Drug Discovery & Development

Issue 1

May 2011

Pharma

Technology Focus
IN ASSOCIATION WITH

Collaborative Action
Why open innovation is the way forward in the development of ever more complex drugs In this issue:
Cannabinoids rise above the stigma The future is digital for clinical trials Intelligent robots revolutionise lab work

Drug Discovery and Development

Contents
Issue #1 May 2011

Pharma

Technology Focus
IN ASSOCIATION WITH

Open the Treasure Chest
Why open innovation is key to the development of ever more complex drugs

BBMRI: The Industry Perspective
How big pharma is getting involved in a project that could revolutionise medical research

Hope on the Horizon?
Treatment for HIV / Aids is more sophisticated than ever - we look at recent developments

The Rise of Cannabinoid Medicine
Compounds found in the cannabis plant could herald a new wave of medical breakthroughs

Finding Focus with Clinical IT
We look at digital solutions that can help make clinical trials quicker and more cost-effective

Evolution of the Robot Scientist
Intelligent robots are helping to speed up lab experiments and screening processes

Drug Discovery & Development

Issue 1

May 2011

Pharma

Technology Focus
IN ASSOCIATION WITH

Collaborative Action
Why open innovation is the way forward in the development of ever more complex drugs In this issue:
Cannabinoids rise above the stigma The future is digital for clinical trials Intelligent robots revolutionise lab work

Drug Discovery & Development

Issue 1

May 2011

Pharma

Technology Focus
IN ASSOCIATION WITH

Collaborative Action
Why open innovation is the way forward in the development of ever more complex drugs In this issue:
Cannabinoids rise above the stigma The future is digital for clinical trials Intelligent robots revolutionise lab work

Integrated Safety in the Lab

guaranteed by IKA®
The magnetic stirrer RCT basic safety control sets new standards
The add-on “safety control” says it all: the magnetic stirrer RCT basic by IKA® offers an even higher level of safety for lab workers. The heating plate has two independent safety control circuits to assist users with precise temperature control and automatic shut off. Users can also independently adjust the safety and medium temperature. Depending on the application, the device can even be configured for various heating times while offering maximum security. The safety-relevant parts are continuously checked throughout the operation. Self-monitoring of all safety relevant components guarantees safety in the event of a malfunction. By setting the independent safety circuit we ensure that the flashpoint of the medium will not be overshot and that accidental changes of the safety temperature are prevented. In addition, the already powerful magnetic stirrer now has an even stronger motor. This way, a larger speed range can be regulated. Another new feature is an additional temperature mode for quicker heating of media. The set temperature is reached quickly and held stable. The temperature set/actual as well as speed set/actual are easily read due to the large digital display. The RCT basic safety control with its chemically resistant and fully enclosed housing in compliance with IP 42 has been checked according to international lab equipment standards DIN EN IEC 61010-1, DIN EN IEC 61010-2-010, DIN EN IEC 61010-2-051 - tested and certified by cULus International - as well as DIN EN IEC 61326-1. The IKA® RCT basic fulfills, in all areas, the required safety regulations for laboratory equipment. Of course all of our products conform to CE certification. When it comes to IKA®’s magnetic stirrer, safety is ensured through continuous innovation and design. IKA® continues to develop and release products that are “designed to work perfectly” and designed to work safety.

About IKA®
The IKA® group is the worldwide leader in laboratory, analytical and process technology. The laboratory and analytical technology product line-up is comprised of magnetic stirrers, overhead stirrers, dispersers, shakers, mills, rotary evaporators, calorimeters, laboratory reactors and incubator shakers. The process technology department develops and distributes solutions for stirFounded in 1910, IKA® now proudly looks back on 100 years of company history. headquarters is in Staufen im Breisgau, South of Germany. As a global player, IKA® has subsidiaries in the United States of America, China, India, Malaysia and Japan. In 2009, the owner-managed company with its 617 employees generated 67 million Euros in revenue.

To read more about this product, click here

ring, mixing and kneading applications. The company’s

www.ika.com

Drug Discovery and Development

Contents
Issue #1 May 2011

Pharma

Technology Focus
IN ASSOCIATION WITH

Open the Treasure Chest
Why open innovation is key to the development of ever more complex drugs

BBMRI: The Industry Perspective
How big pharma is getting involved in a project that could revolutionise medical research

Hope on the Horizon?
Treatment for HIV / Aids is more sophisticated than ever - we look at recent developments

The Rise of Cannabinoid Medicine
Compounds found in the cannabis plant could herald a new wave of medical breakthroughs

Finding Focus with Clinical IT
We look at digital solutions that can help make clinical trials quicker and more cost-effective

Evolution of the Robot Scientist
Intelligent robots are helping to speed up lab experiments and screening processes

ICON’s Integrated Technology Solution
A centralised technology solution providing transparency throughout the management, reporting and analysis of all drug development data
Provides true data transparency and visualisation of data from site selection through to database lock Easy access to study trends to enable sponsors to proactively identify issues Secure, web-based, near real-time access anytime, anywhere Critical and more timely safety and efficacy information End to end audit trail with chain of custody in clinical data Scalable and leverages existing data systems

For further information or to arrange a free consultation

Contact us

Industry News
Navigation: Select a news category to the left Click on the headlines to read the full stories

Integrated Safety in the Lab

guaranteed by IKA®
The magnetic stirrer RCT basic safety control sets new standards
The add-on “safety control” says it all: the magnetic stirrer RCT basic by IKA® offers an even higher level of safety for lab workers. The heating plate has two independent safety control circuits to assist users with precise temperature control and automatic shut off. Users can also independently adjust the safety and medium temperature. Depending on the application, the device can even be configured for various heating times while offering maximum security. The safety-relevant parts are continuously checked throughout the operation. Self-monitoring of all safety relevant components guarantees safety in the event of a malfunction. By setting the independent safety circuit we ensure that the flashpoint of the medium will not be overshot and that accidental changes of the safety temperature are prevented. In addition, the already powerful magnetic stirrer now has an even stronger motor. This way, a larger speed range can be regulated. Another new feature is an additional temperature mode for quicker heating of media. The set temperature is reached quickly and held stable. The temperature set/actual as well as speed set/actual are easily read due to the large digital display. The RCT basic safety control with its chemically resistant and fully enclosed housing in compliance with IP 42 has been checked according to international lab equipment standards DIN EN IEC 61010-1, DIN EN IEC 61010-2-010, DIN EN IEC 61010-2-051 - tested and certified by cULus International - as well as DIN EN IEC 61326-1. The IKA® RCT basic fulfills, in all areas, the required safety regulations for laboratory equipment. Of course all of our products conform to CE certification. When it comes to IKA®’s magnetic stirrer, safety is ensured through continuous innovation and design. IKA® continues to develop and release products that are “designed to work perfectly” and designed to work safety.

About IKA®
The IKA® group is the worldwide leader in laboratory, analytical and process technology. The laboratory and analytical technology product line-up is comprised of magnetic stirrers, overhead stirrers, dispersers, shakers, mills, rotary evaporators, calorimeters, laboratory reactors and incubator shakers. The process technology department develops and distributes solutions for stirFounded in 1910, IKA® now proudly looks back on 100 years of company history. headquarters is in Staufen im Breisgau, South of Germany. As a global player, IKA® has subsidiaries in the United States of America, China, India, Malaysia and Japan. In 2009, the owner-managed company with its 617 employees generated 67 million Euros in revenue.

To read more about this product, click here

ring, mixing and kneading applications. The company’s

www.ika.com

OPEN THE TREASURE CHEST
CONFRONTED WITH INCREASINGLY CHALLENGING CLINICAL AND MEDICAL PROBLEMS, THE PHARMACEUTICAL INDUSTRY IS FACING HUGE PRESSURE TO DEVELOP MORE COMPLEX DRUGS. BUT NO ORGANISATION IS CAPABLE OF DOING THIS ON ITS OWN. DR PAUL STOFFELS OF JOHNSON & JOHNSON TELLS ELLY EARLS WHY OPEN INNOVATION – THE COLLABORATION BETWEEN BIG PHARMA, BIOTECH AND ACADEMIC INSTITUTIONS – IS THE WAY FORWARD

The simple diseases have been solved,” says Dr Paul Stoffels, worldwide chairman of pharmaceuticals at Johnson & Johnson. “Today we are confronted with very challenging clinical and medical problems that require a significant amount of science and technology to come together to reach a solution.” Consequently, the process of creating a new product and getting it to market has become too difficult for one organisation to undertake effectively alone. “Take the history and the number of products approved over the last 20 years and the amount of money invested in these products and you come to realise the numbers are staggering,” says Stoffels, who has over 15 years’ global experience in pharmaceutical and HIV/AIDS R&D. Add to this a stringent regulatory climate and an environment in which consumers want to pay less for drugs and healthcare, and it is little wonder that the pharmaceutical industry and the scientific community are beginning to embrace a new paradigm – open innovation.

“There is a tremendous amount of science ongoing globally, and it’s difficult to work with the idea that everything can be done in one organisation,” says Stoffels. “You need so much disparate science and technology to come together to create a new solution for diseases such as Alzheimer’s, so you cannot live in a world where companies think they can do all innovation in their own laboratories.” For Stoffels, it is essential for big pharma to access different parts of the scientific community, such as academic institutions and biotech companies, that may bring part of the solution to the table. “I am a believer that the combination between academic science, biotech and big pharma will yield significant transformational solutions in the future for significant global problems,” he says. That is not to say that the pharmaceutical companies’ labs are without merit. “They are very important because they have what is required to turn information and science into a product, into a pill, into an injection, into an antibody that gives the desired effect in the patient,” Stoffels explains.

“ YOU CANNOT LIVE IN A WORLD WHERE COMPANIES THINK THEY CAN DO ALL INNOVATION IN THEIR OWN LABORATORIES ”

We have a challenging and inspiring mission: To improve the quality of human life by enabling people to do more, feel better and live longer. This mission gives us the purpose to develop innovative medicines and products that help millions of patients and consumers around the world.

www.gsk.com

BBMRI:

The Industry Perspective
The Biobanking and Biomolecular Resources Research Infrastructure is paving the way for research cooperation in Europe. We talk to Dr David Cox, senior vice-president at Pfizer, to find out how big pharma is getting involved in a project that could revolutionise medical research

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HOPE on the Horizon?
Treatment for HIV / Aids is more sophisticated than ever, but how much closer are we to finding a cure? Chris Lo investigates the colossal challenges for organisations trying to treat, prevent, and eventually find a cure for the world’s most feared virus

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A group of compounds found in the cannabis plant could herald a new wave of medical breakthroughs. Chris Lo talks to GW Pharmaceuticals executive chairman Dr Geoffrey Guy about their new cannabis-derived drug Sativex and the future for cannabinoid research

The Rise of Cannabinoid Medicine

Cannabinoids, the class of chemical compounds found in the cannabis plant, could be a drug development treasure trove. They have been shown to have pain-relieving, antispasmodic, anti-cancer and antiinflammatory properties. These compounds can be used to stimulate or suppress appetite, reduce nausea or even as an antioxidant. Their usefulness for certain sufferers of multiple sclerosis (MS), Aids and cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy, among others, is beyond doubt. Despite the inherent pharmacological value of these substances, they have not been as intensely investigated as one might suspect. The reason might be a lingering stigma surrounding cannabinoids and their perceived association with a recreational drug that is illegal in most countries. THC, the most well-known of the cannabinoids – and the only one with a psychoactive or ‘high-

inducing’ effect – is only one of a large number of pharmacologically active cannabinoids, but its coverage has far outstripped that of any other. Synthetic medicines that mimic the effects of cannabinoids, such as Marinol and Cesamet, are available in some countries, but there is only one licensed prescription medicine derived directly from the cannabis plant. The world’s first cannabis-derived medicine Sativex is an oral spray derived from THC and cannabidiol (CBD), developed by UK-based pharmaceutical company GW Pharmaceuticals. The spray is fully licensed in the UK, Spain, Canada and New Zealand for the treatment of muscle spasticity in MS patients. It is also approved in Canada for the reduction of cancer pain and neuropathic pain, and is in various stages of the approval process in the European Union and in the US.

For Dr Geoffrey Guy, executive chairman at GW Pharmaceuticals, the main aim was to create a drug with the widest possible ‘therapeutic window’ – the dosage range at which a drug is effective without causing unacceptable side effects. This was achieved in the delivery method and in the combination of cannabinoids used. The oral spray delivery allows for a more gentle absorption rate, thus maximising the tolerability of the drug and increasing the therapeutic window. “If people were to inhale THC-containing materials, their blood levels would rise to 100ng150ng/ml in six to eight minutes,” says Guy. “With a standard 10mg four spray dose of THC by Sativex, you would find that the levels rise to about 3ng or 4ng/ml in two hours.” According to Guy, the CBD in Sativex also plays a part in tempering the psychoactive effects of THC, making the THC more tolerable.

“That again opens the therapeutic window,” he says. “It is the essential underlying strategy for developing Sativex to provide a medicine that captured the pharmacology and therapeutic benefits that were available within cannabis compositions, but to remove the unwanted side effects that would be produced by inappropriate root administration of very high amounts.” Overcoming misconceptions With Sativex gaining approval, the concept of cannabinoid medicine has been established as more than a kooky herbal remedy. But there are still hurdles that need to be overcome in terms of acceptance. As the head of one of the world’s leading cannabinoid research groups, one of Guy’s tasks is to debunk the myths and preconceptions about this emerging area of science. He explains the challenge: “We have to take more care to provide far more fundamental data than if we’d just invented a molecule and said, ‘This is what it does, please accept it’. There is an education process. And it’s very different throughout the world. We’ve been operating around the world for 12 years and each country has a very different view on it.”

Another misconception is the overwhelming media focus on the cannabinoid THC, which Guy puts down to the ‘frisson’ of it being the psychoactive component of street cannabis. Indeed, recreational cannabis has been specifically bred to maximise THC at the expense of other cannabinoids. But in terms of research for future applications, Guy describes THC as the least interesting cannabinoid. It is when we take a look at the lesser-known cannabinoids that this research world really begins to open up. In basic scientific terms, cannabinoids are chemical compounds that interact with and stimulate the cannabinoid receptors that exist in almost all living beings. These receptors in the body are responsible for modulating other systems in the body. The key is that cannabinoid receptors encourage homeostasis, in other words encouraging the body to do what it is supposed to do. Unlike with synthetic medicines, which simply trigger a predetermined effect based on the dosage provided, the activation of a cannabinoid receptor on two different occasions could have the opposite result, because the cannabinoid system will react in a way that most supports homeostasis.

This means that cannabinoids share a very good organoleptic and toxic safety profile. But the pharmacology of each cannabinoid differs in the effect that it might bring about. For example, GW Pharmaceuticals has discovered that THCV, a cannabinoid that is an analogue of THC, acts as to reduce excess activity of the cannabinoid receptor rather than stimulate it. THCV, along with other cannabinoids such as CBD, CBDV, CBC and CBG, is forming the bulk of the company’s current research. A new area of science Research into the cannabinoid system is developing a new area of scientific thought, not just on environmental substances, but on a fundamental system within the human body. Discoveries in this area could hold the key to a new wave of treatment options for patients. “A few years ago, cannabinoids were referred to as the aspirin of the 21st century,” says Guy. “We have a 20 to 25-year research programme ahead of us. I think that the real benefits of cannabinoid medicines, in terms of human physiology and human pathology, will really come into their own probably in ten to 20 years. It is a hugely promising area, although highly complex, requiring

a massive push from the academic world and the pharmaceutical industry to develop. “We have to develop whole new types of science and new ways of assessing what might be going on when you’re introducing a range of cannabinoids,” Guy explains. “We and our partners are spending our time and resources to lay down a basis of not only cannabinoid science, but also a very different way of assessing how each of these new cannabinoids are going to have a benefit. So watch this space.”

Online- Moisture Measurement in Granulation and Drying

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Drying after granulation is one of the most important steps in the production of pharmaceutical products. Especially the target moisture of e.g. 2% +/-0,2% is important for the production and the quality of the product. TEWS-Elektronik located in Hamburg/Germany is one of the most experienced companies in using microwave technology for fast and accurate moisture measurement for online and laboratory. The latest development has been made especially to meet the requirements of the pharmaceutical industry. Some of the key features are: • • • • • • • • • • Fast and accurate measurements of product moisture and temperature Indication when target moisture is achieved Measurement of core moisture of granulate not only surface like optical systems Density independent measurement No influence from the microwave to the product Up to 400 measurements/sec Meets GMP requirements EX – certificate Connectivity: 4-20mA, TCP/IP, Profibus, PC Easy to refit existing systems

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Finding Focus with Clinical IT
LEVERAGING TECHNOLOGY TO STREAMLINE THE CLINICAL TRIAL PROCESS IS BENEFICIAL TO BIG PHARMA AND THE PATIENTS IT SERVES. CHRIS LO LOOKS INTO THE NEW DIGITAL HORIZON FOR DRUG DEVELOPMENT

TRIAL AND ERROR:

0 01 10 01 11 10 01 11 00

Along with the likes of expiring patents and the booming illicit trade in counterfeit medication, the difficulty of modern clinical trials can create a challenge for pharmaceutical companies and medical technology manufacturers looking to get their products to market as quickly as possible. The complexity of the international regulation system, as well as dwindling patient bases for clinical trials, is forcing the industry to look for new ways to economise the development process. But a strict approval process is no guarantee against safety breaches and product recalls. At the beginning of February, a report by the Advanced Medical Technology Association (AdvaMed) stated that recall rates for medical devices were similar in the US and Europe, despite the former having a more drawn-out path to approval. In order to overcome these obstacles, the pharmaceutical and medical device industries must make better use of the digital revolution of the last ten years. Better implementation of IT could hold the key to making the long process of putting a medical product into the hands of doctors and patients quicker, more cost-effective and safer. Although progress has been made by big pharma and other industry organisations, there is still more that could be done to integrate IT into the medical development world.

1 10 11 01 10 01 10 10 01

Pharma

Technology Focus
Editorial

Logistics & Supply Chain
Next Issue: June 2011

The pharmaceutical industry faces unique challenges in logistics and supply chain management. Delays or disruptions do not only affect profits – they can be a matter of life and death. Next month we look behind the scenes of the massive operation of getting the drug to the patient. We talk to industry experts about their risk management strategies and find out how companies can develop robust delivery strategies. We also examine the growing role of IT in supply chain management and investigate how scientist and packaging experts work on new ways to overcome the limitations of pharmaceutical cold chains.

Duncan West Head of Editorial and Production duncanwest@pmgoperations.com Susanne Hauner Editor / Production Manager susannehauner@pmgoperations.com John Hammond Graphic and Flash Designer johnhammond@pmgoperations.com Jason Luff Graphic and Flash Designer jasonluff@pmgoperations.com

Sales
Jasmin Keick Sales Manager jasminkeick@nridigital.com

Marketing
Ashleigh Cushing Marketing Executive ashleigh.cushing@nridigital.com Natalie Fleet Product Coordinator natalie.fleet@progressivedigitalmedia.com

Pharma Technology Focus is a product of Net Resources International.Copyright 2011 Net Resources International, a trading NET RESOURCES division of SPG Media Limited. Registered INTERNATIONAL office John Carpenter House, John Carpenter Street, London, EC4Y 0AN, UK. Company registration number 01155599. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced in any form or by any means, electronic, photocopying or otherwise, without prior permission of the publisher and copyright owner. While every effort has been made to ensure the accuracy of this publication, the publisher accepts no responsibility for errors or omissions. The products and services advertised are those of individual authors and are not necessarily endorsed by or connected with the publisher. The opinions expressed in the articles within this publication are those of individual authors and not necessarily those of the publisher.

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A Technology Solution for Improving the Management of Drug Development Programs
Kris Gustafson, Senior Vice President, Global Data and Technology Services

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EVOLUTION
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In the increasingly competitive, global and high-expense world of drug discovery and development, HTS and HCS have been a vital part of the pharmaceutical company’s armoury for some time. As the science around automation and robotics becomes ever more advanced, their importance is on the rise, as Nic Paton learns from robotics pioneer Dr Ross King

Put simplistically, high throughput screening (HTS) and high content screening (HCS) are the workhorses of the pharmaceutical industry, particularly when it comes to searching for and creating new pharmaceutical compounds. In HTS, a screening facility typically holds a library of stock plates whose contents have been catalogued and have been created by the laboratory or supplied by a commercial source. From these stock plates separate assay plates are created by pipetting a small amount of liquid from the wells of a stock plate to the corresponding wells of a completely empty plate. Then, normally through

an automated process, the assay-microplates are transported from station to station for sample and reagent addition, mixing, incubation, and finally readout or detection. The beauty of an HTS system is the way it can be used to prepare, incubate and analyse many plates simultaneously. This can greatly speed up the data collection process, with HTS robots often testing up to 100,000 compounds per day. The results of those tests determine the quantitative structure-activity relationships that relate the structure of a chemical compound to its pharmacological activity.

HCS, by comparison, uses modern cell biology, with image analysis being used to measure changes in properties of the cells caused by external treatment, such as chemical inhibitors, but also using automated high-resolution microscopy and robotic handling. HCS is most often used as a technology to determine whether, or how, a potential drug affects aspects of cell function involved in or describing a disease. HCS has been used in drug discovery for more than a decade, with its use growing and becoming more mainstream as technology has advanced.

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Pharma

Technology Focus
Editorial

Logistics & Supply Chain
Next Issue: June 2011

The pharmaceutical industry faces unique challenges in logistics and supply chain management. Delays or disruptions do not only affect profits – they can be a matter of life and death. Next month we look behind the scenes of the massive operation of getting the drug to the patient. We talk to industry experts about their risk management strategies and find out how companies can develop robust delivery strategies. We also examine the growing role of IT in supply chain management and investigate how scientist and packaging experts work on new ways to overcome the limitations of pharmaceutical cold chains.

Duncan West Head of Editorial and Production duncanwest@pmgoperations.com Susanne Hauner Editor susannehauner@pmgoperations.com John Hammond Flash Designer johnhammond@pmgoperations.com Jason Luff Flash Designer jasonluff@pmgoperations.com

Sales
Jasmin Keick Sales Manager jasminkeick@nridigital.com

Marketing
Ashleigh Cushing Marketing Executive ashleigh.cushing@nridigital.com Natalie Fleet Product Coordinator natalie.fleet@progressivedigitalmedia.com

Pharma Technology Focus is a product of Net Resources International.Copyright 2011 Net Resources International, a trading NET RESOURCES division of SPG Media Limited. Registered INTERNATIONAL office John Carpenter House, John Carpenter Street, London, EC4Y 0AN, UK. Company registration number 01155599. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced in any form or by any means, electronic, photocopying or otherwise, without prior permission of the publisher and copyright owner. While every effort has been made to ensure the accuracy of this publication, the publisher accepts no responsibility for errors or omissions. The products and services advertised are those of individual authors and are not necessarily endorsed by or connected with the publisher. The opinions expressed in the articles within this publication are those of individual authors and not necessarily those of the publisher.

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COMBINING THE 11TH ANNUAL ECLINICAL TRIALS AND 4TH ANNUAL EVOLUTION OF CLINICAL DATA MANAGEMENT:

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Dirk Langeneckhardt, Head Data Management Coordination, MERCK SERONO Michael Herschel, Director Clinical Research, GLAXOSMITHKLINE Guenter Briegel, Business Project Manager, BOEHRINGER INGELHEIM Herbert Noack, Senior Project Statistician, BOEHRINGER INGELHEIM Katalina Mettke, Senior GCP Inspector, BFARM Tero Laulajainen, Global Head of Clinical Operations, ROCHE DIAGNOSTICS Ramzi Najm, VP - R&D Information & Technology Management, ALLERGAN US Anastasia Christianson, Senior Director Discovery Information, AstraZeneca Nadir Ammour, Business and Technology Innovation Lead, SANOFI AVENTIS

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Industry News
Navigation: Select a news category to the left Click on the headlines to read the full stories

Drug Discovery & Development

Issue 1

May 2011

Pharma

Technology Focus
IN ASSOCIATION WITH

Collaborative Action
Why open innovation is the way forward in the development of ever more complex drugs In this issue:
Cannabinoids rise above the stigma The future is digital for clinical trials Intelligent robots revolutionise lab work

Issue 1

May 2011

Drug Discovery & Development

Pharma

Technology Focus
IN ASSOCIATION WITH

Collaborative Action
Why open innovation is the way forward in the development of ever more complex drugs In this issue:
Cannabinoids rise above the stigma The digital future of clinical trials Intelligent robots speed up screening

Issue 1

May 2011

Drug Discovery & Development

Pharma

Technology Focus
IN ASSOCIATION WITH

Collaborative Action
Why open innovation is the way forward in the development of ever more complex drugs In this issue:
Cannabinoids rise above the stigma The digital future of clinical trials Intelligent robots speed up screening

Drug Discovery & Development

Issue 1

May 2011

Pharma

Technology Focus
IN ASSOCIATION WITH

Collaborative Action
Why open innovation is the way forward in the development of ever more complex drugs In this issue:
Cannabinoids rise above the stigma The future is digital for clinical trials Intelligent robots speed up screening

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