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JUNE 20-26, 2012
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INSIDE THIS ISSUE
Bike for ice cream
Family ride planned for
June 23. PAGE 2
JULIE STIPE/The West Windsor Sun
District
shows
strong
scores
By JULIE STIPE
The West Windsor Sun
The West Windsor-Plains-
boro school district showed
strong scores on the 2010-11
New Jersey School Report
Cards, which were released at
the end of last month.
The annual report cards
present data from each public
school in the state in 35 fields
of information dealing with
school environment, students,
student performance indica-
tors, staff, and district fi-
nances. The data is compared
to state averages, district fac-
tor group averages and data
from previous years.
Average SAT scores from
West Windsor-Plainsboro High
School South were 640 on
math, 601 on verbal, and 616 on
the essay portion of the test.
West Windsor-Plainsboro High
School North scores were 638
on math, 600 on verbal and 607
on the essay. The scores were
significantly higher than aver-
age state scores, which were
518 on math, 494 on verbal and
496 on the essay.
Superintendent of Schools
Dr. Victoria Kniewel said the
districts scores are a reflec-
tion of the time and effort put
Longtime resident
of West Windsor
Dr. Manzoor Hus-
sain checks on a
sunflower plant on
his patio. Hussain,
who grew up in
Pakistan, recently
published a book
entitled Islam: An
Essential Under-
standing for Fellow
Americans.
please see CLASS, page 9
By JULIE STIPE
The West Windsor Sun
West Windsor resident Dr. Manzoor
Hussain cant pinpoint the exact mo-
ment he knew he wanted to write a
book on Islam, but one incident in
particular got him thinking about
how Islam is viewed in the United
States. One day, Hussain was talking
to his Presbyterian father-in-law
about Islam when the conversation
became tense.
I told him Islam is one of the
Abrahamic religions like Christianity
and Judaism, and he got very upset,
Hussain said.
Hussains father-in-law told him
not to associate Christianity and
Islam. It was kind of a shock to me,
Hussain said, that my father-in-law
had such a negative image of Islam.
The conversation made Hussain
recognize the need to educate people
about Islam, especially those in the
West whose experience with Islam is
usually limited to media reports of vi-
olence and repression in Muslim
countries.
My perception then became that
Islam is a very misunderstood reli-
gion in the United States, Hussain
said. I realized that I need to do my
part whatever I need to do to edu-
cate people.
What Hussain chose to do was
write a book, which he began in
2004 and worked on for seven
years. Titled Islam: An Essential
Understanding for Fellow Ameri-
cans, Hussains book is designed
to explain the key facets of the re-
ligion of Islam to non-Muslims
please see BOOK, page 7
Author educates in book on Islam
2 THE WEST WINDSOR SUN JUNE 20-26, 2012
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The West Windsor Bicycle and
Pedestrian Alliance is planning a
series of short family-friendly
bike rides this summer. The first
will be a ride for ice cream on Sat-
urday, June 23. Rain date is June
24. It is suitable for the youngest
riders accompanied by their par-
ents.
The group will gather at 2:45
p.m. by the tennis courts at the
North Mill Road entrance to Com-
munity Park and leave at 3 p.m. for
Rite-Aid using neighborhood
roads and entirely avoiding Route
571. The route is less than 1.5 miles
each way. The ride is free and
theres no need to preregister, but
bring money for ice cream or an-
other snack. Helmets are required.
Watch the WWBPAs website at
wwbpa.org and the groups Face-
book page for details on other
rides. Questions? Email ww-
bikeped@gmail.com or leave a
message on Facebook.
The West Windsor-Plainsboro
Regional School District an-
nounced recently that Devin Ou,
a senior at High School South,
was selected as the winner of the
American Red Cross Blood Drive
recruitment video for the Penn-
Jersey Region.
Ou is a member of the Red
Cross Club at High School South
and has served on the Blood Drive
Committee for the 2011-12 school
year.
Jennifer M. Graham, Ameri-
can Red Cross supervisor for pro-
gram development, commented
on Devins video.
The story of how your school
supports blood donation was cre-
ated, filmed, produced and edited
very well, she said. The video
effectively relays the importance
of a high school blood drive, what
it entails as well as some very im-
portant facts regarding the need
for blood and blood donors. The
goal is to promote blood donation
as a safe, easy way to make a dif-
ference in the community and
students play an important role
in keeping the blood supply sta-
ble. Some students help by donat-
ing blood while others participate
in committees and volunteer at
blood drives. (The) video showed
all of those elements.
Family bike ride for
ice cream on June 23
Ou wins blood drive award
JUNE 20-26, 2012 THE WEST WINDSOR SUN 3
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The Pennington Players, the
production company, which an-
nually performs shows at Mercer
County Community Colleges
Kelsey Theatre, has announced
audition dates and details for its
fall production of Pippin.
Auditions for children only
will be held on Thursday, June 21,
6:30 to 7 p.m., and Sunday, June 24,
from 11 a.m. to noon. Auditions
for adult roles will be Thursday,
June 21, 7 to 10 p.m., and Sunday,
June 24, from noon to 5 p.m. Call-
backs will be held Tuesday, June
26, from 7 to 10 p.m.
Auditions and callbacks will be
held in the Communications
(CM) building adjacent to Kelsey
Theatre on MCCCs West Windsor
campus, 1200 Old Trenton Road.
Pennington Players is seeking
seven men, eight women and one
child.
Auditioners are asked to pre-
pare one complete song from mu-
sical theater, and to bring sheet
music in the correct key.
Actors wishing to be consid-
ered only for the featured dancer
roles need not prepare a song for
the audition.
Audition appointments are
suggested and can be made by
calling (609) 737-PLAY, or email-
ing auditions@penningtonplay-
ers.org.
Walk-ins will be seen on a time-
available basis.
The show comes to Kelsey The-
atre for six performances: Sept. 7,
9, 10, 16, 17 and 18. For maps and
directions, call (609) 570-3333, or
visit www.kelseytheatre.net.
Special to The Sun
Eight students from Community Middle School (CMS) in the West
Windsor-Plainsboro Regional School District performed with the
New Jersey All-State (Intermediate) Orchestra on May 12. All of
the students are participants in the CMS orchestra program and
earned places in the New Jersey honors orchestra by audition.
Hanfang Zhang, Mary Schmidt and Brian Woodward, instrumental
music teachers at CMS, serve as instructors for the CMS stu-
dents.
Students perform with orchestra
Audition for Pippin in June
Iemen1ury 5cbIs
20I0-II wes1 windsr 5cbIs Repr1 Curd
AVERAGE CLASS SIZE
SCHOOL
Dutch Neck
Wicoff
Hawk
Millstone
Village
State
K
18.4
17.7
20.2
--
--
19.5
Grade 1
23.3
22
22.4
--
--
19.9
Grade 2
21
22.4
19.7
--
--
20.2
Grade 3
24.0
21.8
22.9
--
--
20.5
Grade 4
--
--
--
23.8
22.2
21.2
Grade 5
--
--
--
25.3
23.5
21.5
STUDENT/FACULTY RATIO
SCHOOL
Dutch Neck
Wicoff
Hawk
Millstone
Village
State
2010-11
12.6
12.6
15.1
10.9
12.0
11
2009-10
13.5
11.4
13.9
10.2
11.6
10.7
2008-09
13.8
11.4
13.6
9.8
11.9
10.8
NJASK5 LANGUAGE ARTS
SCHOOL
Millstone
Village
State
Partial Proficiency
14.1%
14.2
36.7
Proficient
65.3%
65.4
56
Advanced Proficiency
20.6%
20.4
7.3
SCHOOL
Millstone
Village
State
Partial Proficiency
5.8%
4.8
20
Proficient
19.9%
24.4
47.5
Advanced Proficiency
74.4%
70.8
32.5
NJASK5 MATH
The Sun compiled the following statistics from the state Department
of Educations annual School Report Cards. For more coverage visit
our website, http://cj.sunne.ws/west-windsor/
MEDIAN DISTRICT SALARIES
Administrators
Salary - Dist.
Salary - State
Faculty
Salary - Dist.
Salary - State
2010-11
$131,707
$119,491
$78,090
$63,851
2009-10
$127,728
$117,895
$78,700
$61,840
2008-09
$123,563
$114,950
$74,700
$59,545
COST PER STUDENT
District
State
2010-11
$16,232
$14,832
2009-10
$16,555
$15,538
2008-09
$16,201
$15,168
wes1 windsr 5cbI Dis1ric1
MiddIe 5cbIs
20I0-II wes1 windsr 5cbIs Repr1 Curd
STUDENT/FACULTY RATIO
SCHOOL
Community
Grover
State
SCHOOL
Community
Grover
State
2010-11
10.3
10.6
11
2009-10
10.4
9.8
10.6
2008-09
10.2
9.7
10.8
Grade 6
17.5
22.8
20.7
Grade 7
19
20.6
20.5
Grade 8
16.6
25.3
20.3
AVERAGE CLASS SIZE
LANGUAGE ARTS
Partial
Proficiency
3.7%
3
17.2
Proficient
41.9%
51.7
63.4
Advanced
Proficiency
54.4%
45.3
19.4
SCIENCE
Partial
Proficiency
4.8%
3
18.2
Proficient
32.1%
36.9
52.2
Advanced
Proficiency
63.1%
60.1
29.1
MATH
NJASK(8)
Partial
Proficiency
10.8%
6.4
27.9
Proficient
22.4%
27.2
41.4
Advanced
Proficiency
66.8%
66.3
30.8
SCHOOL
Community
Grover
State
SCHOOL
Community
Grover
State
SCHOOL
Community
Grover
State
STUDENT/FACULTY RATIO
2010-11
13.1
11.8
11
2009-10
12.3
11.1
10.8
2008-09
12.2
11.2
11.1
SCHOOL
South
North
State
9
22.5
24.3
20.4
10
23.9
22.6
21
11
25.5
23.3
20.4
12
26.1
20.9
20.6
SCHOOL
South
North
State
AVERAGE CLASS SIZE
Class of 2011
98.05%
96.05%
N/A
Class of 2010
N/A
N/A
N/A
Class of 2009
N/A
N/A
N/A
SCHOOL
South
North
State
GRADUATION RATE
MATH
Partial Proficiency
3%
2.5
Proficient
45.8%
49.1
Advanced Proficiency
51.2%
48.4
SCHOOL
South
North
Partial Proficiency
3%
2.5
Proficient
45.8%
49.1
Advanced Proficiency
51.2%
48.4
SCHOOL
South
North
LANGUAGE ARTS
MATH
640
638
518
SCHOOL
South
North
State
601
600
494
SCHOOL
South
North
State
VERBAL
616
607
496
SCHOOL
South
North
State
ESSAY
Migb 5cbIs
HSPA
SAT
6 THE WEST WINDSOR SUN JUNE 20-26, 2012
20 Nassau Street, Suite 26A
Princeton, NJ 08542
609-751-0245
The Sun is published weekly by Elauwit
Media LLC, 20 Nassau Street, Suite 26A,
Princeton, NJ 08542. It is mailed weekly to
select addresses in the 08550 ZIP code. If
you are not on the mailing list, six-month
subscriptions are available for $39.99. PDFs
of the publication are online, free of charge.
For information, please call 609-751-0245.
To submit a news release, please email
news@westwindsorsun.com. For advertis-
ing information, call 609-751-0245 or
email advertising@westwindsorsun.com.
The Sun welcomes suggestions and com-
ments from readers including any infor-
mation about errors that may call for a cor-
rection to be printed.
SPEAK UP
The Sun welcomes letters from readers.
Brief and to the point is best, so we look for
letters that are 300 words or fewer. Include
your name, address and phone number. We
do not print anonymous letters. Send letters
to news@westwindsorsun.com, via fax at
609-751-0245, or via the mail. Of course,
you can drop them off at our office, too. The
West Windsor Sun reserves the right to
reprint your letter in any medium includ-
ing electronically.
PUBLISHER Steve Miller
GENERAL MANAGER & EDITOR Alan Bauer
VICE PRESIDENT OF SALES Joe Eisele
NEWS
MANAGING EDITOR, NEWS Kevin Canessa Jr.
MANAGING EDITOR, PRODUCTION Mary L. Serkalow
WEST WINDSOR EDITOR Julie Stipe
OPERATIONS
DIGITAL MEDIA DIRECTOR Tim Ronaldson
ART DIRECTOR Tom Engle
CHAIRMAN OF THE BOARD Russell Cann
CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER Barry Rubens
VICE CHAIRMAN Michael LaCount, Ph.D.
ELAUWIT MEDIA GROUP
CHAIRMAN OF THE BOARD Dan McDonough, Jr.
VICE CHAIRMAN Alan Bauer
in our opinion
T
he state Department of Educa-
tion recently released its annu-
al report cards, reviews of
every school in New Jersey. And if
anything, they reveal just how com-
plex a system it is to run public
schools.
From budgeting to cost-per-pupil
numbers to maintaining test scores to
ensuring theres adequate technology
in schools and classrooms, theres no
doubt its hardly an easy task to main-
tain excellence in schools.
Yet what we found is quite promis-
ing, especially in high schools in towns
we cover.
SAT scores in all three categories:
verbal, mathematics and essay are
very strong. In most cases, the average
scores were at or above the states aver-
age. Some were well above average.
The same can be said for HSPA test,
which all high school students must
take and pass before graduating. The
average scores, for the most part in our
readership, are solidly at or above state
averages, especially in the proficient
and advanced proficiency categories
for both mathematics and language
arts.
This is a true representation of the
diligent work of most students, and its
an indication of the hard work of most
teachers and administrators in New
Jersey.
While youll see in our report card
stories this week that most superin-
tendents of schools and other school
officials are happy with results, we
were also pleased to see some of the
same leaders not content with the sta-
tus quo, and making it clear that as
well as districts have performed,
theres still much more room for im-
provement in all areas.
Often, teachers and school adminis-
trators mostly unfairly are knocked
by the public. There are too many in-
stances to list here. Yet one thing is
abundantly clear from the local results
of the 2010-11 report cards: Theres
much more to celebrate than there is to
be concerned about.
Making the grade
State school report cards confirm: local districts getting the job done
How did your school fare?
In todays edition of The Sun, we take
a look at results of the 2010-11 state
schools Report Cards. Be sure to read
the story beginning on page 1, and
check out our information graphics
on the inside pages of the newspaper.
letters to the editor
Reader shares memories
of true Memorial Day spirit
I would like to thank you for your edito-
rial in the true significance of Memorial
Day. As you pointed out it has been trans-
formed not only to a three-day weekend,
but into a day of cookout and Memorial
Day sales.
For most people who do not know, I
would like to tell you what Memorial Day
was like.
As a little boy growing up in Brooklyn in
the 1930s, the day was an all day event. The
parade started at Grand Army Plaza and
proceeded along Eastern Parkway with the
last contingent being Civil War veterans rid-
ing in an open car with their Civil War hats.
We did not know what a barbecue was.
There were no Memorial Day sales because
we didnt have much money and the de-
partment stores were closed on Sundays
and Memorial Day.
We knew of no weekend since very few
had a car.
Hence, the day was spent watching the
parade with all kinds of military units and
with the most touching part of the day
being the Civil War veterans who received
an outstanding ovation.
That is the way it was.
Sam Greco
Mercer County Executive Brian M.
Hughes and the Mercer County Park Com-
mission have announced the eighth annual
Mercer County Freedom Festival will be
held in conjunction with popular radio sta-
tion 94.5 WPST on Saturday, June 30.
Thanks to a generous private donation,
collaboration with WPST, and corporate
sponsorships, the festival is free of
charge and will be held at no cost to taxpay-
ers.
Freedom Festival will be at Mercer
County Park in West Windsor from 3 to 11
p.m. and it is one of the earliest Fourth of
July celebrations in the area.
The Freedom Festival gets better each
year, with help from our lead sponsor,
WPST, and we are so pleased that it has be-
come an annual attraction, said Hughes.
Mercer County Park is more popular than
ever and I invite everyone to come to this
free family event.
The event features great food, beer and
wine gardens, craft vendors, live music,
tethered hot-air balloon rides, games,
water rides, mechanical bull, a childrens
area with inflatable rides, and much more.
This festival will culminate in a fireworks
display at nightfall.
Mercer County also is grateful for the
generosity of its many community part-
ners that make Freedom Festival possible,
including the Mercer County Sports & En-
tertainment Commission, PSE&G, Mercer
Oaks Catering, CME Associates, Engineer-
ing and Land Planning Associates Inc.,
Stouts Transportation Services, Clean
Communities of NJ, EMT Associates, CGI
Racing and Marturano Recreation.
This years Freedom Festival will also
feature a super 50/50 raffle as well as a
drawing for a free catered party at Mercer
Oaks.
The concert lineup starts at 3 p.m. with
the Little Mac & the Peoples Champ, Liq-
uid A at 5:30 p.m. followed by The Amish
Outlaws at 7:30 p.m., and Incognito imme-
diately after the fireworks.
Freedom Festival set for June 30 at county park
JUNE 20-26, 2012 THE WEST WINDSOR SUN 7
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and dispel some of the myths and
misunderstandings surrounding
the religion.
Hussain grew up in Islamic
Pakistan, and came to the United
States in 1966 as a student. He at-
tended the University of Nevada
and the University of California
where he met his wife Jana, a Cal-
ifornia native.
After receiving a Ph.D. in
chemistry, Hussain worked for
the chemical industry as a senior
research scientist before taking a
job with the International Atomic
Energy Agency of the United Na-
tions. As a scientist with the Unit-
ed Nations, Hussain traveled to 52
countries, training other scien-
tists to use radioactive isotopes in
research.
After returning to the United
States, Hussain began teaching at
The College of New Jersey, and is
now teaching at Noor-Ul-Iman, an
Islamic school in Monmouth
Junction.
Although Hussain grew up in a
primarily Muslim country, his
family was culturally, rather than
religiously Islamic. Nevertheless,
Hussain still grew up well versed
in the practices and traditions of
Islam, and believes that his
unique background worked in his
favor when it came to writing a
book on Islam.
Some Muslims have an excel-
lent secular education, but no re-
ligious education, Hussain said,
and some Muslims are religious
scholars who have little secular
educational background.
Hussain, with his Islamic back-
ground, scientific training, and
experience as a citizen of Pak-
istan and now of the United
States, bridges these two
groups.
His book hopes to clarify the re-
ligion of Islam for non-Muslims,
Hussain said, and to show them
that Islam is not as alien as they
think it is.
There are six main articles of
faith for a Muslim, said Hussain.
The first states that there is one
God alone Muslims do not be-
lieve in the Christian trinity, or
that Jesus was the Son of God.
They also believe, as do Chris-
tians, that angels exist and that
they, like the rest of the universe,
were created by God. Muslims be-
lieve in prophets many of the
same prophets, in fact, as those
mentioned in the Bible, such as
Moses, Abraham, Joshua, and
John the Baptist. Jesus is also
considered a prophet.
Muslims also believe certain
scriptures to be the word of God,
not only the Koran, but also the
Jewish Torah the first five
books of the Bible and the
gospel of Jesus. As in Christiani-
ty and many other religions, Mus-
lims hold that everyone will be
resurrected after death, and that
there will be a final day of judg-
ment.
Lastly, Muslims believe in di-
vine predestination that God is
in full control of everything that
happens, and that he knows and
has preordained what will hap-
pen in the future. According to
Islam, however, man still has free
will, and is able to choose be-
tween good and evil.
Although Muslims believe the
Bible to be divinely inspired, they
believe that the Bible was
changed by man, and therefore is
no longer pure.
The message is mixed up with
human intervention, Hussain
said.
Accordingly, Muslims place
special significance on the Koran,
which they believe is the final
and direct word of God as com-
municated to the prophet
Muhammed.
Hussains book touches on
these and other basics of Islam,
but it also deals with the difficult
issue of Islamophobia the fear
that accompanies perceptions of
Muslims as violent and full of ha-
tred.
Hussain is quick to point out
that the religion of Islam does not
encourage violence. Its a reli-
gion of peace, harmony, mercy
and justice, Hussain said.
These are the things taught in
Islam. Forgiveness is taught over
and over.
The religion also comes down
very strictly on extremists. Ex-
tremism is not allowed in any as-
pect, even in worship, Hussain
said.
Islam doesnt teach that it
should be spread by the sword,
Hussain said, nor is suicide
bombing or terrorism condoned
by the religion. Rather, like the
atrocities committed during the
Spanish Inquisition in the name
of Christianity, Muslim acts of vi-
olence are the result of specific
groups or rulers imposing their
own interpretation and agenda
onto others.
Nor is Islam meant to be re-
pressive, Hussain said. The Islam-
ic tradition of having women
cover their heads comes from the
Korans emphasis on modesty
and respect, and men in many
Muslim countries also cover their
heads.
Some countries and regions
have taken the Korans command
to the extreme, requiring women
to wear a burqa, which covers the
entire body including the face
women must look through a
small slit or a mesh panel, and
generally no facial features can
be distinguished.
Such requirements are cultur-
al interpretations of what is writ-
ten in the Koran, said Hussain,
and Islamic groups vary just as
do Christian denominations in
the way they interpret their scrip-
tures.
The same is true of the way in
which women are treated. Islam
gives women rights, such as the
right to inherit and own property
and the right to divorce, said Hus-
sain.
When Hussain is asked about
the Islamic view on women, he
said he usually points out that
Turkey and Pakistan have both
had a female prime minister, and
that from 2001-2004 the president
of Indonesia, a largely Muslim
country, was a woman.
America has yet to produce a
female president or vice-presi-
dent, said Hussain.
BOOK
Continued from page 1
Book touches on basics of Islam
and tackles Islamophobia
Addiction Hotline
of New Jersey
(800) 238-2333
PSA
Pet Friends Grief
support for pet owners
(800) 404-7387
PSA
Parents Anonymous/
Family Helpline
(800) 843-5437
PSA
WEDNESDAY JUNE 20
Adult Summer Reading Program:
9:30 a.m. to 9 p.m. at West Wind-
sor Branch Library. Register for
the summer-long program at the
reference desk and pick up a
reading log. Turn in the log by Fri-
day, Aug. 10, and by entered into
a drawing to win a Kindle or $30
Target gift certificates. Call (609)
275-8901 for more information.
Bingo: Ages 8 to 11. 3:30 to 4:30 p.m.
at West Windsor Branch Library.
Everyone wins a prize. No regis-
tration needed.
AP French Review: Session I: 11:30
a.m. to 12:30 p.m. at West Wind-
sor Branch Library. Taking the
SAT French subject test this fall?
Attend this review session to cov-
er: vocabulary, grammar, reading
comprehension and listening
comprehension. Registration
required.
Get Into Character: Ages 12 to 18. 7
to 9 p.m. at West Windsor Branch
Library. Through playing exciting
and fun acting games, learn how
to develop a character on the fly,
analyze a scene and improvise a
new scene. Registration required.
THURSDAY JUNE 21
Mr. Ray Outdoor Music Concert: All
ages. 10:30 to 11:30 a.m. Bring a
blanket, sun screen and a water
bottle. Settle down and enjoy the
music to kick off the summer
reading program. In the event of
rain, event will be held indoors
and seating will be on a first
come, first serve basis.
Scouting Out a Good Book: Pre-
school to third grade. 1:45 to 4:15
p.m. at West Windsor Branch
Library. Girl Scouts present
crafts, books and activities based
on a theme. Theme for June 21 is
Lions, Tigers and Bears Oh
My! Walk-in activity. Children are
allowed to come and go any time
during the program. Parents
need to stay in the library. No reg-
istration required.
Family Movie: 3:30 to 5:10 p.m. at
West Windsor Branch Library.
Come watch Hop, rated PG. All
ages welcome, but children must
be accompanied by an adult.
Teen Movie: 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. at
West Windsor Branch Library.
Watch Contagion, rated PG-13, a
thriller center on the threat
posed by a deadly disease and an
international team of doctors
contracted by the CDC to deal
with the outbreak.
FRIDAY JUNE 22
Walk-in Craft: Ages 3 and older. 11
a.m. to 2 p.m. at West Windsor
Branch Library. Self-directed
craft activity. No staff will be
present, so caregiver must
accompany child. No registration
needed.
Sing & Play Luau: All ages. 10:30 to
11 a.m. at West Windsor Branch
Library. Wear your muumuus and
Hawaiian shirts. Put a flower in
your hair and a lei around your
neck. Library will add some spe-
cial island music and even learn
a little hula. Boys and girls of all
ages invited.
Studio Scrawl: The College Applica-
tion Essay: 2 to 3:30 p.m. at West
Windsor Branch Library. Rutgers
University Senior Admissions
Counselor Lee Ann Dmochowski
will provide tips on what to do
and not do when writing your
application essays. Registration
required.
SATURDAY JUNE 23
Sinfonietta Nova Classical Con-
cert: Free concert 7 to 8:30 p.m.
at Nassau Park Pavilion. For more
information call (609) 716-1931.
Yoga & Meditation: 10:30 to 11:30
a.m. at West Windsor Branch
Library. Led by Sita. Bring a mat.
Scouting Out a Good Book: Pre-
school to third grade. 1:45 to 4:15
p.m. at West Windsor Branch
Library. Girl Scouts present
crafts, books and activities based
on a theme. Theme for June 23 is
The Great Outdoors. Walk-in
activity. Children are allowed to
come and go any time during the
program. Parents need to stay in
the library. No registration
required.
SUNDAY JUNE 24
Go for the Gold 5K and Run: 9:30
a.m. to noon at Mercer County
Park. Sponsored by USROWING.
Following the run, community can
meet the U.S. National Rowing
Team and wish them luck at the
London Olympic games. For more
information call (917) 494-3269.
MONDAY JUNE 25
Alphabet Hour: Ages 4 to 6. 6 to 7
p.m. at West Windsor Branch
Library. Join Ms. Lisa for an hour
of fun and get to know the alpha-
bet. Every week children will
focus on one letter. Theyll hear
stories featuring the letter and do
a letter-related craft. Registration
required.
Kids Music Round Demo: Infants to
age 4. 10:30 to 11 a.m. at West
Windsor Branch Library. Enjoy a
class of music and movement. No
registration needed.
Ghost Writer Pens: Ages 12 to 18.
2:30 to 3:30 p.m. at West Windsor
Branch Library. Its amazing what
you can do with a pen, some Mod-
el Magic and fake nails! Registra-
tion required.
West Windsor Township Council
meeting: 7 p.m. For more infor-
mation and to confirm meeting
time, visit www.westwindsornj.
org.
TUESDAY JUNE 26
Toddler Story Time & Craft: Ages 2
to 4. 10:30 to 11 a.m. at West Wind-
sor Branch Library. Stories and
crafts geared toward toddlers.
Siblings welcome. No registration
required.
Library Garden: Ages 4 to 11. 4 to
4:45 p.m. at West Windsor
Branch Library. Talk about the
importance of organic gardening
and how to maintain a garden.
Participants will have opportuni-
ty to weed the garden, water veg-
etables, observe various changes
and monitor for pests. Please
wear clothes you dont mind get-
ting dirty. A guardians presence
is required for all sessions. No
registration needed.
CALENDAR PAGE 8 JUNE 20-26, 2012
WANT TO BE LISTED?
To have your West Windsor meeting or affair listed in the Calendar
or Meetings, information must be received, in writing, two weeks
prior to the date of the event.
Send information by mail to: Calendar, The West Windsor Sun, 20
Nassau Street, Suite 26A, Princeton, N.J. 08542. Or by email:
news@westwindsorsun.com. Or you can submit a calendar listing
through our website (www.westwindsorsun.com).
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West Windsor
JUNE 20-26, 2012 THE WEST WINDSOR SUN 9
Expires 8/29/12.
in by the students themselves, as
well as by parents, teachers and
administrators.
Student achievement, as
shown on the New Jersey State
Report Card, along with other as-
sessments, is a testament to the
hard work of students, teachers,
staff and families, said Kniewel.
In WW-P, we believe that stan-
dardized testing scores, along
with myriad other measures and
assessments, show the strengths
and achievements of all our stu-
dents.
The district also did well on
high school statewide assess-
ments (HSPA), with 63.4 percent
of High School South students
and 60 percent of High School
North students considered ad-
vanced proficient in math, com-
pared to a state average of 25.7
percent.
From High School South, 51.2
percent of students were consid-
ered advanced proficient in lan-
guage arts, as were 48.4 percent of
students from High School North,
while an average of 21.2 percent
of students in the state were con-
sidered advanced proficient.
The district also saw 100 per-
cent of grades 11 and 12 partici-
pate in advanced placement
courses or tests in both High
School North and High School
South. The state average for ad-
vanced placement participation
is 39.9 percent.
The districts middle and ele-
mentary schools also performed
well on NJASK tests. In Millstone
River School, 20.6 percent of stu-
dents received advanced profi-
cient scores in language arts on
the NJASK 5 test, and 20.4 percent
of Village students also scored at
the advanced proficient level,
compared to the state average of
7.3 percent.
In the NJASK 5 math test, 74.4
percent of Millstone River School
students and 70.8 percent of Vil-
lage School students received ad-
vanced proficient scores, com-
pared to the state average of 32.5
percent.
Kniewel stressed that the im-
pressive scores are the result of a
collaborative effort, and not one
particular factor in the district.
Research tells us that success-
ful schools are characterized by
dedicated educators, motivated
students, involved parents, and a
supportive community, said
Kniewel. This community col-
laboration provides opportunities
for our students to excel academi-
cally, artistically, and athletical-
ly.
Student-faculty ratios in the
district are comparable to the
state average of 11 students per
faculty member. Maurice Hawk
School had the highest student to
faculty ratio, with 15.1 students
per faculty member.
Class sizes in the district tend-
ed to be larger than the state aver-
ages. The largest average class
size was 26.1 at High School
South.
The report card shows that
both of the districts high schools
grew in the 2010-11 school year,
with High School South adding 18
students, and High School North
adding 13 students. However, the
enrollment rate for many of the
districts middle and elementary
schools went down in the 2010-11
school year. Town Center Elemen-
tary Schools enrollment dropped
most drastically, from 706 stu-
dents in 2009-10 to 664 in 2010-11.
The districts report card
scores may be remarkable, but
the tradition of excellence in the
West Windsor-Plainsboro school
district extends to more than
good test scores, Kniewel said.
All that we do, we do for the
students of WW-P, and everything
is tied to the 21st century compe-
tencies the skills we want our
students to have to be productive,
caring members of the global
community, said Kniewel.
These skills, which are not
specifically measured on the state
report card are: effective commu-
nicator, collaborative team mem-
ber, creative and practical prob-
lem solver, flexible and self-direct-
ed learner, globally aware and re-
sponsible student-citizen, and in-
formation literate researcher.
CLASS
Continued from page 1
National Suicide
Prevention Lifeline
(800) 273-8255
PSA
Class sizes tended to be
more than state average
in West Windsor
Send us your West
Windsor news
Have a news tip? Want to send
us a press release or photos?
Shoot an interesting video?
Drop us an email at
news@westwindsorsun.com.
Fax us at (856) 427-0934. Call
the editor at (609) 751-0245.
classified
T HE WE S T WI N DS O R S U N
JUNE 20-26, 2012 PAGE 10
BOX A DS
W H A T Y O U N E E D T O K N O W
All ads are based on a 5 line ad, 15-18 characters per line. Additional lines: $9, Bold/Reverse Type: $9 Add color to any box ad for $20. Deadline: Wednesday - 5pm for the following week.
All classified ads must be prepaid. Your Classified ad will run in all 10 of The Sun newspapers each week! Be sure to check your ad the first day it appears.
We will not be responsible for more than one incorrect insertion, so call us immediately with any errors in your ad. No refunds are given, only advertising credit.
L I NE ADS
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