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Basic Curves

When you choose this option, the Basic Curves dialog is displayed. The icons at the top
are the curve types that you can create, plus two editing methods.
Basic Curves Dialog Icons

Line Brings up the Line mode of the Basic Curves dialog, which gives you options for
creating lines.
Arc Brings up the Arc mode of the Basic Curves dialog, which gives you options for
creating arcs.
Circle Brings up the Circle mode of the Basic Curves dialog, which gives you options
for creating circles.
Fillet Brings up the Fillet mode of the Basic Curves dialog, which gives you options for
creating fillets.
Trim Brings up the Trim mode of the Basic Curves dialog, which gives you options for
trimming basic curves.
Edit Curve Brings up the Edit Curve Parameters mode of the Basic Curves dialog, which
Parameters gives you options for editing parameters of basic curves.

Other options on the Basic Curves dialog vary, depending on which of the icons you choose. The
unique options are described in the appropriate individual curve creation sections. Options that
are common to more than one curve type are described in the Overview.

Overview
The Basic Curves dialog is available from both the Create Curve dialog and the Sketch Tools
dialog. The Basic Curves dialog provides you with several tools to make curve creation faster and
easier.

Basic Curves Tools and Common Options

Tools

Dialog bar Text fields in which you can enter values for the location or parameters of the
curve that you are creating.
Preview of Object In most cases, as you are creating a curve, the display shows what the curve
Creation will look like based on its current definition.

Shift/MB3 Popup Provide quick access to frequently-used options for specific curve types.
Menus

Status line Gives you valuable feedback while you are creating curves, such as what kind
of point is highlighted, or whether you have highlighted an object. The Status
line is located below the graphics window.
Common Options

Delta When this option is ON, any values you key into the dialog bar are relative to
the last defined point.
Point Method Lets you specify points relative to existing geometry, or by specifying a cursor
location or using the Point Constructor.
String Mode Lets you create an unbroken string of curves. When this option is on, the end
of one object becomes the beginning of the next. To stop string mode, turn the
button OFF. To break string mode and start it again with the next object
created, choose Break String or press MB2.
Break String Breaks the string of curves at the place where you chose this option, but
String Mode remains active (i.e., if you create more lines or arcs, they will be
in another unbroken string).

Basic Curves Line


There are several options on the Basic Curves dialog that are unique to line creation.

Basic Curves Dialog Options (unique for line mode)

Unbounded When this option is ON, any line that you create, regardless of the
creation method, is bounded by the limits of the view. (String Mode
is grayed out.)
Lock Mode / Unlock Mode Use Lock Mode when your next action would normally cause the line
creation mode to change, and you want to avoid that.
Parallel options Options for creating parallel lines. The lines can be parallel to a
WCS axis, or at a specified distance from a selected line.
Line Creation Dialog Bar Special Dialog Bar fields for Line Creation.

Angle Increment If you specify the first point, then drag the cursor around the
graphics window, the line snaps to each degree of increment that is
specified in this field. The Angle Increment is effective only when the
Point Method is set to Inferred Point. If any other Point Method is
used, the Angle Increment is ignored.
To change the Angle Increment, enter a new value in the field and
press the <Enter> key. (The new value will not become effective until
the <Enter> key is pressed.)
Other options on this dialog are common options (i.e., shared by several modes) that are
described in the Overview.
You can change the angle and/or length of a line immediately after you create it, by keying new
values into the dialog bar text fields and pressing <Enter>.

Lock/Unlock Mode
When you are creating a line that is parallel, perpendicular, or at an angle to an existing line, and
you choose Lock Mode, the mode of line creation that is currently "rubberbanding" in the graphics
window is locked. You can use this option when your next action would normally cause the line
creation mode to change, and you want to avoid that.
When you choose Lock Mode, the button changes to Unlock Mode. You can choose Unlock Mode
to free up the line being created, to switch to a different mode.
Let's say you wanted a line through a point, parallel to line A, and ending at a point projected from
the endpoint of line B.

When you have specified the start point and selected line A, the new line "rubberbands" parallel
to the line A. At this time, the word "Parallel" is displayed in the Status line. However, if you try to
select the endpoint of line B, to determine the projection for the end of your new line, the line will
snap to that endpoint - not what you want.

Press MB2 to choose Lock Mode, which is the default action. Now you can select the endpoint of
Line B to establish the end of the new line.
Basic Curve Arcs
When you are in arc creation mode, there are several options on the Basic Curves
dialog that are unique to arc creation. These options are covered in this section.

Basic Curves Dialog Options (unique for arc mode)

Full Circle When this option is ON, any arc that you create, regardless of the creation
method, is created as a complete circle.
Alternate Solution Creates the complement of the currently previewed arc; can be used only
while the arc is being previewed. If you choose Alternate Solution after
moving the cursor to the dialog, the previewed arc changes and you will not
get the result you want.
Creation Method Specifies how the points (or other objects) that you select will be used to
define the arc.
Arc Dialog Bar The dialog bar includes special fields for arc creation and editing.
Fields

Other options on this dialog are common options (i.e., shared by several modes) that are
described in the Overview.

Creation Method
There are two basic methods for creating arcs:
• Start, end, point on arc
With this method, you can create an arc that passes through three points, or which passes
through two points and is tangent to a selected object.
The object selected for tangency to an arc cannot be a parabola, hyperbola, or spline.
(However, one of these objects can be selected for tangency to a complete circle.)
• Center, start, end
With this method, you define the center point, then the start and end of the arc.
The start and end points can be adjusted by entering angle values in the dialog bar, as
shown below.

Dialog Bar Fields


The following fields are available in the dialog bar during arc creation and editing:

The XC, YC, and ZC fields display the location of the arc's start point.
The Radius field displays the radius of the arc.

The Diameter field displays the diameter of the arc.

The Start Angle field displays the beginning angle of the arc, measured from the XC axis and
moving counterclockwise.

The End Angle field displays the ending angle of the arc, measured from the XC axis and moving
counterclockwise.

The Start Angle and End Angle fields are grayed out when you are using the Start, End,
Point on Arc creation method.

Basic Curves Circles


In the first portion of this section, the various options on the dialog that pertain to circle
creation are explained. Following that, there is a summary of circle creation methods.

Basic Curves Dialog Options (unique for circle mode)

Multiple When this option is ON, each time you define a point, a copy of the previously
Positions created circle is created, with its center at the specified point.

The String Mode option is grayed out; it is not available in circle mode.

Dialog Bar Fields


The following fields are available in the dialog bar during circle creation and editing:
The XC, YC, and ZC fields display the location of the circle's center.

The Radius field displays the radius of the circle.

The Diameter field displays the diameter of the circle.

Simple Fillet
Creates a fillet between two coplanar nonparallel lines. You determine the size of the
fillet by entering a value for the radius. The lines are automatically trimmed to the points
of tangency with the arc.
The fillet that is created is directly related to where you select the lines. Both lines are selected at
the same time. You must position the selection ball in such a manner as to include both lines.

The trim options and Point Constructor are not available.


If the selection ball contains only one line, an error message displays.
Cannot find two lines within the selection ball radius
Both lines are selected by indicating a single point. The point determines how the fillet is created;
it indicates the center of the arc. Position the center of the selection ball nearest to the
intersection where you want the fillet formed. Each line extends or trims to the arc.
2 Curve Fillet
Constructs a fillet between two curves, including points, lines, circles, conics or splines.
A two curve fillet is an arc generated in the counterclockwise direction from the first
curve to the second. The fillet created by this method is tangent to both curves.

Fillets Between Two Points


If a fillet is created between two points, it is created in a plane based on the location of the points.
In the figure below, the reference plane is defined by a vector between each point (A) and the
vector parallel with the ZC axis (B). The fillet is created in the plane containing each point and
normal to the reference plane.
If the vector between the two points is parallel to the ZC axis, the fillet cannot be
constructed.

Fillets Between One Point and Another Curve


If only one curve is a point, the fillet plane is defined as the plane which contains the vector
between the point and the fillet tangency point (A), and the tangent of the filleted object (B) (see
the figure below). The fillet plane is totally independent of the WCS.

Fillets Between Two Curves


If neither curve is a point, the fillet plane is the plane that contains the tangent of the first curve.
The plane is normal to the vector that is normal to both tangents. The two curves do not need to
lie in the same plane and the fillet is completely independent of the WCS.
3 Curve Fillet
This option creates a fillet between three curves, which can be any combination of
points, lines, arcs, conics, and splines. The Radius option is not available.

A three curve fillet is a circular arc generated in a counterclockwise direction from the first curve
to the third curve. The fillet is constructed in such a way that the center of the arc is equidistant to
all three curves. The three curves do not have to lie in the same plane.

The curves are trimmed to the tangent point of the fillet. If the original curve is not tangent to the
fillet arc, the extrapolation of the curve necessary to intersect the fillet is calculated and displayed
(except for points and splines which cannot be extrapolated).

If One Curve is an Arc


If any one of the curves selected is an arc, you are required to supply additional information to
create the fillet:
Tangent Outside To have the selected arc lie outside of the fillet.

Fillet Within Circle To have the fillet lie inside the selected arc.

Circle Within Fillet To have the selected arc to lie inside the fillet.

Tangent Outside
Use Tangent Outside if you wish to have the selected arc lie outside of the fillet to be created.

In the figure above, Tangent Outside was chosen after Curve 1 was selected. With automatic trim,
Curve 1 is trimmed from its starting point to the point of tangency. Curve 2 is deleted; Curve 3 is
trimmed to the point of tangency.

Fillet Within Circle


If you want the fillet to lie inside the selected arc, use Fillet Within Circle.
In the figure above, Fillet Within Circle was chosen after Curve 2 was selected. This causes the
fillet to lie within the selected arc. With automatic trim, Curve 2 (arc) is deleted, and Curves 1 and
3 are trimmed to the points of tangency.

Circle Within Fillet


If you want the selected arc to lie inside the fillet, use Circle Within Fillet.

In the figure above, Circle Within Fillet is chosen after selecting Curves 1 and 2. This causes the
selected arcs to lie within the fillet. With automatic trim, Curve 2 is deleted, and Curves 1 and 3
are trimmed to their points of tangency to the fillet.

Error Messages
The following error message is displayed if the three curves you selected cannot form a fillet arc,
or if the filleting procedure is unable to converge to a fillet center.
Invalid Fillet Defined
The latter occurs when the maximum allowable number of iterations (100) used to find a point on
each of the three curves that is equidistant from the indicated fillet center is exceeded. In this
case, choosing another approximate fillet center may yield a fillet.
The following error message is displayed when the system is unable to solve the set of quadratic
equations. In this case, choosing another approximate fillet center may create a fillet.
No Solution - Fillet Not Created

Basic Curves Fillets


When you choose the Fillet option, the Curve Fillet dialog is displayed. You can use the Fillet
option to "round off" the intersection between two or three selected curves. You can also specify
how the curves are trimmed when the fillet is created.

Fillets in active sketches are created with the Sketch Fillet dialog, instead of the Curve Fillet
dialog that is described in this section.

Create Fillet Dialog Options

Simple Fillet Creates a fillet between two coplanar nonparallel lines.

Constructs a fillet between two curves, including points, lines, circles, conics or
2 Curve Fillet splines. A two curve fillet is generated in the counterclockwise direction from the
first selected curve to the second.

3 Curve Fillet Creates a fillet between three curves, which can be any combination of points,
lines, arcs, conics, and splines.
Radius Defines the radius of the fillet.

Inherit Lets you define the values of the new fillet by selecting an existing fillet.

Trim Options If you choose to create a two or three curve fillet, you need to choose a
trimming option. Trimming shortens or extends the selected curves to join with
the fillet. (Depending on the fillet option selected, some trimming options are
changed or are not available.)
Point
Constructor Lets you use the Point Constructor to select some or all of the curves to fillet.

Overview
The figure below shows the three types of fillets you can create in NX.

The general procedure to create a fillet is:


1. Choose the type of fillet you want to create.
2. Indicate how you wish to trim the objects.
3. Enter the radius of the fillet.
4. Select the objects.
5. Specify the approximate center point of the fillet.

Many of these steps are done simultaneously when creating simple fillets.
There is a quick reference sheet about creating fillets at the end of this section.
You can use the Point Constructor to select one, two, or all three of the curves for a 2 curve fillet
or 3 curve fillet. The Point Constructor remains modal until you choose OK or Back. The figure
below shows two examples of fillets created using the Point Constructor.

Trimming Options
If you choose to create a two or three curve fillet, you need to choose a trimming option. Trimming
shortens or extends the selected curves to join with the fillet. Depending on the fillet option
selected, some trimming options are changed or not available.

Points cannot be trimmed or extended.


Choose one of the following trim options:
Trim First Curve
Delete Second Curve
Trim Third Curve
In 2 Curve Fillet, you can choose to trim the first, last, or both curves. The Delete Second Curve
and Trim Third Curve options are not available.
In 3 Curve Fillet, you can choose to trim the first, last, or both curves and delete the second
curve.
If you do not select any of the trimming options, none of the curves are trimmed.

If the trimmed curve has a length equal to zero and there is no associative connection to the
curve, it is deleted.
Define the Fillet Center
After selecting the curves to be rounded, indicate the approximate center point of the fillet curve.
The position you select is projected normally to the first curve to help determine where the fillet
should start.
Indicate the center by using the cursor or the Point Constructor. Using the cursor location method
in the Point Constructor selects a position in the X-Y plane of the WCS. This is different from the
normal method for indicating the arc center, which specifies a point in a plane parallel to the
viewing screen.

Undo
After you have created a fillet and trimmed the original curves, you can choose Undo to delete the
fillet and reverse the trim.

Trim Curve
Trim Curve adjusts the endpoints of curves based on bounding entities and segment(s) of curves
selected for trimming. You can trim or extend lines, arcs, conics or splines. You can trim to (or
extend to) curves, edges, planes, faces, points, or cursor locations. You can specify that the
trimmed curve is associated with its input parameters.
You can use bodies, faces, points, curves, edges, datum planes and datum axes as bounding
objects when trimming a curve. You cannot trim bodies, sheet bodies or solid bodies.

If you are trimming splines, you are warned that the defining data of the spline will be
changed. You can choose Cancel to quit or OK to continue with the trim operation.
If you are using Trim Curve in a sketch see Trim Curve Within Sketcher for special
operation notes.
For simple instructions on using this option see the Basic Trim Curve Procedure.
For additional detail help and procedures see the Trim Curve Usage Tips.
For detailed field descriptions, see below.

Trim Curve Dialog Options

The Selection Steps icons allow the selection of:


The First Bounding Object
The Second Bounding Object
Selection Steps The Vector Direction
The String to Trim

Lets you select a string of objects from the graphics window for the
First Bounding first boundary against which the selected curves are to be trimmed.
Object This step is required.
You can use a Filter mask to restrict the type of objects to select for
the string. Note that you cannot mix data types for bounding objects. If
conflicting data types are selected, the previous selections are
dropped.
Selecting the first boundary string highlights it in the graphics window.
If the string consists of a single curve, an oval displays, marking its
Start or End point. If the string consists of multiple curves the oval
shows the start or end of the selected string of curves.
If you select a curve string nearest its end point, the oval displays its
end point, and the Trim/Extend option changes to End. If you select a
curve string nearest its start point, the oval displays the start point,
and the Trim/Extend option changes to Start. You can change the
Trim/Extend option setting to suit the way you want the trim operation
to work.
If Single Selection is turned on, after you select the first boundary
string the system automatically activates the Second Bounding Object
selection step.
If you later select the First Bounding Object option again, the first
boundary string highlights in the graphics window.

When trimming a bounding object (that is, the Trim Bounding


Objects toggle is on) with the Associative Output toggle on, the state
of the bounding object follows the rules defined by the Input Curves
option. Since under these conditions a copy of the bounding object is
created for each string (curve) you trim, if you trim multiple strings,
you are going to get multiple, associative copies of the bounding
object. You may therefore not always want to trim bounding objects
with the Associative Output toggle turned on.

Lets you select a second boundary string of objects against which the
Second Bounding selected curves will be trimmed. You can use the same methods to
Object select the Second Bounding Object as were used for the first. If you
later select the Second Bounding Object option again, the selected
second boundary string is highlighted in the graphics window.
This step is optional.

When trimming a bounding object (that is, the Trim Bounding


Objects toggle is on) with the Associative Output toggle on, the state
of the bounding object follows the rules defined by the Input Curves
option. Since under these conditions a copy of the bounding object is
created for each string (curve) that you trim, if you trim multiple
strings, you will get multiple, associative copies of the bounding
object. You may therefore not always want to trim bounding objects
with the Associative Output toggle turned on.

Lets you select the vector direction for the trim operation. This option
Vector Direction is available only when Along a Vector is selected under the Method to
Find Intersections option.
When the Vector Direction selection step is active, a vector selection
option menu displays in the changeable window, to let you pick the
method to define the vector direction. Options include Plane of
Curves, Specified Vector, Specify New Vector, +XC Axis, +YC Axis,
+ZC Axis and Selected Datum Axis.
• If you select the Plane of Curves option, the string to trim
must be planar. The boundary object string must also be
planar and in the same plane as the string to trim.
• For options other than Plane of Curves or Selected Datum
Axis, an arrow displays the defined vector direction.

Lets you select one or more curves to trim. This step is required. As
String to Trim you select curves they are highlighted in the graphics window. If you
selected a Second Bounding Object, the Trim option becomes
available during this selection step.
Selecting Single Curves to Trim - If you select a single curve to trim,
an oval displays its Start or End point. If you selected the curve
nearest its end point, the oval displays its end point, and the
Trim/Extend option changes to End. If you selected the curve nearest
its start point, the oval displays the start point, and the Trim/Extend
option changes to Start. You can change the Trim/Extend option
setting to suit the way you want the trim operation to work.
Selecting Multiple Curves to Trim - If you select multiple curves to
trim, the ovals that display the start or end points on the curves do not
display. Clicking Apply or OK with multiple selected curves to trim
causes two things to happen: 1) ovals displaying the ends to be
trimmed display on all of the selected trim curves, and 2) a dialog
opens to let you flip the ovals to the other ends of each selected
curve, by clicking on the desired end.
If the multiple curves you select to trim form a chain of curves, the
trimming operation is performed on the string as though it were one
continuous curve.
Filter The Filter lets you apply a mask when you specify the types of objects
to allow for selection. Options will vary depending on the Trim Curve
operation you are in. Possible options include Any, Point, Curve,
Edge, Face, Sketch, String, Plane, Datum Plane and Datum Axis. If
you specify Point for the filter, the Snap Point tool becomes active.
Other options that can display in the Filter window include the Plane
Tool and the Vector Method.

Single Selection When on, this option automatically advances you through each
Selection Step. Upon selecting the String to Trim, an Apply is
immediately performed. When off, you must manually click each
Selection Step. You cannot have this option on and expect to select
multiple curves.

changeable window Contains various options that appear depending on the current
Selection Step. Includes Trim/Extend, Trim, Extend and the Plane
Tool.

Method to Find Determines the method the system uses to find object intersections.
Intersections
Shortest 3D Distance - Trims curves to the bounding objects at the
intersection marking the minimum distance measured in three
dimensions.
Along Screen Normal - Trims curves to the intersection of the
bounding objects as projected along the direction normal to the
screen display.
Along a Vector - Trims curves to the intersection of the bounding
objects as projected along the direction of the selected vector.
Relative to WCS - Trims curves to the intersection of the bounding
objects as projected along the ZC direction.
Use Inferred Intersection - Trims curves at the bounding objects to the
closest intersection point. Eliminates display of the Intersection Points
dialog. If a single bounding object is selected, the pick point on the
curve being trimmed determines which intersection to use (see Single
Bounding Object and Use Inferred Intersection for an example). If two
bounding objects are selected, the pick point on the bounding objects
determines which intersection to use (see Same First and Second
Bounding Object and Use Inferred Intersection for an example).

Trim Bounding Objects Turning this option on causes the system to trim not only the ends of
the String to Trim curves, but also the bounding objects.
The portion of each bounding object that is trimmed depends on the
Trim/Extend option setting, and on where the bounding objects
intersect the curve string. An exception to this is when you have
selected the same curve for both the First Bounding Object and the
Second Bounding Object. In this case, the bounding object is trimmed
as though it were a single string being trimmed to two locations (see
Using the Same String for the First and Second Bounding Objects).

Reuse Bounding Objects Keeps bounding objects selected after an Apply has been performed,
so you do not have to select them again if you want to trim additional
strings using those same bounding objects. If this option is on, the
String to Trim Selection Step is active after an Apply. This option is not
available in the edit mode.

Spline Extension If you are trimming a spline that is to be extended to its bounding
object(s), you can choose the shape of the extension. Options are:
Natural - Extends the spline from its endpoint along the natural path of
the spline.
Linear - Extends the spline from either endpoint to the bounding
object where the extended portion of the spline is linear.
Circular - Extends the spline from its endpoint to the bounding object
where the extended portion of the spline is circular.
None - No extension is performed for any type of curve.
For further details regarding the use of these options see Spline
Extension.

Associative Output Lets you specify that the output trimmed curve is associative. An
associative trim results in the creation of a TRIM_CURVE feature,
which is a duplicate, associative, trimmed copy of the original curve.
The font of the original curves are changed to dashed, so they are
more easily visible against the trimmed, associative copy.
Associative trimmed curves update automatically if the input
parameters change.

Input Curves Lets you specify what state you want for that portion of the input
curves that are trimmed. Input curves consist of the String to Trim
curves, and the bounding objects if the Trim Bounding Objects toggle
is on.
• Blank means the input curves are rendered no longer visible,
as specified by the Edit-> Blank option. (See the Gateway
Help for a description of the Blank option.) New curves are
created based on the output of the trim operation and are
added as new objects. Note that "blanking" occurs only at the
initial creation of the trimmed curve; subsequent updates of
the trimmed curve have no effect on the input or bounding
curves.
• Retain means the input curves are unaffected by the trim
curve operation, and are "kept" in their original state. New
curves are created based on the output of the trim operation
and are added as new objects.
• Delete means the input curves are removed from the model
by the trim curve operation.
• Replace means the input curves are replaced by, or
"exchanged" with, the trimmed curves. When you use
Replace, features that were children of the original curves
become children of the trimmed curves.
If Associative Output is on, you can only use the Blank or Retain
options with the input curves. The Delete and Replace options will be
unavailable

Confirm Upon Apply Lets you preview the results and accept, reject or analyze them. This
option is common to Selection Steps dialogs.

Basic Trim Curve Procedure


The basic procedure to trim (or extend) a curve is shown in the following steps.
1. Use the First Bounding Object selection step to specify the first bounding object. If you
want to trim or extend the bounding object, turn on Trim Bounding Objects and set the
Trim/Extend option to either Start or End.
2. Select the second bounding object (optional). If you have already turned on Trim
Bounding Objects for the first bounding object, the second bounding object is also going
to be trimmed. You can independently set the Trim/Extend option for the second
bounding object to Start or End.
3. Set the desired Method to Find Intersections option.
4. Use the String to Trim selection step to specify one or more curves you wish to trim or
extend. The ends of the curves you select indicate the ends that will be trimmed.
5. Set the Extend and Trim options for the selected curve.
6. If you chose Along a Vector for the Method to Find Intersections option, use the Vector
Direction selection step to specify the desired direction of the trim.
7. Turn on the Associative Output option if you want the output trimmed curve to be
associative with its input parameters.
8. Use the Input Curves pull-down menu to specify the disposition of the curves to be
trimmed.
9. Click OK or Apply.
The curve is trimmed or extended.

Trim Curve Usage Tips


For additional help or procedures see the following Trim Curve Usage Tips.
Bounding Objects
Extending and Projecting Curves
Trimming Circles
Indicating Intersection Points

Trim and Extend Options


Trim and extend options affect both bounding objects and curve strings selected for trimming.

Trim and Extend Options


Trim/Extend When either the First or Second Bounding Object selection step is active and you
have selected a bounding object for that step, the Trim/Extend option becomes
available. Use Trim/Extend to specify which end of the bounding string is to be
trimmed or extended. Even if the bounding object is not being trimmed (that is, Trim
Bounding Objects is off), this setting still controls which end of the bounding object
is extended to get an intersection with the String to Trim.

To trim or extend a bounding object, the Trim Bounding Objects option must
be on.
This option is also available when only one bounding object is specified, and
determines which end of the string is trimmed away or extended to the bounding
object.
Start - For bounding objects, trims or extends the bounding string from its start
point to the trim object. A small oval displays the start point of the bounding object
string. For string to trim objects with only one bounding object specified, trims or
extends the string from its start point to the bounding object.
End - Trims or extends the bounding string from its end point to the trim object. A
small oval displays the end point of the bounding object string. For string to trim
objects with only one bounding object specified, trims or extends the string from its
end point to the bounding object.

If you select the same bounding string for the First Bounding Object and the
Second Bounding Object, and if the Trim Bounding Objects toggle button is on, the
bounding string is trimmed as though it were a single string being trimmed to two
locations. For details see Using the Same String for the First and Second Bounding
Objects.
Extend When the String to Trim Selection Step is active, and both a first and second
bounding object have been specified, Extend is a separate option that lets you
specify which end of the string is to be extended to the first bounding object. The
other end of the string is extended to the second bounding object.
Start - Extends the curve string from its start point to the first bounding object. The
other end of the string is extended to the second bounding object.
End - Extends the curve string from its end point to the first bounding object. The
other end of the string is extended to the second bounding object.
The end of the curve string you select, either its start or end, controls the initial
setting of this option. For example, if you select the part of a curve that is closest to
its starting end, Start is automatically set. You can change the setting by choosing
either Start or End.
Trim When the String to Trim Selection Step is active, and both a first and second
bounding object have been specified, Trim is a separate option that lets you specify
one of the following:
Outside - trims away the portion of the curve string that lies outside of the
bounding objects.
Inside - trims away the portion of the curve string that lies inside or between the
bounding objects.

Spline Extension
When you extend a spline, you can define the extension as:

Natural Extends the spline from its endpoint along the natural path of the spline.

Linear Extends the spline from either endpoint to the bounding object where the extended
portion of the spline is linear.

Circular Extends the spline from its endpoint to the bounding object where the extended portion
of the spline is circular.

None No extension is performed for any type of curve. See Trimming Two Portions of a Single
Circle for an application example using this option.

Linear lets you extend a spline from either endpoint to the bounding object where the extended
portion of the spline is linear. The slope of the extension line is equal to the slope of the curve at
its endpoint.
Circular lets you extend a spline from its endpoint to the bounding object where the extended
portion of the spline is circular. The circle lies in the plane of the tangent and normal at the
endpoint of the curve. The center is along the normal line at the endpoints. The radius of the
circle is the radius of curvature at the endpoint. (See the figure below.) The curvature of a curve is
the inverse of the radius of curvature.

If the curve is not a spline and you are not using the None option, the Natural extension
shape is used.

If the extension of a spline does not result in a true intersection, then the spline will not be
extended and the trim will occur at the minimum distance to the original spline.
If you are trimming a nonperiodic spline using two bounding objects, both ends are extended (if
necessary) to intersect the bounding objects, and the portion between the bounding objects is
kept after trimming. If no extension is needed, the portion containing the selected point is thrown
out.

Indicating Intersection Points


With some trim curve operations, there may be multiple intersection points between the selected
curve and the bounding objects. If this is the case, and to assure that the trim is calculated using
the correct intersection point, a separate selection steps dialog may display during the trim
process after you have clicked OK or Apply (see next figure).
Along with this dialog, the system displays possible intersection points in the graphics window for
you to select. If only one string of bounding objects is specified, you are only prompted for a
single intersection point. If there are two bounding objects you may be prompted for a second
intersection point.
Select the desired intersection point and click OK. The trim operation then proceeds.

Trimming Circles
When trimming circles using a single bounding object, they trim back from the endpoint of the
curve, as shown in the figure below.

When you select a circle, an oval displays the location of its endpoint.

Trimming Two Portions of a Single Circle


Setting the Spline Extension option to None enables you to trim out two separate portions of a
single circle. Setting Spline Extension to any of its other options (that is, Natural, Linear or
Circular) treats arcs to be trimmed as though they are full circles. In order to override this
behavior, set the Spline Extension option to None.
To trim out the first side of the circle, position the cursor to select the bounding objects near one
set of intersections (make sure Use Inferred Intersection is on). Before you attempt to trim out the
other side you will have to set the Spline Extension option to None.

This first trim will give you the result shown below.

Now set the Spline Extension option to None and select the string to trim as shown above. Click
OK or Apply and you should get the results shown in the next figure.
Edit Curve All
The options under Edit-> Curve-> let you modify existing non-associative curves.
You can edit a number of curve types using a Selection Steps dialog similar to the one that was
used to create them. The creation and editing of these types of curves is covered in the same
section of the documentation (for example, see Offset Curve and Wrap/Unwrap Curve).
The Edit-> Curve-> All option opens a dialog with all non-associative edit curve functions.

Edit Curve (All) Dialog Options For Non-Associative Curves

Edit Curve Parameters - Lets you edit the parameters (that is, the defining data) of
most types of curves.

Trim Curve - Adjusts the endpoints of curves (lines, arcs, conics, or splines) based
on the bounding entities selected (curves, edges, planes, faces, points, or cursor
locations) and the segment(s) of curve selected for trimming.

Trim Corner - Trims two curves to their intersection point, thereby forming a corner.

Divide Curve - Divides a curve into a series of like segments.

Edit Fillet - Lets you edit existing fillets.

Stretch Curve - Lets you move geometric objects, while simultaneously stretching
or shrinking selected lines.
Edit Arc Length - Trims a curve by a given arc length increment, or to a total arc
length.

Smooth Spline - to automatically remove imperfections in the curvature properties


of a B-spline.

Point Method Used to change the position of a line endpoint. The Point Method options let you
specify points relative to existing geometry, or by specifying a cursor location or
using the Point Constructor. In some cases, you will use the Snap Point tool
instead of the Point Method options.

Edit You can edit an arc or circle two ways: by editing its Parameters, or by Dragging it.
Arc/Circle By

Complement Lets you create the complement of an existing arc.


Arc

Display If you are editing a spline, this option lets you display the original spline for
Original comparison during the editing.
Spline

Edit By Parameter lets you edit an associative curve while preserving its associativity.
Associative
As Original breaks the associativity between the curve and its original defining data
Curve
(you receive a warning).

Arc Length Total - Use this method to trim a curve by its total arc length. Total arc length is the
Trim Method distance from the start of a curve to the end of the curve, following the exact path
of the curve.
Incremental - Use this method to trim a curve by a given arc length increment. The
arc length increment is the length used to trim from the original curve.
This option is also found under Edit Arc Length.

Arc Length Lets you enter a value for the length of the trimmed or extended arc. This option is
also found under Edit Arc Length.

Update Use this option to update your model after making edits to curves, without exiting
the Edit Curve dialog.
Click on the following topics for additional information for editing non-associative curves:
Editing a Line
Editing an Arc or Circle
Editing an Ellipse
Editing a Spline
Use Edit-> Transform to change the location of an associative or non-associative curve. (See the
Gateway Help for more information on Transform.) However, some functions, such as copy,
remove the relationship between a dependent curve and its associated geometry. In many cases,
you are warned if a transformation would have this effect. For cases like a copy operation or
circular/rectangular instance arrays, no warnings are issued.
Editing Associative Curves
To edit associative (feature) curves, select the curve in one of the following places:
• The graphics window, followed by MB3-> Edit Parameters
• The Part Navigator, followed by MB3-> Edit Parameters
• The Edit-> Feature dialog listing
All of these actions opens the dialog you used to create the associative curve, which you can
then use to modify the curve.
For more information on associative curves, see the Associative Line, Associative Arc/Circle,
Lines and Arcs, Studio Spline, Mirror Curve and Point topics.

Basic Curves Creation Tools


The Dialog Bar
The dialog bar is a series of data entry fields that appear at the bottom of the graphics window,
just to the right of the work layer input box, when the Basic Curves dialog is active. The data entry
fields in the dialog bar vary depending on which type of curve you are creating, and which options
you have selected. For example, this is what the dialog bar looks like when you are creating lines.

There are two types of data entry fields in the dialog bar:
• Location fields - XC, YC, and ZC. These fields track the location of the cursor, or you can
use them to input a fixed value.
• Parameter fields - These fields control parameters of the curve, such as length of a line,
or radius of an arc.
There are also two options on the User Interface Preferences dialog (described in the NX
Gateway Online Help), in the Dialog Bar Options area, that affect dialog bar interactions:
• Decimal Places - This controls the number of decimal places displayed in the fields.
• Tracking - This controls whether or not the fields track the current location of the cursor.
To give a text field focus, you can use the <Tab> key or click MB1 in the field you want (once for
"insert" mode, twice for "replace" mode), as with any other Motif text field. (For more information
on text fields, see the NX Gateway Help.)
Here are the general rules that apply to keying in text in the dialog bar fields:
• When the XC, YC, or ZC field has focus, and you press <Enter>, the location you have
specified is accepted and an asterisk is displayed in the graphics area indicating that
point.
• When a parameter field (such as length, radius, etc. - any field other than the three
mentioned above) has focus and you press <Enter>, the values in all parameter fields are
accepted and applied to the curve being constructed.
• As soon as you finish creating a line, arc, or circle, you can enter new values in the
parameter text fields and the newly created object will be updated accordingly (unless
you are using String Mode).
The content and function of the fields are discussed in the individual curve creation sections.

Preview of Object Creation


As you go through the steps to create a line, arc, or circle, in most cases you will see a "preview"
of what the new curve will be, so that you know what the curve will look like before you create it.
You can also change some of the parameters of a curve right after you create it.
When you are creating a curve in the Basic Curves dialog, all curves other than fillets are created
with some type of dragging method. The shape of the curve is previewed, i.e., you see what the
curve will look like, as you are dragging it, before it is actually created. When the curve looks
correct, you can accept it by completing selection of the currently highlighted geometry or
indicating a screen location.

Shift/MB3 Popup Menus


When you are in line, arc, or circle creation mode in the Basic Curves dialog, there is a special
popup menu you can use. To display this menu, move the cursor to the graphics window and
press <Shift>MB3.
This popup menu changes depending on what type of curve you are creating. The figure below
shows what the popup looks like when you are creating lines and arcs. (When you are creating
circles, the top two options are not displayed.)

Basic Curves Point Method Creation Option


This option menu lets you specify points relative to existing geometry, or by specifying a cursor
location, or by using the Point Constructor. The options on this menu (shown below), except for
Inferred Point and Select Face, work similarly to those in the Point Constructor.

Inferred Point Intersection Point

Cursor Location Arc/Ellipse/Sphere Center

Existing Point Quadrant Point

End Point Select Face

Control Point Point Constructor

Inferred Point
The Inferred Point method affects the following points:
• Cursor locations
• Control points (end point, midpoint, existing point)
• Arc centers
The type of point currently selected is displayed in the Status line. As you move the cursor around
the graphics area, objects, control points, and arc centers are prehighlighted to help you select
them.
• See the Snap Point Tool for specific types of point inferencing methods that are
available when specifying points and point locations during the creation and
editing of certain geometric objects.
When you use an option other than Inferred Point, several things change:
• The cursor location is no longer tracked in the dialog bar.
• Control points are no longer highlighted.
• The snap angle is ignored.

Select Face
The Select Face option lets you select a face and use it as the limiting object for a line. This
option is grayed out when you are in any other curve creation mode. After you select a face, you
are automatically returned to Infer mode.
If you choose the Point Constructor method, the Point Constructor is displayed. When you
choose OK or Back from that dialog, you are returned to the Basic Curves dialog.