompt-User

admin, zhonedebug, voice, data, manuf, database, systems, tools, useradmin admin, voice, data, manuf, database, systems, tools, useradmin

When establishing a connection to the MALC with RADIUS authentication, the MALC passes RADIUS information securely to the RADIUS server. The RADIUS server then authenicates the user and either allows or denies access to the MALC. If access is denied and the local authentication option is also configured, the MALC then authenticates access based on the locally configured users and passwords. For logins and failed logins, a console message is generated with user ID and IP address of the device from which the login originated. Failed logins also are logged as alert level messages in the MALC system log file. By default, RADIUS access uses the UDP port 1812 for authentication.This parameter can be changed in the radius-client profile.
Figure 39: MALC RADIUS authentication

Telnet user

Telnet

IP RADIUS server

MALC Console user

Local authentication RADIUS authentication

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Note: Follow the RADIUS server guidelines for RADIUS configuration instructions. For example, when using the MALC with the FreeRadius server:

Create only one entry in the clients.conf file for each subnet or
individual MALC. For individual MALCs, the IP in this file must match the IP address of the outbound interface used by the MALC to connect to the RADIUS server.

The MALC uses the value stored in the RADIUS system.sysname


file for the NAS-Identifier attribute.

The shared-secret in the MALC radius-client profile, must exactly


match the shared-secret in the RADIUS client entry.

Configuring RADIUS support


The MALC can be configured for local authentication, RADIUS authentication, or RADIUS then local authentication. Multiple radius-client profiles can be defined using the index and subindex numbers. This index scheme can be used to create index numbers for groups of RADIUS servers. When an index number is specified in the system profile, the MALC attempts authenication from each RADIUS server in that group in sequential order of the subindex numbers. To configure RADIUS support: Note: Before beginning this procedure, ensure that the MALC has IP connectivity to the RADIUS server. 1 2 Update the RADIUS server with settings for the Zhone prompts. Create a radius-client profile on the MALC with the desired index number and RADIUS settings for server name, shared secret, number of retries, and other parameters. The first number in the index is used to group radius-client profiles so multiple profiles can be assigned to a MALC. The second number in the index specifies the order in which radius-client profiles are referenced. This example specifies the radius-client 1/1 with server name radius1 and a shared-secret of secret. A DNS resolver must be configured in the system to resolve the server name and IP address.If a DNS resolver is not available, specify the IP address of the The index 1/1 specifies that this profile is the first profile in group 1.

zSH> new radius-client 1/1 Please provide the following: [q]uit. server-name: ----> {}: radius1.test.com [DNS resolver must be configured in the system.] udp-port: -------> {1812}: shared-secret: --> {** password **}: secret retry-count: ----> {5}: retry-interval: -> {1}: .................... Save new record? [s]ave, [c]hange or [q]uit: s

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Record created.

Another method to reference the RADIUS server is by specifying the IP address. This example specifies the radius-client 1/1 with server IP address 172.24.36.148 and a shared-secret of secret. The index 1/1 specifies that this profile is the first profile in group 1.
zSH> new radius-client 1/1 Please provide the following: [q]uit. server-name: ----> {}: 172.24.36.248 udp-port: -------> {1812}: shared-secret: --> {** password **}: secret retry-count: ----> {5}: retry-interval: -> {1}: .................... Save new record? [s]ave, [c]hange or [q]uit: s Record created.

Create another radius-client profile on the MALC with the desired RADIUS settings for server name, shared secret, number of retries, and other parameters. This example specifies the radius-client 1/2 with server IP address 172.24.36.148 and a shared-secret of secret. The index 1/2 specifies that this profile is the second profile in group 1.

zSH> new radius-client 1/2 Please provide the following: [q]uit. server-name: ----> {}: 172.24.36.249 udp-port: -------> {1812}: shared-secret: --> {** password **}: secret retry-count: ----> {5}: retry-interval: -> {1}: .................... Save new record? [s]ave, [c]hange or [q]uit: s Record created.

Create additional radius-client profiles for each additional RADIUS server to be assigned to this MALC. 4 In the system profile on the MALC, set the desired user authentication method and specify the index of the radius profile to use. This examples specifies the radiusauthindex of 1. This index is configured with two radius-client profiles (1/1, 1/2). The MALC first attempts authenication using the server specified in radius-client 1/1. If this authenitication fails, the MALC attempts authenication using radius-client 1/2 server. If this authentication also fails, the MALC then attempts authentication based on the authentication mode setting in the system profile. This example uses radiusthenlocal. Caution: If the radius authentication mode is used, local authentication is disabled so the MALC may become inaccessible if IP connectivity to the RADIUS server is lost or other changes prevent the MALC from receiving RADIUS authentication.

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zSH> update system 0 Please provide the following: [q]uit. syscontact: -----------> {Zhone Global Services and Support 7001 Oakport Street Oakland Ca. (877) Zhone20 (946-6320) Fax (510)777-7113 support@zhone.com}: sysname: --------------> {Malc1}: syslocation: ----------> {Oakland}: enableauthtraps: ------> {disabled}: setserialno: ----------> {0}: zmsexists: ------------> {true}: zmsconnectionstatus: --> {inactive}: zmsipaddress: ---------> {172.16.49.76}: configsyncexists: -----> {false}: configsyncoverflow: ---> {false}: configsyncpriority: ---> {high}: configsyncaction: -----> {noaction}: configsyncfilename: ---> {172.16.88.14_4_1178142210378}: configsyncstatus: -----> {synccomplete}: configsyncuser: -------> {zmsftp}: configsyncpasswd: -----> {** private **}: ** read-only ** numshelves: -----------> {1}: shelvesarray: ---------> {}: numcards: -------------> {3}: ipaddress: ------------> {172.16.88.14}: alternateipaddress: ---> {0.0.0.0}: countryregion: --------> {us}: primaryclocksource: ---> {0/0/0/0/0}: ringsource: -----------> {internalringsourcelabel}: revertiveclocksource: -> {true}: voicebandwidthcheck: --> {false}: alarm-levels-enabled: -> {critical+major+minor+warning}: userauthmode: ---------> {local}: radiusthenlocal radiusauthindex: ------> {0}: 1 .................... Save changes? [s]ave, [c]hange or [q]uit: s Record updated. zSH>

After completing the RADIUS configuration, the MALC displays console messages for RADIUS login and logout activity.

For users logging in through RADIUS, the system prompt appears as the username@systemname. For example, the system prompt for a basic user on a MALC using the default Zhone Malc system name will appear as basicuser@Zhone malc. The system name is configured using the sysname parameter in the System 0 profile.

Viewing chassis and slot information


The following commands display information about the status of the system:

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slots

To view overall status of the system, use the shelfctrl monitor command:
zSH> shelfctrl monitor Shelf Monitor CPLD version: 1.2 Shelf Monitor Firmware version: 1.6 Inlet temperature 79 degrees. Left outlet temperature sensor: 78 degrees (normal) Right outlet temperature sensor: 78 degrees (normal) Power Supply A: failure Power Supply B: normal Fan status: OK. System: Critical alarm set. Card 12: Critical alarm set.

To view general system statistics:


zSH> shelfctrl stats Shelf Controller Message Statistics ----------------------------------Card updates: 42 Card ECHO: 0 Directory services messages: 2 Clock messages: 178707 Lease messages: 496 Heartbeat messages: 470902 Card update errors: 0 Card ECHO errors: 0 Directory services errors: 0 Clock errors: 0 Lease errors: 0 Heartbeat errors: 0 Receive errors: 0

To verify whether the shelf is active:


zSH> shelfctrl show Shelf Controller Address: 01:02:12 Shelf Registry Address: 01:02:75 Lease ID: 0x022b0008_00000036 State: active

To view the system slot cards and their status:


zSH> slots 1: MALC OC3 (RUNNING) 5: MALC ADSL AC5 (RUNNING) 6: MALC ADSL AC5 (LOADING) 7: MALC ADSL AC5 (RUNNING) 8: MALC ADSL AC5 (RUNNING) 9: MALC ADSL (RUNNING) 13: MALC MTAC (RUNNING) 16: MALC ADSL AC6 (RUNNING) 20: MALC GSHDSL (RUNNING)

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21: MALC GSHDSL (RUNNING)

To view information about a particular slot card, use the slots command and specify a slot number. For example:
zSH> slots 1 Type Card Version EEPROM Version Serial # CLEI Code Card-Profile ID Shelf Slot State Mode Heartbeat check Longest hbeat Fault reset Uptime : : : : : : : : : : : : : : MALC OC3 1 1 7714040 No CLEI 1/1/5011 1 1 RUNNING FUNCTIONAL enabled 50 enabled 1 hour, 49 minutes

Controlling Telnet access


The port-access profile specifies from which IP addresses users can telnet to the MALC. If a hosts IP address is not specified in a port-access profile, users from that host cannot telnet to the MALC. These restrictions take effect after the first port-access profile has been created. By default, no port-access profiles are created, so telnet access is not restricted.

Creating port-access profile entries


Up to 100 port-access profile entries can be created on a MALC. To create a port-access profile entry: Create a new port-access profile and specify the telnet port number, host/ network IP address to be granted access, and the netmask applied to the IP address to allow access to a range of IP addresses. This example creates port-access entry 1 on telnet port 23 and allows hosts on the 172.16.41.xx network to telnet to the MALC. Note: Typically, only port 23 is used for telnet access.

zSH> new port-access 1 Please provide the following: [q]uit. portNumber: -> {0}: 23 portArg1: ---> {0.0.0.0}: 172.16.41.0 portArg2: ---> {0.0.0.0}: 255.255.255.0 ....................S= Save new record? [s]ave, [c]hange or [q]uit: s

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New record saved.

Displaying port-access profile entries


To display configured port-access profile entries use the list command:
zSH> list port-access port-access 1 1 entry found.

Modifying port-access profile entries


To modify a configured port-access profile entry use the update command. The following example changes the entrys source IP address to 172.16.40.0:
zSH> update port-access 1 portNumber: -> {23} portArg1: ---> {172.16.41.0} 172.16.40.0 portArg2: ---> {255.255.255.0} 1 entry found. .................... Save new record? [s]ave, [c]hange or [q]uit: s Updated record saved.

TFTP server support


By default, the MALC runs as an TFTP server enabling files stored in the root/pubs folder to be downloaded to other devices with connectivity to the MALC. The following example downloads the file file.bin from a MALC with the IP address 172.24.15.19.
image download 172.24.15.19 /pub/file.bin file.bin

Testing
This section describes the following:

Activating or deactivating interfaces on page 353 BER tests on page 354 IMA test pattern procedure on page 356 Loopbacks on page 360 Viewing IMA group status on page 366

Activating or deactivating interfaces


Physical interfaces on the MALC have associated if-translate profiles, which enable or disable the interfaces. To change the state of an interface, use the

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adminstatus parameter in the if-translate profile associated with the interface. The if-translate profile uses the following syntax:
if-translate shelf-slot-port-subport/type

For example, to activate a MALC T1 interface:


zSH> update if-translate 1-1-1-0/ds1 Please provide the following: [q]uit. ifindex: -----> {1}: . shelf: -------> {1}: slot: --------> {1}: port: --------> {1}: subport: -----> {0}: type: --------> {ds1}: adminstatus: -> {down}: up physical-flag: ----> {true}: iftype-extension: -> {0}: ifName: -----------> {}: redundancy-param1: -> {0}: .................... Save changes? [s]ave, [c]hange or [q]uit: s Record updated.

For example, to deactivate a MALC T1 interface:


zSH> update if-translate 1-1-1-0/ds1 Please provide the following: [q]uit. ifindex: -----> {1}: . shelf: -------> {1}: slot: --------> {1}: port: --------> {1}: subport: -----> {0}: type: --------> {ds1}: adminstatus: -> {up}: down physical-flag: ----> {true}: iftype-extension: -> {0}: ifName: -----------> {}: redundancy-param1: -> {0}: .................... Save changes? [s]ave, [c]hange or [q]uit: s Record updated.

BER tests
The send-code parameter in the ds1-profile controls loopbacks and BER tests on the T1 interface. The following table describes the BERT options.

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Parameter

Description

send-code

Indicates what type of code is being sent across the DS1 interface by the device. Setting this parameter causes the interface to send the requested code. Values: sendQRSSPattern Sends a Quasi-Random Signal Source (QRSS) test pattern. send511Pattern Sends a 511 bit fixed test pattern. send3in24Pattern Sends a fixed test pattern of 3 bits set in 24. send2047Pattern Sends 2047 test pattern. send1in2Pattern Sends alternate one, zero pattern

Activating a BER test


Note: BER tests disrupt traffic on the interface.

Update the ds1-profile to specify the BERT pattern:

zSH> update ds1-profile 1-1-1-0/ds1 Please provide the following: [q]uit. line-type: ----------------------> {esf}: line-code: ----------------------> {b8zs}: send-code: ----------------------> {sendnocode}: sendqrsspattern circuit-id: ---------------------> {ds1}: loopback-config: ----------------> {noloop}: signal-mode: --------------------> {robbedbit}: fdl: ----------------------------> {fdlnone}: dsx-line-length: ----------------> {dsx0}: line-status_change-trap-enable: -> {enabled}: channelization: -----------------> {enabledds0}: ds1-mode: -----------------------> {csu}: csu-line-length: ----------------> {csu00}: clock-source-eligible: ----------> {noteligible}: transmit-clock-source: ----------> {throughtiming} cell-scramble: ------------------> {false} coset-polynomial: ---------------> {true}: protocol-emulation: -------------> {network} signal-type: --------------------> {loopstart} ds1-group-number: ---------------> {0} line-power: ---------------------> {disabled} .................... Save changes? [s]ave, [c]hange or [q]uit: s Record updated.

To end a BER test:

zSH> update ds1-profile 1-1-1-0/ds1

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Please provide the following: [q]uit. line-type: ----------------------> {esf}: line-code: ----------------------> {b8zs}: send-code: ----------------------> {sendqrsspattern}: sendnocode circuit-id: ---------------------> {ds1}: loopback-config: ----------------> {noloop}: signal-mode: --------------------> {robbedbit}: fdl: ----------------------------> {fdlnone}: dsx-line-length: ----------------> {dsx0}: line-status_change-trap-enable: -> {enabled}: channelization: -----------------> {enabledds0}: ds1-mode: -----------------------> {csu}: csu-line-length: ----------------> {csu00}: clock-source-eligible: ----------> {noteligible}: transmit-clock-source: ----------> {throughtiming cell-scramble: ------------------> {false} coset-polynomial: ---------------> {true}: protocol-emulation: -------------> {network} signal-type: --------------------> {loopstart} ds1-group-number: ---------------> {0} line-power: ---------------------> {disabled} .................... Save changes? [s]ave, [c]hange or [q]uit: s Record updated.

IMA test pattern procedure


The MALC supports IMA test pattern procedures to validate the status of the IMA link. A test pattern sent over a transmit link is looped back over all available receive interfaces. Test pattern procedures do not interrupt traffic.

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The following table describes the test pattern procedure parameters in the ima-group-profile.
Parameter Description

testLinkIfIndex

Indicates the interface used to transmit the test pattern. The test pattern is looped back from the far end device over each active link in the IMA group. Note that this value is not the same as the txImaId value. Values: A valid interface on the system in the form shelf-slot-port-subport/type This is the link whose link identifier (LID) value is inserted in the Tx LID field of the transmitted ICP cells. Default: 0

testPattern

Specifies the transmit Test Pattern in an IMA group loopback operation. A value in the range 0 to 254 designates a specific pattern. Values: 1 to 254 1 indicates that the test pattern is randomly generated. Default: 1

testProcStatus

Enables or disables the Test Pattern Procedure. Values: disabled Deactivates the test pattern procedure. operating Activates the test pattern procedure. Default: disabled

Testing the IMA link with a random test pattern


A test pattern procedure with a random pattern will run continuously until it is disabled. Use the imatppshow command to view the status of the test (as explained in Viewing test procedure status on page 359). To test the IMA link with a randomly generated test link and pattern (the default): 1 Specify an interface to transmit the test over:
zSH> update ima-group-profile 1/1/1 Please provide the following: [q]uit. groupSymmetry: ---> {symmetricoperation}: minNumTxLinks: ---> {1}: minNumRxLinks: ---> {1}: txClkMode: -------> {ctc}: txImaId: ---------> {1}: txFrameLength: ---> {m128}: diffDelayMax: ----> {75}: alphaValue: ------> {2}: betaValue: -------> {2}: gammaValue: ------> {1}:

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testLinkIfIndex: -> {0}: 1-1-1-0/ds1 IMA link to test testPattern: -----> {-1}: testProcStatus: --> {disabled}: operating txTimingRefLink: -> {0}: rxTimingRefLink: -> {0}: groupRestoreNumRetry: -> {0}: groupRestoreNumDelay: -> {0}: .................... Save changes? [s]ave, [c]hange or [q]uit: s Record updated.

To disable the test:


zSH> update ima-group-profile 1/1/1 Please provide the following: [q]uit. groupSymmetry: ---> {symmetricoperation}: minNumTxLinks: ---> {1}: minNumRxLinks: ---> {1}: txClkMode: -------> {ctc}: txImaId: ---------> {1}: txFrameLength: ---> {m128}: diffDelayMax: ----> {75}: alphaValue: ------> {2}: betaValue: -------> {2}: gammaValue: ------> {1}: testLinkIfIndex: -> {1/1/1/0/ds1}: testPattern: -----> {-1}: testProcStatus: --> {enabled}: disabled txTimingRefLink: -> {0}: rxTimingRefLink: -> {0}: groupRestoreNumRetry: -> {0}: groupRestoreNumDelay: -> {0}: .................... Save changes? [s]ave, [c]hange or [q]uit: s Record updated.

Testing the IMA link with a specific test pattern


A test with a specified test pattern runs until it verifies link connectivity. Use the imatppshow command to view the status of the test (as explained in Viewing test procedure status on page 359). 1 To specify a particular test pattern (for example, 23):
zSH> update ima-group-profile 1/1/1 Please provide the following: [q]uit. groupSymmetry: ---> {symmetricoperation}: minNumTxLinks: ---> {1}: minNumRxLinks: ---> {1}: txClkMode: -------> {ctc}: txImaId: ---------> {1}: txFrameLength: ---> {m128}: diffDelayMax: ----> {75}: alphaValue: ------> {2}:

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betaValue: -------> {2}: gammaValue: ------> {1}: testLinkIfIndex: -> {0}: 1-1-1-0/ds1 IMA link to test testPattern: -----> {-1}: 23 testProcStatus: --> {disabled}: operating txTimingRefLink: -> {0}: rxTimingRefLink: -> {0}: groupRestoreNumRetry: -> {0}: groupRestoreNumDelay: -> {0}: .................... Save changes? [s]ave, [c]hange or [q]uit: s Record updated.

To run the test again, update the ima-group-profile without making any changes. 2 To disable the test:
zSH> update ima-group-profile 1/1/1 Please provide the following: [q]uit. groupSymmetry: ---> {symmetricoperation}: minNumTxLinks: ---> {1}: minNumRxLinks: ---> {1}: txClkMode: -------> {ctc}: txImaId: ---------> {1}: txFrameLength: ---> {m128}: diffDelayMax: ----> {75}: alphaValue: ------> {2}: betaValue: -------> {2}: gammaValue: ------> {1}: testLinkIfIndex: -> {1/1/1/0/ds1}: testPattern: -----> {-1}: testProcStatus: --> {enabled}: disabled txTimingRefLink: -> {0}: rxTimingRefLink: -> {0}: groupRestoreNumRetry: -> {0}: groupRestoreNumDelay: -> {0}: .................... Save changes? [s]ave, [c]hange or [q]uit: s Record updated.

Viewing test procedure status


Use the imatppshow command to view the status of the test: If the test is successful, imaGroupTestProcStatus displays OPERATING:
zSH> imatppshow 1 TestLink .....................: 2 imaGroupTestPattern ..........: 23 imaGroupTestProcStatus .......: OPERATING

If the test fails (if, for example, the remote link is down), imaGroupTestProcStatus displays LINKFAIL:

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zSH> imatppshow 1 TestLink .....................: 2 imaGroupTestPattern ..........: 71 imaGroupTestProcStatus .......: LINKFAIL

After the test is disabled, the imaGroupTestProcStatus displays DISABLED:


zSH> imatppshow 1 TestLink .....................: 2 imaGroupTestPattern ..........: 23 imaGroupTestProcStatus .......: DISABLED

Loopbacks
The MALC support the following types of loopbacks:

T1 loopbacks on page 360 DS3 loopbacks on page 363 SONET loopbacks on page 362 ISDN loopbacks on page 365

T1 loopbacks
The loopback-config parameter in the ds1-profile controls T1 loopbacks. The following table describes the loopback options.
Parameter Description

loopback-config

The loopback configuration of the DS1 interface. Values: noloop Not in the loopback state. A device that is not capable of performing a loopback on the interface always returns this as its value. lineloop The received signal at this interface is looped through the device. Typically the received signal is looped back for retransmission after it has passed through the device's framing function. payloadloop The received signal on this interface does not go through the device (minimum penetration) but is looped back out. Default: noloop

Activating a T1 loopback
Note: Loopbacks disrupt traffic on the interface.

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Specify the type of loopback:


zSH> update ds1-profile 1-1-1-0/ds1 Please provide the following: [q]uit. line-type: ----------------------> {esf}: line-code: ----------------------> {b8zs}: send-code: ----------------------> {sendnocode}: circuit-id: ---------------------> {ds1}: loopback-config: ----------------> {noloop}: lineloop signal-mode: --------------------> {robbedbit}: fdl: ----------------------------> {fdlnone}: dsx-line-length: ----------------> {dsx0}: line-status_change-trap-enable: -> {enabled}: channelization: -----------------> {enabledds0}: ds1-mode: -----------------------> {csu}: csu-line-length: ----------------> {csu00}: clock-source-eligible: ----------> {noteligible}: transmit-clock-source: ----------> {throughtiming} cell-scramble: ------------------> {false} coset-polynomial: ---------------> {true}: protocol-emulation: -------------> {network} signal-type: --------------------> {loopstart} ds1-group-number: ---------------> {0} line-power: ---------------------> {disabled} .................... Save changes? [s]ave, [c]hange or [q]uit: s Record updated.

Note: Only one loopback can be active at a time. If there is a loopback running, a message similar to the following will appear when you attempt to run another loopback:
1/1: ds1rp: : l=3278: Please disable any active loopbacks on line 1:1:0:0

To stop the loopback:


zSH> update ds1-profile 1-1-1-0/ds1 Please provide the following: [q]uit. line-type: ----------------------> {esf}: line-code: ----------------------> {b8zs}: send-code: ----------------------> {sendlinecode}: circuit-id: ---------------------> {ds1}: loopback-config: ----------------> {lineloop}: noloop signal-mode: --------------------> {robbedbit}: fdl: ----------------------------> {fdlnone}: dsx-line-length: ----------------> {dsx0}: line-status_change-trap-enable: -> {enabled}: channelization: -----------------> {enabledds0}: ds1-mode: -----------------------> {csu}: csu-line-length: ----------------> {csu00}: clock-source-eligible: ----------> {noteligible}: transmit-clock-source: ----------> {throughtiming} cell-scramble: ------------------> {false}

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coset-polynomial: ---------------> {true}: protocol-emulation: -------------> {network} signal-type: --------------------> {loopstart} ds1-group-number: ---------------> {0} line-power: ---------------------> {disabled} .................... Save changes? [s]ave, [c]hange or [q]uit: s Record updated.

SONET loopbacks
A SONET terminal loopback is a SONET circuit with a loop that terminates at the MALC OC3-c/STM1 interface. The medium-loopback-config parameter in the sonet-profile specifies the type of loopback:
Parameter Description

medium-loopback-config

How the SONET loopback is configured. Values: sonetnoloop SONET circuit, with no loop. sonetfacilityloop All incoming data on the Rx interface is retransmitted out of the Tx interface. Used to check the circuit between a remote device and the MALC and to test the MALC optical module. sonetterminalloop All of the data transmitted on the Tx interface is also internally looped back to the Rx interface. Used to verify that the ATM and PHY layers are communicating. sonetotherloop All incoming data on the Rx interface is retransmitted out of the Tx interface. Used to check the circuit between the IAD and a remote unit and to verify that the optical module and the SONET PHY are working.

Looping back the SONET interface


The following example initiates SONET terminal loopbacks. 1 Set the interface to testing:
zSH> update if-translate 1-1-1-0/sonet shelf-slot-port-subport/type Please provide the following: [q]uit. ifindex: -----> {232}: . shelf: -------> {1}: slot: --------> {1}: port: --------> {1}: subport: -----> {0}: type: --------> {sonet}:

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adminstatus: -> {down}: testing physical-flag: ----> {false}: iftype-extension: -> {none}: ifName: -----------> {}: .................... Save changes? [s]ave, [c]hange or [q]uit: s Record updated.

Configure the type of loopback:

zSH> update sonet-profile 1-1-1-0/sonet Please provide the following: [q]uit. medium-type: ---------------> {sonet}: medium-line-coding: --------> {sonetmediumnrz}: medium-line-type: ----------> {sonetshortsinglemode}: medium-circuit-identifier: -> {}: medium-loopback-config: ----> {sonetnoloop}: sonetterminalloop medium-scramble-config: ----> {sonetscrambleon}: path-current-width: --------> {sts3cstm1}: clock-external-recovery: ---> {enabled}: clock-transmit-source: -----> {looptiming}: medium-cell-scramble-config: -> {true}: medium-line-scramble-config: -> {true}: .................... Save changes? [s]ave, [c]hange or [q]uit: s Record saved.

Note: The adminstatus of the SONET line remains up and SONET communications continue during SONET terminal loopbacks.

DS3 loopbacks
The loopback-config parameter in the ds3-profile controls DS3 loopbacks. The following table describes the loopback options.

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Parameter

Description

loopback-config

Specifies the loopback configuration of the interface. Values: dsx3noloop The DS3 interface is not in the loopback state. dsx3payloadloop The received signal at the DS3 interface is looped through the system for retransmission. dsx3inwardloop The sent signal at the DS3 interface is looped back through the system. dsx3lineloop The received signal at the DS3 interface does not go through the device before it is looped.

Activating a DS3 loopback


Note: Loopbacks disrupt traffic on the interface.

Specify the type of loopback:

zSH> update ds3-profile 1-1-2-0/ds3 line-type: ---------------> {dsx3cbitparity} line-coding: -------------> {dsx3b3zs} send-code: ---------------> {dsx3sendnocode} circuit-id: --------------> {} loopback-config: ---------> {dsx3noloop} specify type of loopback transmit-clock-source: ---> {looptiming} line-length-meters: ------> {0} line-status-trap-enable: -> {enabled} channelization: ----------> {disabled} ds1-for-remote-loop: -----> {0} far-end-equip-code: ------> {} far-end-loc-id-code: -----> {} far-end-frame-id-code: ---> {} far-end-unit-code: -------> {} far-end-fac-id-code: -----> {} medium-scramble-config: --> {true} medium-frame-config: -----> {e3frameg832} medium-atmframe-config: --> {dsx3atmframingdirectcellmapped}

Note: Only one loopback can be active at a time.

To stop the loopback:

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zSH> update ds3-profile 1-1-2-0/ds3 line-type: ---------------> {dsx3cbitparity} line-coding: -------------> {dsx3b3zs} send-code: ---------------> {dsx3sendnocode} circuit-id: --------------> {} loopback-config: ---------> {dsx3payloadloop} dsx3noloop transmit-clock-source: ---> {looptiming} line-length-meters: ------> {0} line-status-trap-enable: -> {enabled} channelization: ----------> {disabled} ds1-for-remote-loop: -----> {0} far-end-equip-code: ------> {} far-end-loc-id-code: -----> {} far-end-frame-id-code: ---> {} far-end-unit-code: -------> {} far-end-fac-id-code: -----> {} medium-scramble-config: --> {true} medium-frame-config: -----> {e3frameg832} medium-atmframe-config: --> {dsx3atmframingdirectcellmapped}

ISDN loopbacks
Loopbacks can be run on the ISDN B and D channels. Note: Loopbacks disrupt traffic on the interface.

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Modify the loopback parameter in the isdn-profile to configure ISDN loopbacks:


Parameter Description

loopback

Initiates ISDN loopback on the U interface. Values: loop-back-none no loop back loop-back-b1-idl2-tr transparent loopback on the Interchip Digital Link, Version 2 (IDL2), which is used for transporting the ISDN channels towards the system (B1 channel) loop-back-b1-idl2-nt non-transparent loopback on the IDL2 interface towards the system (B1 channel) loop-back-b2-idl2-tr transparent loopback on the IDL2 interface towards the system (B2 channel) loop-back-b2-idl2-nt non-transparent loopback on the IDL2 interface towards the system (B2 channel) loop-back-2bd-idl2-tr transparent loopback on the IDL2 towards the system (2B + D channel) loop-back-2bd-idl2-nt non-transparent loopback on the IDL2 towards the system (2B + D channel) loop-back-2bd-u-interface-tr transparent loopback on the U interface towards the user (2B + D channel) loop-back-2bd-u-interface-nt non-transparent loopback on the U interface (2B + D channel) loop-back-2bd-external-analog loopback on the external analog interface towards the user (2B + D channel) Default: loop-back-none

zSH> update isdn-profile 1-14-1-0/isdnu Please provide the following: [q]uit. line-term-class: ---> {class1}: activation-timer2: -> {t2-50ms}: loopback: ----------> {loop-back-none}: loop-back-b1-idl2-tr Save changes? [s]ave, [c]hange or [q]uit: s Record updated.

Viewing IMA group status


The imarpshow command displays information about the MALC IMA group. The command uses the following syntax:
imarpshow [index]

where index is the IMA group number. For example:


zSH> imarpshow RP Info: rp state -------------------> RP_INITIALIZED address --------------------> 01:01:113

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rp shelf -------------------> rp slot --------------------> rp ima core started --------> imaGrpProfLeaseId ----------> LineRRProvLeaseId ----------> LineRRClientLeaseId --------> numImaGroups ---------------> ImaGroupIndecies: 1

1 1 TRUE 0x02070000_00000057 0x02070000_00000055 0x02070000_00000056 1

To display complete information about an IMA group, specify the group number:
zSH> imarpshow 1 RP Info: rp state -------------------> RP_INITIALIZED address --------------------> 01:01:113 rp shelf -------------------> 1 rp slot --------------------> 1 rp ima core started --------> TRUE imaGrpProfLeaseId ----------> 0x02070000_00000057 LineRRProvLeaseId ----------> 0x02070000_00000055 LineRRClientLeaseId --------> 0x02070000_00000056 numImaGroups ---------------> 1 ImaGroupIndecies: 1 IMA Group Index =1 .............................................. group status ==========> OOS ......................... group ne state --------> INSUFFICIENTLINKS group fe state --------> OPERATIONAL ......................... group ctlr state ------> GRP_INITIALIZED group ifIndex ---------> 11 group in service ------> TRUE driver attached -------> TRUE driver unit -----------> 0 auto-created ----------> FALSE ifxLeaseId ------------> 0x02070000_00000057 lineProfLeaseId -------> 0x02070000_00000057 lineGrpLeaseId --------> 0x02070000_00000057 ifStackLeaseId --------> 0x02070000_00000057 ds1LeaseId ------------> 0x00000000_00000000 ......................... ifxlateProfValid ----------------> TRUE ifxlatProf.ifIndex --------------> 11 ifxlatProf.shelf ----------------> 1 ifxlatProf.slot -----------------> 1 ifxlatProf.port -----------------> 2 ifxlatProf.ifType ---------------> ATMIMA ifxlatProf.adminStatus ----------> UP ......................... lineProfValid -------------------> TRUE lineProf.profileName ------------> Atm IMA Group default line profile lineProf.physicalAddress.shelf --> 1

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lineProf.physicalAddress.slot ---> 1 lineProf.physicalAddress.port ---> 2 lineProf.lineGroupName ----------> 11 ......................... lineGrpProfValid ----------------> TRUE lineGrpProf.groupName -----------> 1/1/1 lineGrpProf.primaryName ---------> 11 lineGrpProf.secondaryName -------> 0 lineGrpProf.primaryWeight -------> 0 lineGrpProf.secondaryWeight -----> 0 lineGrpProf.adminState ----------> UP ......................... imaGrpProfValid -----------------> TRUE imaGrpProf.groupSymmetry --------> SYMMETRICAL imaGrpProf.minNumTxLinks --------> 1 imaGrpProf.minNumRxLinks --------> 1 imaGrpProf.txClkMode ------------> CTC imaGrpProf.txImaId --------------> 1 imaGrpProf.txFrameLength --------> M128 imaGrpProf.diffDelayMax ---------> 75 imaGrpProf.alphaValue -----------> 1 imaGrpProf.betaValue ------------> 1 imaGrpProf.gammaValue -----------> 1 imaGrpProf.testLinkIfIndex ------> 0 imaGrpProf.testPattern ----------> -1 imaGrpProf.testProcStatus -------> DISABLED imaGrpProf.txTimingRefLink ------> 0 imaGrpProf.rxTimingRefLink ------> 0 ......................... Link#1 linkType -----------> DS1_PROFILE_LINETYPE_ESF ifIndex ------------> 2 framerstatus -------> OOS netxlinkstatus -----> NOT-IN-GROUP nerxlinkstatus -----> NOT-IN-GROUP .......................... ... ... ...

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MALC ATM OVERVIEW


This chapter describes ATM support on the MALC. It includes the following sections:

ATM overview, page 369 ATM data, page 370 ATM voice, page 370 Cross connects, page 371 Early packet discard (EPD) and partial packet discard (PPD), page 372 Usage parameter control (UPC), page 372 ATM validation, page 372 VPI and VCI ranges, page 373 Virtual channel and virtual path links, page 374 Service categories, page 375 Traffic descriptors, page 376 Connection admission control (CAC), page 379 ATM traffic policing, page 382 ATM statistics, page 387 Note: Read this chapter before configuring your device.

ATM overview
The MALC supports voice, video, and data communications with different networking requirements for each signaling type. Voice traffic is sensitive to delay and transported by ATM Adaption Layer 2 (AAL2) at a Constant Bit Rate (CBR). Data traffic is not sensitive to delay and is carried over ATM Adaption Layer 5 (AAL5) at an Unspecified Bit Rate (UBR). Video streams and videoondemand applications use Variable Bit RateReal Time (VBR-RT) over ATM Adaption Layer 5 (AAL5).

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For VoATM traffic on the voice gateway card, ATM traffic destined for the voice gateway card enters through one of the MALC uplink cards ATM interfaces and is terminated on the voice gateway card. It is sent as TDM traffic to the local exchange switch. Figure 40 illustrates ATM on the MALC.
Figure 40: ATM on the MALC

ATM

ATM

Local Exchange Switch

Layer 3 IP Layer 2 IP IP SAR ATM VCL/VPL DSL ATM CC ATM VCL/VPL Layer 1 ATM UNI Voice Gateway ATM VCL/VPL TDM

ATM data
The MALC communicates with subscriber integrated access devices (IADs) or DSL modems using ATM over DSL interfaces. The MALC relays the traffic to the ATM Trunking card, which provides a high-speed interface to an ATM network. The MALC can also terminate management traffic and route it over the Ethernet to a management station. The MALC supports LLC encapsulation for AAL5 connections that it terminates.

ATM voice
For voice traffic, the MALC supports derived voice using AAL2 over DSL interfaces. The ATM traffic is sent to the Uplink card, then onto the ATM network.

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ATM Video

On the MALC, voice is transported by ATM Adaption Layer 2 (AAL2) at a Constant Bit Rate (CBR). The MALC supports 120 AAL2 VCLs for POTS to AAL2 and ISDN to AAL2 voice connections. For VoATM traffic on the voice gateway card using VC-switching, the maximum number of VCs that can be allocated to an individual VC-switched VPI is determined by the zhoneAtmVpiMaxVci parameter in the atm-vpi profile. In VP-switching, the maximum VCI value that can be allocated to an individual VP-switched VP on the voice gateway card is determined by the zhoneAtmMaxVciPerVp parameter in the atm-vpi profile. Note: For more information on ATM support for the Voice Gateway card, see the MALC Hardware Installation Guide.

ATM Video
ATM video signaling has different networking requirements than voice and data. Video streams and videoondemand applications use Variable Bit RateReal Time (VBR-RT) over ATM Adaption Layer 5 (AAL5). Each video channel requires enough bandwidth to carry compressed video plus the IP and ATM overhead. For example, if the video stream is 2.5 Mbps with maximum packet size of 1316 bytes per packet, the formula for traffic descriptor is as follows: 2500000 / 8 /1316 = 238 video packets per second Total IP packet size = 1316 + 20 + 8 + 14 = 1358 bytes/packet 1358 bytes/packet / 48 bytes/cell = 28.333 cells/packet = 29 cells/packet 238 Packets/Sec * 29 Cells/Packet = 6902 cells/sec. Therefore, the PCR on the traffic descriptor should be 7000. If a system is deployed with 4 Video channels at 2.5 Mbps encoding, the traffic descriptor should be: 4 * 7000 = 28000 cells/ sec rtvbr.

Cross connects
The MALC supports creating cross connects between any of its ATM-capable ports.

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Early packet discard (EPD) and partial packet discard (PPD)


In EPD, the ATM interface monitors the AAL5 traffic and discards an entire data frame if its output buffers do not have the space to process it. In PPD, the ATM interface drops the remaining cells of the frame if other cells of the frame have already been dropped. Both of these techniques increase the efficiency of the data transfer by dropping frames that have already been determined to be errored and will have to be retransmitted. Both EPD and PPD are disabled by default on the MALC.

Usage parameter control (UPC)


UPC is the process of monitoring and controlling the ATM traffic by enforcing the traffic parameters. The MALC allows disabling of UPC on a per-traffic descriptor basis. UPC is enabled by default.

ATM validation
The Zhone CLI performs the following validation on ATM configuration:

VCLs cannot be created using VCIs in the reserved range (0 to 31), for any VPI. VCLs being used in a cross connect cannot be deleted. To delete a VCL, first delete the cross connect. ATM traffic descriptors used in VCLs cannot be modified. A VCL can be used in only one cross connect.

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VPI and VCI ranges

VPI and VCI ranges


The MALC supports configurable VPI/VCI ranges for all ATM-capable cards except the T1/E1 32 port card. VPI/VCI ranges are configured in atm-vpi records. Table 15 lists the VPI/VCI support for MALC cards. Note the following about VPI/VCI ranges:

After creating or modifying atm-vpi records, the card must be rebooted. A maximum of 256 VPIs can be created on a port.

As atm-vpi records are created, the system allocates connections from this pool. Each VP-switched VP uses one connection and each VC-switched VP uses one connection per allowable VC.
Table 15: VPI/VCI ranges for MALC cards Card Default ranges Supported ranges Maximum connections per card

Uplink cards MALC-UPLINK-DS3/ E3-ATM/IP MALC-UPLINK-T1/ E1-ATM/TDM/IP-16 MALC-UPLINK-OC-3C/ STM1-ATM/IP Line cards DSL (except the ADSL 48 port card) MALC-ADSL-48B cards VPI: 0 to 1 (per port) VCI: 32 to 255 (per VCI) VPI: 0 to 15 (per port) VCI: 0 to 63 (per VCI) MALC-ADSL-48-A/M VPI: 0-15 VCI: 0-63 VPI: 0 to 255 (per port) VCI: 32 to 1,023 (per VCI) VPI: 0 to 63 (per port) VCI: 0 to 63 (per VCI) VPI: 0-63 VCI: 0-63 VPI: 0 to 63 (per port) VCI: 0 to 63 (per VCI) VPI: 0 to 255 VCI: 32 to 1,023 VPI: 0 to 255 (per port) VCI: 0 to 1,023 (per VCI) 448 (VC-switched to Uplink) 48 (VP-switched to Uplink) 448 (VC-switched to Uplink) 48 (VP-switched to Uplink) 448 (VC-switched to Uplink) 48 (VP-switched to Uplink) 448 (VC-switched to Uplink) 48 (VP-switched to Uplink) 448 (VC-switched to Uplink) 48 (VP-switched to Uplink) 448 (VC-switched to Uplink) 48 (VP-switched to Uplink) VPI: 0 to 3 VCI: 32 to 1,023 VPI: 0 to 3 VCI: 32 to 511 VPI: 0 to 7 VCI: 32 to 1,023 VPI: 0 to 255 (per port) VCI: 32 to 4,095 (per VCI) VPI: 0 to 255 (per port) VCI: 32 to 4,095 (per VCI) VPI: 0 to 255 (per port) VCI: 32 to 4,095 (per VCI) 16,384 16,384 16,384

MALC-ADSL+SPLTR-48 A/M-2S
MALC-BPON-SC-1 card

VPI: 0 to 15 (per port) VCI: 0 to 63 (per VCI) VPI: 0 to 63 VCI: 32 to 255

MALC-T1/E1-CES-12

VPI: 0 to 1 VCI: 0 to 255

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Table 15: VPI/VCI ranges for MALC cards (Continued) Card Default ranges Supported ranges Maximum connections per card

MALC-T1/E1-ATM-32

VPI: 0 to 7 (per UNI interface or IMA group) VCI: 32 to 63 (per UNI interface or IMA group)

VPI: 0 to 7 VCI: 32 to 63

448 (VC-switched to Uplink) 48 (VP-switched to Uplink) 496 total per card

MALC-VG-T1/E1-32-2ST1/ E1 32VG MALC-VG-T1/E1-8-2S

VP-switched: VPI: 16 to 63 (per card) VCI: 32 to 8,192 (per card) VPI: 0-7 VCI: 32-63

VP-switched: VPI: 16 to 63 (per card) VCI: 32 to 8,192 (per card) VPI: 0-63 VCI: 32-63

448 (VC-switched to Uplink) 7,680 (VP-switched to Uplink) (no external ATM interface)

MALC-ReachDSL-24

224 (VC-switched to Uplink) 24 (VP-switched to Uplink) 248 total per card

MALC-G.SHDSL-48

VPI: 0-7 VCI: 32-127

VPI: 0-63 VCI: 32-127 VPI: 0-63 VCI: 32-63

448 (VC-switched to Uplink) 48 (VP-switched to Uplink) 224 (VC-switched to Uplink) 24 (VP-switched to Uplink) 248 total per card

MALC-G.SHDSL-24 MALC-G.SHDLS-4W-12

VPI: 0-15 VCI: 32-63

ADSL+POTS-TDM/ PKT-48A/M-2S ADSL+POTS-TDM-48A/ M-2S MALC- ISDN 4B3T-24 MALC-ISDN 2B1Q-24 MALC- POTS-GBL-TDM/ PKT-24 MALC-VDSL2-24 MALC-ACTIVE-ETH-10 MALC-DS3/E3-4

Not Applicable Not Applicable Not Applicable Not Applicable Not Applicable Not Applicable Not Applicable VPI: 0-3 VCI: 32-1,023

Not Applicable Not Applicable Not Applicable Not Applicable Not Applicable Not Applicable Not Applicable VPI: 0-255 VCI: 32-1,023 Not Applicable

Not Applicable Not Applicable Not Applicable Not Applicable Not Applicable Not Applicable Not Applicable

MALC-EFM-T1/E1-24

Not Applicable

Not Applicable

Virtual channel and virtual path links


The MALC supports both VC and VP switching. In VC switching, cells are switched based on the VPI/VCI. In VP switching, cells are switched based on

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Service categories

the VPI only. The VCI remains the same on both the incoming and outgoing interfaces. A virtual channel link (VCL) used for VC switching. It is uniquely identified by an index in the form interface-index/atm/VPI/VCI where:

interface-index is the unique name or address of the ATM layer on a given port. For example, 1-3-1-adsl/atm. VPI/VCI pair is a unique connection identifier on that port.

A virtual path link (VPL) is used for VP switching. It is uniquely identified by an index in the form interface-index/atm/VPI where:

interface-index is the unique name or address of the ATM layer on a given port. For example, 1-3-1-adsl/atm. VPI is a unique connection identifier on that port.

VCLs/VPLs are provisioned according to RFCs 2514 and 2515. Each VCL/ VPL on the MALC requires a VCL or VPL record and an associated ATM traffic descriptor. Note: A VCL/VPL can be used in only one cross connect. VCLs/VPLs being used in a cross connect cannot be deleted. To delete a VCL/VPL, first delete the cross connect. If a VCL/VPL is updated with a new traffic descriptor, the VCL/VPL must be brought down, then back up to update the policing value.

Service categories
The MALC supports the following ATM service categories:

constant bit rate (CBR) non-real-time variable bit rate (nrt-VBR) real-time variable bit rate (rt-VBR) unspecified bit rate (UBR)

Constant bit rate (CBR)


The CBR service category is used by connections that require a constant and guaranteed cell rate during the lifetime of the connection. The sampling time for CBR is constant, with no delay. Cells exceeding the provisioned PCR rate are discarded.

Non-real-time variable bit rate (nrt-VBR)


The nrt-VBR service category is used by applications that are tolerant of network delays and do not require a timing relationship on each side of the

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connection. The nrt-VBR service supports somewhat bursty connections having less-stringent delay requirements than rt-VBR and CBR, but still require low cell loss. The source traffic descriptor is characterized by peak cell rate (PCR), sustainable cell rate (SCR), and maximum burst size (MBS).

Real-time variable bit rate (rt-VBR)


The rt-VBR service category is used by applications that require a tightly constrained delay and delay variation. The source traffic descriptor is characterized by peak cell rate (PCR), sustainable cell rate (SCR), and maximum burst size (MBS).

Unspecified bit rate (UBR)


The UBR service category does not specify traffic-related guarantees. No numerical commitments are made with respect to the cell loss ratio (CLR) experienced by the connection, or the cell transfer delay (CTD) experienced by the cells. With UBR service, the available bandwidth is fairly distributed to the active UBR subscribers.

Traffic descriptors
Each ATM endpoint requires a traffic descriptor, which defines the traffic parameters and type of service provided on ATM interfaces. Traffic descriptors are configured in atm-traf-descr records. Quality of Service (QoS) parameters such as max cell transfer delay (maxCTD) and cell loss ratio (CLR) do not apply to a single node on the network and so are not provisioned for individual VCs.

Configuring PCR and SCR


The atm-vcl-param profile defines the allowable values for the PCR and SCR for certain traffic types. The values in this profile are used as follows:

The SCR for rt-VBR traffic descriptors must use one of the first 16 rates (vcl-rate-param1 through vcl-rate-param16) The PCR for CBR traffic descriptors can use any of the 32 rates. For a UBR traffic descriptor, if usage-parameter-control in an ATM traffic descriptor is set to false, or if PCR is greater than the modem trained rate, then the UBR traffic is shaped to one of the 32 rates. The shaper will pick a rate that is equal to or less than the modem trained rate. If there are multiple rates less than the modem trained rate, the one closest to the trained rate will be selected.

Each PVC on the MALC is assigned a PCR of 182 cells per second (for G.711 voice calls) or 91 CPS (for G.726 voice calls). An initial 182 CPS is needed to support sending and receiving of CAS packets.

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To support voice VCs use the following formulas: For G.711 calls, use the formula:

PCR = (CIDS per VC * 182) + 182 SCR = (CIDS per VC * 3/5) + (CIDS per VC * 182)

For G.726, use the formula: PCR = (CIDS per VC * 91) + 91 SCR = (CIDS per VC * 3/5) + (CIDS per VC * 91)

For example, 8 CID per VC produces the following values for PCR and SCR: PCR=1638 CPSSCR=1460 CPS Note: When fax and modems calls are connected on G.726 compress mode, the full 182 CPS are used.

Traffic descriptor parameters


Table 16 shows the required parameters used to define MALC traffic descriptors and the validation rules associated with them.
Table 16: ATM traffic descriptor parameters Service category TD type td_param1 td_param2 td_param3 td_param4

CBR UBR

atmNoClpNoScr (TD type 2) OID 1.3.6.1.2.1.37.1.1.2

PCR for CLP=0+1 traffic must be > 0 For CBR, must match a value in atm-vcl-param profile

Not used

Not used

Not used

UBR

atmClpTaggingNoScr (TD type 4) OID 1.3.6.1.2.1.37.1.1.4

PCR for CLP=0+1 traffic must be > 0

PCR for CLP=0 traffic, excess traffic tagged as CLP=1 must be > 0

Not used

Not used

nrt-VBR rt-VBR

atmClpNoTaggingScr (TD type 6) OID 1.3.6.1.2.1.37.1.1.6

PCR for CLP=0+1 traffic td_param1 > td_param2

SCR for CLP=0 traffic For rt-VBR, must match a value in atm-vcl-param profile must be > 0

MBS must be > 1

Not used

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Table 16: ATM traffic descriptor parameters (Continued) Service category TD type td_param1 td_param2 td_param3 td_param4

nrt-VBR rt-VBR

atmClpTaggingScr (TD type 7) OID 1.3.6.1.2.1.37.1.1.7

PCR for CLP=0+1 traffic td_param1 > td_param2

SCR for CLP=0 traffic, excess traffic tagged as CLP=1 For rt-VBR, must match a value in atm-vcl-param profile must be > 0

MBS must be > 1

Not used

CBR

atmClpTransparentNoScr (TD Type 9) OID 1.3.6.1.2.1.37.1.1.9

PCR Must match a value in atm-vcl-param profile must be > 0

CDVT must be > 0

Not used

Not used

nrt-VBR rt-VBR

atmClpTransparentScr (TD Type 10) OID 1.3.6.1.2.1.37.1.1.10

PCR for CLP=0+1 traffic must be > 0

SCR for CLP=0 traffic For rt-VBR, must match a value in atm-vcl-param profile must be > 0

MBS

CDVT

CBR

atmNoClpNoScrCdvt (TD Type 12) OID 1.3.6.1.2.1.37.1.1.12

PCR must be > 0 Must match a value in atm-vcl-param profile PCR for CLP=0+1 traffic td_param1 > td_param2

CDVT must be > 0

Not used

Not used

nrt-VBR rt-VBR

atmClpNoTaggingScrCdvt (TD type 14) OID 1.3.6.1.2.1.37.1.1.14

SCR for CLP=0 traffic For rt-VBR, must match a value in atm-vcl-param profile must be > 0

MBS must be > 1

CDVT

nrt-VBR rt-VBR

atmClpTaggingScrCdvt (TD type 15) OID 1.3.6.1.2.1.37.1.1.15

PCR for CLP=0+1 traffic td_param1 > td_param2

SCR for CLP=0 traffic, excess traffic tagged as CLP=1 For rt-VBR, must match a value in atm-vcl-param profile must be > 0

MBS must be > 1

CDVT

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Tip: Refer to the following specifications for more information about traffic descriptors:

ATM Forum, ATM User-Network Interface, Version 3.0 (UNI 3.0)


Specification, 1994.

ATM Forum, ATM User-Network Interface, Version 3.1 (UNI 3.1)


Specification, November 1994.

Traffic descriptor configuration rules


Note: When configuring the traffic descriptors, it is important that they follow the rules described in this section. A traffic descriptor cannot be saved if the parameters violate these rules. Note the following information about traffic descriptors on the MALC:

ATM traffic descriptors used in active VCLs cannot be modified. To modify a traffic descriptor, first bring down VCLs that use the descriptor. For atmNoClpNoScr with a service category of rtvbr, trnk-vcl-rate of unused is allowed for backward compatibility. If set to unused, the system uses a rate-16k for the purposes of CAC.

Connection admission control (CAC)


MALC Uplink cards support connection admission control (CAC) and provisioning of oversubscription factors on a per port basis. The CAC functions on the Uplink card will not accept new connections if they exceed the remaining bandwidth. Note the following about CAC and service categories:

For CBR VCLs, the PCR value of each VCL is subtracted from the available rt-VBR bandwidth to determine whether the VCL can be created. For rt-VBR VCLs, the SCR value of each VCL is subtracted from the available rt-VBR bandwidth to determine whether the VCL can be created. For nrt-VBR VCLs, the SCR of each VCL is subtracted from the available nrt-VBR bandwidth to determine whether the VCL can be created. For UBR VCLs, CAC does not apply. The system will provide up to the bandwidth configured for UBR connections, if the bandwidth is available.

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MALC ATM Overview

CAC oversubscription
CAC enables the ATM interface to service more data VCL connections than the bandwidth allows. Because not all connections are likely to be active at the same time, an interface can support a larger number of PVCs. When oversubscription is enabled, CAC calculates available bandwidth in the system by dividing the SCR (for nrt-VBR or rt-VBR VCLs) value by the cac-divider parameter in the atm-traf-descr. It then uses that value to determine if the VCL can be created. For example, to oversubscribe bandwidth at a rate of 4:1, set cac-divider to 4. By default, oversubscription is not enabled and the cac-divider is set to 1. Note that CAC oversubscription should not be used to oversubscribe AAL2 voice connections.

Bandwidth allocation for ATM cards


The bandwidth allocated to ATM traffic types and used by CAC is specified in the card-atm-configuration parameter in the card-profile for the Uplink cards. (See Table 17.)
Table 17: ATM bandwidth allocation Setting DS3 104,268 CPS E3 80,000 CPS T1 28,976 CPS total (8 T1s)/ 3622 each E1 36,224 CPS total (8 E1s)/ 4528 each OC-3/STM1 353,207 CPS

vbnrt95rt5 UBR 1% nrt-VBR: 94% CBR/rt-VBR: 5% vbnrt80rt15 UBR: 5% nrt-VBR: 80% CBR/rt-VBR: 15% vbnrt65rt30 UBR: 5% nrt-VBR: 65% CBR/rt-VBR: 30% vbnrt50rt45 UBR: 5% nrt-VBR: 50% CBR/rt-VBR: 45% 5,213 CPS 52,134 CPS 46,920 CPS 4,000 CPS 40,000 CPS 36,000 CPS 1,448 CPS 14,488 CPS 13,039 CPS 1,811 CPS 18,112 CPS 16,300 CPS 17, 660 CPS 176,603 CPS 158,943 CPS 5,213 CPS 67,774 CPS 31,280 CPS 4,000 CPS 52,000 CPS 24,000 CPS 1,448 CPS 18,834 CPS 8,692 CPS 1,812 CPS 23,545 CPS 10,867 CPS 17, 660 CPS 229,584 CPS 105,962 CPS 5,213 CPS 83,414 CPS 15,640 CPS 4,000 CPS 64,000 CPS 12,000 CPS 1,448 CPS 23,180 CPS 4,346 CPS 1,811 CPS 28,979 CPS 5,433 CPS 17, 660 CPS 282,565 CPS 52,981 CPS 1,042 CPS 98,011 CPS 5,213 CPS 800 CPS 75,200 CPS 4,000 CPS 289 CPS 27,237 CPS 1,448 CPS 362 CPS 34,050 CPS 1,811 CPS 3,532 CPS 332,014 CPS 17, 660 CPS

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Table 17: ATM bandwidth allocation (Continued) Setting DS3 104,268 CPS E3 80,000 CPS T1 28,976 CPS total (8 T1s)/ 3622 each E1 36,224 CPS total (8 E1s)/ 4528 each OC-3/STM1 353,207 CPS

vbnrt35rt60 UBR: 5% nrt-VBR: 35% CBR/rt-VBR: 60% vbnrt20rt75 UBR: 5% nrt-VBR: 20% CBR/rt-VBR: 75% vbnrt5rt95 UBR: 1% nrt-VBR: 5% CBR/rt-VBR: 94% 1,042 CPS 5,213 CPS 98,011 CPS 800 CPS 4,000 CPS 75,200 CPS 289 CPS 1,448 CPS 27,237 CPS 362 CPS 1,811 CPS 34,050 CPS 3,532 CPS 17, 660 CPS 332,014 CPS 5,213 CPS 20,853 CPS 78,201 CPS 4,000 CPS 16,000 CPS 60,000 CPS 1,448 CPS 5,795 CPS 21,732 CPS 1,811 CPS 7,244 CPS 27,168 CPS 17, 660 CPS 70,641 CPS 264,905 CPS 5,213 CPS 36,493 CPS 62,560 CPS 4,000 CPS 28,000 CPS 48,000 CP 1,448 CPS 10,141 CPS 17,385 CPS 1,811 CPS 12,678 CPS 21,734 CPS 17, 660 CPS 123,622 CPS 211,924 CPS

Table 18 shows the parameters used by CAC for specified service categories.
Table 18: Service category traffic descriptor parameters Service category Parameters specified CAC

CBR

td_param1 (peak cell rate (PCR)) td_param2 (cell delay variation tolerance (CDVT))

td_param1 (PCR)

nrt-VBR

td_param1 (peak cell rate (PCR)) td_param2 (sustained cell rate (SCR)) td_param3 (maximum burst size (MBS)) td_param4 (cell delay variation tolerance (CDVT))

td_param2 (SCR)

rt-VBR

td_param1 (peak cell rate (PCR)) td_param2 (sustained cell rate (SCR)) td_param3 (maximum burst size (MBS)) td_param4 (cell delay variation tolerance (CDVT))

td_param2 (SCR)

UBR

td_param1 (peak cell rate (PCR))

N/A

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Example CAC calculation


The following is a sample calculation on DS3 Uplink card with a line speed of 104,268 CPS (the DS3 line rate of 45,000,000 bits/sec minus overhead) and no oversubscription: If the atm-configuration parameter is set to vbnrt20rt75, the ATM bandwidth allocation is as follows: 104,268 * 0.20 = 20,853 CPS is allocated to nrt-VBR 104,268 * 0.75 = 78,201 CPS is allocated to rt-VBR 104,268 * 0.05 = 5,213 is allocated to UBR
Total bandwidth available for rt-VBR VCL nrt-VBR VCL # 1 with SCR 12,000. Since there is enough available bandwidth, CAC allows the VCL Remaining bandwidth for rt-VBR VCLS 20,853 CPS -12,000 CPS

8,853 CPS

nrt-VBR VCL # 2 with SCR of 9,000 VCL rejected by CAC, not enough available bandwidth

-9000 CPS

For CBR or rt-VBR traffic, the CAC algorithm is the same.

ATM traffic policing


The MALC polices traffic using the ATM continuous-state leaky bucket algorithm. It monitors the incoming ATM cells to ensure that they adhere to the VCL traffic descriptors. If they do not, they are either dropped or tagged with a lower cell loss priority (CLP), depending on which traffic descriptor is in use for the VCL. Tip: For more information about traffic policing, refer to ATM Forum Traffic Management Specification Version 4.0 and ITU-T I.371.

Enforcing SCR and MBS


Bucket B polices SCR and MBS parameters. It applies to the following TD types:

atmClp NoTagging Scr (TD type 6) atmClp Tagging Scr (TD type 7) atmClpNoTaggingScrCdvt (TD type 14)

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atmClpTagging ScrCdvt (TD type 15)

Bucket B uses the following formula: cdvt_btB = 1,000,000/SCR + [(MBS - 1)*(1,000,000/SCR - 1,000,000/PCR)] For these traffic descriptors, limit = cdvt_btB * F/68. where F is

100 for MALC OC-3c/STM1 cards and MALC DS3/E3 cards 50 for DSL line cards and MALC T1/E1 IMA cards

Bucket B either drops or tags non-conforming cells, depending on the TD type. It then passes the cells that have not been dropped to bucket A.

Enforcing PCR and CDVT


Bucket A polices PCR and CDVT parameters. It applies to all TD types. Bucket A uses the following formula: cdvt_btA = [(td_param2 or td_param4)/10.0] where: td_param2 is CDVT for CBR VCLs with the exception of AtmNoClpNoScr traffic type td_param4 is CDVT for rt-VBR VCLs If the CDVT is not specified, the default value of 30000 (tenths of microseconds) is used. For these traffic descriptors, limit = cdvt_btA * F/68. Bucket A drops cells that do not conform to the PCR.

General policing rules


ATM traffic descriptors must adhere to the following rules:

The limit must be within the following range: 1 < limit < 1,966,080 (1.8751 * 0x100000) cdvt_btA and cdvt_btB must be greater than 68/F

where F is 100 for MALC OC-3c/STM1 cards and MALC DS3/E3 cards 50 for DSL line cards and MALC T1/E1 IMA cards

Traffic shaping
The MALC provides traffic shaping features for most uplink cards that protects the cards from being disabled by data flooding. Each uplink card has

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a limit to the amount of incoming data that can enter it in a given time interval. Once the threshold of maximum data allowed into the card has been exceeded, the uplink port will partition or become disabled. Two types of instances exist where port disabling can occur because of data overflow.

benevolent transmissions are sent to the card that contains large amounts of oversize packets or cells, for video and voice data for use by the customer. Sometimes, the amount of data exceeds the amount of incoming packets or cells that the port can handle, inadvertently disabling the port. malicious transmissions are sent to the card that contain deliberately large amounts of oversize packets or cells for any application, designed explicitly to bring down the network. The amount of data exceeds the amount of incoming packets or cells that the port can handle, maliciously disabling the port.

The MALC provides automatic traffic shaping that helps manage the flow of packets or cells sent to the uplink card.Using defined service categories, the MALC now ensures that the uplink card port cannot be overloaded and disabled. The MALC uses the service categories described in the following table to perform the traffic shaping:
Table 19: Common Service Category Values Service Category Description

CBR

Constant bit rate. Used by connections that require a constant and guaranteed cell rate during the lifetime of the connection. Non-real-time variable bit rate. Used by applications that are tolerant of network delays and do not require a timing relationship on each side of the connection. Real-time variable bit rate. Used by applications that require a tightly constrained delay and delay variation. Unspecified bit rate. Does not specify traffic-related guarantees.

nrt-VBR

rt-VBR UBR

CBR, nrt-VBR, and rt-VBR each enable traffic shaping that will limit incoming packets to the uplink port. Note that if you have the UBR value specified as the Service Category in the profile, traffic shaping will be disabled and no rate limiting will be applied to incoming packets. Other traffic descriptor variables related to service are described in the following table.

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Table 20: Traffic Descriptor Variables for Traffic Shaping Variable Description

PCR

Peak Cell Rate. This variable indicates the top-level threshold that identifies the most amount of traffic in Mbps that can enter the uplink port. Maps to the td_param1. Sustained Cell Rate. This variable is time-oriented, indicating the maximum amount of traffic in Mbps that can pass through the uplink port over a preset period of time. Maps to td_param2. Cell Variation Delay. This variable indicates the amount of time that the uplink can wait to accept traffic. Maps to td_param3.

SCR

CVR

Listing traffic descriptors and Peak Cell Rates


To configure traffic shaping limits, you need to change PCRs (Peak Cell Rates) in the traffic descriptor associated with the card. To identify the traffic descriptor you need to change, display existing traffic descriptors by issuing the list atm-traf-descr command. To list ATM traffic descriptors issue the list atm-traf-descr command:
zSH> list atm-traf-descr atm-traf-descr 1 atm-traf-descr 49050 atm-traf-descr 1210 atm-traf-descr 2000

Configuring traffic shaping in traffic descriptors


To change the PCR values of the traffic descriptor, display the contents of the desired descriptor using the get command. The following example presupposes you want to perform traffic shaping on the traffic descriptor with the 49050 value. 1 To display traffic descriptor values:
zSH> get atm-traf-descr 49050 td_type: ----------------------> td_param1: --------------------> td_param2: --------------------> td_param3: --------------------> td_param4: --------------------> td_param5: --------------------> cac-divider: ------------------> td_service_catgory: -----------> td_frame_discard --------------> usage-parameter-control -------> {atmNoClpNoScr} {49050} {0} {0} {0} {0} {1} {ubr} {false} {true}

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Note that td_param1 is the variable that contains the PCR value for this traffic descriptor. You have now changed the PCR from 49,050 Mbps to 500 Mbps. 2 To change the PCR value, issue the update atm-traf-descr command. This example shows limiting the allowable incoming traffic rate (PCR) of 500 Mbps.
zSH> update atm-traf-descr 49050 Please provide the following: [q]uit td_type: ----------------------> {atmNoClpNoScr}: td_param1: --------------------> {49050}: 500 td_param2: --------------------> {0}: td_param3: --------------------> {0}: td_param4: --------------------> {0} td_param5: --------------------> {0} cac-divider: ------------------> {1}: td_service_category: ----------> {ubr} td_frame_discard: -------------> {false} usage-parameter-control -------> {true} ................... Save changes? [s]ave, [c]hange or [q]uit: s

Shaping for non-ADSL2+ cards with GigE uplinks


Shaping for non-ADSL2+ cards with GigE uplinks is performed on the GigE uplink card (MALC-UPLINK-2-GE, MALC-UPLINK-GE). Constant Bit Rate (Cbr) is the highest priority. For Unspecified Bit Rate (Ubr), the Peak Cell Rate (Pcr) as specified in the traffic descriptor parameter td-param1 is enforced. For Variable Bit Rates (Vbr-nt, Vbr-Nrt), the Peak Cell Rate (Pcr) as specified in the traffic descriptor parameter td-param1 and Sustained Cell Rate (Scr) as specified in the traffic descriptor parameter td-param2. Burst up to the Pcr are allowed with regular traffic at the Scr. The minimum scheduler rate is restricted to multiples of 167 frames per second and 535 frames per second for depending on the type of line card to which traffic is sent. Line cards with rates restricted to multiples of 167 frames per second:

MALC-ADSL-48A, MALC-ADSL+POTS-TDM-48A-2S, MALC-ADSL+POTS-TDM/PKT-48A-2S MALC-ADSL-48B

Line cards with rates restricted to multiples of 535 frames per second: MALC-BPON-SC-1 MALC-DS3/E3-4 MALC-POTS-GBL-TDM/PKT-24 MALC-ISDN4B3T-24

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ATM statistics

MALC-ISDN2B1Q-24 MALC-SHDSL-48 MALC-G.SHDSL-24 MALC-G.SHDSL-4W-12

For all types of rates, the rate specified for the traffic descriptor parameters is rounded up to the next multiple of the minimum rate.

Traffic shaping for 1.13.x and higher mixed IP and ATM networks
When the MALC SLMS software loads transitioned from Release 1.12.x to 1.13.x, traffic descriptor orientations changed so that the concept of an ATM uplink with TX and RX directions do not exist. Instead, the MALC uses the ATM TX and RX settings of the line card and then reflects them, in reverse for the uplink side. For example:

Line card ATM TX = 4000, RX= 8000 Uplink ATM TX = 8000, RX = 4000

The required upstream and downstream DSL maximum line rates (service guaranteed rate) should equal the TD rate plus 15% for margin. Also, recommended is to set the asymmetrical min and max rates at the same number creating both a stable and predictable flow control. The MALC shapes UBR traffic in the downstream direction using the td-param1 traffic descriptor that's set for a particular port. The subscriber will be able to send traffic at the provisioned and trained line rate.

Downstream Direction = ADSL port at 115% of required downstream line rate. Traffic regulated with the UBR ATM traffic descriptor at 100% Upstream Direction = ADSL port set to 115% of required upstream line rate. UBR ATM traffic descriptor is not used and should be set to match the downstream.

Symmetrical (Upstream and Downstream) traffic descriptors are strongly recommend to simplify the TX and RX calculations.

ATM statistics
Real-time ATM statistics on the MALC are provided through the NetHorizhon ZMS client. ZMS supports the following ATM statistics:

ATM VCL ATM VPL AAL2

The ZMS performance manager periodically collects real-time statistical data. You can monitor real-time data at a polling interval of your choice. For

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information on how to access ZMS ATM statistics, refer to the NetHorizhon Users Guide and the NetHorizhon online help.

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INDEX
A
accessing the flash card cd command 338 dir command 338 pwd command 338 acronyms, described 12 activating slot cards ADSL cards 272, 278, 280, 290 adding a user, description of 344 adding routes description 50 route add command 50 addresses assigned via DHCP 51 admin deleting user account of 346 administration configuring traps 321 creating SNMP access lists 320 creating SNMP community names 320 logging 309 saving and restoring configurations 343 user accounts 344 ADSL low power alarm 335 alarm suppression 336 alarms low power ADSL 335 viewing card and shelf 351 alarms, viewing 327 A-Law setting 198 always offhook, configuring 217 ARP, broadcasts and bridging 103 ata command, use of 339 ATM bridging and IP support on VC 96, 98 CAC 380 cross connects 371 EPD and PPD 372 overview 369 PVCs supported per card 373 SCR and PCR 376 SCR and PCR, configuring allowable values for 160 statistics 387 traffic descriptor configuration rules 377 traffic descriptor validation 383 traffic descriptors 376 general rules 379 traffic policing 382 UBR and usage-parameter-control 160 video 371 voice overview 370 VPI/VCI ranges 373 ATM cell relay connection configuration 157, 163 creating cross-connect 170, 171 creating traffic descriptor 157, 163 creating VCLs 168, 169 creating VCLs and VPLs 166 ATM cell termination connection adding IP route to remote LAN 23 configuration 24 creating IP interface 25 verifying IP interface 23 ATM data connection cell relay 157, 163 configuration 370 data communications 370 traffic descriptors 376 VCLs 375 VPLs 375 ATM management connection creating IP interface 25 ATM OC3-c interfaces loopbacks 362 ATM on Zhone devices data communications 370 overview 370 virtual channel links 375 virtual path links 375 ATM traffic descriptor creating 24

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Index

B
BER test, described 354 binding interfaces 341 bootfile parameter 55 boot-server parameter 55 BRAs 137 bridge statistics 150 bridgeinsertpppoevendortag 141 bridging 106 adding untagged bridge 114 administrative commands 149 ARP broadcast 103 broadcasts and 103 custom DHCP server 146 forbid OUI 141 intralinks 97 option 82 141, 145 overview 96 support on VC 96, 98 VLAN 107 VLAN bridge-paths 106 VLAN configuration 106 VLAN overview 105 VLAN strip and insert 145 broadcast suppression, described 146

C
CAC described 380 call conferencing, SIP 225 call progress parameters 252 caller, rejecting malicious 225 caller-id-sig-protocol 253 calls checking bandwidth before accepting a call 199 cards VG-T1/E1-32-2S 269 cd command, use of 338 cdvt_btA, formula used to calculate 383 cdvt_btB, formula used to calculate 383 change default passwords, how to 345 channel bank, configuring system 230 chassis viewing errors 351 viewing temperature 351 Class of Service (COS) 110, 150 clid-mode 253

client leases, DHCP 93 clientId parameter 63 client-match-string parameter 63 clock setting system using NTP 344 commands ata 339 cd 338 dir 338 host add 41 host delete 91 host show 89 ifxlate 25 image 339 interface add 46 interface delete 91 interface show 90 log 312 log show 312 mcast 86 pwd 338 rip 49 rip show 90 route 79 route add 50 route delete 91 route show 90 stack bind 342 configurable jitter buffer 249 configuration ATM cell relay connection 157, 163 ATM cell termination connection 24 ATM data connection 370 ATM VCLs and VPLs 166 CLI disabled 26 creating DHCP server subnet options 54 creating dhcp-server-group profile 62 creating dhcp-server-host profile 63 DHCP server 51 DNS resolver 64 Ethernet management channel 39 host-based routing 41 interface indexes 179, 188 IP filters 66 local management channel 20 logging in 21 logging out 21 network-based routing 46 overview of profiles 15 RIP 49

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saving and restoring 343 configuring ATM data connection ATM cell termination connection 24 ATM on Zhone devices 370 cell relay connections 171 configuring IP DHCP server 51 displaying routing information 90 DNS resolver 64 host-based routing 41 IP filters 66 modifying host and interface routes 87 network-based routing 46 RIP 49 static routes 50 configuring management interface accessing the serial port 20 local management channel 20 logging in and out 21 configuring physical interfaces loopbacks 362 configuring traps, description of 321 COS processing 59 COS, in VLAN headers 110, 150 craft interface 21 creating IP interface adding route to remote LAN 23 description 25 ifxlate 25 specifying VPI/VCI pair 25 verifying the interface 25 creating IP management interface description 25 creating SNMP access lists, description of 320 creating SNMP community names, description of 320 cross-connect, creation of 170, 171

D
D channel status, ISDN PRI 301 Data rate delay criteria 375 throughput criteria 375 data, voice, video 307 default configuration, description of 16 default passwords, changing 345 default-lease-time parameter 55 default-router parameter 55

deleting a user, description of 345, 346 deleting hosts 91 deleting interfaces 91 deleting routes description 91 route delete command 91 DHCP address assignment 51 advanced applications 62 broadcast suppression 146 creating subnet options 54 custom DHCP setting in bridge records 146 enabling a DHCP server 56 external server 58 logging 92 logging messages described 92 profiles 51 relay 57 setting server options 52 DHCP client leases 93 DHCP server 29 DHCP server, enabling 56 DHCP, description of 29 dhcp-server-group profile 62 dhcp-server-host profile 52, 63 dhcp-server-subnet profile 54 dialing plan 223 dir command, use of 338 displaying host information 89 displaying interface information 90 displaying RIP information 90 displaying routing information rip show command 90 route show command 90 routing table 90 DNS resolver configuration creating a host profile 65 creating a resolver record 65 DNS, description of 28 Domain Name System, see DNS domain parameter 55, 65 domain-name parameter 55 DS1 to POTS configuring connection 230 DS3 call admission control 379 dual counter rotating rings, RPR 119 Dynamic Host Control Protocol, see DHCP

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Index

E
encoding types supported 198 EPD, described 372 errors, viewing system 351 Ethernet Linear GigaBit configuration 132 Linear GigaBit redundancy configuration 134 Resilient Packet Ring (RPR) 116 Ethernet interface configuration 22 creating a default route 23, 40 creating a route from management PVC to 25 IP interface 22 route show command 23, 40 verifying 22 verifying the route 23, 40 Ethernet management channel 39

configuration 41 description of 34 hostname parameter 66 huntgroups 219 hwaddr parameter 63

I
if-translate profile renaming interfaces in 342 image command, use of 339 interface add command 46 interface delete command 91 interface groups number supported on Voice Gateway card 271 interface indexes, configuration of 179, 188 interface show command 90 commands interface show 90 interfaces renaming 342 intermediate agent, PPPoE 140 internetworking, PPPoA-PPPoE 137 Intralinks configuring 97 IP addresses for redundant Uplink cards 22 administrative procedures 86 advanced provisioning procedures 62 applications 31 DHCP external server 58 DHCP relay 57 overview 27 provisioning procedures 39 routing 31 support on VC 96, 98 video, configuring 82 IP filtering description of 37 IP filters configuration 66 IPSLA 69 ISDN loopbacks 365

F
fax service, T.38 263 first-nameserver parameter 65

G
GigE-2 card Linear GigaBit Ethernet configuration 132 Linear GigaBit Ethernet redundancy 134 GPON configuration 307 GR-303 configuring 178

H
H.248, configuring 211 hookflash configuring 216 configuring timers 216 host add command 41 host delete command 91 host profile 66 host show command 89 hostalias1 parameter 66 hostalias2 parameter 66 hostalias3 parameter 66 hostalias4 parameter 66 host-based routing

J
jitter buffer 249

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L
lease-time parameter 53 Linear GigaBit Ethernet, configuration 132 Linear GigaBit Ethernet, redundancy configuration 134 local management channel 20 log messages, description of content for 309 logging description 309 DHCP 92 DHCP messages described 92 displaying persistent logs 314 enabling/disabling 310 enabling/disabling for session 21 enabling/disabling over the serial craft port 21 log messages 309 modifying logging levels 312 syslog, configuring 314 logging in and out description 21 logout command 21 timeout command 21 logging in, restricting telnet access 352 logging levels, log command and modifying 312 logging out, described 21 loopbacks DS3 363 ISDN 365 T1 363 loopbacks, SONET and 362

min-lease-time parameter 53, 55 Mu-Law setting 198 multicast creating control list 85

N
name parameter 62, 63 netmask parameter 55 network parameter 55 network-based routing configuration 46 description of 35 NTP configuring 344

O
option 82, bridging 145 option 82, described 141 OUI forbin, described 141

P
packet-rule 144 parameters bootfile 54 boot-server 54 clientId 63 client-match-string 63 default-lease-time 54 default-router 54 domain 54, 65 domain-name 54 first-nameserver 65 hostalias1 66 hostalias2 66 hostalias3 66 hostalias4 66 hostname 66 hwaddr 63 lease-time 53 max-lease-time 53, 54 min-lease-time 53, 54 name 62, 63 netmask 54 network 54 primary-name-server 54

M
malicious caller, rejecting 225 management configuring interface for 22 creating route from management PVC to Ethernet 25 creating VLAN for 22 ZMS 25 managment Zhone Web Config Tool 17 max-lease-time parameter 53, 55 mcast command, described 86 Megaco, configuring 211 MGCP configuring 205 MGCP, configuring 209

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Index

query-order 65 range1-end 54 range1-start 54 range2-end 54 range2-start 54 range3-end 54 range3-start 54 range4-end 54 range4-start 54 reserve-end 53 reserve-start 53 secondary-name-server 54 second-nameserver 65 third-nameserver 65 vendor-match-string 63 passwords, changing default 345 PCM encoding type supported 198 persistent logs, displaying 314 policing, ATM 382 POTS DS1 to POTS 230 power ADSL low power alarm 335 PPD, described 372 PPP tunnel 137 PPPoA-PPPoE internetworking 137 PPPoE intermediate agent 140 primary-name-server parameter 55 profiles dhcp-server-group 62 dhcp-server-host 52, 63 host 66 overview of configuration 15 resolver 65, 66 protection switching, RPR 124 PVCs number supported per card 373 pwd command, use of 338

R
RADIUS 347 range1-end parameter 55 range1-start parameter 55 range2-end parameter 55 range2-start parameter 55 range3-end parameter 55 range3-start parameter 55 range4-end parameter 55 range4-start parameter 55 redundancy IP addresses and 22 reserve-end parameter 53 reserve-start parameter 53 resetting passwords, description of 346 Resilient Packet Ring (RPR) bridged traffic 130 configuration 123 configuration display 125 overview 116 protection switching 124 ring status 128 statistics 129 topology 118 topology display 126 resolver profile 65, 66 ring cadence 252 RIP configuration 49 configuring global defaults 49 description 29 displaying information 90 rip command 49 rip show command 90 route command 79 routing description 31 routing information base 31 routing in Zhone systems route types 31 routing information base, description of 31 Routing Information Protocol, see RIP routing table, displaying 90 RPR 116

Q
QoS and traffic descriptors QoS categories described 375 non-real-time variable bit rate 375 Quality of Service, see QoS query-order parameter 65

S
SABR 30, 51

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Saving and restoring configurations 343 saving and restoring configurations description 339 secondary-name-server parameter 55 second-nameserver parameter 65 security restricting telnet access 352 server-max-timer, voice-system profile 206 service level agreement, SLA 69 Service, quality objectives 375 SIP connections over different networks 204 SIP, call conferencing 225 SIP, calls not registering 206 sip-dialplan 223 SLMS Web Interface Tool 19 SNMP statics, gathering 322 SONET loopbacks 362 source address based routing 30, 51 stack bind 342 static routes adding routes 50 configuration 50 deleting routes 91 statistics ATM 387 bulk 322 statistics, bridge interfaces 150 strip and insert configuring 145 subtending, example ATM subtending 172 syslog server, configuring 314 system configuring ATM data connection 370 configuring management interface 20 data communications 370 default configuration 16 Ethernet interface 22 logging out 21 management interface 22 Uplink cards 22 system profile voice configuration 198

T
T.38 fax service 263 T.38, on voicegateway 276 T1 loopbacks activating 361, 364 tagged bridging described 96 telnet restricting access 352 temperature, viewing chassis 351 terminal interface, settings for 20 TFTP server 353 third-nameserver parameter 65 three-way call conferencing 225 TOS processing 59 tosCOS 61 tosOption 61 traffic descriptors configuration rules 377 creation 157, 163 description 376 QoS rules for 379 validation for 383 traps configuring 321 Type of Service (TOS) 59

U
UBR modem train rates and 160 unnumbered IP interfaces description of 38 untagged bridging described 96 Uplink card redundancy and IP addresses 22 Uplink cards configuration 22 VOIP support and 270 user accounts adding a user 344 changing default passwords 345 deleting a user 345 deleting admin 346 resetting passwords 346 using flash cards

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Index

using the ata command 339 using the image command 339

V
V5.2 activating the IG 194 C-channels 190 C-paths 192 IG 187 parameters 184 provisioning links 189 V5.2 profile, configuring 183 VCI allowed ranges 373 VCLs creation 168, 169 description 375 VCLs and VPLs creation 166 vendor-match-string 63 video ATM 371 configuring IP 82 mulitcast control list 85 virtual channel link, see VCL VLAN bridge-paths and 106 creating management 22 VLAN IDs supported 106 vlanCOS 61 VLANs adding bridge 107 configuring 105, 106 IDs supported 106 overview 105 strip and insert 145 VoATM to TDM voice connections 280 voice always offhook 217 configuring MGCP 205 configuring VOIP 203 hookflash 216 hookflash timers 216 POTS to DS1 230 POTS to VOIP 215, 297 VoATM to TDM connections 280 voice gateway 269 VOIP to TDM connections 272

voice configuration checking bandwidth before accepting a call 199 PCM encoding supported 198 system profile 198 voice gateway configuration 270 overview 269 VoATM to TDM connections 280 VOIP to TDM connections 272 Voice Gateway card number of IGs supported 271 Uplink cards supported with 270 VP- and VC-switching on 281 VOIP always offhook, configuring 217 call progress parameters 252 configuring voice gateway connections 203 hookflash, configuring 216 hookflash, configuring timers 216 malicious caller 225 POTS to VOIP 215, 297 ring cadence 252 SIP connections 204 Uplink cards that support 270 VOIP to TDM voice connections 272 voip, country-specific dialing features 251 VPI allowed ranges 373 VPLs description 375

W
Web Configuration Tool configuraiton, Web tool 17 Web Interface Tool 19

Z
ZMS CLI configuration disabled 26 managing device with 25

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