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Folk

2 0 1 2 S a n ta f e i n t e r n at i o n a l

market

t h e s a n ta f e n e w m e x i c a n w w w. s a n ta f e n e w m e x i c a n . c o m

MuseuM District HoMe anD Guest casita


Located across from the beautiful rose gardens of Amelia White Park.

960 Old Santa Fe Trail $2,175,000


Experience a classic and gracious home located across from the beautiful rose gardens of Amelia White Park. This spacious home with guest casita is a canvas for collections, large and small, with its generously scaled rooms of varied and usable dimensions. The gated, walled and landscaped grounds ensure privacy and the native gardens and outdoor entertaining spaces are welcoming. The generously scaled floor plan offers a lofty, light filled living room with corner fireplace and garden views, a cooks kitchen with center island and breakfast bar, separate study, office and two guest suites. The air- conditioned master suite with corner fireplace features a large walk-in closet, luxurious bath and flagstone patio. A gallery hall with floor to ceiling bookshelves and art lighting leads to a large great room with two fireplaces, well equipped bar, storage closet, powder room and utility room. The expansive room lends itself to a variety of uses including a family room, theater, music room or studio. A circular driveway, new exterior stucco and other amenities complete this rare parkside residence in the historic museum district.

D: 505.984.7306 C: 505.577.5112 richardschoegler@santafeproperties.com www.gotsantafe.com santafeproperties.com

ricHarD scHoeGLer

ART OF THE STATE


MUSEUM OF INTERNATIONAL FOLk ART
505.476.1200 on Museum Hill

State of the Art,

Art of Gaman: Arts and Crafts from the Japanese American Internment Camps, 1942-1946
They braved the seemingly unbearable with dignity and patience

NEW MEXICO MUSEUM OF ART


505.476.5072 on the Plaza Its About Time: 14,000 Years of Art in New Mexico Looking back, the state of everlasting art marks its 100th year

NEW MEXICO HISTORY MUSEUM/ PALACE OF THE GOVERNORS


505.476.5100 on the Plaza Native American Portraits: Points of Inquiry Original prints capture elegance and beauty in the faces of the first Americans

MUSEUM OF INDIAN ARTS & CULTURE


505.476.1250 on Museum Hill Margarete Bagshaw: Breaking the Rules A Native American artist goes her own way

2012 Santa Fe International FOLK ART MARKET 3

4 2012 Santa Fe International FOLK ART MARKET

GENEROUS SUPPORTERS!
Heather & Case Tanner Cliff & Joan Vernick Miranda & Lois Viscoli Kelly Waller Susan & Paul Young Ahdina Zunkel & Marc Romanelli COMMUNITY Anonymous (2) James & Elisabeth Alley in memory of Augustine Rivera Thomas Andrzejewski Lynn Bickley Susan Boren Gay Browning Andrea & Bill Broyles Beverly Bunting Moor Leslie & Brad Burnside Shirley Burton & Mel Meeks Thomas Byrd Carnell Chosa Sally Corning & Ted Buchanan Margaret Ann Cronin Diana Crow Jo Ann Crow Andrew & Sydney Davis Nancy Sue Dimit Lowell & Rosalind Doherty Linda Donnels Steven & Karen Durkovich Bob & Pat Eggers Ardith Eicher & Dave Rashin Tom & Marilyn Elwood Nancy Etheridge Gail Factor Deborah Fondren Mary Joy Ford Wes & Betty Foster Ed & Jackie Foutz Claire Gantos Doug Garfinkel & Donna Shibat Paget Gates Higgins Peggy Gaustad & Stuart Ashman Felice Gonzales Barbara & Larry Good Melinda Hardwick Deborah Harrison Jill Heppenheimer Anne Houlihan Brown & William Brown Patricia & Franz Jahoda Katy Kane William & Patricia Kenney Judith & Phil Laughlin Bill & Carter Leinster Willard & Kay Lewis Ali MacGraw Kathryn Marczak Mimi & Michael McGarrity Carleen Miller Cathy & Scott Miller Rich Moore Riette Mugleston Judy Nix & Mary Ellen Degnan Debra Normann & Frederick Larimore Linda & Bob Off in honor of Charmay Allred Sandra & Arnold Peinado Sandra Penn Romily Perry in honor of Sophie Andar Gerald & Yara Pitchford Vivianne & Joel Pokorny Judy Pote James & Deborah Quirk Crennan Ray Lee Sigler William Singer & Joanne Cicchelli Robert & Irma Smith Carl & Joan Strutz Julia Thompson Alice Townsend Regina & Bill Turner Marilyn & David Ullman Michael & Laurie Vander Velde in honor of Dr. Grant La Farge David Waller Carole Ward Jane Wilner in honor of Umoja women SUPPORTERS Anonymous (2) Susan Akins Robert Armstrong Bill & Julie Ashbey Nathan & Leslie Axelrod in honor of 2011 Volunteers; in memory of Michee Ramil Remy Jan & Thomas Bailey Megan Baldrige Karen Beall Joan & Robert Benedetti Signe Bergman David Bernstein & Erika Rimson Victoria Bridges Edith & George Brown Ingrid Bucher Norma Burch John Burke & Barbara Hadley Ann Caldwell in honor of Edd and Carole Stepp Elaine Clayman Peter Coha & Vicki Nowark Janeen Cunningham Lori Dauelsberg Leslie & Dan Davidson Mary Davis & Ron Sherman Ann Dehart & Robert Milne Rene Donaldson John & Mary Easley in honor of Edd Stepp and Eileen Wells Brenda & Robert Edelson Bonnie Farello Susan Feiner & Peter Whitman Marlene Fischer Daniel Frayer in memory of Paulette Vasquez Cebrian Frayer Jennifer & Roberts French Karen Gahr Sandy Gally in honor of Janie Hoffman Robin & Jim Gavin in memory of Carol Y. Farwell Roger Goldhamer Don & Lorraine Goldman Phil Goldstone & Heidi Ann Hahn John Gordon in honor of Amy and Bill Conway Judith Haden Peter & Francie Handler Mara Harris in honor of Harriet Edmunds Christian Richard & Patricia Hawkins Charles Hendrix Mickey & Judy Herrmann Leslie Hylton Joyce Ice & Ron Latimer Edna Jamandre Heather Johnson in honor of Cynthia Williamson Trudy Joyce in honor of Gale Anne Hurd James King Betty Kronsky Louise Ladd Amy Lafferty in honor of Paul Borienski Mary Lance Linda Ligon Robert & Margot Linton Claire Lissance in memory of Regina Picker Lynne Loshbaugh Meredith & Steve Machen Lizbeth Malkmus Elizabeth Manak-Robert Creve & Jan Maples Renee Martinez Barbara Mauldin Beatrice McGrath Tom & Vicki McGuffy Steve & Christie McPharlin in honor of Sue Hinshon Stephanie & Mike Mendez Tom & Marilyn Morrish in honor of Nic Morrish, Tamara Morrish, Lauren Grant, and Rita Morrish Karen Mosier Michael Mullins in honor of Charmay Allred and Mary Mill Marshall & Monika Mundy The Nash Family Marty Nichols in memory of Clyde Nichols Jessie Nichols Janice & Louis Oien in memory of Eli Anne Pedersen & Mark Donatelli Annet Pellikaan Grace Perez Megan Perkins & Pete Shepard in honor of Kathy DeJardin Patricia Pittman Light Dianne & Boone Powell Lisa & Karl Ray in honor of Charlene Cerny Clare Rhoades Beverly Rhymes Helena Ribe Jane Robinson Jean Rooke in honor of Judy and Henry Sauer Patricia Sablatura & Ginny Swenson Ann & Rudolf Sacks Claire & Jon Schneider Ann Schunior Kay Seriff in honor of Suzanne Seriff and Charlene Cerny Ann Shafer Patricia & Richard Shapiro Betsy Shillinglaw Bard Shollenberger in honor of Madeline Hubbard Marjorie Sitter Morgan & Julie Smith Clare Smith Stephanie Smither Jimmie Spulecki Adrienne & Rosie St. Clair in memory of Tiffany St. Clair Pat & Luis Stelzner Sue Sullivan Peggy Swoveland Carroll Thomas Becky & Brad Todd Teresa Tunick Sachiko & Anthony Umi Thomas Weirath Laurie West Jim & Amy Weyhrauch Larry White & Family Marilyn Whitney Lee Witt Arthur H. Wolf & Holly M. Chaffee Mary Young in honor of Jill Heppenheimer, Barbara Lanning, and Susan Summa Bill Zimmerling & Sara Boyd

THANK yOU TO OUR mORe Than 1,600 AMAZING & DEDICATED VOLUNTEERS!
MARKET COMMITTEE LEADERSHIP
Admissions Catherine Lindberg Darryl Lindberg Ambiance Decorating and Art Team Amanda Moore Michael Mullins Sally Spillane Ambiance Sales Alexis Girard Laurie Morgan Silver Ernie Sulpizio Artist Hospitality Valerie Baugh Amy Conway Denise Johnson Marcia Lenihan Marisol Navas Sacasa Heather Robertson Mary Ann Shaening Benita Vassallo Artist Selection Marsha Bol, Ph.D. Martha Egan Felicia Katz-Harris Cory Kratz, Ph.D. Melinne Owen Suzanne Seriff, Ph.D. Artist Training Cathy Allen Nella Domenici Joni Parman Jane Shreffler Jean Zunkel Best of the Best Booth Sheila Ellis Booth Photography Paul Giguere Booth Supervision & Supplies Cherryl Busch Richard Haber Melinne Owen Bob Zimmerman Entertainment Neal Copperman Felicidades! Farewell Dinner Charmay Allred Food & Beverage Brian Graves Green Team Laura Lovejoy-May Information Booth Andrea Fisher Mara Harris International Folk Arts Week & An Evening with Gayle Tzemach Lemmon Nancy Benkof Line Hosts Marci Riskin Local Interpreters Peter Greene Market Opening Party Martha Alexander Leigh Ann Brown Market Sales Robin Berry Sheryl DeGenring John Stafford One World Dinner JoAnn Balzer Deborah Spiegelman Outreach Program Sarah Alley Manges Aurelia Gomez Patricia Sigala Passport Program Donna Rosingana Zenia Victor Regional Coordinators Judith Espinar Nyira Gitana Mara Harris Barbara Mauldin Marisol Navas Sacasa Sylvie Obledo Sylvia Seret David Soifer Lea Soifer Benita Vassallo Deborah Weinberg Belinda Wong-Swanson Bill Zunkel Signage Laurie Vander Velde Michael Vander Velde Thursday Night Community Celebration Gayla Bechtol Suby Bowden Transportation, Parking & Safety Bob Casper Judy Casper Laura Lovejoy-May Andy Perea Visitor Survey Debby Everett Annette Kelley Volunteer Support Team Prudy Krieger Sarah Taylor Volunteer Hospitality Joan Chodosh Marlene Schwalj Paul Schwalj Water Team Krista Foutz

OTHER SUPPORTING ORGANIZATIONS


Atalaya Elementary School; Breakthrough Santa Fe; Center for Nonprofit Excellence; City of Santa Fe Parks, Parking, Police, & Fire Departments; First Baptist Church; Good Water Company; Immaculate Heart of Mary Retreat Center; Museum of Indian Arts and Culture; Museum of International Folk Art; Museum of Spanish Colonial Art; Museum Hill Caf; National Hispanic Cultural Center; New Mexico Department of Transportation; New Mexico Legislative Council Service; New Mexico Property Control Division; Office of Senator Jeff Bingaman; Office of Senator Tom Udall; Rio Grande School; Santa Fe Railyard Community Corporation; Wheelwright Museum of the American Indian
SpecIal thankS to new MexIcoS congreSSIonal delegatIon, governor SuSana MartInez, the new MexIco departMent of cultural affaIrS, new MexIco State legISlatorS, Mayor davId coSS, Mayor pro teM rebecca wurzburger, the Santa fe cIty councIl, and all theIr Invaluable Staff. List as of June 1, 2012 every effort haS been Made to Include a coMplete and accurate lISt of donorS, SponSorS, and volunteerS. pleaSe notIfy uS of any oMISSIonS or correctIonS.

2012 Santa Fe International FOLK ART MARKET 5

We Know Santa Fe Real Estate


Historic Eastside Properties
Upper Canyon Road

IDYLLIC RETREAT

Secreted off legendary Upper Canyon Road in the shadows of the Sangre de Cristo foothills, this idyllically pastoral property is a hidden treasure. Green swaths of grass; towering mature cottonwoods; and a hot tub and pool; plus an adjacent, undeveloped lot surround a rened 3,831 sq ft main residence and a stylish 1,058 sq ft studio guesthouse. 4BR, 2 full & 1 three-quarter baths, 4,889 sq ft on 3 acres MLS# 201101133 Offered at $3,200,000

EASTSIDE SANCTUARY
Camino del Monte Sol
Quietly tucked behind adobe walls on a historic street, the artfully designed main residence has gracefully evolved from its 1930s origins into an expansive estate of warm, welcoming elegance. A freestanding guesthouse comfortably accommodates visitors. 4BR, 5 1/2BA, 5,492 sq ft on 1.033 acres. MLS# 201202075 Offered at $2,950,000

East Alameda

HISTORIC EASTSIDE ADOBE CONDOMINIUM

This elegant yet comfortable historic home is a quiet, spacious escape in the heart of one of Santa Fes enviable gated enclaves. Architectural antiques add to the appeal. An attached 2-car garage is a rarity for an Eastside estate. 3BR, 3 full / 1 three-quarter and 2 half baths, 6,080 sq ft on 0.17 acres. Co-listed with Margo Cutler. MLS# 201103260 Offered at $2,500,000

ELEGANCE ON THE EASTSIDE


Camino Rancheros
In the heart of the Eastside this estate offers a 3BR main house and a separate 1BR guesthouse. Views of the Sangre de Cristos, mature trees and beautiful gardens. The living spaces are large and open with tall ceilings, not always present in Eastside homes. Home shows beautifully and has undergone extensive upgrades in the last couple of years. 4BR, 4 1/2BA, 4,782 sq ft on 0.870 acres MLS# 201202623 Offered at $2,095,000

RAY RUSH
Direct 505.984.5117 Mobile 505.577.5117 ray@knowingsantafe.com

TIM VAN CAMP


Direct 505.984.5118 Mobile 505.690.2750 tim@knowingsantafe.com

JOHN RIGATTI
Direct 505.984.5141 Mobile 505.660.3353 jrigatti16@comcast.net
231 Washington Avenue 505.988.8088

www.knowingsantafe.com
6 2012 Santa Fe International FOLK ART MARKET

FOLK
2 0 1 2 S A N TA F E I N T E R N AT I O N A L
P U B L I S H E D J U LY 1 1 , 2 0 1 2

MARKET
COVER PHOTO CHRISTIAN PEACOCK E L H A DJ I KO UM A M A , N I G E R COVER DESIGN DEBORAH VILLA OWNER ROBIN MARTIN PUBLISHER GINNY SOHN EDITOR ROB DEAN EDITORIAL CREATIVE DIRECTOR DEBORAH VILLA 986-3027, DVILLA@SFNEWMEXICAN.COM MAGAZINE EDITOR ZLIE POLON

ENTERTA I N M E N T SCHEDULE

14

TABLE OF CO NTENTS
MAPS 8 OFFSITE PA R K I N G M A P

3 0 A RT I ST & B O OT H LO C ATO R MAP

A RT I ST B O OT H LO C ATO R MAP

30 38
A RT I ST B I O S
PHOTO JANE BERNARD

F E AT U R E S 10 12 14 16 18 21 S A N TA F E S U P P O RTS FO L K A RT M A R K E T FO LK ARTS W E E K C A L E N DA R E N T E RTA I N M E N T S C H E D U L E S H O RT TA K E S A M O D E L WO RT H R E P L I C AT I N G TOYS T E AC H C U LT U R A L H I STO RY

MAGAZINE DESIGN WHITNEY STEWART COPY EDITORS SANDY NELSON, PAT WEST-BARKER ADVERTISING ADVERTISING DIRECTOR TAMARA HAND 986-3007 ART DEPARTMENT SCOTT FOWLER MANAGER DALE DEFOREST, ELSPETH HILBERT ADVERTISING LAYOUT RICK ARTIAGA ADVERTISING SALES KAYCEE CANTOR, 995-3844 MIKE FLORES, 995-3840 MARGARET HENKELS, 995-3820 BELINDA HOSCHAR, 995-3844 CRISTINA IVERSON, 995-3830 STEPHANIE GREEN, 995-3820 ART TRUJILLO, 995-3820 NATIONALS ACCOUNT MANAGER ROB NEWLIN, 505-995-3841 NATIONALS@SFNEWMEXICAN.COM SYSTEMS TECHNOLOGY DIRECTOR MICHAEL CAMPBELL PRODUCTION OPERATIONS DIRECTOR AL WALDRON ASSISTANT PRODUCTION DIRECTOR TIM CRAMER PREPRESS MANAGER DAN GOMEZ PRESS MANAGER LARRY QUINTANA PACKAGING MANAGER BRIAN SCHULTZ DISTRIBUTION CIRCULATION MANAGER MICHAEL REICHARD DISTRIBUTION COORDINATOR CASEY BREWER WEB DIGITAL DEVELOPMENT GEOFF GRAMMER WWW.SANTAFENEWMEXICAN.COM ADDRESS OFFICE: 202 E. MARCY ST. HOURS: 8 A.M.-5 P.M. MONDAY-FRIDAY ADVERTISING INFORMATION: 505-986-3082 DELIVERY: 505-986-3010, 800-873-3372 FOR COPIES OF THIS MAGAZINE, CALL 428-7645 OR EMAIL CASEYB@SFNEWMEXICAN.COM.

2 5 CO - O P S S U P P O RT A RT I STS, CO M MU N I T I E S 2 8 R E P O RTS F RO M T H E F I E L D 3 2 FO LK ARTS QUIET P OW E R 35 S O U N D O F MU S I C I S M AG I C A L

MEET THE ARTISTS 3 8 A RT I ST B I OS

2012 Santa Fe International FOLK ART MARKET 7

OFFSITE PARKING
O ISTE

TO DOWNTOWN PLAZA

GAL

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OLD SANTA FE TRA IL

SOU

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EAST
CAP L
LAMY BLDG

DE VA RGAS

GASP

FREE PARKING
MA
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PERA BLDG BUS STOP

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STATE CAPITOL

FREE PARKING

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FREE PARKING

PASEO DE PERA

LTA

CORDOVA RD

Offsite parking is available for all events on Museum Hill.


JOSEPH MONTOYA BLDG

DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION BUS STOP

NM

FREE PARKING

P
FREE PARKING

HAROLD L RUNNELS BLDG

ST FRANCIS DR

July 13-15. Free parking and shuttle service from P.E.R.A./Lamy building area parking, located on the northeast corner of Paseo de Peralta and Old Santa Fe Trail (immediately east of the New Mexico State Capitol). Buses pick up and return to the front of the Lamy Building. Overflow parking is available in the State Capitol parking deck located at the corner of West Manhattan Avenue and Galisteo Street (entrance on Galisteo), one to two blocks from the bus pickup at the Lamy building. Santa Fe Trails buses are fully ADA compliant with wheelchair lifts. (Call 955-2001 or (866) 551-7433 for more information.)

14 / CER RILL OS RD

SOUTH CAPITOL STATION


ALTA VISTA ST

ST MICHAELS DR

8 2012 Santa Fe International FOLK ART MARKET

2012 Santa Fe International FOLK ART MARKET 9

SANTA FE SUPP ORT ENERGIZES THE INTERNATIONAL FOLK ART MARKET


BY ARIN MCKENNA
VO LUNTEERS AND COM MU N I T Y B AC K I N G K E E P T H I S WO R L D - C L A S S M A R K E T STRONG. SANTA FE INTERNATIONAL FOLK ART MARKET IS NOW THE LARGEST INTERNATIONAL FOLK ART MARKET IN THE WO RLD. EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR CHARLENE CERNY AND CREATIVE DIRECTOR JUDITH ESPINAR OFTEN WONDER IF THE MARKET COU L D H AV E R E AC H E D I T S C U R R E N T S U CC E S S A N Y W H E R E E L S E .

I think thats very doubtful, Espinar said. The Santa Fe community loved the idea from the very beginning, and the ripple effect throughout the community in terms of community members joining market efforts has just been marvelous. Volunteers spearhead that community involvement. Over 1,500 volunteers provide the massive workforce necessary to stage such a complex event, helping with everything from delivering water to booths to serving as artists assistants and interpreters, to helping plan and execute the event. In 2011, volunteers donated 16,530 hours of work with an estimated value of $747,503. We have volunteers that work all year long, like they would work on regular jobs, Espinar said. They start to formulate their committees for the next year a

HIGHLIGHTS
Thursday, July 12, 5-9 p.m. Community Celebration, Santa Fe Railyard Park Kick-off party for the 2012 International Folk Art Market featuring artists procession, concert, international food booths and more Free and open to the public Friday, July 13, 6:30-9 p.m. Market Opening Party, A Global Gathering Under the Stars, Museum Hill Shopping, dancing, international music, food and drink artists booths will be open $125 per person ($75 tax-deductible) Advance tickets: www.folkartmarket.org, or call 505-886-1251 Tickets can also be purchased at the door Saturday, July 14, 7:30-9 a.m. Early Bird Market, Museum Hill Tickets $50, valid all day Saturday Market 9 a.m. 5 p.m. Tickets $15 in advance, $20 at the door Sunday, July 15, 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Family Day at the International Folk Art Market with Childrens Passport Program, Museum Hill Children receive a passport and collect stickers from each country/artist they visit Tickets $5 in advance (www.folkartmarket.org, or call 505 886-1251.) Tickets can also be purchased for $10 at the door NEW! Buy and print your tickets online www.folkartmarket.org
SPAIN | LUIS MENDEZ LOPEZ | PHOTO JOSE BLANCO

10 2012 Santa Fe International FOLK ART MARKET

According to the UN, Niger is the poorest country in the world and is getting worse. Last year Elhadji used some of his profits to buy food for the very poorest people in Agadez who have no way of earning a living. There was a terrible flood on August 31. He paid for emergency food and supplies for some of the 4,000 families who lost their homes. He pays for tuition for his younger brothers children to go to school as well as paying for the tuition of his own children. Now, because of the famine and the political problems in his country, he is supporting his eight older brothers and sisters and their families along with a number of elderly aunts and uncles.
N I G E R | A N N M . E L STO N , A B O U T E L H A DJ I KO UM A M A , KO UM A M A FAMILY CO O P E R AT I V E NIGER | ELHADJI KOUM AMA | PHOTO CHRISTIAN PEACO CK

month or two after the market, and put together piece by piece, committee by committee, what the market is going to be doing, how it is going to function, how its going to look, how its going to feel and what were going to be communicating. We feel so humble in relationship to the extraordinary effort and also the extraordinary skills the volunteers bring to the market, Espinar said. Charlene [Cerny] and I have enormous gratitude for our volunteer base and also for the internal excitement that they generate around this project. And that excitement never goes down. After the market, everybody is four times as excited as they were before. Then right away the conversations and the germination of new ideas, new ways of helping the artists begins again. The new Gallery Trail is a prime example of that, and of the degree of community involvement. For several years galleries have offered related exhibits during market week. This year, market organizers set up a schedule of 45-minute sequential slots and asked 10 galleries to fill those with a special event related to their exhibit. The galleries responded with talks, demonstrations and videos. This gave it a rhythm, and that is what we wanted, said Nancy Benkof, coordinator for International Folk Arts Week. The market features more than 150 artists from over 54 countries. In the past eight years, market artists have earned more than $12 million dollars. Last year, 90

percent of the $2.3 million in sales went directly to the artists, an average of $17,300 per booth. That money benefits both families and communities. Artists have used their earnings to bring food, electricity, water, health clinics and schools to their villages. Last year, the market had a record attendance of well over 20,000 people. It drew ambassadors from Asia, Africa and the Middle East, representatives from UNESCO and the Clinton Global Initiative, scores of Peace Corps volunteers, and designers from Donna Karan, Martha Stewart and West Elm. More than 40 percent of the 2012 market artisans are new participants, including craftspeople from the worlds newest county, South Sudan, as well as Hungary, Uganda and Vanuatu. The markets Sponsor an Artist program helps many of those artists participate. Every year we raise over $100,000 specifically to bring first-time artists to the market who have no way of knowing if they will be able to earn enough to make it worth their while, Espinar said. The market has always supported artists cooperatives, and 38 are participating this year, representing over 15,000 members. Cooperative sales will positively affect over 200,000 extended family members. The United Nations has declared 2012 the International Year of Cooperatives. South Asia joins Southeast Asia, East Asia and Central Asia in the booth highlighting recipients of UNESCOs

Award of Excellence for Handicrafts this year. The booth gives artists a chance to see how their work will sell at the market without making the full commitment to applying on their own, Espinar said. We have many wonderful, successful artists that first sold their work at the market in one of those booths. As a way of giving back to the community, the market is reprising the wildly successful Community Celebration at the Railyard Thursday evening. Organizers estimate that last years turnout was between 2,500 and 3,000 people. The attendance was phenomenal, Espinar said. People stopped me on the street in my car the day after saying, Community, community. Another highlight is An Evening with Gayle Tzemach Lemmon, which features the journalist and New York Times best-selling author of The Dressmaker of Khair Khana. Proceeds from the event benefit the Folk Art Market. (Details, page 12) One of the best new things this year is the ability to buy and print tickets online, so patrons can avoid both ticket booth and will call lines. Tickets may even be purchased online the weekend of the event, but advanced sales discounts end Friday for Saturday admission and Saturday for Sunday admission. Espinar noted that whatever changes, the markets mission remains consistent. The focus is always the same, which is to bring the world together to celebrate world culture, and to do everything we can to keep it on the face of the earth.
2012 Santa Fe International FOLK ART MARKET 11

FOLK ART MARKET EVENTS


Asterisks (*) denote a Gallery Trail event. Gallery Trail events are free and open to the public but seating will be limited, so please arrive promptly.

W E D N E S D A Y, J U L Y 1 1
We are proud to be indigenous. We all have different clothes but we have the same blood. I will take this experience home to better the lives of my children. This income is also a big help to all of the women in the community. Mil gracias.
BOLIVIA | SANTUSA QUISPE UNAY PALLAY ASOCIACIN DE TEJEDORES INDIGENAS DE CANDELARIA

demonstrations: Nomvuselelo Mavundla & Elliot Mkhize (South Africa), wire basket demonstration; Claudio Jimnez Quispe (Peru), Peruvian retablo demonstration. Also a hands-on project for ages 3-103, Making Wire Baskets. Museum of International Folk Art, 476-1200. Museum admission fee for adults: youth 16 and under free.

1-4 p.m. Santa Fe International Folk Art Market artist

*1-1:45 p.m. Bellas Artes Gallery, Colombian Fiber Artist Olga de Amaral: selected weavings and video by the artist. 653 Canyon Rd. (next to Compound Restaurant), 983-2745. *2-2:45 p.m. Jane Sauer Gallery, The Magic of the Bead
in the Hands of Teri Greeves. Demonstration and discussion with the award-winning artist. 652 Canyon Rd., 995-8513.

*3-4:30 p.m. Taylor A. Dale Fine Tribal Art, Antique

Ceremonial Containers of Tribal Cultures, exhibition and talk. 129 W. San Francisco St., 2nd floor, 989-9903.

INTERNATIONAL FOLK ARTS WEEK CALENDAR


ONGOING
Museum of International Folk Art, The Art of Gaman: Arts and Crafts from the Japanese American Internment Camps, 1942-1946. Ongoing through October 7. 706 Camino Lejo, 476-1200. Back Street Bistro, Artists of the Santa Fe International Folk Art Market: a photography exhibit benefiting the Folk Art Market. Through July 28 during regular business hours: M-F 10 a.m.-2:30 p.m., Saturday 11 a.m.-2 p.m. 513 Camino de los Marquez, 982-3500. Monroe Gallery of Photography, People Get Ready: The Struggle for Human Rights, an exhibition of 55 dramatic photographs from significant human rights struggles in history. Through September 2. 112 Don Gaspar, 992-0800. Travelers Market, The Art of the Shawl: Adornment, Status and Ritual, exhibit and sale of shawls from around the world. Through July 29. DeVargas Center, 153B Paseo de Peralta, 989-7667.

*3-4:30 p.m. John Ruddy Gallery, Resist-dyed textiles


from Japan and SE Asia. John Ruddy talks about exhibit textiles with a range of dying techniques. 129 W. San Francisco St., 2nd floor, 989-9903.

7 p.m. An Evening with Gayle Tzemach Lemmon, journalist and New York Times best-selling author of The Dressmaker of Khair Khana. Lensic Performing Arts Center, 211 West San Francisco St. Tickets: $15, $25 and $35. www.lensic.org or 988-1234. Pre-Lensic cocktail party with the author at the Coyote Cafe from 5:30-6:30 p.m. Tickets: $125 includes a signed copy of the book and prime seating for the event at the Lensic.
T H U R S D A Y, J U L Y 1 2

July 12 - July 15 Park Fine Art presents How Things

Are Made: Korean Paper Making Demonstration Art Santa Fe, an exclusive demonstration of hanji. Part of Art Santa Fes How Things Are Made series. Opening event 58 p.m. Thursday. Ongoing demonstrations from 11 a.m.6 p.m. FridaySunday. Santa Fe Convention Center, 201 Marcy St.

*12:30-1:15 p.m. Shiprock Santa Fe, Spiderwomans Song, an exhibition from a contemporary Navajo weaver with a demonstration of both modern and traditional weaving techniques by a member of the Ramah Navajo Weavers Association. 53 Old Santa Fe Trail, 982-8478. *1:30-2:15 p.m. Santa Fe Weaving Gallery, From Waste to Wealth: An exhibition of folk textiles of India, exhibit and talk by former textile curator Nora Fisher. 124-1/2 Galisteo St., 982-1737.

12 2012 Santa Fe International FOLK ART MARKET

*2:30-3:15 p.m. Seret and Sons, Rugs and Fine Furnishings, Wooden Wonders: The ancient art of Tibetan decorated furniture, talk and gallery tour of Tibetan decorated furniture. 224 Galisteo St., 988-9151. *3:30-4:15 p.m. Casa Nova Gallery, Isnt She a Doll?
African dolls in ritual and play, exhibit and talk. 530 South Guadalupe St., 983-8558.

6:30-9 p.m. Market opening party, A Global Gathering Under the Stars. Shopping, dancing, international music, food and drink. Artists booths will be open, lighted and ready to sell. Museum Hill. $125 per person ($75 tax-deductible).
S A T U R D A Y, J U L Y 1 4

2012 International Folk Art Market, featuring the annual market artists procession, a free concert, international foods and more. Santa Fe Railyard Park. The event is free and open to the public.

5-9 p.m. Community Celebration: Kickoff party for the

7:30- 9 a.m. Early Bird Market. Museum Hill. $50 ticket valid all day Saturday.
Museum Hill. $15 advance sales, $20 day of event, children 16 and under free.

DETAILS, DETAILS
For updates on events during Santa Fes International Folk Arts Week (Friday, July 6 through Sunday, July 15) or more details about any of the scheduled Folk Art Market events listed in this calendar, log onto www. folkartmarket.org/coming/ international-folk-arts-week. For information about additional events around town, pick up a copy of Pasatiempo, The New Mexicans Weekly Magazine of Arts, Entertainment & Culture, on Friday. You can also visit www.santafe. com and scroll down to the Santa Fe International Folk Art Market links.

9 a.m.-5 p.m. International Folk Art Market,

F R I D A Y, J U L Y 1 3
Embroidering Culture in the Andes. Light continental breakfast followed by a talk and video presentation by Ralph Bolton from The Chijnaya Foundation and textile exhibit. 927 Baca St., 982-1755.

11 a.m.- noon Workshop with African Show Boyz from


Ghana. Museum of International Folk Art Auditorium.

*9:30-10:30 a.m. The Ann Lawrence Collection,

1 p.m. Gallery talk with Felicia Katz-Harris, Curator of

Asian & Middle Eastern Collections, The Art of Gaman: Arts & Crafts from the Japanese American Internment Camps, 1942-1946. Museum of International Folk Art.

*11-11:45 a.m. William Siegal Gallery, The Iscayo, Womens Ceremonial Mantles from the 17th-19th centuries, exhibit and talk by William Siegal. 540 South Guadalupe St., 820-3300. 2-3 p.m. Collected Works Bookstore, Author Alyse
Nelson speaks about her new book, Vital Voices: The Power of Women Leading Change Around the World. 202 Galisteo St. #A, 988-4226.

3-4 p.m. Workshop with Aldar Tamdyn, Tuvan throat singer. Museum of International Folk Art Auditorium.
journalists/photographers Judith Fein and Paul Ross present a talk, slideshow, video, music and an authentic kava ceremony led by Vanuatu artist Zilo Bong. El Museo Cultural, 555 Camino De La Familia, 955-0712. $15, $12 seniors (percentage donated to Vanuatu Kastom School for Cultural Preservation).

7:30 p.m. Award-winning international travel

TICKET PRICES
MARKET OPENING PARTY $125 ($75 tax-deductible) SATURDAY EARLY BIRD MARKET $50 ($25 tax-deductible) SATURDAY MARKET $15 in advance $20 day of event SUNDAY FAMILY DAY $5 in advance, $10 day of event Youth 16 and under FREE Saturday and Sunday To purchase tickets in advance, visit www.folkartmarket.org or call 505-886-1251. There will also be ticket booths at the entry to the Folk Art Market on Museum Hill for lastminute ticket purchases.

S U N D A Y, J U L Y 1 5

9 a.m.-5 p.m. International Folk Art Market, Family Day with Childrens Passport Program. Children receive a passport and collect flag stickers from each country/artist they visit. Museum Hill. $5 advance sales, $10 day of event, children 16 and under free.
Asian & Middle Eastern Collections, The Art of Gaman: Arts & Crafts from the Japanese American Internment Camps, 1942-1946. Museum of International Folk Art.

11 p.m. Gallery talk with Felicia Katz-Harris, Curator of

2:30-3 p.m. Black Sea Hotel (Balkan Songs).

Performance in Young Brides, Old Treasures: Macedonian Embroidered Dress exhibit. Museum of International Folk Art.

For me it is a lesson and an inspiration as an indigenous woman to return to Panama and to raise my children with that pride and to make sure that Im raising children who can claim their roots.
PANAMA | LUBISIA MEMBACHE WOUNAAN NATIONAL CONGRESS

2012 Santa Fe International FOLK ART MARKET 13

ENTERTAINMENT SCHEDULE
S AT U R D AY
Mario Reynolds A market tradition! Andean flute music Sadaqah Music from the Silk Road

7:00 to 9:00 a.m. 9:00 to 9:45 a.m.

Potala Dance Troupe Tibet

12:15 to 12:40 p.m.

12:45 to 1:30 p.m. 2:00 to 3:00 p.m.

Black Sea Hotel Balkan a cappella (Macedonia, Bulgaria) Mala Maa Womens drum and vocal band rooted in AfroColombian music MORIA West African Traditional Music Ensemble West African music and dances of Guinea

10:00 to 11:00 a.m. 10:00 a.m.

Market artists perform on stage

Akbarali Aliev, Uzbekistan Doira, tor and rubab music from Bukhara Aldar Tamdyn, Tuva, Russia Tuvan throat singing and traditional music Matthew Ngau Jau, Malaysia Sapeh music

3:30 to 4:30 p.m.

10:20 a.m.

EVENTS AND WORKSHOPS


in the MUSEUM of INTERNATIONAL FOLK ART

10:40 a.m.

S AT U R D AY
African Showboyz An introduction to African drums, other instruments and dances from Ghana. Explore musical traditions with main stage artists in the intimate setting of the museum auditorium. The Art of Gaman: Arts & Crafts from the Japanese American Internment Camps, 1942 - 1946 Gallery Talk with Felicia Katz-Harris, Curator of Asian & Middle Eastern Collections, in the Gallery of Conscience

11:15 a.m. to 12:00 p.m.

11:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m.

Los Nios de Santa Fe and Grupo Coreografico Leyendas Traditional dance from Mexico Black Sea Hotel Balkan a cappella (Macedonia, Bulgaria) African Showboyz Dance music from Ghana Havana Son Traditional Cuban street music, cumbia and reggaeton

12:15 to 1:00 p.m.

1:00 p.m.

1:30 to 2:45 p.m.

3:15 to 4:30 p.m.

2:00 to 3:00 p.m.

S U N D AY

Meet Cndida Fernndez de Caldern, director of Fomento Cultural Banamex, as she signs her two new limited edition titles, Great Masters of Folk Art Iberoamerica and Great Masters of Folk Art Oaxaca (Spanish edition) at the museum shop. Aldar Tamdyn Tuvan throat singing from Russia Musical workshop with market artist in the museum auditorium

10:00 to 11:00 a.m. 10:00 a.m. 10:20 a.m.

Market artists perform on stage

3:00 to 4:00 p.m.

Aldar Tamdyn, Tuva, Russia Tuvan throat singing and traditional music Akbarali Aliev, Uzbekistan Doira, tor and rubab music from Bukhara

S U N D AY
The Art of Gaman: Arts & Crafts from the Japanese American Internment Camps, 1942 - 1946 Gallery Talk with Felicia Katz-Harris, Curator of Asian & Middle Eastern Collections, in the Gallery of Conscience Black Sea Hotel Balkan musical performance in the Young Brides, Old Treasures: Macedonian Embroidered Dress exhibit in the museums Neutrogena Wing All events are FREE!
FROM TOP: PHOTOS DAVID EVANS, KIM KURIAN, LISA LAW

11:00 a.m.

10:40 a.m.

Matthew Ngau Jau, Malaysia Sapeh music

11:15 a.m. to 12:00 p.m.


Wat Buddhamongkolnimit Sunday School Traditional Thai music and dance

2:30 to 3:00 p.m.

Quang Minh Buddhist Youth Lion Dance Team Ceremonial dance from Vietnam
14 2012 Santa Fe International FOLK ART MARKET

12:00 to 12:15 p.m.

G LO B A L F O O D FA R E
AGAPAO COFFEE American Fair Trade/certified organic coffees, plus tea and pastries ANASAZI ROASTED CORN Southwest American Roasted sweet corn sprinkled with butter and toppings such as red chile powder ANGEL FIRE NUT CO. American Roasted almonds, pecans, cashews, walnuts and peanuts in several different flavors ANNAPURNA WORLD VEGETARIAN CAF Indian Vegetarian and ayurvedic selections including rice, kitchari, vegetable wraps and chilled teas CLEOPATRA CAF Egyptian and Mediterranean Lamb gyros, chicken gyros, falafel, dolmas and iced tea COWGIRL BBQ American Breakfast tacos, BBQ beef on a bun, butternut squash casserole, smoked chicken enchiladas, harvest salads, smoked turkey sandwich, hot dogs and mint-ginseng iced tea ETHIOPIAN KITCHEN Ethiopian Traditional Ethiopian food including lamb stew, chicken stew, spinach and chickpeas JAMBO CAF Caribbean and West African A Swahili fusion of European, Arabic and Indian influences including coconut chicken stews, chicken curry wraps and more KONA ICE OF ALBUQUERQUE Hawaiian/American Shaved ice in a variety of flavors everything from banana to Tigers Blood MOLLYS CREPE ESCAPES French, American Crepes including Chicken Florentine, Nutella, lemon and butter, local favorite the Taoseno (ham, cheddar and green chile) and more. NATHS KHMER CUISINE Thai and Cambodian Roasted vegetables, rice, lemongrass chicken, Thai fry bread POSAS EL MERENDERO New Mexican Tamales, burritos, Frito pies, carne adovada and more REIDS American Fresh fruit drinks from strawberry lemonade to watermelon PLATERO FRY BREAD Native American American Indian fry bread and Indian tacos TAOS COW ICE CREAM Fresh, rBGH-free, all-natural premium ice cream in a variety of flavors including Mexican chocolate, pion caramel and more.

FROM TOP: PHOTOS DANA WALDON, LISA LAW, ROBERT SMITH

2012 Santa Fe International FOLK ART MARKET 15

Zunkel described a visit to Turkey last year: We drove for many hours into a valley looking for a small village where we could find weavers of rugs and carpets. We were lost, but we finally found them, and they had tea waiting. They wanted us to see where they lived, how they dyed their yarns. They welcomed us into their village. Earlier this year, Folk Art Market board member Peggy Gaustad led two Passport trips to Cuba. The groups spent time in Havana, Trinidad and Cienfuegos.
Miche Ramil Remy
ROBERT SMITH

Relations in New York City. Fortunately for New Mexico, Peters, 65, is not seeking political office. Rather, he chose to become president in 2005 of St. Johns Colleges Santa Fe campus (the other is in Annapolis, Maryland), and then to become involved with Santa Fes International Folk Art Market, first as a board member and for the past two years as the boards chairman. Peters efforts are aligned with the overall mission of integrating St. Johns into the larger community. The liberal arts

Short takes
Goodbye to

Going one step further

Folk Art Market travel

Miche Ramil Remy

The Santa Fe International Folk Art Market lost a family member this year. Haitian metalwork artist and market favorite Miche Ramil Remy died in March from myriad health complications. He was 41. Remy was born in Croixdes-Bouquets and learned steel-drum carving techniques from his stepfather, the sculptor Gabriel Bien-Aime. Remy was a fixture at the Folk Art Market from 2009 to 2011 and became known for his distinctive, elaborate scenes carved from recycled oil drums. His work depicts mermaids with watery strands of hair, wildlife (birds, serpents, insects) and curling, imposing plants and trees. Remy was a guest artist at the Smithsonian Institute International Festival in the mid 90s and created trophies for the Clinton Global Initiative in 2009. He is survived by his wife and three children and will be deeply missed by those who knew him.

If personal interactions with any of the Santa Fe International Folk Art Markets artists have left you wanting to know more, you may be a candidate for one of the markets organized art trips. Called Passport to Folk Art, the tours allow travelers a deeper view into the lives, work and countryside of some of the markets featured artists. Past trips have ventured to Africa, Turkey and Mexico. This fall, two groups of travelers will visit Gujarat, India, to explore the regions textile centers and bustling markets (the first trip is already sold out). The people who come on these trips are very interested in meeting artists firsthand and seeing their work environment, said Jean Zunkel, owner of BJ Adventures, which organizes most of the Passport trips. The Passport trips are small usually around 12 participants and feature experiences tailored for folk-art lovers. Trips might include a visit to a blockprinting studio or to an artists home.

Its the thread of the Folk Ark Market thats brought all these people together, Gaustad said, explaining that participants come from all over the country. Theres a really dynamic contemporary art scene in Havana, and one of the results is that folk art is still approachable and affordable. Along with artist visits, Passport trips feature lectures by field experts and benefit from the markets relationships with locals in each country. For more information: www.folkartmarket.org/ about/passport-to-folk-art-india-ii/
ADELE MELANDER-DAYTON Michael Peters
ROBERT SMITH

IFAM Board Chairman

Michael Peters

Michael Peters came to Santa Fe with a rsum reading like that of a political candidate in search of a very high office: a U.S. Army colonel who served as chief of staff at the United States Military Academy at West Point; a Soviet military specialist, including duty as an attach in Moscow; an executive assistant in the office of the chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff; and executive vice president of the Council on Foreign

college, which emphasizes classic texts and an overarching theme of expanding knowledge rather than mere information gathering, already contributes to the towns arts events by hosting free concerts and community lecture series. His personal goal with the Folk Art Market was to get involved with something distinctive that also had a global mission and vision, he said. Peters identified the markets engaged, devoted and highly educated volunteer force (Ive never seen anything like that anywhere else) as a major factor of its success. He also pointed to the larger impact the economic benefits might play in global stability. One of the things that encourages conflict is economic necessity, so the ability to build sustainable economic models reduces chances of conflict, he said. Since a large number of these artists are women, it provides for them to have stable communities and families, a fundamental element in a peaceful world. Im not Pollyannaish enough to believe that the big, political forces in the world will be tamed by indigenous artists, but on a local level, it does make a difference.

H AVANA , CUBA | PHOTO K E L LY WA L L E R

16 2012 Santa Fe International FOLK ART MARKET

2012 Santa Fe International FOLK ART MARKET 17

SUCCESSFUL AND SUSTA INABLE


Santa Fes International Folk Art Market offers a model worth replicating

BY ZLIE POLLON
T H E R E A R E A N Y N UM B E R O F W E L L M E A N I N G B U T T RU LY D I S A ST RO U S STORIES OF ORGANIZATIONAL ATTEMPTS TO H E L P D E V E LO P I N G CO U N T R I E S . T H E M I C RO LOA N PHENOMENON SMALL BUSINESS LOAN S M A D E P R I M A R I LY TO WOMEN, P O PULARIZED BY N O B E L P E AC E P R I Z E W I N N E R MUHAMMAD YUNUS HAS HELPED MILLIONS OF P O O R P E O P L E , B U T I T H A S N E V E R B E E N A PANACEA FOR LIFTING PEOPLE OUT OF P OVERTY.

Sadly, stories of sustainable successes in the fields of economic development are often outnumbered by tales of failures. Which makes the success of Santa Fes International Folk Art Market that much more important and, in fact, noteworthy not only on a local and national level but also on a global scale. It must be said that the market was never intended as a development project. It just so happens that as the event developed and grew, it became a powerful vehicle to financially help thousands of artists around the world, while also contributing to the worldwide preservation of and education about folk art. Looking at numbers alone, in 2011, 150 artists from 49 countries collectively sold $2.3 million worth of art. The average booth holder took home $17,307 more than most people from any of the participating countries make in a year. Here at home, the market provided nearly $14 million in total economic impact to the state, with $179,000 paid in gross receipts tax alone. Because so many artists come as representatives of cooperatives (in 2011, 54 artists from 29 countries) and their members families, their earnings impacted the lives of more than 200,000 people, according to market officials.

The Folk Art Market earnings did not just benefit me, they benefited a whole country of Rwandan folk artists. Our country has been changed by the women earning an income. Most of the 3,000+ women who weave in our cooperative were denied an education during the 5-year war. When I returned with earnings from our baskets, we all shared the earnings.
RWANDA | JANET NKUBANA | GAHAYA LINKS GIFTED HANDS INNOVATION CENTER | PHOTO JUDITH HADEN

By any account, these figures are excellent. But what sets the Folk Art Market apart and what might be worth noting for development projects the world over lies beyond mere statistics and more in a sustainability model that allows artisans to maintain and grow their successes into the future based on self-determination. Sustainability is where many development projects fail, said executive director Charlene Cerny, and why the Folk Art Market was chosen as one of only 100 nonprofits to attend the Clinton Global Initiative annual meeting in 2009. There, government officials, scholars and business leaders, among others, discussed and committed to strategies to address global issues such as economic development and global health. This year market organizers began a dialogue with Ambassador-at-Large Melanne Verveer, who works under Secretary Hillary Clinton in the State Departments Office of Womens Global Issues. At State, they know that great things are made by women, often in rural environments. What these

18 2012 Santa Fe International FOLK ART MARKET

Thank you for the opportunity provided to me I had never seen a place like this The most inspiring of all was the amount of sales that we have received on these two days is as equal as a year earning from sales in Nepal. This has again raised the possibility of hope... Earnings have been distributed among members of the cooperative. Earnings were used for sending the children to school, paying for medical expenses too. I have been able to make a hand pump for drinking water in my house. This has helped my family and me greatly. Because of the Folk Art Market, we are now able to make our earnings meet the minimum standard wage of Nepal.
N E PA L | M A N J U L A D E V I M A I T H I L B A H U N | JANAKPUR WOMENS DEVELOPMENT CENTER | PHOTO ROBERT SMITH

women lack is the ability to get their products to market. Theyre asking, How do we then turn that into income for their families? They see us as one strong way to make that happen, Cerny said. Cerny points to several aspects that make the market exceptional: a model of Learn and Do that trains artists in market mechanisms upon arrival; a nonprofit structure whose focus is not solely on commerce but also the preservation and promotion of folk art; and an extensive and amazingly coordinated volunteer army made up not only of dedicated individuals but also of people steeped in folk art academia and culture. This includes a highly educated board whose members all serve as ambassadors. And though she initially resisted the idea of a vetted market, Cerny said the fact that the market is highly vetted, requiring an extensive application process, is what sets the quality apart. Its not a flea market by any stretch of the imagination. Its an art market.

PEOPLE ARE INVESTING IN THE STORY BEHIND THE PRODUCT AND HOW THATS DEVELOPED BY THE ARTISANS AND THE MARKET. THE INDIVIDUAL STORIES BECOME INTEGRAL TO THE FOLK ART EXPERIENCE , THE EDUCATION ITSELF BECOMING THE MARKETING ENGINE AND OFTEN GENERATING A DESIRE TO PURCHASE . what they like and dont like, whether the price is too high or the colors too harsh. So theyre learning and then immediately theyre doing. Having that much direct customer contact is a phenomenal opportunity. Theyre like sponges, listening to everything thats being said, Cerny said. These are lessons that are integrated into the following years designs and preparations. Which is yet another sustainable and beneficial aspect of the market organization: The market serves as a direct sales channel to the retail market, often a rare experience for those who have only dealt with thirdparty players who might take large shares of profits in exchange for market access. It also means artists are encouraged to eventually take responsibility for every aspect of their own businesses. At the market, several first-time vendors are selected each year for financial sponsorship, but that gift is offered only once. After that, vendors are encouraged to budget their earnings to allow for the costs of returning the following year. We consider it something to celebrate when someone who had to use an intermediary in the past then doesnt need that help, said Cerny. This year, a group of philosophy and business students working out of the University of New Mexicos Anderson School of Management asked if they might study the market to identify factors contributing to its sustainability and success, with a view to seeing what might be replicated elsewhere. Led by Manuel Montoya, assistant professor of global structures at the Anderson School, the market is being looked at as a component of the international marketplace (a channel for goods and services), but one that functions as a non-governmental organization, creating a community of transnational entrepreneurs, Montoya said. It also embodies an epistemic community, which means that the combined academic and historic knowledge of the markets organizers and volunteer base is significant and cant easily be replicated. That community goes beyond curating and is generating values around folk art, Montoya said. One could attempt to replicate the educational rubric, but its much more difficult to create the same epistemic community, one that includes anthropologists and historians who work with the Folk Art Market to regulate the kinds of goods allowed into the market every July. Theres 300 to 400 years of cumulative knowledge and curatorship that goes into these communities, that goes into protecting and talking about folk art, he said. Montoya also sees the market community as sharing distinctive aspects, namely a common and very culturally sensitive language around business, a language critical of ethnocentrism. And in terms of market training, the artists who emerge from the experience know what a global supply chain is and grow to see themselves as more than locally relevant, Montoya explained. At the same time, the artists dont see themselves as foreign, or outsiders, because the market has created an unusual global community of people who are interested in a particular craft. The market transcends those things, Montoya said of labels that often separate buyers and artists. People are investing in the story behind the product and how thats developed by the artisans and the market. The individual stories become integral to the folk art experience, the education itself becoming the marketing engine and often generating a desire to purchase. If it sounds a bit esoteric, its a more holistic way of thinking about sustainable business one that recognizes that the elevation of handicraft and manual labor is in direct relation to the increasingly mechanized world and exploitation of labor. The International Folk Art Market has managed to combine traditional art forms with contemporary market training and then has the benefit of Santa Fes educated communities. Montoya noted: Here, its the perfect storm. It has all the right elements in the right places at the right time, and thats what makes it really work.
2012 Santa Fe International FOLK ART MARKET 19

E VO LU T I O N O F A M A R K E T
It was nine years ago in 2004 when Judith Espinar, Charlene Cerny, Charmay Allred and Tom Aageson came together and engaged Santa Fes cultural and business communities to create the first International Folk Art Market. They were motivated by a desire to create a fun event similar to Spanish Market and Indian Market that occur each summer in Santa Fe. It was only with time that organizers would realize the economic impact for the individuals involved. It didnt dawn on us until we began to hear stories of impact, said Cerny. How can you not respond to someone who is telling you that because of Santa Fe, and because of this market, they can now send their kids to school? Now we feel hugely responsible. Eventually a training and mentorship program was put into place, educating artists on everything from market display to booth readiness and pricing. A group from Theater Grottesco last year mimed a variety of interactions vendors might experience with customers. Primarily an icebreaker, it also served to teach people about customer relations and differing expectations. Pricing, booth display and how to tell your story are other topics. But the direct and indirect exchanges with customers are some of the most valuable teaching tools for artists, Cerny said. For example, artists hear customers discussing artists wares in front of them

REDefine

F O L K A R T M A R K E T. O RG

Changing Lives through Folk Art


The Santa Fe International Folk Art Market is a results-oriented entrepreneurial nonprofit organization dedicated to fostering economic and cultural sustainability for folk artists and folk art worldwide and creating intercultural exchange opportunities that unite the peoples of the world.

Did you know?


Artists take home 90% of their sales revenues Last year artists sales totaled $2.3 million In 2011, the average sales per Market booth were $17,300 94% of Market artists come from developing nations Almost half come from countries where the average income is less than $5 per day In 2012, the earnings from 156 artists and artist cooperatives will impact the lives of some 365,000 people

BOARD OF DIRECTORS
OFFICERS & EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE Michael P. Peters Chair Jon Patten Vice Chair Owen Van Essen Treasurer Joni Parman Secretary Judith Espinar Creative Director Leigh Ann Brown Alexis Girard Suzanne Sugg
Bob Smith

MARKET STAFF
Charlene Cerny Executive Director Kira Luna Rich Moore Laura Sullivan Heather Tanner Ernesto Torres Sachiko Umi Kelly Waller Ahdina Zunkel COnTRACT/SEASOnAL STAFF Nancy Benkof Emily Budziak Neal Copperman Staci Golar Chris Gonzales Peter Greene Clare Hertel Dawn Manges Daran Moon Amanda Moore David Moore Michael Mullins Sally Spillane MARKET InTERnS Adam S. Horowitz Gianou Knox Emily Souder Kelsy Wilson ART TEAM InTERnS Rebecca Alvarez-Alcocer Robert Anthony Fernandez Tallis Geohegan Jonathan Hargraves Sango Imai-Hall Colin Jarrett Monk Blaire Chris Stahelin Iman Ster

what matters
MARKET OPENING PARTY 2012
Milner Plaza on Museum Hill Friday, July 13, 2012 6:30 - 9pm Shopping and dancing under the stars
Featuring festive international finger foods and libations Music by African Showboyz Parking available off-site with shuttle service provided

Buying Begins!

DIRECTORS Polly Ahrendts Charmay Allred JoAnn Lynn Balzer Donna Bruni Carnell Chosa Kathryn King Coleman Sheila Ellis Peggy Gaustad Jill Halverson Linda Marcus Mary Mill Richard C. Porter Keith Recker Carol Robertson Lopez Marisol Navas Sacasa Sylvia Seret Steve Wedeen Don Wright ADVISORY MEMBERS Veronica Gonzales Marsha C. Bol John Easley ADVISORY DIRECTORS Cynthia Delgado Hank Lee Nance Lopez Sarah Alley Manges Edd Stepp

Online | folkartmarket.org By phone | 505 886 1251 In person | Museum of New Mexico Shops & Los Alamos National Banks Tickets $125 per person ($75 tax-deductible) | Sales limited For additional information | folkartmarket.org/friday or call 505 992 7600

Buy Tickets Now

Wear your RED and celebrate!


Additional support provided by Thornburg Investment Management
20 2012 Santa Fe International FOLK ART MARKET

Donna and Robert Bruni, Event Sponsors

MO RE THAN CHILDS PLAY


Toys teach cultural history, values
BY DENNIS J. CARROLL
W H E T H E R STR I N G A N D ROPE PUPPETS FROM INDIA , FELT DOLLS FROM KYRGYZSTA N OR CO LO R F U L B E A DWORK FOR THE NEW BABY S WA L L , A W I D E VA RIETY OF ITEMS CREATED FOR AND ABOUT CHILDREN ARE FEATURED AT THIS YEARS INTERNATIONAL FOLK ART MARKET.

Many of the items, such as the puppets made by Rajesh Gurjargour and Pannalal Meghwal of Rajasthan, India, are not necessarily for use by children but rather employed by adults to tell children stories of native cultures, legends and mortal or divine heroes. The puppets are also used in religious ceremonies and to entertain at various festivals. My puppets represent the people good and bad the stories of the gods special to the Udaipur region, such as Lord Ganesh and Lord Shiva, who have a key role in our religious ceremonies, Gurjargour wrote in his application to the market. The artist acquired his puppet-making skills from his father and grandfather who told stories of the history of traditional culture and gave puppet shows at the palaces of maharajas in Udaipur. Today Gurjargour and members of his family create their puppets out of wood or papier-mch. Heads are colored with oil paints. The very large eyes are outlined with black so they look very aware, as if they can see everything, he said. Gurjargour makes the puppets body out of cloth stuffed with rags and held together with glue and strings. The clothing, usually in the style of the areas traditional garments, is made of cloth and decorated with tinsel, sequins and beads. While Gurjargours puppets might not last long in the hands of a 5-year-old, the embroidered sheeps-wool dolls created by Erkebu Djumagulova of Kyrgyzstan are found in many a childs loving grasp. I use all my positive energy when I do them, Djumagulova said in her application, noting that the felt material absorbs her good feelings and energy and stores it for a long time. Her dolls include a figure riding a brightly decorated camel and children embracing or in the arms of a mother or grandmother figure. Besides the dolls, items made from sheeps wool are common in Kyrgyzstan homes. They include rugs, curtains, sitting mats and various items of clothing and other toys. Brightly colored cloth dolls are also crafted by quilt makers from India. They use cut pieces or leftover fabrics to make the dolls, which they then decorate with beadwork and embroidery. Similar textile dolls are created in the Andean tradition by weavers in Peru. There are also palm mobiles from Thailand (in the UNESCO tent); rustam hats for kids from Uzbekistan; vodou flags from Haiti or beaded paintings coming from Namibia to hang on a childs wall. Look for horsehair dolls and butterflies from Chile, baby blankets from Pakistan or baby slippers from the Hovsgol Coop in Mongolia. Each gift comes with a unique story. One concern market organizers are trying to alleviate is the possible sale of items
2012 Santa Fe International FOLK ART MARKET 21

INDIA | RAMU DEVRAJ HARIJAN

See the latest paintings of

Alexa Alexander
Primitive/Folk Artist
at

alexaalexander.com email for information: alxz@att.net

Serious Folk!

TEXTILES JE WELRY CD S WITH A GL OBAL PER SP ECT IVE


1O 9 8 1/ 2 S. S T FR A NC I S DR . @ P E N R D. MON SAT 1O 5 9 8 2 . 2 5 9 2

PERU | NILDA CALLAAUPA LVAREZ | CENTRO DE TEXTILES TRADICIONALES DEL CUSCO | PHOTO S RO B E RT S M I T H

that might present a danger to children.When its questionable, we cant accept it, said Judith Espinar, the markets founder and creative director. If its a toy that kids play with and we cant document that the glaze or lacquer is safe, then we dont let them bring it in. She also said the market excludes toys that are meant for infants and any dolls or stuffed animals meant for children that have small, loose items such as buttons used for eyes or sewn onto clothing. Espinar said that once the items are on site, market workers can inspect the booths to determine that the crafts match the artists declaration of items in his or her application. We look at whats in the booths, she said. We dont just assume that they followed instructions. Espinar said there are often different interpretations of rules in different cultures. Whether a toy for a child, a tool to educate a child or something for the child in you, many offerings at this years Folk Art Market tell us a lot about how children of the world play or learn about their own culture and how we can learn about other cultures too.

Search Santa Fe real estate


by zip code, area or address. Find vital statistics in your neighborhood of choice, like school information, mortgage rates and terms.

the search for your home is just beginning


22 2012 Santa Fe International FOLK ART MARKET

Georgia OKeeffe and the Faraway:


nature anD image
Featuring OKeeffes Camping gear, Paintings, and Photographs of Her Beloved Southwestern Landscapes
SEE THE EXHIBITION EXPERIENCE THE ADVENTURE

Georgia OKeeffe, Canyon Country, White and Brown Cliffs, 1965, Oil on canvas, 36 x 30 inches. Georgia OKeeffe Museum, Gift of The Georgia OKeeffe Foundation. Georgia OKeeffe Museum. Todd Webb, Georgia OKeeffe at Glen Canyon, 1961. Gelatin silver print, 9 1/ 2 x 7 1/ 2 inches. Georgia OKeeffe Museum. Gift of The Georgia OKeeffe Foundation. Todd Webb Estate.

217 JOHNSON Street, SaNta fe 5O5.946.1OOO OKMUSeUM.OrG OPeN DaILY 1O aM 5 PM OPeN Late, UNtIL 7 PM, frIDaY eveNINGS

2012 Santa Fe International FOLK ART MARKET 23

DOUBLE TAKE AT THE RANCH


Classic Cowboy & Indian

Collectibles

vintage designer
contemporary

Photo: Jim Arndt & Parasol Productions for The EG

boots hats accessories


corner of Guadalupe & Aztec Santa Fe, NM 505 820 7775

International Folk Arts Week: July 1113


The community is invited to participate in the 2012 International Folk Arts Gallery Trail. Organized by key galleries representing global traditional arts, there will be 3 half-days of demos, talks, films and exhibitions, all free and open to the public. Seating will be limited! Details: Each gallery hosts a 45-minute presentation, with a little time in-between, so attendees can get to each one. WED, JULY 11 1-1:45 PM 1 Bellas Artes Gallery 653 Canyon Rd. 983-2745 Colombian Fiber Artist Olga de Amaral, selected weavings & screening of video WED, JULY 11 2-2:45 PM 2 Jane Sauer Gallery 652 Canyon Rd. 995-8513 The Magic of the Bead in the Hands of Teri Greeves, demonstration & discussion

GALLERY TRAIL ~ SCHEDULE

East Palac

e Ave.

3 5 6

4 1 2

THURS, JULY 12 12:30 1:15PM 4 Shiprock Santa Fe 53 Old Santa Fe Trail 2nd fl, on the Plaza 982-8478 Spiderwomans Song, demonstration & exhibit of Navajo weaving techniques THURS, JULY 12 1:30 2:15 PM 5 Santa Fe Weaving Gallery 124- Galisteo 982-1737 From Waste to Wealth: An exhibition of Folk Textiles of India, & talk by Nora Fisher 8

7 9

WED, JULY 11 3-4:30 PM 3 Taylor A. Dale Fine Tribal Art 129 W. San Francisco St. 2nd fl, downtown 989-9903 Antique Ceremonial Containers THURS, JULY 12 2:30 3:15 PM of Tribal Cultures, 6 Seret and Sons, Rugs and Fine Furnishing exhibition & talk 224 Galisteo St., 988-9151 THEN John Ruddy Textile & Wooden Wonders, the ancient art of Ethnographic Art Tibetan decorated furniture. Resist-dyed textiles from Japan and Talk & gallery tour SE Asia, exhibition & talk
24 2012 Santa Fe International FOLK ART MARKET

FRIDAY, JULY 13 9:30-9:45am Light continental breakfast 9:45 10:30am Presentation 8 The Ann Lawrence Collection 927 Baca St. Just off Cerrillos Rd. 982-1755 Embroidering Culture in the Andes, talk by Ralph Bolton, The Chijnaya Foundation, exhibition & showing of a video FRIDAY, JULY 13 11:00 11:45 AM 9 William Siegal Gallery 540 South Guadalupe St., In the Railyard 820-3300 The Iscayo, Womens Ceremonial Mantles from the 17th - 19th centuries, exhibition & talk

THURS, JULY 12 3:30 4:15 PM 7 Casa Nova Gallery 530 South Guadalupe St., In the Railyard 983-8558 Isnt She a Doll?: African dolls in Ritual and Play, exhibition & talk

CO-OPS SUPPORT ARTISTS, COMMUNITIES


Celebrate the International Year of the Cooperative

BY DEVON JACKSON
CO O P E R AT I V E S A R E W H AT D R I V E T H E S A N TA F E I N T E R N AT I O N A L F O L K A RT M A R K E T A N D F O L K A RT, PERIOD. OW N E D A N D OV ERSEEN BY T H E I R M E M B E R S , T H E S E VALUES-BASED ENTERPRISES HELP REDUCE P OVERTY, GENERATE EMPLOYMENT AND INTEGRATE , OR OFTEN REINTEGRATE , THEIR MEMBERS INTO SOCIETY. NO WO N D E R , T H E N , T H AT T H E U N I T E D N AT I O N S D E C I D E D TO D R AW AT T E N T I O N TO T H E M T H I S Y E A R BY D E E M I N G 2 0 1 2 T H E I N T E R N AT I O N A L Y E A R O F T H E COOPERATIVE TO H O N O R CO O P E R AT I V E S A N D T H E I R B U S I N E S S M O D E L S A S A N A LT E R N AT I V E M E A N S O F D O I N G B U S I N E S S A N D F U RT H E R I N G S O C I O E CO N O M I C D E V E LO P M E N T.

Although not all were founded by or made up mostly of women, the cooperatives participating in the Folk Art Market tend to have a largely female membership. Many of the women have been disenfranchised, socially and economically constricted or just plain abandoned. The cooperatives provide them with an income, purpose, social life, exposure to other women and other cultures, opportunities and support. Most cooperatives typically reinvest the money earned at market back into the co-op or divide the profits equally among its members. Below are just a few of nearly 40 co-ops coming to market this summer, the work they do and the impact the market has on their artists and communities. The 80-odd members (three of them men) of La Mega Cooperativa de Saraguro, from the Andes region of Ecuador, specialize in making woven glass seed bead jewelry. The members, who often do their work at home, have begun to band together, said their translator Linda Belote, into cooperatives to support each other in improving their techniques, sharing their designs and stimulating each others creativity. Its members have been able to support their families financially through their beadwork and have established micro-credit institutions in their communities.

SAHALANDYs participation in the Folk Art Market has been the answer to an age-old question: How would they bridge the gap between their small village in Madagascar and the rest of the world? SFIFAM was exactly that. We are planning to use our funds from Santa Fe to build four bungalows and a showroom for the tourists that pass through.... The other part of the project is a showroom in order to show the timeconsuming and extensive process of silk weaving from farming silk cocoons, dyeing, washing, weaving and finishing. Its quite a sight to see and now visitors will have a good look. It is also a chance for our weavers to work together. Up until now, they have been scattered for miles around, rarely seeing each other except for meetings. Now they will be able to manage orders and come together as a team. SAHALANDY is very excited! A plan of this nature has been talked about for the past seven years.
MADAG ASCAR | NATALIE MUNDY | PEACE CORPS VO LUNTEER WO R K I N G W I T H S A H A L A N DY | P H OTO DAVID EVANS

The Minority People Silversmith Folk Artists Cooperative of Southwest China came together in 1985 as a way to increase their efficiency and to better handle the high demand. Its easier for a wellknown cooperative to get orders than for individual silversmiths, said the groups representative, Xu Xuan, especially if the order is big and urgent. Being at the market promotes the cooperative and its art form, and success brings in more money and attracts younger members to join. Volume and the bigger draw of the market are what count for many other cooperatives. Kandahar Treasure, the Afghan group that started in 2003 with only 25 embroiderers, is alive because of Santa Fe, said its founder, Rangina Hamidi. We have tried these high-end boutiques and other smaller retailers
2012 Santa Fe International FOLK ART MARKET 25

PANAMA | GREMIO DE ARTESANOS WOUNAAN

LAO PDR | LUANG PRABANG FUND FOR CULTURE AND CO N S E RVATION

UZBEKISTAN | COOPERATIVE BOGIAFZAL

26 2012 Santa Fe International FOLK ART MARKET

SAHALANDY members are now known as role models in the community for problem solving, business advice and financial planning. Women are taking more of a predominant position in the politics of the village. And they are now allowed to have more of a say because of their reputation of being successful abroad.
MADAGASCAR | NATALIE MUNDY | PEACE CORPS VOLUNTEER WORKING WITH SAHALANDY | PHOTOS DAVID EVANS

whove been interested in our products and the like. But trying to sell the products of over 350 women on an annual basis through these smaller boutiques is just not enough. The market really helps us by selling a lot more than we can at these small places. The 22 women weavers of the six-year-old Cooperative Adwal of Ribat El Kheir in Morocco are attending market for the first time. Whatever they make at market will go to the co-ops women carpet makers and to the training of 13 apprentice weavers. It also provides a social outlet in a society which does not encourage women to have lives outside the home, said Karen Booker, a Peace Corps small business developer whos been working with Adwal. Similarly, the Uzbek women of the Bogiafzal cooperative (Uzbek for beautiful garden) banded together more than a decade ago for several reasons: to revive their traditional art of embroidery, to help solve their unemployment problem, and so that the 45 women in their cooperative, said its leader, Matluba Bazarova, could work at home. That was very important to them. They use the money they earn at market for school uniforms and supplies for their children and to buy more raw materials and tools for their cooperative work. We are so thankful for the market, stressed Bazarova. Its effect is boundless. Federation SAHALANDY of Madagascar stands out as one of the biggest success stories of the market and of

cooperatives in general. The federation began in 2006 out of a need for organization among the hundreds of weavers in that area, said Peace Corps volunteer Natalie Mundy, because the women knew they had no chance of selling abroad if they were not a legitimate organization. The 95 members of the federation (comprising five to 10 workers per member group) wanted to improve the standard of living for women in Sandrandahy and give them more of a voice in their community, while also sustaining the silk-weaving traditions endemic to their region of Madagascar. Yet they had never sold a silk product outside of Madagascar before last July. Now its members have more of a reason to make silk work their profession. The money they earned at last years market allowed federation members to build four bungalows and a showroom to improve an ecotourism circuit in the area. Its members, said Mundy, are now known as role models in the community for problem solving, business advice and financial planning. Women are taking more of a predominant position in the politics of the village. And they are now allowed to have more of a say because of their reputation of being successful abroad. The effects for the women of SAHALANDAY, as for most of the markets participants, go well beyond what happens in July. Said Mundy, It provides a kind of empowerment to women that will be talked about for many years to come.

M O RO CCO | CO O P E R AT I V E A DWAL

2012 Santa Fe International FOLK ART MARKET 27

REPORTS FROM THE FIELD

Ramu Devraj Harijan is a quilt maker and embroidery artist who lives in a small village in the middle of the desert. He was earning just enough to sustain himself and his family. I found out about the Santa Fe Folk Art Market and talked to him about applying The second market was a huge success for him and Ramu decided to work completely independently. This increased his income and he employed more people to work for him. Ramu is illiterate and can barely sign his name, did not speak any other language but his mother tongue, that is spoken only in the region. He became confident enough to learn Hindi and traveled to different markets in India to sell his goods The market has helped Ramu not only financially but has also given him huge exposure. His natural talent is finally blossoming and he continues to grow in confidence. He is now the local hero as he will be going abroad for the third time.
INDIA | HIMANSU DUGAR, RAMUS TRANSLATOR

My father used to say: Every man must have a craft in his hands. Later, when I became a master, I realized the content of his words and when I had a chance to teach students, I invited a few apprentices to teach them the ceramic arts. There were more who wished to learn, but I wasnt able to accept all, as I had a tiny workshop and just one kiln. My first Folk Art Market earning was spent to build a few kilns in the outyard of my house and I hired two employees and four apprentices.
UZBEKISTAN | RUSTAM & DAMIR USMANOV

When Angel returned home from work painting plaster dolls a little over two years ago, I asked what he was earning. He said he was being paid 20 pesos a doll and in a good week could earn 1,200 pesos, but the boss was always short of money and he would bring home only 800 pesos. I told him if he would leave that job I would send him 6000 pesos a month as an advance against future purchases to stay and continue working at home. The results of this past year finally paid off with the incredible Folk Art Market. In a good year Angel and his father earn about $9,000 U.S. In Santa Fe they had gross sales of over $25,000. The money they returned with to Tonala represents more than two years income. They now have 10-year U.S. visas and will be returning to the Phoenix area at the end of October for three shows on consecutive weekends, and then return to Tonala where they will do the Feria at Lake Chapala. My rough guess is that theyll earn another $10,000 to $15,000 at those shows. Im thrilled that they are now sustainable and self sufficient for the foreseeable future. Without your amazing event none of this would have come to pass.
Left, Angel Ortiz Arana and Angel Ortiz Gabriel MEXICO | DEBORAH MAYER SHACTER FOR ANGEL ORTIZ GABRIEL

28 2012 Santa Fe International FOLK ART MARKET

Jane Wilner, Director of The Umoja Uaso Womens Fund, Inc., recently sent news: In Umojas case, the money earned from the 2010 market saved their community from starvation. Unprecedented drought and tribal violence had killed all their cattle. School lunches ceased. Beyond this effect, however, is the more sustaining factor of the celebration the market brings to an indigenous and marginalized tribe like the Samburu and the even more marginalized Samburu woman.
KENYA | UMOJA UASO WOMENS FUND, INC.

Matron Mwembe dropped out of school some years back when both her parents passed on. She learned how to make baskets from her grandmother and managed to pay for her sisters school fees from the basket sales as well as look after her grandmother and uncle. With the proceeds from the Santa Fe Folk Art Market, Matron has now gone back to school (grade 10). Matron is a role model in her community because most of the girls have dropped out of school and are married at an early age, most of them are pregnant with children and do not even know who their fathers are. Matron is facilitating an HIV and AIDS program for in and out of school, focusing on behavior change and assertiveness for girls. She has learned skills on managing a cooperative group. She has attended training workshops where she learned facilitation skills and peer education.
ZIMBABWE | JULIANA MUSKWE, PROGRAMMES MANAGER, NTENGWE FOR COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT | PHOTO GENEVIEVE RUSSELL

At Christmas time, I purchased gifts of clothing, shoes and toys to distribute to the poorer children in my village and the other local villages without roads in the high Andes in Peru. Many of these children have never received nor know what a toy is, and so it gives me great joy to give them these gifts so that they can have a happy Christmas.
PERU | BERTHA MEDINA

2012 Santa Fe International FOLK ART MARKET 29

FOLKART
2 0 1 2 S A N TA F E I N T E R N AT I O N A L
Laboratory of Anthropology Artists Hospitality 134 133 132 131 130 129 Ice cream 123 124 125 126 127 128 122 121 120 119 118 117
nce Sales 116 115 Ambia
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1 Haiti Mireille Delism 2 Nigeria Gasali Adeyemo 3 Peru Macedonio Eduardo Palomino Torres & Luzmila Huarancca Gutirrez 4 Panama Idaira Cabezn Mepaquito & Sebedeo Piraza Meja 5 Peru Claudio Jimnez Quispe & Vicenta Flores Ataucusi 6 Uzbekistan Gulnora Chorieva 7 Chile Jorge Antonio Monares Araya 8 Afghanistan Rangina Hamidi & Spoozmai Hamidi 9 Zimbabwe Matron Mwembe 10 Lao PDR Famchoy Saely & Bouathong Phetdara 11 Russia Aldar Tamdyn 12 Uzbekistan Khomid Zukhurutdinov 13 Niger Elhadji Koumama 14 Kyrgyzstan Begimai Shygaeva & Oksana Kononova 15 Ecuador Laura Alejandrina Quizhpe Guaman & Martha Victoria Lozano Cango 16 India Ramu Devraj Harijan 17 Mexico Claudia Martnez Vargas 18 China Yang Cai Mei & Lu Rong Xiang 19 Mexico Angel Ortiz Gabriel & Jos Angel Ortiz Arana 20 Kazakhstan Aizhan Bekkulova 21 Peru Pompeyo Berrocal Evann 22 Nigeria Adebayo Taofeek Folorunsho 23 Japan Sumi Takamoto 24 Indonesia Ida Bagus Anom Suryawan 25 Turkey Mehmet Cetinkaya Gallery 26 Mexico Magdalena Pedro Martnez 27 South Africa Esther Nikwambi Mahlangu 28 Cambodia Chantha Nguon 29 Ukraine Lesia Pona & Nataliya Tereshchak 30 Mozambique Caburdino Mustaf Jeth 31 India Vankar Chhagan Samat 32 Malaysia Bangie Embol & Matthew Ngau Jau 33 Ghana Ebenezer Djaba Nomoda 34 Turkey Seden Elter & Fatma Belli 35 Israel Ben-Zion David 36 Kyrgyzstan Erkebu Djumagulova 37 Turkmenistan Leyli Khaidova & Oksana Soyunmammedova 38 Mexico Hilario Alejos Madrigal 39 India Raniben Jivan & Dhanuben Jadeja 40 Morocco Lhoucine Taous 41 South Africa Nomvuselelo Mavundla & Elliot Mkhize 42 Peru Florencio Huarhua Jeri 43 Mexico Berta Servn Barriga 44 Nigeria Akeem Ayanniyi 45 Peru Wilber Huaman Ciprian & Lider Rivera Matos 46 Spain Luis Mndez Lpez 47 France Franois Fresnais & Sylvie Fresnais 48 Uzbekistan Fatullo Kendjaev, Feruza Khamraeva & Zarina Kendjaeva 49 Mexico Pedro Ortega Lozano 50 Namibia Mara Britz 51 India Abdullah Mohmedhussain Khatri & Abduljabbar Mahmadhushen Khatri 52 Uzbekistan Izzatillo Ruziev 53 Palestinian Territories Tawfiq Alnatsha & Hamzeh Natsheh [NO BOOTH 54] 55 Uzbekistan Ikhtiyor Kendjaev 56 India Anuradha Kuli 57 Peru Bernardo Pedro Gonzlez Paucar 58 Uzbekistan Kamoliddin Shamansurov 59 Madagascar Rado Herivonona Ambinintsoa & Marie Philbertine Razanamalala 60 Niger Moussa Albaka & Houa Albaka 61 Morocco Mouhou Boussine & Jamaiate Assif 62 Turkey Ayse Kurt 63 South Africa Thembeka Hazel Xolile Ndlovu 64 Uzbekistan Nargis Bekmuhamedova 65 Uzbekistan Rustam Usmanov & Damir Usmanov 66 Mexico Pastora Asuncin Gutirrez Reyes & Silvia Zitlaly Gutirrez Reyes [NO BOOTH 67] 68 India Rabari Pabiben Lakhman & Rabari Lachhuben Raja 69 India Luhar Janmamad Salemamad 70 Mexico Rafael Cilau Valadez & Mariano Valdez Navarro 71 South Africa Beauty Ngxongo 72 Thailand Somporn Intaraprayong & Ampornpun Tongchai 73 Uzbekistan Rasuljon Mirzaahmedov 74 Bolivia Ique Etacore de Picanerai 75 India Chandra Bhushan Kumar & Narendra Karna 76 Indonesia Tri Suwarno 77 Morocco Naema Birali 78 Rwanda Joy Ndungutse & Pricilla Kankindi 79 Vanuatu Zilo Bong 80 Mexico Nicolas Gomez Plata 81 Uzbekistan Sayfullo Ikromov 82 Palestinian Territories Hend Eleiwa & Somaya II Abuowda 83 Colombia Divino Nino Cooperative/Earth Bound 83 Venezuela Maigualida Edith Martnez Nuez & Mara Alejandra Martnez / Medewa Cooperative 84 Guatemala Sabina Elena Ramrez 85 Kenya Rebecca Lolosoli / Umoja Uaso Womens Fund, Inc. 86 Mongolia Nara Sambuu, Gerelkhuu Ganbold, Jaakhankhuu (Janna) Grisha, Tuul Sanjdorj & Bayarchimeg Sanduijav 87 Mexico Agustn Cruz Prudencio & Carmen Sosa Ojeda, Agustn Cruz Tinoco, Manuel Cruz Prudencio & Edilma Cruz Prudencio 88 Burkina Faso Habibou Coulibaly 89 Swaziland Thembi Dlamini 90 Panama Martiza Garrido de Fernndez & Nidia Johnson de Figueres/Artesana Nagegiryai 91 Uzbekistan Akbarali Alijanovich Aliev 92 South Sudan Mary Padar Kuojok 93, 94 Market Best of the Best 95, 96 Mexico Irma Martnez Pascual & Remigio Mestas Revilla 97 Uzbekistan Firdavs Yusupov 98 Uzbekistan Matluba Bazarova 99 Pakistan Nilofer Bibi & Muhammad Yousaf 100 Zambia Omba Arts Trust 101, 102 Cuba Carlos Alberto Cceres Valladares, Roberto Domingo Gil Esteban, Cenia Gutirrez Alfonso & Nancy Reyes Suarez 103 Lao PDR Orijyn/Saoban 104 Bolivia Eleoteria Flores & Santusa Quispe 105 Mexico Abdon Punzo Angel, Carlos Punzo Chvez & Abdon Punzo Chvez 106 Haiti Serge Jolimeau 107 Haiti Josnel Bruno 108 Peru Bertha Medina Aquino 109 Pakistan Naina w/o Sudhumal Surendar Valasai 110 Ecuador Jorge Moscoso 111 East Asia UNESCO Award of Excellence 112 South Asia UNESCO Award of Excellence 113 Central Asia UNESCO Award of Excellence 114 Southeast Asia UNESCO Award of Excellence 115 Mexico Inocencia Hernndez Ramrez 116 Morocco Fatima Akachmar 117 Guatemala Yolanda Chiroy Panjoj & Amalia Gue de Teni / Ixbalamke Cooperative 118 Peru Hilda Valeriana Cachi Yupanqui 119 India Rajendra Kumar Shyam 120 Lao PDR Veomanee Douangdala & Ms Note 121 South Korea Han Do-hyun 122 Mali Aboubakar Sidiki Fofana 123 Hungary Levente Lehel St 124 Chile Alba Rosa Seplveda Tapia & Wilfredo Alejandro Arriagada Seplveda 125 India Self Help Enterprise 126 Algeria Karim Oukid Ouksel 127 South Africa Thembile Judicious Nala 128 Kyrgyzstan Kadyrkul Sharshembieva, Farzana Sharshenbieva, Zhanyl Sharshembiev & Aichurek Dzhunushova 129 China Yuzhen Pan 130 China Huang Guangwen 131 Peru Nilda Callaaupa lvarez & Lidia Callaaupa lvarez 132 Uganda Nusulah Kinene 133 Kenya James Ole Kamete / Africa Scools of Kenya 134 Mexico Nicolas Fabian & Rosario Luca, Narcisa Magaa, Othn Montoya (Montoya Family) & Bernardina Rivera Baltasar

MARKET
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FOLK ARTS QUIET P OW E R


Its personal and political
BY DEVON JACKSON
WHILE ITS TEMPTING TO V I E W F O L K A RT A N D T H E I N T E R N AT I O N A L F O L K A RT M A R K E T A S B E N I G N , A P O L I T I C A L E N D E AVO RS, NOTHING CO U L D B E F U RT H E R F RO M T H E T RU T H . P OPULAR FA SCINATION WITH THE MARKET HAS AS MUCH TO D O W I T H T H E PART I C I PA N T S STORIES PA RT I C U L A R LY T H E I R ST RUGGLES FOR OR AGAINST SOMETHING AS IT DOES WITH ART. ITS ABOUT REPRESENTATION AND GIVING A VOICE TO PEOPLE WHO VE BEEN DENIED SELF-EXPRESSION OR THE RIGHT TO S P E A K .

Rangina Hamidi is the founder of Afghanistans Kandahar Treasure, the nonprofit representing women in the culturally patriarchal region of Kandahar. In a letter to the organizers of Santa Fes International Folk Art Market, she wrote, The artwork is the womens expression to the world about their life in Afghanistan. Its a way of women expressing their voices wordlessly through their stitches. Its a sentiment echoed by just about every Folk Art Market participant, be they Afghan, Hutu, Ecuadoran or Lao. Who knew that embroidery, basketry, button-making or any of the dozens of other arts and crafts being sold at this years market could be so empowering? The people who run the market certainly had an inkling. Were apolitical, said Charlene Cerny, one of its founders and, since 2007, its executive director. And although most people may regard the market as harmless and benign, thats hardly the case. Despite the markets official agenda of providing its participants with an economic opportunity and self-determination, many other things aside from commerce are exchanged: ideas, values, outlooks. This is the quiet, the subliminal appeal and effect that folk art, and the Folk Art Market, provide for its attendees as well as its merchants. There are success stories at practically every booth personal, political and financial. The Wounaan basketmaking Indians of Panama are one such story. Renowned for the elegant baskets they construct out of plants and palm trees in the Darien Rainforest, Theyve been using the money they make at market to pay for their legal battles, Cerny said. Theyre struggling for land rights and for recognition of their identity as an indigenous people. The ikat weavers of the Ferghana Valley in Uzbekistan are another. Their craftsmen and trade were nearly obliterated during the repressive Soviet regime; in 1983, 76 ikat weavers, including the father of the current ikat cooperatives leader, Rasuljon Mirzaahmedov, were imprisoned for five years because of their private weaving activities. But since gaining their independence in 1991, theyve gone way beyond anything political, marveled Cerny. Theyve become extremely entrepreneurial and want to connect with

When we started to weave as a community of women, we had to look beyond the ethnic divide and do what we needed to do to provide for our families. I knew that by empowering women with income-generating skills, then I would empower them as a community.
RWANDA | JOY NDUNGUTSE

32 2012 Santa Fe International FOLK ART MARKET

the global market. They have a website, and theyre very active over the Internet. The story of Esther Nikwambi Mahlangu of South Africa, whose work relates the way of life of the Ndebele people and the Nguni cultures, represents another triumph of folk art and the market. Known affectionately as Mama Esther, Mahlangu learned how to paint and bead from her mother and grandmother; she traveled and exhibited overseas during the late 1980s, when apartheid was nearing its end but it was still a time of intense turmoil and sanctions in her homeland. Even more poignant is the case of Janet Nkubana of Rwanda. During the 1994 Rwandan genocide Tutsi tribes were slaughtered by the hundreds of thousands by their Hutu neighbors, primarily with agricultural tools such as spades, hoes and especially machetes. In the months following the atrocities widowed women on both sides of the conflict turned to basket weaving as a means of supporting themselves and their children, as most of the men had either been killed or gone missing. Nkubana, whod been raised in a Uganda refugee camp (after her parents had fled Rwanda during the 1959 civil war there), returned to her homeland vowing to help rebuild it. People would go to her hotel room asking her to buy their baskets, Cerny said. After a while, instead of just buying their baskets, she started getting these women to weave together. Tutsi women and Hutu women. She told them, When we weave, we weave together. Now more than 3,000 women Hutu and Tutsi take part in Nkubanas Gahaya Links Cooperative. It was a healing process, said Cerny. There were no politics. It was a reconciliation. And yet, as communal as it was, the co-op was also extremely political both in its bringing together women whose husbands and brothers and fathers had brutally murdered one another and as a post-genocidal means of transcending those very acts. As Nkubana told the markets organizers, When we started to weave as a community of women, we had to look beyond the ethnic divide and do what we needed to do to provide for our families. I knew that by empowering women with income-generating skills, then I would empower them as a community. The influence Nkubana and her network of women weavers have had on their country is reflected in the Rwandan governments altered coat of arms. Now, in lieu of the agricultural tools and their associations with the genocide, among the cogwheel, the sun, the sorghum and the coffee stands a basket, a symbol of saving, solidarity and sharing. Joy Ndungutse and Priscilla Kankindi, members of the coopertive will represent Gahaya Links at this years market.

Participation in the market, then, means different things to different peoples. For some, participation is political. For others, its all about making money. For most, its less about rights or money and all about personal and cultural survival. Were trying to preserve these traditions, Cerny said of the markets other mission. And the best way we can help do that is through commerce. Sometimes those missions go hand in hand. For the women of the Avoreo tribe in Bolivia, for instance, the primary source of income came from the sales of bags woven from a bromeliad (a type of plant like the pineapple or Spanish moss) that grew only on their local savannah. But because of cattle grazing and overuse, the plant had begun to disappear. Enter one of Bolivias most famous ethnobotanists, Ines Hinojosa Uzquiano, who taught the Avoreo women to replant the species in their gardens. The bromeliad thrived, the women had their resource back, and their art and a way of life had not only been saved but also reinvigorated. This story not only exemplifies the importance of the Folk Art Market to a peoples survival and to the survival of their culture and their resources, it also demonstrates one of the best ways to bring visitors into market: Get them interested not only in the excellence of the art and the superiority of the craft but also in the people who make it. More so than in probably any other city, the markets perfectly suited to Santa Fes sensibility, said Cerny. More than the normal proportion of its residents relate to global citizenship and see value in difference. Also, people going to the market want to be informed. Here, they get to meet the artists, and thats the magic of the market: its personal. And political.

The women in the co-op decided to use their profits to hire a teacher and start an elementary school in their small, remote community the Santa Fe Desert School. The women are making their own choices with their business.
PAKISTAN | PATRICIA STODDARD LILA HANDICRAFTS, RALLI QUILTS

2012 Santa Fe International FOLK ART MARKET 33

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SOUNDS OF MUSIC ADD TO MARKETS MAGIC


BY DENNIS J. CARROLL
A SPRINKLING OF MU S I C A L I N ST RUMENTS AND THE ARTISTS WHO CREATE AND PLAY THEM HAVE ALWAYS BEEN INCLUDED IN THE SANTA FE INTERNATIONAL FOLK ART MARKET, BUT THIS YEAR THE SOUNDS AND RHYTHMS OF DISPARATE CULTURES WILL BE EVEN MORE EVIDENT.

The markets director of artist relations, Ernesto Torres, described the expansion of the festivals musical element as an amazing opportunity for us, the artists and the markets visitors. In previous years, the market has included instruments and musical craftspeople from Tibet, Malaysia and Nigeria varied cultures and musical styles to be sure, but a relatively scant representation of global music considering the dozens of nations participating in the market festival. And while musical instruments have been part of other types of cultural displays such as textiles and sand carvings, it was never in a standout way, Torres said. Expanding the musical options and emphasis will add to the markets magic. This July, in addition to the talking drums of Nigeria, the Malaysian lutes and Tibetan rattles, market-goers atop Museum Hill can expect to hear wind and stringed instruments from Russia and Uzbekistan, bamboo flutes and tamtam gongs from the once cannibalistic tribes of the Pacific island nation of Vanuatu and the melodic burnished copper and brass bells of rural India. They will also have the rare opportunity to purchase some of the instruments and speak with the artists who made them. Zilo Bong is an artist from the island of Ambrym in the Vanuatu archipelago; he began learning to carve the flutes and tam-tams at his fathers side as a young child. The flutes feature delicately chiseled tribal faces reminiscent of animal or human facial icons on totem poles created by indigenous peoples of the American Northwest, Canada and Alaska. The tam-tams, considered gongs but sounding more like drums, were traditionally used by tribal Vanuatu chiefs to summon their people together or inform them of events. Artists now carve them for use in traditional music presentations and dances or simply to sell as a means to support their families. Zilo Bong wrote of his life on Ambrym, the black magic island, including his introduction to woodcarving, in his market application papers: I learned the art of carving from my dad who was a big chief of Ambrym. I only completed six years of education so I learned to be a good carver from the young age of 6. Luhar Janmamad Salemamad of the Kutch district in the Gujarat state of western India also learned his craft from his father as a young child. Salemamad creates copper-coated bells, or kharkis, in much the same way as Indias bell makers did nearly 300 years ago. Its usually a family affair, with the men shaping each bell by pounding strips of recycled metal into a hollow cylinder and then welding a metal crown to the body of the bell. The women dip the bells into an earthwater mixture, then coat them with powdered brass and copper. The bells are then wrapped in clay and cotton and baked in a kiln. After baking, the bells are buffed and polished to a luster tinted with shades of yellow, gold, red and brown, and a wooden ringer is attached inside the bell. The bells traditionally have been used by livestock herders, who would tie the bells around the necks of
2012 Santa Fe International FOLK ART MARKET 35

VANUATU | ZILO BONG | PHOTO SEBASTIAN BADOR

NIGERIA | MUSE ABISOYE | PHOTO LUIS SNCHEZ SATURNO

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their cattle, camels, sheep and goats. The size of the bells signified each animals status in the herd: The bigger the bell, the more important the animal. Among the music makers from the former Soviet Union is Artysh Mongush of Tuva, a Russian republic in southern Siberia. Mongush designs a variety of stringed instruments made from forested hardwoods and the cured hides from indigenous animals, including reindeer, yaks, elk, horses and goats. Like many world artists and craft makers, Mongush discovered his passion for his art as a child. He often accompanied his father and mother to their jobs at an art and music school and would tinker with the instruments used by students. He also learned to make the instruments by studying the methods of master instrument makers in farflung regions of the republic. Busts of animals important in Tuva culture and its economy are often carved onto the top of the instruments. The animals such as horses, camels, sheep and oxen are also featured in the lyrics of Tuva songs as a way of paying tribute to their contribution to life on the islands.

LAURA SHEPPHERD
ATELIER
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Market organizers will feature some of the participants in the festivals entertainment venues, including Tuvas Aldar Tamdyn, a throat singer and instrument maker and player; Matthew Ngau Jau, a stringed instrument player from Ulu Baram, a remote area of Sarawak in Malaysia; and Akbarali Aliev, a percussionist from Uzbekistan. Also performing will be the Black Sea Hotel, a Balkan trio of a cappella singers. Headlining the weekend event will be African Showboyz, from Binaba, a village in northeast Ghana, West Africa. The tribal quintet is described as a unique blend and remarkable experience of African drum, dance, magic and adrenaline. Its the newest way for Folk Art Market visitors to not only hear a wider array of world music but also to learn and see how those tunes are created and then to take some magic home with them.

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2012 Santa Fe International FOLK ART MARKET 37

2012 ARTIST LIST


AFGHANISTAN

ALGERIA
BOLIVIA BURKINA FASO
N E PA L | S I TA D E V I K A R N A | P H OTO RO B E RT S M I T H

CAMBODIA
CHILE

L AO P D R | O R I J Y N / S AO B A N

CHINA
COLOMBIA

CUBA
ECUADOR

FRANCE
GHANA

GUATEMALA
HAITI
K E N YA | UM OJA UA S O WO M E N S F U N D | P H OTO DAVID EVANS

HUNGARY
INDIA INDONESIA ISRAEL

MOROCCO | MOUHOU BOUSSINE

JAPAN
KAZAKHSTAN
SOUTH KO REA | HAN DO -HYUN

KENYA
KYRGYZSTAN

LAO PDR
MADAGASCAR

MALAYSIA MALI
M A DAGASCAR | SAHALANDY | PHOTO DAVID EVANS

38 2012 Santa Fe International FOLK ART MARKET

MEXICO
MONGOLIA

MOROCCO
MOZAMBIQUE NAMIBIA

NIGER
M O RO CCO | AISHA COOP

NIGERIA

PAKISTAN
PALESTINIAN TERRITORIES PANAMA

PERU
RUSSIA RWANDA

SOUTH AFRICA
KENYA | AFRICA SCHOOLS OF KENYA

SOUTH KOREA SOUTH SUDAN

SPAIN
SWAZILAND

THAILAND TURKEY
TURKMENISTAN UGANDA

UKRAINE
UZBEKISTAN
GHANA | EBENEZER DJABA NOMODA | PHOTO DAV I D M O O R E

VANUATU
VENEZUELA

S PA I N | L U I S M E N D E Z LOPEZ PROCESS | JOS BLANCO

ZAMBIA ZIMBABWE
2012 Santa Fe International FOLK ART MARKET 39

HUNGARY | SUTO LEVENTE

AFGHANISTAN
Khamak embroideries of Southern Afghanistan Rangina Hamidi Booth 8 The traditional fine needle embroidery called khamak is a trademark of Kandahar women traditionally used to decorate clothing for male relatives and children and for trousseaus. Khamak artists begin learning as early as five years old, some mastering their skills by age 10-12. Their work is strictly owned and passed down by women. Kandahar Treasure promotes a traditional art form to create income sources for women.
Kandahar Treasure

de Candaleria, a cooperative made up predominantly of women. Having learned from mothers and grandmothers, they infuse the myths and legends of the Tarabuco culture into everyday products such as wall hangings, aprons, ponchos, shawls, belts, bags and coin purses. Tarabuco weavings, embroidered, beaded leather hats Santusa Quispe Booth 104 The Tarabuco Indians of the Highland Andean region of Bolivia are renowned for their centuries-old weaving tradition, which incorporates detailed patterns, figures and symbols drawn from local myth and legend. Santusa Quispe, a master weaver in the Tarabuco tradition, learned the art of spinning and weaving from her mother and grandmother in the small farming village of Candelaria, in the high Andes of Bolivia. Several years ago, with the help of a Peace Corps volunteer from the United States, Santusa founded the local museum, El Museo Centro Cultural de Candelaria. Today, there are 48 women and men who are members of the cooperative, which sells to the local museum and folk art galleries in the capitol of Sucre, 70 miles away.
Unay Pallay Asociacin de Tejedores Indgenas de Candelaria

CHILE
Embossed, engraved and forged copper and bronze pots Jorge Antonio Monares Araya Booth 7 Copper handicrafts have a special significance in Chile since Chile is one of the most important copper exporters in the world. Jorge learned the craft of making pots and plates from his father, who began as a silversmith. To learn more, Jorge dug deeply into the libraries of local monasteries in Santiago to recover the lost folk technique of forging copper pots. His work has been nationally recognized by the Chilean government and in magazines, but unfortunately there is little market for this work in Chile. Comparte is a Fair Trade export organization that helps artists like Jorge find international markets for their work. Horsehair weavings Alba Rosa Seplveda Tapia Booth 124 Alba Seplveda began hand-weaving delicate miniature sculptures and designs out of horsehair at the age of seven, and has been developing her craft for more than 50 years. Born into a family of artisans from a renowned horsehair-weaving town, Alba is one of the foremost weavers in Chile, with a long list of awards. She has developed a cooperative called El Arte del Crin, made up of 52 artisans from her hometown of Rari. Their weaving technique is particular to the region and town of Rari where miniature weavers use a local agave fiber called ixtle along with the horsehair. They create whimsical and vibrant designs drawn from nature and from folklore, including butterflies, birds, bees, burros, witches, angels, dolls, flowers and rosaries. Horsehair weavings Wilfredo Alejandro Arriagada Seplveda Booth 124 Wilfredo Alejandro Arriagada Seplveda works with his mother Alba. Both are award-winning weavers from El Arte del Crin, a unique handwork cooperative originating in the town of Rari, Chile. According to popular legend, this craft began more than two hundred years ago when two young girls of Rari began to weave different shapes from poplar roots found along a stream and sell them to raise money for their families. Over time, the poplar root was depleted and the community began using horsehair imported from Mexico. The tradition continues to provide economic stability for the member families of Rari.
El Arte del Crin El Arte del Crin UNESCO Award of Excellence Winner Supported by Comparte UNESCO Award of Excellence Winner

CHINA
Miao textiles resist dyed or embroidered Yang Cai Mei Booth 18 Inspired by Miao traditional legendary stories and culture, Yang Cai Meis batik and embroidered textiles have been exhibited in many major metropolitan areas across China, including Shanghai, Guangzhou, Shenzhen and Kunming. Growing up in a Miao village near Anshun, well-known for its traditional batik folk arts and textiles using wax resist dye techniques, Cai Mei started practicing wax painting at the age of five. She received further training in traditional techniques from Ms. Yang Jing Xio, a well-known master artist. The richly woven and traditionally dyed and embroidered textiles are considered the major living art form of Miao culture as they are indicators of family wealth, identifiers of a specific group, and considered their most important possessions. Weavings and textiles resist dyed, appliqud or embroidered Lu Rong Xiang Booth 18 These beautiful skirts, jackets and bags of the Luo ethnic group of southwest China are all hand dyed, appliqud and embroidered by one of the regions master artists, Lu Rong Xiang. Mrs. Lu still lives in the remote village where she was born, and where she learned to make her communitys textiles from her mother at an early age. Both the men and the women of this region still wear the traditional robes and jackets for festival occasions. The mans beautiful dyed jacket is made by his bride as a wedding present. Miao, Yi, Dong and Bai Minority People weavings, embroideries and batik textiles Yuzhen Pan Booth 129 A number of different minority groups, Miao, Yi, Dong and Bai, live in Guizhou Province and each group is identified by its different traditional techniques of intricate and colorful embroidery. The Miao women produce a variety of embroidered pieces executed in silk floss embroidery thread, which is split to make a very fine strand, often on a ground of home-woven indigodyed cloth. These are then sewn onto garments or other items such as baby carriers. Batik is sometimes used with the embroidery.
Minority People Textile Folk Artists Cooperative of Southwest China Supported by Dr. Andrew Wang Supported by Dr. Andrew Wang

Silver work with designs of mythological people, animals and nature Huang Guangwen Booth 130 The Minority People Silversmith Folk Artists Cooperative of Southwest China represents master craftsmen of the region who carry on their history, customs and religion through the elaborate and symbolic designs of their silver necklaces, bracelets, hair pieces, earrings, garment attachments and foot ornament accessories. Huang Guangwen first learned the art of Miao silversmithing from his father in Leishan, his home village in Guizhou province, and has since traveled throughout southwest China to master the techniques and designs of the entire region. Over the years, Huang Guangwen has earned enough from his jewelry making to educate his four children, one of whom honored the family with its first college degree.
Minority People Silversmith Folk Artists Cooperative of Southwest China

ALGERIA
Enamel and inlay jewelry Karim Oukid Ouksel Booth 126 Karim is from a small village in the Kabylia region in northern Algeria, an area with a long and rich tradition of Berber jewelry production. He began learning the art of jewelry making to continue the tradition and promote the rich culture of his community. The filigreed geometric forms in Kabylian jewelry reflect the patterns found in Berber tapestries and ceramics of the region. To Karim, these pieces are more than decorative objects they express poems and the love of his motherland.

COLOMBIA
Zenu indigenous hats and jewelry woven from the cana flecha palm Divino Nino Cooperative Booth 83 The Zenu are an Amerindian indigenous people in the remote region of northeastern Colombia in the Department of Crdova, known for their handwoven black and beige vueltiao sombreros (hats with revolving bands of color) and jewelry made from cana flecha, a palm found throughout the American tropics. The hats today have become a symbol of national pride for all of Colombia and have been worn by such officials and dignitaries as Gabriel Garca Mrquez, President Bill Clinton and Pope John Paul II. The finer hats can be folded up and put in your pocket.
Supported by Earth Bound, Inc.

BURKINA FASO
Bogolan mudcloth Habibou Coulibaly Booth 88 Habibou creates textiles using a mud cloth, or bogolan, technique and vegetable-based dyes. In his native Burkina Faso, this craft is typically learned through apprenticeship or passed down from father to son. Ethnic groups in neighboring Mali, Guinea and the Ivory Coast share similar techniques for creating textiles. The textiles were traditionally used for camouflage for hunting and during important ceremonies such as marriages and circumcisions.

BOLIVIA
Bags, skirts, flat panels and a traditional blanket woven by the Ayoreo from fibers of the garbat fino plant Ique Etacore de Picanerai Booth 74 Ique is an Ayoreo Indian from the Bolivian savannah, an arid and desolate landscape. Ayoreo hunter-gatherers once used net bags to collect native herbs and roots. For hundreds of years these bags have been made of a special grass gathered by the women. In the last few decades, as the Ayoreos became more settled, the sale of these stunning bags was their only source of cash income. But the grass was overharvested. Ins Hinojosa Ossio, a Bolivian ethnobotanist and MacArthur Fellow, helped the Ayoreos organize to replant the grass species on reserves and in gardens to provide a resource for their bags.
Organizacin Cheque Oitedie Cooperative

CUBA
Nave paintings of the Orishas Nancy Reyes Suarez Booths 101, 102 Nancy Reyes Suarezs paintings have strong central figures, with ample parts of magic and color. Self-taught, Suarez watched people paint on the beach in Cuba, and used sand and flowers to create short-lived but beautiful art on the beach. Today she uses a variety of materials cloth, used ballet slippers, pencils, pens and palette knives to make raised, tactile paintings. She describes her work as a combination of painting and handicrafts that expresses the environment around her the city and the countryside each with energy, light and the spirituality of the Santeria, which she practices.

CAMBODIA
Silk clothing, accessories and wall hangings woven in traditional Khmer style Chantha Nguon
Stung Treng Womens Development Centre Mekong Blue UNESCO Award of Excellence Winner

Tarabuco weavings, embroidered beaded leather hats Eleoteria Flores Booth 104 Eleoteria Flores lives in the eastern foothills of the Andes in Bolivia, where the tradition of weaving handspun wool and traditional cloth is hundreds of years old. She is a member of the Unay Pallay Asociacin de Tejedores Indgenas
Unay Pallay Asociacin de Tejedores Indgenas de Candelaria

Booth 28 Chantha started the Stung Treng Womens Development Centre in 2002 with a $3,000 grant from Partner in Progress in a small house with two traditional wooden weaving looms and a big dream. The project focuses on teaching and mentoring women in the art of ikat silk weaving while developing life skills that assist in breaking the cycle of poverty. The Mekong Blue silk products are regarded as the finest in Cambodia.

40 2012 Santa Fe International FOLK ART MARKET

Nave paintings and drawings Carlos Alberto Cceres Valladares Booths 101, 102 A self-taught artist, Carlos began painting as a child in elementary school and today is nationally recognized in Cuba. His paintings touch on the themes of the Yoruba religion, Santera and its deities, the Orishas, as well as the customs carried on by the Guajiros, the people of the Cuban countryside. Carlos technique of applying acrylic paint with used toothpaste tubes creates a vibrant and pointillistic style. Nave paintings, drawings and woodblock prints Roberto Domingo Gil Esteban Booths 101, 102 Using bright colors and depicting scenes from everyday life, Roberto Domingo Gil Esteban creates what he calls nave art. He remembers being a small child and painting images depicting all of his daily experiences, and he has carried that passion and excitement into his more recent artwork. Roberto loves painting without any aesthetic or formal obligations, a fact he believes has made his work more dynamic. Nave paintings and drawings Cenia Gutirrez Alfonso Booths 101, 102 Cenia Gutirrez Alfonso began painting as a small child and continues today to create folk paintings and ink drawings in Cienfuegos, Cuba. She is self-taught and represents her community in her paintings through their legends, popular beliefs, fiestas and religions. She is known in her community as the painter of guijes, or fairies and mystical figures. Cenia says of her work, It is about materializing dreams, reflecting the world that surrounds me, where urban and rural life intermingle in a macro world of poetry and experiences.

Cooperativa de Saraguro as a way to increase productivity and quality for an international clientele. Woven glass seed bead jewelry of the Saraguro Martha Victoria Lozano Cango Booth 15 For Martha Victoria Lozano Cango, the joy of weaving beaded jewelry goes hand in hand with the challenge of coming up with innovative patterns that delight her customers and Cooperative members. Like most of the women of her tribe, Martha wears her own wide-collar necklaces for special occasions such as festivals or weddings, and always saves her newest designs for a special fiesta where the design will be seen and admired by many. The ultimate form of flattery is to have her original design copied by others and incorporated into the Cooperatives beadwork. 18 Karat gold and fine (.999) silver jewelry Jorge Moscoso
Supported by Belle Jewelry La Mega Cooperativa de Saraguro

GHANA
Recycled glass beads Ebenezer Djaba Nomoda Booth 33 Nicknamed Cedi by his grandmother after the Ghanaian currency, the artist has been making beads from recycled glass since he was seven years old, when he would sneak away from dinner to fill glass molds. Glass beads play an important role in eastern Ghanaian Krobo culture, signifying wealth and status. Young girls wear strings of colorful beads during the traditional dipo comingof-age ceremony. Today Cedi makes beads in his workshop. He uses a mortar and pestle to crush bottles and fills molds with the glass. The glass is fired in clay kilns in order to shape the glass into beads, which are cooled, smoothed and strung. Cedi travels internationally to conferences and has received numerous awards for his work.

and interpreting from their native Kakchique language to Spanish. Maya Keckchi weaving on backstrap loom Amalia Gue
Ixbalamke Cooperative Supported by Olga Reiche / Indigo

HUNGARY
Transylvanian-Hungarian painted and carved furniture and other home items Levente Lehel St Booth 123 A 14th generation TransylvanianHungarian furniture maker, Levente creates vivid hand-painted Vargyas floral carvings for the home and special occasions. The work includes elaborate boxes, childrens furniture for baptisms, and the carved wooden headstones specific to the Carpathian basin of Hungary. Using organic paints, made by mashing minerals on stone plates to create the rich colors, Levente creates harmoniouslyproportioned designs carrying deep symbolism. His familys works are found inside churches, on furniture in homes, on decorative boxes and on household items.

Booth 117 Amalia represents Ixbalamke, a cooperative of women dedicated to the production of traditional textiles and preservation of traditional weaving. They live in the community of Samac de Cobn in Alta Verpaz and are inspired by the landscape and beautiful views of the region. The members of the cooperative maintain the intricate technique of gauze weaving and the use of coyuche, or natural brown cotton practices that are rapidly disappearing. They also have a project making little looms for younger generations to continue to learn the tradition of weaving.

HAITI
Vodou flags Mireille Delism Booth 1 Mireille embroiders sequined Vodou flags or drapo, which her cousin taught her to make. With her earnings, Mireille can afford to send her daughters to school and help support her sisters, aunts, brother, mother and friends. The flags she makes are created to honor and invoke deities in the Vodou religion widely practiced throughout Haiti. Her brother, who inherited the tradition of vodun priesthood, often uses her sequin flags in rituals and ceremonies. Recycled oil drum sculptures Serge Jolimeau Booth 106 Serge Jolimeau was inspired as a child by the blacksmiths in his neighborhood. He learned metal work from the Louis Juste brothers in Croix-des-Bouquets where Georges Liautaud created cemetery crosses made from iron bars and recycled metal. With the discovery of these crosses, a new and original art form was born that has resulted in thousands of new jobs in Haiti. Serge opened his own shop by the time he was 20. His work has been shown at the Brooklyn Museum and at LACITA in Biarritz, France. Recycled oil drum bowls and platters Josnel Bruno Booth 107 Josnel was an apprentice to master Serge Jolimeau and is now a metalworker in Croix-des-Bouquets, Haiti, where he transforms discarded oil drums into remarkable artwork with skill and creativity. Josnel describes himself as a difficult child who only found purpose once he was taught metalworking. His hammered, chiseled, punched and incised bowls and platters represent another innovation within the tradition.

INDIA
Embroidered quilts, pillow covers, wall and decorative items, bags, belts, dolls and pouches Ramu Devraj Harijan Booth 16 Ramu, a Meghwal, was born in the Banni region of Kutch, where quilt making and embroidery are integral to the culture. Men source and sew the cloth while women are skilled in embroidery and mirrored work. At 12, Ramu made his first quilt for his mother to embroider. Later traveling craft fairs, Ramu joined a company in Bhuj where he improved his skills. He has now trained two of his brothers and two nephews in the work. Handwoven shawls, stoles and scarves Vankar Chhagan Samat Booth 31 Vankar Chhagan Samat lives with his parents, five brothers and their wives and children in the Kutch region of Gujarat state, India. The Vankar tribe weaves protective clothing using cotton from local farms for the summer and Merino wool from local shepherds for the winter. Shawls and stoles, veils and turbans carry geometrical decorations and traditional motifs. The men weave the cloth and the women set the warp and do much of the postweaving finish work. Vankars familys weavings reflect the rich blues, golds and bright reds of their desert environment, which attracts flamingos, larks and other migratory birds to this unique area. Embroidered clothing, accessories, home furnishings representing the techniques of Gujarat Dhanuba Jadeja Booth 39 In the Indian communities of Patan and Kutch, detailed embroidery is used to decorate nearly everything from clothes to items for ceremonies, houses and cattle. The color palettes, stitches and designs are passed
SEWA Trade Facilitation Center

GUATEMALA
Maya Ixil weavings Sabina Elena Ramrez Booth 84 Since she began to weave at her mothers side at age eight, Sabina Elena Ramirez has received many honors for both her weaving and her representation of her native community. She has taught weaving at museums and with United Nations special projects, and has won honors at weaving competitions. In 1989 Ramirez was selected by the Ixil nation as their Princess, and has since served to represent the Maya Indian Woman on a national and international level. Her textiles are crafted in the ancestral tradition on the backstrap loom. The designs, color combinations and weaving techniques of each textile reflects its intended daily or ceremonial use, the weavers personal and community identity, and the particular heritage of her village. Maya Kakchiquel backstrap loom weavings Yolanda Chiroy Panjoj
Wajxa ib Kan

Booth 110 As a teenager, Jorge Moscoso began apprenticing under a master jeweler who lived with his family. Educated in painting, sculpture, art restoration and metallurgy, Moscoso incorporates freshwater pearls and gems into his work. The traditional Andean Highland jewelry includes earrings, pendants, chains and necklaces that one might have seen on the streets of Ecuador years ago, but which have been lost to hard economic times. Moscoso, designated by the Minister of Education and Culture as a Master of the Taller in the Art of Jewelry, founded the Fundacion Artesanal de Cuenca, dedicated to the preservation of indigenous crafts such as weaving.

ECUADOR
Woven glass seed bead jewelry of the Saraguro Laura Alejandrina Quizhpe Guaman
La Mega Cooperativa de Saraguro

His work comes to Santa Fe through local gallery Belle Jewelry.

FRANCE
Glazed earthenware Franois and Sylvie Fresnais Booth 47 Franois Fresnais has applied his training in ceramics to the revival of a centuries-old tradition of pottery making in France. This tradition, through which potters transcribe the daily life of the people, nearly disappeared after World War II. Having studied these traditional shapes and patterns, he set up a workshop in Burgundy, which has a strong tradition in pottery. Working in partnership, Franois creates the forms and his wife Sylvie executes the decorations.

Booth 15 Like many Saraguro women from the Andean highlands of southern Ecuador, Laura learned bead jewelry making along with the traditional arts of rug weaving, embroidery and sewing from her parents. Without written instructions, she and the other Saraguro women of her cooperative weave collars, earrings, bracelets and rings with complex patterns that express the figures of their daily life: foliage, flowers, fruit, waterfalls, snails, insects, etc. They also weave intricate geometric shapes including triangles, diamonds and rhomboids, whose colors are graded to shift from bright to subtle shades. In 2010, the local bead weaving coop Laura belongs to joined with four other cooperatives to form La Mega

Booth 117 The indigenous Mayan women of the province of Solol, near Lake Atitln in Guatemala, continue to weave their traditional blouses, shawls and skirts from handspun and naturallydyed wool on backstrap looms. Yolanda lives in the small village of Chavacruz, 12 kilometers from the main market town of Solol where she sells her handloomed textiles. The community was devastated during the civil war from 1970 to the 1980s and many women were left as widows. During this time, her mother formed the weaving cooperative, Wajxa ib Kan, which means the number eight referring to the eight founding widows. The daughters have now joined the widows to help with the weaving, as well as translating

2012 Santa Fe International FOLK ART MARKET 41

down by women from generation to generation, distinctive to their particular community. In the 1980s, the Self-Employed Womens Association began organizing poor women workers to provide them with a sustainable income and help them move towards self-reliance. Dhanuba Jadeja, from Gangaonpura, Kutch, is one of SEWAs nearly 500 members who now use their skills to support themselves and their community. Bandhani tie dye textiles Abdullah Mohamedhussain Khatri Booth 51 Abdullah Khatri practices the traditional bandhani or tie and dye processes of his community in western India, but has introduced vegetable dyes to the process. A pattern is stenciled on fabric, then the cloth is sewn according to the indigomarked pattern. Men dip the fabric in a dye solution and when the threads are removed, beautiful patterns are made on cloth used by both men and women. Today the fabric may be seen in traditional turbans or stylish modern dresses. Bandhani tie dye textiles Abduljabbar Mahmadhushen Khatri Booth 51 The Khatri brothers were born into a family of traditional tie-dyers whose ancestral line had been broken by their great-grandfather. Drawn back toward this traditional Kutch craft, the brothers took advantage of the knowledge of uncles and cousins still in the trade, as well as college studies, to revive the traditional family business. The brothers experimented with new fabrics and international markets, merging traditional and contemporary designs. From naturally dyed cotton Bandhani shawls in the traditional indigo to Habuti silk dupattas (long, multipurpose scarves), their work has won international acclaim. Handwoven clothing, stoles and pillow covers Anuradha Kuli Booth 56 Market newcomer Anuradha Kuli weaves stoles and traditional mekhela skirts from three kinds of locally produced silk: eri, mulberry and muga. Part of the Mishing tribe, Anuradha and her husband Malays Kumar Pegu live in Assam, a northeastern state of India. There, more than 30 tribes express their identity through the handwoven clothes they use for work, festive occasions and for marriages and other religious events. Using natural dyes and motifs, Anuradha keeps traditions alive in an area without good education, health facilities or transportation.
UNESCO Award of Excellence Winner UNESCO Award of Excellence Winner

Rabari embroidered clothing, bags, runners, pillow covers, traditional games, appliqud quilts, wall hangings and toys Pabiben Lakhman Rabari
Kala Raksha UNESCO Award of Excellence Winner (Kala Raksha)

the body of the animals to increase the productivity of the herds. Today, the highly polished and finely tuned bells hang in entranceways and are combined to make wind chimes and other forms of festive decoration. Madhubani paintings on handmade paper Chandra Bhushan Kumar Booth 75 The town of Madhubani literally forests of honey is a traditional center in Bihar for a distinctive form of painting. As a young man, Chandra struggled in school, so his mother, Girija Devi, encouraged him to master Madhubani painting as a means to a good life. The tools of a Madhubani painters trade are a bamboo stick, a holder, a nib, a brush, natural vegetal paints and paper or canvas. With these simple materials, a painter such as Chandra retells the revered Hindu myths of the Ramayana in imagery that graces freshly plastered walls. Papier-mch animal sculptures and decorative items (Madhubani painting on papier-mch) Narendra Karna Booth 75 Narendra has been working on the art of Madhubani papier-mch for the past 40 years and is a master of his craft. Initially these utilitarian and decorative items were made from clay, but since clay is highly breakable, the tradition has evolved into using papier-mch from recycled papers. Artists like Narendra work independently from start to finish. They first soak the paper for about a week and then beat the pulp with a hammer to make paste. The forms are made without the use of molds and are painted with bright colors using motifs from Madhubani painting. Pardhan Gond painted stories on paper and canvas Rajendra Kumar Shyam Booth 119 Rajendra Kumar Shyam draws upon the religious and folk myths of central India for his richly textured and beautifully symmetrical paintings. The Pardhan Gond paintings are living expressions of his tribal life. The paintings, once done in plaster on village walls, are now available on paper and canvas. The ancient art form was revitalized and transformed in the 1980s, centered in Bhopal. It is art that tells stories that have been protected and nurtured for centuries. Kantha embroidered clothing, accessories, household goods, bed covers and canopies Self Help Enterprise Booth 125 Self Help Enterprise trains rural women from West Bengal to use nakshi kantha a centuries-old, simple technique for sewing layers of old fabrics together. SHE also provides these women access to national and international markets for textiles based on nakshi kantha. Traditionally, women from poor and

Booth 68 Pabiben Lakhman Rabari is the eldest of three sisters and part of the nomadic Dhebaria Rabari community in Kutch, western India, near the Arabian Sea. Seeking new applications of traditional fabric and design work, she created the Pabi bag, a narrow purse that was an instant international success. She became a producer and leader in traditional embroidery art when the cooperative Kala Raksha came to her village. Pabiben set up a producer group and traveled all over India to market their spectacular embroidered goods, with intricate stitching, bright mirrors and vibrant colors. Today, she is a group leader in her in-laws village. She and her husband supervise three village groups and 60 artisans. Rabari embroidered clothing, bags, runners, pillow covers, traditional games, appliqud quilts, wall hangings and toys Lachhuben Raja Rabari
Kala Raksha UNESCO Award of Excellence Winner (Kala Raksha)

middle-class homes would overlay and rework bits of cloth from worn clothing, using a simple running stitch to create mats, baby wraps and blankets. The practice lagged as printed materials were introduced, but SHE has reinvigorated the art both by providing training and using contemporary colors, geometric patterns and luxury textiles. Through Self Help Enterprise founder Shamlu Dudejas efforts, kantha has been popularized among Indian designers and is now used by men and women around the world.

filigree jewelry of all sorts, including ceremonial items that have been used for centuries by Yemenite Jews.

JAPAN
Natural dye, handwoven textiles, tapestries, curtains, wrapping cloth, stoles and uchiwas (fans) Sumi Takamoto Booth 23 Sumi lives and works in Kumamoto, where she continues the tradition of Japanese textiles made with hand-spun silk and cotton yarns, dyed with fermented Awa indigo and other natural dyes. Her works include ceremonial kimonos as well as textiles for home decoration and clothing for daily life. By turning her thoughts toward tradition during each process, she hopes to convey a piece of Japanese culture to those who purchase her art.

INDONESIA
Balinese carved and painted wood masks Ida Bagus Anom Suryawan Booth 24 Born in Mas village in Bali, Ida makes masks from light pule wood for use in the topeng masked dance ceremony. The brightly colored masks feature as many as 40 layers of acrylic paint, which ensures their durability. Ida learned mask making from his granduncle Ida Bagus Tilem, his older brother and uncle, all well-known wood carvers and mask makers. He also performs topeng dance for ritual occasions in the Mas-Ubud or Denpasar areas. Wayang kulit flat, carved and painted leather shadow puppets Tri Suwarno Booth 76 Tri grew up in a family of puppet makers. Although the family is trained in all aspects of puppet making, they specialize in painting and decorating puppets. It is not unusual for many artists to be involved in making a puppet, each with a special skill. Shadow puppet theater has been performed in Indonesia for hundreds of years and is the epitome of cultural expression in Java. The puppet shows are not only entertaining, but also celebrate events, teach ethics and values, and provide commentary on current events or contemporary issues.

KAZAKHSTAN
Shashaks yurt amulets, Korzhyn woven saddlebags, Zhelbau woven ribbons for yurt interiors, Kilemshe woven carpet pictures, Tuskiiz embroidered ceremonial panels, Alasha woven panels, Baskur woven, patterned bands Aizhan Bekkulova Booth 20 The work of the Union of Kazakhstan Artisans carries out local traditions in silver, felt, leather and naturally dyed wool. Every medium is imbued with the colors, patterns and textures of Kazakhstan. The organizations mission is the revival, preservation and development of the cultural heritage of Central Asia. The work of the 400 artisans is well informed by workshops, craft fairs and competitions. It celebrates craftsmanship through the creation of adornments and useful objects that are full of color and beautiful design. Aizhan is an officer in the organization and winner of a UNESCO Seal of Excellence for her weaving. While highly-educated, she carries on the weaving traditions of her family.
Public Foundation Our Heritage

Booth 68 Lachhuben Raja Rabari learned traditional embroidery from her family in Viyar and later became known as an expert artisan. Her eye for quality is renowned and her work carries both authenticity and traditional meaning. She joined the cooperative Kala Raksha in the 1990s and has traveled internationally, acting as marketer, cultural mediator and teacher. While some work is done for contemporary markets, it is primarily used to build a dowry. The beautiful work does double-duty while it adorns, it also communicates the identity of a woman, her age, marital status, children, etc. Men wear embroidered clothes during weddings and festivals. Copper-coated, forged metal bells, wind chimes and musical instruments Luhar Janmamad Salemamad Booth 69 First-time market artist Luhar Janmamad Salemamad represents the ancient tradition of melodic, forged metal bell and wind chime making of his Muslim Luhar community in Kutch, Gujarat, India. The metal craftsmen of his village have preserved and practiced the art of bell making for over 300 years. Originally used by local cattle, camel, sheep and goat herders whose animals grazed in the nearby Banni grasslands, the melodic iron and copper-coated bells were made to adorn the animals necks and were thought to create good vibrations in
Supported by INDIKA

ISRAEL
Yemenite jewelry and Judaica formed from silver filigree Ben-Zion David Booth 35 For hundreds of years, Yemenite Jews have maintained a closely-guarded tradition of jewelry making using precious metals. Their tools and techniques have been passed down as family secrets from one generation to the next, protecting a heritage and a livelihood that has constituted a special role for Yemenite Jews. In his workshop and gallery in Old Jaffa, Israel, Ben-Zion David is seeking to revive this disappearing art form, which he learned from his father and grandfather. Ben-Zion uses traditional tools to shape sterling silver, semi-precious stones, lava, coral and archaeological artifacts into

KENYA
Samburu beaded jewelry and baskets Rebecca Lolosoli
Supported by Umoja Uaso Womens Fund, Inc.

Booth 85 The semi-nomadic, pastoral Samburu people of northern Kenya were named by a neighboring tribe because of their striking jewelry and face paint reminiscent of butterflies. Samburu women make vibrant beaded jewelry that is worn by all members of the community with different designs denoting a persons age. Rebecca is a prominent activist and artist within her Samburu community. In addition to making the traditional hand-strung, colorful beaded necklaces and bracelets, Rebecca founded the womens organization Umoja to

42 2012 Santa Fe International FOLK ART MARKET

help combat the abuse of Samburu women. Through capacity-building workshops, markets, jewelrymaking trainings and the creation of a network of womens groups, Rebecca and Umoja are helping to create sustainable livelihoods for Samburu women. Maasai beaded jewelry and clothing James Ole Kamete Booth 133 James Ole Kamete, a respected elder of the semi-nomadic Maasai peoples of southern Kenya, is the founder and director of Esiteti School, the first primary school for Maasai girls. In 2007, American teacher Teri Gabrielsen worked with James to create an umbrella organization, Africa Schools of Kenya, to augment the meager resources for children in this Maasai community of over 800 people through educational, economic and crosscultural exchange initiatives. One such initiative involves the sale of traditional Maasai beaded jewelry and beaded dresses made by a group of over 220 Maasai women living in the Esiteti/ Embarinkoi Hill region of Maasailand. A traditional caftan-like dress, usually worn for special ceremonies such as weddings or feasts, might take two craftswomen 40-50 hours of handwork to adorn the dress.
Supported by Africa Schools of Kenya

Feltwork dolls Erkebu Djumagulova Booth 36 Erkebu Djumagulova is a textile artist from the capital city of Bishtek, Kyrgyzstan, who is a master at capturing the expressions and customs of the villagers of her native Kyrgyzstan and Central Asia through the intricately dressed dolls she makes from embroidered felt wool, silk and yarn. Drawn to the traditional Kyrgyz felt arts since childhood, Erkebu followed her dreams all the way to professional art college where she carefully researched and learned the intricate art of felt making from local folk artists around the country. Today, her repertoire includes traditional clothes and decorated household items in addition to the felt dolls for which she is most known. Her work has won numerous awards internationally, including the UNESCO Award of Excellence in 2004, 2005 and 2007. Felt work, also incorporating silk Kadyrkul Sharshembieva
UNESCO Award of Excellence Winner UNESCO Award of Excellence Winner

Bouathong is a weaver carrying on the tradition of Tai Lue cotton weaving. Both learned to create textiles at an early age and now make them to support their families. They are working with the Luang Prabang Fund for Culture and Conservation to help organize other women artisans to produce their work for markets and to promote the cultural heritage of Laos. Jewelry featuring the Dok Phikoun flower pattern Orijyn/Saoban Booth 103 Working on a bench with a blowtorch and hand tools, silversmiths in Vientiane, Laos, labor over silver ingots to create intricately crafted cuffs, bracelets and necklaces. The silversmiths are members of a cooperative called Saoban, part of a nonprofit school that preserves traditional arts while improving education and healthcare through revenue development for artisans. Although silversmithing is typically passed down through families, the cooperative is working to introduce more young people to the art in order to keep the tradition alive. The style of silversmithing employed by members of Saoban is specific to the Lao Loum group in Laos. Traditional designs created for the Lao royal court adorn the handcrafted silver jewelry. The Dok Phikoun flower is incorporated into many designs and is believed by the followers of Lao Buddhism to bring health, well being and prosperity. Silk and cotton weavings of the Tai Kadai style Veomanee Douangdala Booth 120 Veomanee Douangdala learned weaving at the age of eight by helping her mother weave the easy parts of patterns for woven textiles used in daily life. She also learned natural dye skills from her mother, a wellrespected weaver known for her knowledge of natural dyes. In 2000, Veomanee co-founded Ock Pop Tok, a textile gallery and weaving center in Luang Prabang, which provides sustainable employment to 400 artisans throughout Laos. Silk and cotton weavings of the Tai Kadai style Ms Note Booth 120 A decade ago, two women in their 20s a London fashion photographer and the daughter of a master weaver from the Mekong region of Lao Peoples Democratic Republic came together to form the cooperative Ock Pop Tok, which means East Meets West. Featuring the exquisite silk and cotton weavings for which the country is so well known, this 21st century cooperative is as likely to sell wall hangings inspired by Mark Rothko as the traditional skirts woven with Laotian motifs.
Ock Pop Tok Ock Pop Tok

In just over 10 years, Ock Pop Tok has grown from a one-room weaving studio for local weavers to an internationally recognized heritage destination, gallery, retreat center and womens weaving collaborative for over 400 artisans in three provinces and seven villages. This year, the seasoned co-founders will be accompanied by first-time market artist Ms Note.

MADAGASCAR
Woven silk, cotton and raffia accessories and home furnishings Rado Herivonona Ambinintsoa and Marie Philbertine Razanamalala Booth 59 The Federation SAHALANDY, in the central highlands of Madagascar, is made up of seven weaving cooperatives representing 80 weavers in the area. Federation SAHALANDY empowers artists by increasing non-subsistence income, finding sustainable markets abroad, building a cultural heritage center, and continuing to teach the weaving tradition to future generations. One silk strand is strong, but when many are woven together, they are stronger, is a Malagasy proverb that illustrates SAHALANDY weavers and community work.
Federation SAHALANDY

native village of Long Semiyang, along the Baram river in northeast Malaysia. In addition to his mastery of the art of Sape music, Matthew is also an accomplished traditional dancer of the Sarawak feather or warrior dance, bark painter of the chiefly bark vests, and blow pipe musician. Much recognized nationally and internationally as Malaysias preeminent Sape artist, Matthew is now a regular feature at the Annual Rainforest World Music Festival held in Kuching, Sarawak, and has performed in Paris, Germany, Australia and the United States.

MALI
Indigo and mud-dyed woven clothing, hats, bags and home furnishings Aboubakar Sidiki Fofana Booth 122 Aboubakar Sidiki Fofana utilizes organic hand-spun cotton and natural indigo and mud dyes to create exquisite textiles, which are spun on a traditional West African loom and hand stitched to create the finished products. He learned about traditional West African textiles by traveling around West African countries and speaking to his elders. From these experiences he began to feel an urgency to preserve the use of indigo and to revive the growth of biological indigo and of organic cotton in West Africa, particularly in Mali. Aboubakars craft has also been highly influenced by his time in Japan and in France. His Sublime Indigo initiative addresses his priorities by teaching the techniques of textile production and by developing a textile industry in West Africa based on principles of sustainability and respect for the environment.

KYRGYZSTAN
Felted and embroidered footwear Begimai Shygaeva
Ala-Too

Booth 128 Ala-kiyiz is a traditional felting technique from Kyrgyzstan that has been passed down since the 17th century. It comes from nomadic cultures that utilize the wool of sheep that graze in the mountainous terrain of Kyrgyzstan. Kadyrkuls family has been involved with this craft in multiple capacities for numerous years, and Kadyrkul continues to pass on the tradition to her two daughters. Felt work, also incorporating silk Farzana Sharshenbieva

MALAYSIA
Iban ikat textiles, baskets, mats, hats, batik textiles and sarongs Bangie Anak Embol Booth 32 Bangie Anak Embol is a master basket and textile weaver and dyer from the Iban community of Malaysian Borneo. The intricately woven and shaped container baskets from this community are made from rattan vines and bamboo gathered in the rainforests. These materials are cut with traditional knives and then dyed. The last step in the process is the plaiting and shaping, which is most often done by women. Before the advent of plastic buckets and tin cans, the handwoven baskets were used for all daily tasks such as planting, fishing, gathering edible greens and other household uses. Iban textiles are handwoven at the Rumah Garle Longhouse in remote Sarawak using backstrap looms and silk and cotton yarns that are dyed naturally. The weavings are integral to Iban culture and are part of daily and ritual life, such as rice planting and shamanistic offerings. Orang-Ulu bark paintings, vests, jackets, and Orang-Ulu Sape wooden lute Matthew Ngau Jau
Society Atelier Sarawak Society Atelier Sarawak UNESCO Award of Excellence Winner

Booth 14 Begimai represents a small cooperative consisting of 20 women who recognize the value of ancient Kyrgyz handwork and are revitalizing the nomadic tradition of felt making. They make thick felt from wool, and from that cut the traditional Kyrgyz footwear, adorning it with beautiful embroidery. Over the past 10 years, globalization has introduced European fashion trends into Kyrgyzstan. With the gaining of the countrys independence, many traditions such as felting started to revive and people are now taking pride in wearing their traditional dress. Felted and embroidered headgear Oksana Kononova Booth 14 With Kyrgyzstans independence in the 1990s, the countrys economic infrastructure was destroyed. For Oksana, who then had two small children, it was difficult to find work amid high unemployment. She and four women artisans formed a group to produce felt headwear. The group now consists of 11 Kyrgyz women and four men who aim to revive, preserve and develop folk art that originated from sheep-breeding and their cultures previously nomadic way of life. Together they are studying and teaching their knowledge and skills to younger generations.
Studiofelt

Booth 128 Farzana Sharshenbieva has taken on the honored family tradition of making ala-kiyiz Kyrgyz felt rugs, as well as making scarves that combine silk and felt and traditional jackets. These beautiful and delicate crafts are made with local raw materials, natural dyes, sheeps wool and handmade yarn. Her family even began to use the remnants from felt carpets by creatively transforming them into other domestic goods and toys. Farzanas family has been translating the natural beauty of their surroundings and the importance of their cultural heritage into these beautiful, handmade products for centuries.

UNESCO Award of Excellence Winner

MEXICO
Altars, collages and toys made of recycled materials Claudia Martnez Vargas Booth 17 Winner of national awards, Claudia is a self-taught artist who draws upon the rich legacy of altar making and retablos in Mexican culture. She uses homemade glue and recycled materials such as boxes, labels, bottles, magazines, strings and buttons to craft her work. Burnished clay pottery from Tonal, Jalisco Angel Ortiz Gabriel Booth 19 Angel Ortiz Gabriel grew up with his artisan grandparents and mother in Tonal, a town known for its distinctive narrative pottery. Since childhood, he has created handmade pottery such as decorated plates, vases, nahuales, bowls and traditional Tonal masks. He is dedicated to reviving pottery styles from the 1920s that include traditional country designs called Fantasia (fantasy) and polychrome floral designs. His unique

LAO PDR
Yao Mien hand-dyed, embroidered textiles, clothing, accessories, scarves, baby hats with ornaments Famchoy Saely and Bouathong Phetdara Booth 10 Famchoy and Bouathong are both leaders in their communities and masters of their art. Famchoy embroiders cloth in the traditional style of the Yao Mien people, while
Supported by Luang Prabang Fund for Culture and Conservation

Booth 32 Matthew Ngau Jau is an accomplished performer and maker of the carved and beautifully painted Sape lute instrument of his

2012 Santa Fe International FOLK ART MARKET 43

style is recognizable. Angel is honored to be able to keep alive old stories and traditions and bring aesthetic pleasure to peoples lives. Burnished clay pottery from Tonal, Jalisco Jos Angel Ortiz Arana Booth 19 At age 10, Jos Angel Ortiz Arana began to learn to create traditional Tonal pottery from his father Angel Ortiz Gabriel. They currently work together in his fathers studio and handbuild each piece using press molds and then paint them with thin, delicate handmade brushes. The pottery most often depicts ancient myths, symbolism that relates to nationalism or Pre-Hispanic history, animal and plant life. He has won several awards for his unique style of handmade pottery and design. Black pottery sculptures of women in regional dress Magdalena Pedro Martnez Booth 26 Magdalena Pedro Martnez uses the distinctive black clay indigenous to her town of San Bartolo Coyotepec in the Mexican state of Oaxaca to form her sculptures what she calls a permanent record of women dressed in regional costumes. Her sculptures are carefully engraved with detail; the faces, hands and feet are lifelike. The regional costumes are carved in minute detail, with specific embellishments. She also burnishes the clay to achieve contrast that helps set her work apart. Magdalena grew up in a family of artists, whom she credits with urging her to experiment with the black clay that gave the villagers a way of making cookware for everyday use, a technique that is still used today. Glazed clay, molded and appliqud pineapple pots, candelabras, bowls and figures Hilario Alejos Madrigal
Supported by Quaucalli-Santa Fe

scenes and landscapes that depict the stories, celebrations and daily life of the Purpecha indigenous community in the state of Michoacn, Mexico. The president of the Vasco de Quiroga Cooperative, Berta leads the women of her village of Tzintzuntzan to produce exquisitely embroidered storypieces including rebozos, bed covers, shawls, tablecloths and runners that they sell from local stands and at crafts fairs throughout Mexico and the United States. This will be Bertas first year at the market; her sister, Teofila, is a market favorite. Mixed media collages Pedro Ortega Lozano Booth 49 Pedro creates the perforated paper ornaments that brighten Mexican homes and streetscapes for annual fiestas, birthday parties, quinceaeras, and even the Folk Art Market. Applying familiar tools and techniques, he has taken the tradition and transformed it by creating elaborate collages that suggest the Baroque altar screens in Mexican colonial churches. Pedro and his work were featured in the Great Masters of Mexican Folk Art exhibition and publication organized by Banamex. Loom-woven Zapotecan rugs, home furnishings and bags Pastora Asuncin Gutirrez Reyes and Silvia Zitlaly Gutirrez Reyes Booth 66 Vida Nueva is a cooperative of Zapotec women from Teotitlan del Valle, an indigenous Mexican community with centuries of weaving history. Their patterns and techniques have been passed down for generations and express their unique culture. Members pool their resources to provide economic opportunity as well as serve their community through projects related to health, hunger and preservation of their Zapotec heritage. The Cooperatives weavings contain traditional geometric designs with dozens of different colors made with natural dyes, ranging from fuchsia to purples and reds. Huichol-Wixarika yarn paintings Mariano Valadez Navarro Booth 70 Huichol yarn painting has been a part of Mariano Valadez Navarros heritage for as long as he can remember. His family often made them for sacred places and ceremonies in their indigenous community. He now makes these vibrant and elaborate yarn paintings professionally to support his family, but has continued to incorporate spiritual and mythological themes, as he often depicts scenes from peyote visions, ceremonial life and Huichol cosmology in his work. Mariano not only identifies as a Huichol yarn painter, but also as a storyteller who is translating his cultures rich traditions into an art form that he hopes anyone can appreciate.
Vida Nueva

Huichol-Wixarika yarn paintings Rafael Cilau Valadez Booth 70 Rafael Cilau Valadez is part of a new generation of young Huichol Indians who have migrated to cities outside of their indigenous villages. One of the few in his community fluent in English, Rafael uses his voice as an advocate for Huichol indigenous rights and his vision as an artist to spread the meaning and beauty of his peoples culture to the world. The son of world-renowned Huichol yarn painter Mariano Valadez and anthropologist Susana Valadez Eger, Rafael has been mentored by his communitys master craftsmen and shamans to be able to carry on the practices of the Huichol mystic arts. Woven and embroidered textiles representative of the Otom culture Nicolas Gomez Plata Booth 80 Craft production plays a large part in the economies of several Otom communities. Some of these villages are well known for their vibrantly colored, embroidered textiles, ranging from clothing to bedspreads, tablecloths, runners and napkins. The Otom embroideries reflect the world they interact with daily, especially plants, insects, birds, animals and fish. Many girls and women still wear the traditional embroidered blouse, wrap skirt, woven sash and quechqumitl. JJMARQUIN HECHO A MANO is a family-owned business that specializes in textiles. Based in Tlaquepaque, near Guadalajara, JJMARQUIN is dedicated to sustaining the diverse textile traditions of Mexico. Hand carved and painted figures Augustn Cruz Prudencio Booth 87 Augustn Cruz Prudencios skilled wood carvings have won him various awards in his home state of Oaxaca and nationally. His work carries on a centuries-old heritage of giving a baby a small carving of their spirit protector or nahual. For hundreds of years since, woodcarvings of nativity scenes, virgins, saints and other religious images have held a significant role in daily and spiritual life. Augustn learned the skill at a young age from his father. He is one of the most inventive artists working in this folk art form and collaborates with his wife, Carmen Sosa Ojeda, a skilled painter, to create intricatelypainted wood carvings. Hand carved and painted figures Augustn Cruz Tinoco Booth 87 The hand-carved wooden figures that have brought Augustn Cruz Tinoco national recognition begin as blank pieces of pine, bursera, cedar or mahogany wood. Born in Oaxacas Mixe Sierra, Augustn has been practicing this folk art form since
Supported by JJMARQUIN HECHO A MANO

1970, and has received awards in state and national folk art competitions for his carved wooden pieces. Augustn seeks to understand and exploit the natural forms and qualities of the wood. He then uses various knives, files, sandpaper, agave thorns, needles and paints to shape his brightly-painted and intricately-detailed jaguar boxes, religious figures, altar pieces and nativity scenes. Fomento Cultural BANAMEX, A.C. Fomento Cultural BANAMEX, A.C. was formed in 1996 to preserve and promote the values of the Mexican culture from its roots to very diverse cultural and popular expressions. Initially, through a two-year process of research and artist selection from all regions of Mexico, a collection of traditional arts was assembled from 150 master craftsmen. The collection has since been greatly expanded to include other specialties and artists. The organization is also dedicated to improving work conditions and expanding production opportunities for folk art and craft producers. The BANAMEX booths feature the artists that follow: Embroideries and weavings Irma Martnez Pascual Booths 95, 96 Irma Martnez Pascual is a master artisan from San Felipe Santiago, a Mazahua community in the state of Mexico. Like her mother and grandmother, Irma embroiders miniature floral, geometric and mythic designs on the hand-dyed textiles for which her community is well known. The town has a long handicraft tradition of fine embroidery products, including table runners, bedspreads and napkins. Mazahuas rank as the poorest indigenous group in the state of Mexico. Irmas artistry reaped the benefits of her close association with famed Mexican folk art scholar and museum founder, Maria Teresa Pomar, who mentored her in her craft. Embroideries and weavings Remigio Maestas Booths 95, 96 Remigio Maestas works with two hundred weavers from 11 indigenous groups to encourage a return to natural dyes, traditional designs and old weaving techniques, particularly the backstrap loom. The clothing types are typical of this region, which has one of the most diverse and elaborate costume traditions in the country. His shop in Oaxaca, Los Baules de Juana Cata, is one that many tourists consider a destination.
Supported by Fomento Cultural BANAMEX AC Supported by Fomento Cultural BANAMEX AC

Hammered and engraved silver and copper Abdon Punzo Angel, Carlos Punzo Chvez and Abdon Punzo Chvez Booth 105 Abdon Punzo ngel is an awardwinning master craftsman from the copper and silver region of Santa Clara del Cobre, in the state of Michoacn, western Mexico. Abdon and his two sons create their exquisitely hammered copper pots, bowls, vessels and pitchers in elegant, abstract floral and animal shapes that draw and expand upon pre-Hispanic tradition. Abdon has been perfecting his craft since he was five years old and, to date, has won more than 20 national awards as well as the coveted Presidents National Award for silversmithing. Abdons workshop is always full of members of his family forming hammered copper vessels. Ofebre filigree jewelry Inocencia Hernndez Ramrez Booth 115 Inocencia Hernndez Ramrez began making delicate and intricate filigree at age 12, in Oaxaca, a Mexican state known for its tremendous filigree traditions. She currently has her own store and works with gold and silver, as well as with turquoise, coral and pearls. Filigree is a tradition that was brought to Mexico in the 16th century from Spain. The earrings, necklaces, pendants, rings and bracelets made from this technique are traditionally worn during Oaxacan festivals and weddings, but many people have begun to wear them daily. Lead-free pottery Nicolas Fabian and Rosario Luca
Supported by Barro Sin Plomo USA Supported by Museo Belber Jimenez

Booth 38 One of Mexicos most recognized folk potters, Hilario Alejos from San Jose de Gracia, Michoacn, is the recipient of numerous awards, including the Premio Fomento Cultural Banamex. His highly traditional ornamental pineapple pots, elaborated with techniques of appliqu and openwork, require exceptional mastery not only in the clay work but in the dual firings required. Working not only in the familiar green glossy glaze, Hilario often uses yellows and blues for his pots, candelabras and punch bowls that are sought by collectors. Embroidered clothing, accessories, wall hangings, home furnishings and bags Berta Servn Barriga Booth 43 Berta is a natural-born storyteller; her tales are stitched in cloth, not woven in words. She uses backstitch, single and double cross-stitch, and chain stitch to outline the drawn figures,
Cooperativa Vasco de Quiroga

Booth 134 Nicolas Fabian and Rosario Luca are a husband and wife team of master potters from the Purepcha community of Santa Fe de la Laguna. Together and separately, they have been recognized nationally for their high quality burnished pots and for being innovators while maintaining traditional processes and designs in their work. Rosario is a founder of the Uarhi Cooperative and has worked diligently to address womens issues around health care in her community a passion she developed after she suffered a series of health issues caused by the poisonous toxins in the lead-based glazes that were once used for their pots. Today, Rosario and Nicolas are both innovators and leaders in lead-free processes of glaze production and have trained artisans throughout Mexico. Lead-free pottery Narcisa Magaa Booth 134 The cazuela, or casserole dish, stands at the heart of the kitchen for the indigenous Purpecha people from the state of Michoacn, Mexico. Narcisa creates lead-free cazuelas and animal dishes with the help of
Supported by Barro Sin Plomo USA

44 2012 Santa Fe International FOLK ART MARKET

2012 Santa Fe International FOLK ART MARKET 45

her family. Her husband mines the clay and carries it on his donkey to a communal grinder. Her sister prepares the clay. Narcisa and her husband press the clay into molds and add details. Narcisa is a member of Barro sin Plomo, a nonprofit that helps artisans create sustainable products while preserving traditional art forms and advocating for leadfree ceramic production. Lead-free pottery Montoya Family Booth 134 Like their father, Othn, the seven Montoya sons create ceramics for the kitchen and home. Among the items are large green platters with flower motifs and cazuelas (casseroles). Specialties of the family include Othns cross-hatch terracotta casserole, lidded casseroles and snack trays, and son Germans highly decorative pieces created using black and white engobes. Othn Montoya works with two of his sons fulltime; the other five help out on weekends. His wife Braulia Julia Vazquez works with him as the primary painter. Lead-free pottery Bernardina Rivera Baltasar Booth 134 The Purpecha village of Huancito, in Michoacn, is justly famous for its handsome burnished red ceramics with their finely lined images of butterflies, flowers and hummingbirds. Bernardina learned the tradition from her mother, who is a national prizewinner herself. The tower of pots allows quantities of water to be stored in a relatively small area within each home.
Supported by Barro Sin Plomo USA Supported by Barro Sin Plomo USA

detailed and expressive images related to migration. Gerelkhuu is part of the Hovsgol Park Cooperative, which is located in a small village and works to train local people to make traditional crafts and clothing in order to create employment opportunities, stimulate the local economy and preserve cultural traditions. Clothing Tuul Sanjdorj Booth 86 Before Hovsgol Park Cooperative was established in 2000 through funding from United States Aid for International Development, artisans like Tuul worked individually in their homes and sought out markets on their own. Now the cooperative supports a wide range of traditional arts, including painting and carving. Artist Tuul Sanjdorjs specialty is the beautiful clothing typical of nomadic Mongolians. Clothing Bayarchimeg Sanduijav Booth 86 Master garment maker Bayarchimeg Sanduijav has meticulously studied and perfected the traditional method of construction and decoration of costumes from her home region in central Mongolia, as well as many other regions of the country. Although Bayarchimeg grew up in Mongolias urbanized capital city, she spent most summers with her grandparents in the countryside, where her grandmother taught her to make clothing and household goods. Following her grandmothers teachings, she became proficient in sewing many types of traditional Mongolian clothing, including the intricately appliqud and decoratively stitched long coat known as the deel, and the richly ornate vests and jackets worn by both men and women. According to Bayarchimeg, the secret to her beautiful strong stitches lies in the thread itself, spun from the wool of the camels mane.
Hovsgol Park Cooperative Hovsgol Park Cooperative

Tazarbit n iharkan Moroccan rag rugs Mouhou Boussine Jamaiate Assif Booth 61 Mouhou learned to weave rag rugs, or handwoven carpets, from the women in her family. Weaving used clothing, unraveled sweaters and natural-dyed handspun sheep and camel wool, Mouhou and the other weavers of her cooperative create brightly colored carpets with bold geometric tribal designs. Their carpets decorate homes and also serve as beds, couches and tables for meals. Each carpet takes several months to create, starting with the gathering of recycled materials, then hand spinning wool and weaving the carpet on a vertical wooden loom made of sticks and tree branches. Necklaces, bracelets and earrings made from djellaba buttons Naema Birali Booth 77 Naema is the president of a cooperative of 100 women from low-income families. Each member learned the craft of djellaba button making from their mothers or grandmothers. Traditionally, these buttons were made to sell to tailors who make djellabas, the traditional hooded and buttoned caftan worn by Moroccan and Berber women. Cooperative members make the buttons at home using a special sabra thread for use in clothing and jewelry. After plying together two to three strands of more than one color and then placing them over a steel holder, the buttons are then hand sewn using needle and thread. The women formed a cooperative so that they can become self-sustaining and find markets for their work. Beni Ourain-style, hand-knotted pile carpets, flat weave carpets and home furnishings Fatima Akachmar Booth 116 Fatima represents the Cooperative Adwal, a group of 22 women living in the community of Ribat El Kheir in the Middle Atlas mountain range. They weave pile carpets from wool in hand-knotted patterns that are memorized and passed down through generations. The complex designs utilize diamond patterns, and Berber symbols are incorporated into each piece. The cooperative is working to provide needed income to women of the village, many of whom are unmarried. They also provide training for apprentices to ensure the continuation of this unique tradition.
Cooperative Adwal Artisanat des Femmes de Khenifra

carving made from the wood of the cashew nut tree. Dino began to learn to carve at the age of 18 from an elderly neighbor who was a master of the craft. Dino learned to join the figures to a base in order to create scenes of daily life, customs and traditions such as weddings, and Chiguiana, the after-wedding ceremony for receiving gifts. He received further training from Aid to Artisans and has participated in exhibitions in Maputo as well as the National Fair organized by Cedarte.

amulets square pendants encasing a selection from the Koran worn by all ages to protect against evil spirits. The Koumama family works in small groups of two to 15 men with boys beginning their apprenticeship at age seven. The pieces are made by the lost wax method, then engraved, hammered and adorned with stones. Tuareg jewelry (fine silver and Tuareg silver) Moussa Albaka Booth 60 As a metal smith, Moussa designs jewelry using sterling silver, Tuareg silver and semi-precious stones. His techniques include engraving intricate geometric designs, using decorative inlay and a lost wax process. Many of his pieces show the repouss style by which Moussa hammers a shape on the reverse side which creates a raised design on the front. He also fashions veil weights in the Tuareg tradition of elaborate design. This jewelry is worn by women to hold their head cloths in place. Moussa is from Agadez, just south of the great Saharan desert, and as a young man traveled with camel caravans. This folk art is passed down through the male side of the family to families of the enad or blacksmith caste. Moussa was taught by his father and uncles. In turn, he has taught his sons and nephews. Tuareg leather work Haoua Albaka Booth 60 Haoua comes from a family of traditional Niger craftsmen. She started learning leathercraft at a young age from her mother. Traditional leather products from the region are made of goat leather dyed with natural dyes, with cut out designs and long fringe that is sometimes braided to make tassels. These items continue to be used in the everyday life of the Tuareg people and are unique to their culture.

NAMIBIA
Ju/Hoansi Bushmen beaded pictures, Ikung and Ju/Hoansi Bushman linotype prints, baskets from the Kavango region, Khwe Bushman baskets, PVC jewelry from the Kavango and Kunene regions, and Ikung and Ju/Hoan Bushman ostrich eggshell jewelry Mara Britz Booth 50 The Bushmen of Southern Africa have been creating and trading glass beads for centuries. Mara Britz and other artisans in her community have begun to use these colorful and delicate glass beads to create elaborate designs on fabrics that depict different aspects of Bushmen culture, such as animals and medicinal plants that are an important part of their daily life. For centuries, the stories of the Bushmen have traditionally been depicted through painting on rock, but with the loss of land and resources, their stories and language are dying out, as is the rock art. The Bushmen are now reviving their stories through linotype prints. The Kavango region and Caprivi region baskets are made from the fronds of the hyphaene petersiana palm. Kavango baskets are made with the coil method; Caprivi baskets with warp and weft. Gihiriku and Sambiyu bracelets are made from PVC etched with traditional designs by men from the Kavango region. The ostrich eggshell jewelry is made from individually shaped beads using eggshell from commercial farms. These adornments are exchanged as gifts or worn during cultural dances and festivals.
Supported by Omba Arts Trust

MONGOLIA
Containers made of horn, wood carvings, clothing and felt work Narantsetseg (Nara) Sambuu Booth 86 Narantsetseg comes from a family of traditional nomadic herders and learned her skills from her family. In 2000 Nara was instrumental in establishing the Hovsgol Park Cooperative through funding from United States Aid for International Development. Forming artisans into small groups enabled all to help improve production systems and access additional markets. The cooperative specializes in making garments, felt boots, purses and toy animals for their children. Secular paintings (Mongolian Zurag) Gerelkhuu Ganbold Booth 86 Gerelkhuu Ganbold has been painting in the traditional Mongolian style called Mongolian Zurag since he was a young boy. He enjoys painting Mongolian folk tales and images of different nomadic tribes, including
Hovsgol Park Cooperative Hovsgol Park Cooperative

NIGERIA
Batik, adire and tie dye fabric and clothing Gasali Adeyemo Booth 2 Gasali Adeyemo uses graceful, geometric batik designs that are laid out by using a coating of either paraffin or beeswax, which is then carefully removed after the fiber is dyed. Adire is a second method. It uses the traditional tools of a broom stalk, a chicken feather and cassava paste. Sometimes, in the adire method, a stencil design is the overlay and the artist creates the patterns by hand. In some creations a tie dye technique called stitch resist is used by stitching the raffia into the fabric. Adeyemo specializes by using indigo dyes because of its importance to his people. Each design has a specific meaning or identity. The design can serve as a passport showing ones village of origin when traveling.

MOROCCO
Tuareg and Berber-style daggers Lhoucine Taous Booth 40 The art of dagger making has over 700 years of history in Morocco. Lhoucine represents the Azlag Dagger Cooperative, the only group of its kind following this tradition. Its handcrafted designs are derived from Roman, Jewish, Berber and Islamic influences. The artisans in the ancient Berber village of Azlag, which means come together, support over 100 families and employ nearly 100 men. The daggers are made from various metals, woods, animal bones and skins, using plants for the natural dyeing of the handles.
Azlag Dagger Cooperative (La Cooperative Artisanale Des Poignards Azlag)

NIGER
Tuareg Jewelry (fine silver, ebony and stones), flatware and other metal work Elhadji Koumama Booth 13 Nomadic Tuaregs typically owned few material possessions, but they cherish beauty, so jewelry has been an important (and portable) art form in their culture. Most pieces are geometric in shape and have a special significance, including crosses given from fathers to sons, triangular pieces given from mothers to girls, diamonds given by men to their brides, and
Supported by Ann M. Elston

MOZAMBIQUE
Psikelekedana softwood carvings of daily life in Mozambique Caburdino Mustaf Jeth Booth 30 The trademark folk art form of Santo Damsio in Mozambique is Psikelekedana, a type of softwood

46 2012 Santa Fe International FOLK ART MARKET

2012 Santa Fe International FOLK ART MARKET 47

Adeyemos singular creations are traditional Yoruba designs. Adeyemo was a student at the Nike Center for Arts and Culture and has become a trainer of the arts of the Yoruba people. Yoruba aluminum relief panels Adebayo Taofeek Folorunsho Booth 22 Although still a young man, Adebayo Taofeek Folorunsho already approaches his blacksmithing art with the skill, refinement and talent of a veritable master. He uses a repouss method to create intricate scenes on hand-forged aluminum panels, following a process of ornamenting aluminum surfaces with designs in relief by hammering out from the back. Adebayo was born into a family of artisans who use blacksmithing tools, such as the chisel, hammer, knife, punches and coals, for forging and hammering relief panels. This art today is used to decorate the doors, entrance gates and dining rooms of village houses. Through his expertly crafted panels, the stories of Yoruba culture are brought to life with images of festivals and biblical stories. Ashiko, djembe and talking drums Akeem Ayanniyi Booth 44 The gorgeous West African drums and the hypnotic, dynamic rhythms of Agalu African music are the two folk art traditions brought to us by Akeem Ayanniyi from Nigeria. These instruments are handcrafted with local materials, carved from mahogany or teak, topped with cowhide, and laced with rope strings. The shape creates the type and sound of the drum: conical is ashiko, inverse conical is bata, mushroom is djembe, and cylindrical shape is the famous Yoruba talking drum. These West African drums are among some of the oldest village to village communication instruments. Akeem is from a highly respected family of drummers and drum makers, and he can proudly trace this folk art in his family through nine generations. He founded an Agula dance troupe and tours Europe and the United States sharing African music and culture.

tradition dating back to the Mughal Empire and Dynasty between 15261858, which has been utilized for dowries as well as everyday use. Embroidered clothing, accessories and household goods of the Khyber Pakhtunhwa Province Nilofer Bibi
Supported by Poetic Threads of Pakistan

heritage dating back to the 1800s. Although Tawfiq and his family are familiar with the international art market through the sale of their glass worldwide, this will be his first time boarding an airplane. Handblown Hebron glass Hamzeh Natsheh Booth 53 The Natsheh Handicrafts workshop is a family group that is carrying on this ancient tradition of mouth-blown, hand-decorated glass that is passed down from generation to generation. Now using recycled Coca-Cola bottles and a steel pipe or kammasha, 1-1.5 meters long, the glasswork is blown at 1,000 degrees celsius, and then left for eight hours to cool. This tradition is threatened due to decrease in tourism, problems of export and restrictions on movement of Palestinians. Embroidered clothing, accessories and pillow covers Hind El-Arabi and Somaya II Abuowda Booth 82 Traditionally it has been very important for Palestinian villagers to assure that their daughters are acquainted with embroidery skills and techniques. By the age of 10, most girls have fully mastered the skills and can begin the finely detailed panels for their trousseau garments. The creation of valuable wedding costumes is, to this day, a source of great pride for Palestinian women. The United Nations Relief and Works Agency runs a self-supporting embroidery program which employs over 500 refugee women in the Gaza Strip to produce articles to sell at the Sulafa Embroidery Shop, helping preserve valuable traditions and increasing family incomes.
United Nations Relief and Works Agency Sulafa Embroidery Project

not recognized by the Panamanian government and are in endangered by encroaching foreign developers. Tagua Wounaan vegetable ivory sculptures Sebedeo Piraza Meja
Micro-Empresas de Artistas Wounaan

Booth 99 Nilofer Bibi is from the Swat Valley of Khyber Pakhtunwha Province, in the mountain areas bordering Afghanistan. She is representing the textile traditions of both the Swat and the Hazara, the plains area near the Indus River. Textiles of the Hazara region are known for their precise geometric patterns. Swat region textiles are less uniform and more freeform in design. Richly embroidered shawls, apparel and household linens are made by the women of this province.

Booth 4 Tagua, or vegetable ivory, is a type of palm tree, native to the Darien rainforests of Panama close to the Colombian border. The Wounaan people have developed a fine art of carving the hard seed into magnificent figurines and jewelry, using only the simplest manual tools of knives, chisels, dyes and sandpaper. Through their art, they have developed an appreciation of sustaining and protecting their rainforest habitat. Sebedo Piraza Meja grew up in a small indigenous Wounaan community of wood carvers and basket weavers, moving to Panama City to continue his high school education, which he supported through the sale of his tagua sculptures. For the past 10 years, Sebedo has worked with the National Congress of the Wounaan people as a governmental liaison promoting the arts and culture of his community. Molas (reverse appliqu textiles) from the Island of Ustapo in Guna Yala Martiza Garrido de Fernndez and Nidia Johnson de Figueres
Artesana Nagegiryai Supported by Asociacin Pro Artesana Panamea

of the flora and fauna of Peru. These have their origin in the traditional embroidery of the WARI-URPIs ancestors who can be traced back to the eighth century B.C. Worn daily by the WARI women of the HuantaAyacucho region, embroidered shawls called llicllac are often used to carry children, crops or wood. Other embroidered garments are worn during the feast of the Virgin of Cocharcas. Retablos, figures and masks Claudio Jimnez Quispe and Vicenta Flores Ataucusi Booth 5 Vicenta and her husband Claudio represent the world-famous Quispe family of Peru, widely known for their Peruvian retablos, or portable shrines. Such shrines have been traditionally used by Quechua-speaking indgenas to bring fecundity to their agricultural fields and to ask for the intervention of a Catholic saint or deity for a successful crop. The Quispes have made their mark in part by introducing contemporary themes and representing scenes of Andean life that encompass religion, customs, tales and legends, and social life. The Quispes left Ayacucho in 1989 when the political situation created difficulties there. They reside in Lima. Tablas de Sarhua paintings, local legends, farm life, Varas de Alcalde mayors staffs, wool spinning sets and embroidered hats Pompeyo Berrocal Evann Booth 21 Pompeyo Berrocal Evann is originally from Sarhua Ayacucho. Pompeyo remembers growing up with an incredible painted tabla de sarhua of his village that was in his grandparents home. He migrated to Lima where his uncle taught him to create colorful tablas that he began selling at an artisan market. A tradition of Sarhua for over 100 years, the tablas represent the genealogical heritage of families from Pompeyos village and scenes of daily life in rural Andean villages. They are given as gifts to families moving into new homes as a blessing. Clay nativities, churches, angels, candleholders, figures and animals Florencio Huarhua Jeri
Supported by Arts and Treasures from Latin America UNESCO Award of Excellence Winner

Poetic Threads of Pakistan works with a network of artists to source handmade, high quality work that is fair trade compliant. PTOP primarily focuses on the Khyber Pakhtunwha Province because the artists have less access to markets, as well as limited mobility because the conservative culture and tradition of the region prevents women from working outside the home. Ralli quilts (patchwork, appliqu, embroidery) Lila Handicrafts Booth 109 Ralli quilts are made in the remote regions of Pakistan and India by women artisans, many of whom will not travel out of their own village without their husbands or another male. Patchwork ralli quilts are patterned textiles made of cloth from discarded clothing and household fabrics that are sometimes hand dyed to give them a new appearance. The cloth is torn or cut into geometric shapes, then stitched together on a palm mat on the ground using a large needle and cotton thread. Three quilting methods are used: patchwork, appliqu and embroidery. Lila Handicrafts is a cooperative of women from a small village in the Thar Desert region of Pakistan, Tehsil Diplo. The money the women make is used to pay the costs for their children to attend the village school.

PANAMA
Darien Rainforest baskets woven from black palm (chunga) Idaira Cabezn Mepaquito
Gremio de Artesanos Wounaan

Booth 90 The traditional dress of a Guna (Kuna) woman consists of a patterned, blue cotton wrapped skirt called a sabure, a red and yellow headscarf, beaded bracelets and anklets called wini, and the many-layered and finely sewn mola panel blouse. The mola is said to have originated with the tradition of Guna women painting their bodies with geometric designs, using native dyes. The finest molas have fine stitching and multiple layers with progressively smaller patterns. Nidia Johnson de Figueres is a master mola maker from the island of Ustupu, where she learned the art from her mother and grandmother. Today Nidia lives in the city of Chitre where she and her business partner, Martiza Garrido de Fernndez, create molas for sale in Panama. Through their alliance with a nonprofit organization called Asociacin Pro Artesana Panamea, they have been able to grow their business to include 10 families in the city where they live.

PAKISTAN
Moghul Kundan jewelry of the Khyber Pakhtunkhwa Province Muhammad Yousaf
Supported by Poetic Threads of Pakistan

Booth 99 Muhammad Yousaf, a goldsmith from Mardan, has handcrafted intricate and delicate jewelry for many years and comes from generations of male jewelers. The style of his work is called Kundan and utilizes gold, 22k vermeil plating, silver and natural semi-precious and precious stones. Muhammad Yousaf also utilizes lac, the secretion from a bug native to India, as glue compound to hold the jewels in place also a Kundan tradition. This is a jewelry crafting

PALESTINIAN TERRITORIES
Handblown Hebron Glass Tawfiq Alnatsha
Hebron Glass

Booth 4 The Wounaan and Embera Indians from the Darien Rainforest of Panama are master artisans. The women are well known for the exquisite baskets they weave from natural palm fibers and plant dyes found in their native rainforest. The original designs portray life in the village, animals, insects and plant life. Income earned from the sale of these baskets reduces the need to destroy the rainforest for agricultural use. One of 11 children, Idaira Cabezn Mepaquito began weaving baskets at the age of 15. A university graduate, Idaira teaches literacy to teens and adults in her community with the help of the Ministry of Educations Program for Literacy. She also advocates on behalf of her indigenous community for the preservation of her peoples land resources, which are

Booth 53 The tradition of Hebron glass dates back to the 13th century when camel caravans, guarded by both the official armies and private guards, carried the glass in special wooden boxes across regional borders. Tawfiq Alnatsha carries on this ancient tradition of handblown glass. Tawfiq learned from his father and grandfather, a family

PERU
Wari embroidered weavings Macedonio Eduardo Palomino Torres and Luzmila Huarancca Gutirrez
Artesanias WARI-URPI

Booth 3 The hand-embroidered textiles created by the members of Artesanias WARI-URPI embody traditional, brightly colored designs

Booth 42 As an eight-year-old, Florencio Huarhua Jeri helped his parents make pottery for the local market in Ayacucho City, a Quinua community. Using potters wheels, polishing stones, feathers for painting and clays of different colors, he now creates nativities, churches, candleholders, angels and figures of animals and people that reflect Quinua culture. The highly detailed ceramics are made by a team of the most skilled potters, one of whom is Florencio, a master ceramist. In addition to carrying on the ceramic tradition of the Quinua,

48 2012 Santa Fe International FOLK ART MARKET

Take the Rail Runner to Albuquerque!


New Mexico Stock Michael Barley

A cultural gem with 5 museums and over 100 shops, galleries and restaurants in the area. Stop by the visitor information center to pick up your free visitors guide.

Historic Old Town

Just off the Rail Runner stop at Alvarado Transportation Center, you'll find nightclubs, theaters, restaurants and events along Central Avenue (Route 66).

Downtown

Just east of the University, Route 66 neon signs and architecture combined with local shops, galleries and restaurants make Nob Hill a trendy area.

Nob Hill

A short bus ride from the Rail Runner, Coronado Center and ABQ Uptown feature major national retail stores and chic boutiques as well as dining.

Uptown

www.itsatrip.org/railrunner

2012 Santa Fe International FOLK ART MARKET 49

ABQ Uptown

J. Sinclair

Florencio has also served as president and, in this capacity, introduced electric power, potable water, organic agriculture and small animal breeding. He has since formed Kallpa, an association of artisan producers that includes low-income women and youth. Arts and Treasures from Latin America is a St. Louis, Missouri, based nonprofit that preserves the traditional arts and cultures of Latin America. Horn jewelry and utensils Lider Rivera Mattos Booth 45 Lider was incarcerated in Castro, Limas largest prison, for 17 years because of his involvement with the Shining Path. Now free, this experience humbled him and he is determined to create a new life for himself and his son. He realizes that change must come through peaceful means. A carpenter by trade, Lider learned to carve and shape horn from a fellow prisoner. The intricate hair combs and elegant spoons and pins show remarkable skill and detail. Carved wood serving utensils Wilber Huaman Ciprian Booth 45 Wilber comes from a community of 30 families, Chiopampa, located near the town of Ayacucho. Since the age of nine he has worked to help support his family of six brothers and sisters by harvesting cotton, working in a gas station and baking bread. His father is a woodcarver and Wilber learned to carve by observing him, then sneaking into his fathers shop and practicing with his tools. Polychrome sculptures crafted from maguey wood Bernardo Pedro Gonzlez Paucar Booth 57 Pedro Gonzlez Paucar comes from a long tradition of imaginera makers. Imaginera the making of crosses, retablos and mixed figures has had its roots in the Huancayo region of the Peruvian central highlands since the mid16th century. Pedros father, uncles and grandfather were his teachers. By the age of eight he was able to model, carve and use a brush. Pedros first experience involved making a hummingbird out of maguey. Other materials include plaster and cloth as well as ochre and shade rust pigments. Pedros figures are used as Christmas decorations, and his image of Santiago, a saint important to the people of Huancayo, is incorporated into festivities. Mates gourds carved with designs of daily life, special events, real and fantastical animals Bertha Medina Booth 108 Bertha is from Cochas Chico Huancayo, a small village high in the Andes of Peru. Bertha learned the art of gourd carving at the age of five from her father, Evaristo Medina, who

is also world-famous for his work. Gourd carving goes back generations in the Medina family. Each gourd is unique and tells a story of daily life in the Peruvian Andes. The gourds she carves are grown only on the coast of Peru, and she travels there to find the right gourd for each creation. Once collected, the gourds are hand carved using a variety of knives, awls and other tools. Details are then handpainted onto the gourd, or other shading effects are created using burning cords or small twigs to mark the gourds surface. Silver (.950) jewelry and items that incorporate Inca and Spanish colonial designs Hilda Valeriana Cachi Yupanqui Booth 118 Hilda is one of seven sisters who actively preserve silver-working traditions passed on to them by their father Gregorio. Archeological excavations show that some of the forms still made today, such as shawl pins, date back nearly 2,500 years. Hilda brings an entrepreneurial vision to her work, introducing techniques that result in high quality work while still maintaining traditional designs. Her work combines contemporary with traditional and is in the Smithsonian Institutions collection. Handspun, natural-dye alpaca and wool textiles woven on backstrap looms Nilda Callaaupa lvarez and Lidia Callaaupa lvarez Booth 131 Textiles in the Andes are an important social and ethnic marker and a significant part of the cultural patrimony. Each community uses a different combination of designs and colors that reflect their connection with the earth through agriculture, cosmology and nature.
Centro de Textiles Tradicionales del Cusco UNESCO Award of Excellence Winner UNESCO Award of Excellence Winner

the Republic of Tuva, a country of 310,000 people in southern Siberia. Once a part of the Soviet Republic, Tuva is rediscovering the rich musical culture suppressed by the Soviets. The music and throat-singing capture and reflect the natural world of Tuva, a place of deserts, mountains and steppes where summer temperatures break 110 degrees and winters can see 60 below zero. The music has been kept alive in this harsh environment by shamans and shepherds. The Ovaa Collective makes a variety of traditional Tuva instruments, including the four-stringed spike fiddle (byzaanchy); the flat drum used by shamans (dungur); the threestring plucked lute (chanzy); and the large frame drum (kengirge). Often the necks of the stringed instruments are topped by an intricately carved bust of an animal of Tuva the horse, ox, yak or reindeer.

artisans from 22 communities in these vibrant cultural traditions at her Ndebele Art School in her village. Telephone wire baskets and bowls Nomvuselelo Mavundla Booth 41 As one of the members of the BAT Shop telephone wire project in Siyanda, KwaZulu-Natal, Nomvuselelo learned to weave telephone wire baskets. She started weaving baskets on weekends and school holidays to pay for her school expenses. After completing grade 12, she began weaving full time. With her husband Simon she creates patterns with bright colors. Telephone wire baskets and bangles Elliot Mkhize Booth 41 The fine, even texture and variety of colors of telephone wire used in Elliot Mkhizes exquisitely designed baskets produce the signature geometric patterns that define his art. The techniques and aesthetic of traditional grass basket weaving have been adapted by contemporary Zulu artisans for more than 50 years to this readily available scrap material. Elliot first learned the art of traditional grass mat weaving from his grandmother, who was a master craftsman. After training at Ndaleni Art School in the late 1990s, Elliot changed to soft wire and galvanized wire to produce the baskets, traditionally commissioned for special occasions and gifts for brides. His designs are inspired by Zulu ethnic artistry and his work is now finding its way to an international art market. Stories of daily life through embroidery Thembeka Hazel Xolile Ndlovu Booth 63 Thembeka was first introduced to embroidery during the 2004 Ntokozo development project at the African Art Centre in Durban. Seven women, all single mothers living in KwaZuluNatal, were taught to make appliqu and stitchery panels and cushion covers, some embellished with beads. Thembekas narrative embroideries provide commentary on changing Zulu customs and contemporary life. Each embroidery is accompanied by a short paragraph that explains its meaning. Baskets from Zululand Beauty Ngxongo Booth 71 Beauty lives in the Empembeni district of Hlabisa and is a Zulu master basket weaver. Her work is in all major South African museums, including the South African National
Supported by John Lee and by Department of Trade and Industry, South Africa Supported by Department of Trade and Industry, South Africa Supported by the Department of Trade & Industry of South Africa Supported by Department of Trade and Industry, South Africa

Gallery, Cape Town, and has also been collected by the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York and the Smithsonian. Beauty uses native grasses and palm leaves to make her baskets. Her dyes are derived from fruits, leaves, bark and roots. Color thread changes produce the designs which are derived from beading traditions. Beautys signature basket is the Isichumo, the water vessel. Zulu pottery Thembile Judicious Nala
Odiyweni Cooperative Supported by Department of Trade and Industry, South Africa

RWANDA
Handwoven baskets, urusika decorative panels, bangles and earrings Joy Ndungutse
Gahaya Links Cooperatives

Booth 78 For centuries, Rwandan women have taken up basket weaving as part of their rite of passage into adulthood. The baskets, which are woven with a variety of organic reeds and grasses using traditional tools, carry designs with longstanding and particular cultural meanings.

Booth 127 Now an award-winning potter, Thembile Judicious Nala began working with clay as a very young child, making her own toys. At age 12, Thembi started making real pots. She uses clay that she digs herself, mixing grey clay with red clay and water, and then building and shaping with a piece of calabash and a knife. Designs, geometric as well as plantlike, are incised with a sharp wire. Thembi fires her pots using several kinds of wood and burnishes them to a lustrous sheen using a river stone. Thembi participated in the 2011 Folk Art Market as an independent artist and returns in 2012 representing the Odiyweni Cooperatives 12 members. The Odiyweni Co-op has exhibited nationally and internationally.

SOUTH KOREA
White porcelain, Jin-Sa porcelain and tea bowls (Da-Wan, Gyeyoung-bae and Sam-Jok-O) Han Do-hyun Booth 121 Koreas stunning ceramic traditions date back as early as 57 B.C. and continue to the present. Incheon is a city famous for its pottery with more than 40 traditional wood-fired kilns still operating, including the one owned by Han Do-hyun. It is especially known for white porcelain and celadon. Han Do-hyun has spent years perfecting each of his techniques. He holds a patent for a type of tea bowl, Gyeyoungbae, which teaches moderation.

Founder and director of CTTC, Nilda Callaaupa was born in Chinchero Village near Cusco, Peru. She began spinning wool from sheep and alpaca at the age of six, and was weaving her first patterns by age seven. CTTC weavers, such as Nilda and Lidia, are remarkable in the quality of the textiles that they produce as well as their emphasis on traditional designs and techniques. The CTTC works with over 600 weavers, preserving and studying Peruvian textiles, their symbolism and significance, and assisting families to create a larger market for their textiles and a new economy for their communities.

Following the Rwandan Genocide, the Gahaya Links Cooperatives were founded as a way of turning Rwandas basket weaving tradition into a source of livelihood for the rural women without any means of support. This model proved successful in generating an income for its members and has contributed to the rebirth of Rwanda following the genocide. Joy Ndungutse is the sister of Janet Nkubana, co-founder of Gahaya Links, and, like Janet, learned to weave from their mother. The Gahaya Links Cooperatives specialize in making the elegantlyshaped, conical peace baskets that have earned these talented and entrepreneurial women international fame.

SOUTH SUDAN
Dinka, Latuka, Taposa and Mundari beaded jewelry and accessories Mary Padar Kuojok Booth 92 South Sudan, after decades of war, became the worlds newest nation in 2011. The Roots Project employs over 60 women from 16 different tribal groups, selling and marketing their traditional arts. A mother of 12, Mary Padar found work as a cook for the Sudan Peoples Liberation Army. She is the only co-op member who knows how to make the Dinka beadwork corset traditionally worn by unmarried Dinka women, a skill she is now teaching to younger members.
The Roots Project, Juba, South Sudan

SOUTH AFRICA
Ndebele bead work dolls, bracelets and pottery Esther Nikwambi Mahlangu Booth 27 As a young girl, Esther Nikwambi Mahlangu worked with her mother and grandmother beading and painting in what is a way of life for the Ndebele people. Their homes, as well as their clothing and accessories, are brightly decorated in traditional colors and patterns that are distinctively Ndebele. Mama Esther is a master artist who has trained
Supported by Department of Trade and Industry, South Africa

RUSSIA
Musical instruments of the Republic of Tuva Aldar Tamdyn Booth 11 The sound that emanates from the instruments of Aldar Tamdyn reflects the religion, culture and landscape of
Ovaa Collective

50 2012 Santa Fe International FOLK ART MARKET

ST. JOHNS COLLEGE


Music on the Hill
6 to 8 p.m., Athletic Field, free July 11 | Janice & Vinnie Zummo, jazz vocals and guitar July 18 | Bobby Shew, jazz trumpet July 25 | Hillary Smith with Soul Kitchen, R&B

Community Seminar
July 25, August 1, 8, 15 | Marcus Aurelius Mediations $140.00 mspray@sjcsf.edu or 505-984-6117

Free Summer Lectures


July 11 | Why Does Socrates Never Tell Us What We Want to Know? July 18 | God Going Naked: An Exploration of the Female Bhakti Poets of Ancient India July 25 | Poetry and Power: A Literary Reflection on the Book of Job

1160 Camino Cruz Blanca| Santa Fe| New Mexico 87505 | 505-984-6000 For complete information go to www.stjohnscollege.edu

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2012 Santa Fe International FOLK ART MARKET 51

Adornment, Status & Ritual


July 10 - July 29 an exhibit & sale of shawls from around the World. Prayer shawls, Shawls As Status, Shawls as Fashion
Open Monday July 16, 10 - 8pm

The Art of the Shawl:

SPAIN
Charra filigree gold and silver jewelry of Salamanca Luis Mndez Lpez Booth 46 Luis began working at his fathers filigree jewelry workshop in Tamames, Salamanca, when he was 14. He and his brothers now represent the third generation of goldsmiths in their family. A traditional goldsmith technique introduced by Greek and Phoenician settlers in Spain and Portugal, filigree is similar to textile embroidery, employing gold and silver threads that are smoothed or twisted and worked over a metal sheet.
Craftsmens Luis Mndez

or floral designs that have remained virtually unchanged throughout the years. Several years ago, Mehmet Cetinkaya, a renowned dealer of traditional weavings and textiles from Central Asia, began working with a group of Armenian women who possessed the embroidery skills of their ancestors. Today, the embroidery project started by Cetinkaya has succeeded in empowering a large group of women to earn a sustainable income, and re-energize a textile whose stunning silk and natural-dyed embroideries are descendants of those seen in Armenias National Museum. Handwoven, organic wool kilims with Anatolian symbols and motifs Seden Elter and Fatma Belli
Anatolian Artisans

SWAZILAND
Swazi woven sisal baskets Thembi Dlamini Booth 89 Tintsaba Crafts grades Swazi baskets into five different grades: trainee, market, craft, gallery and master weaver. Out of 400 basket weavers, 40 weavers have been developed by Tintsaba as master weavers. Thembi Dlamini, who will bring her baskets as well as represent the work of Tintsabas other basket weavers, is a master weaver. Basket making goes back hundreds of years among the Swazi and is part of the Swazi homestead tradition. Training is largely mother to daughter. Skills taught include hand cleaning and spinning of the sisal. The spinning into thread takes as long as the basket weaving itself 30 to 40 hours. The grading of Swazi baskets is done by thickness of coil, fineness of cotton, shape and strength, and the patterns originality and symmetry.
Supported by Tintsaba Crafts

Booth 34 Woven of organic wool colored with organic dyes, kilims are flatwoven. Seden, Fatma and their weavers group use symbols and motifs from the Van region, as well as replicas of antique kilims from other regions of Turkey. In the Kurdish community of Van, weavers learn from their mothers and female relatives girls are not allowed to go to school. Seden and Fatma represent a new generation within their community, having learned to weave in a workshop founded by social worker and photographer Enver Ozkahraman. Trained in the mornings as weavers, the group learns to read and write in the afternoons. The incomegeneration component of the workshop has helped gain the support of parents for the literacy training. Anatolian Artisans provides sustainable economic benefits for low-income artisans of Turkey by helping improve quality and design, and through marketing and training in microbusiness management. Igne Oyasi silk knotted lace jewelry and silk knotted lace-embellished scarves Ayse Kurt Booth 62 Ayse has been making oya, silk-knotted lace embellishments on headscarves, for 50 years. Making the silk, dying it with natural dyes, and forming the bold shapes with horse hair, the silk motifs are used to express the emotions of the women who make them. They are used at weddings, births and special occasions, as well as in daily life. At festivals, men wear an efe, a version of the oya that publicly displays how much he is loved by how difficult the silk embellishments were to make.

THAILAND

Presentation & Sale of Museum Quality Textiles


Monday July 16, 6 - 8 pm

Handwoven clothing and accessories Somporn Intaraprayong Booth 72 Born in Bangkok, Somporn has worked in a social services capacity with several Hill Tribe groups in Northern Thailand. An artist in her own right, she is helping to teach and organize women from remote villages to hand sew garments to preserve their traditionally woven fabrics. Handsewn, embroidered clothing, accessories and household goods Ampornpun Tongchai Booth 72 Ampornpun is working in northeastern Thailand in Sakonnakorn, where traditional weavers are known for the use of indigo and other natural dyes in their clothing. Ampompun is a farmer and weaver who had organized a cooperative of weavers in her village, encouraging the use of homegrown silk, cotton and natural dyes.
Supported by Chinalai Tribal Antiques, Ltd. Supported by Chinalai Tribal Antiques, Ltd.

LOS BAULES DE JUANA CATA TEXTILE SHOP


Remigio will show a film about his weavers Manos Prodigiosas (Prodigious Hands) Hosted by Sweet Birds Mexican Folk Art
Open Monday July 16, 10 - 8pm

Remigio Mestas Revilla of Oaxacas renowned

TURKMENISTAN
Woven and embroidered clothing and accessories Leyli Khaidova and Oksana Soyunmammedova
ANSI

Travelers Market
DeVargas Center, (Behind Office Depot)
35 Dealers of Fine Tribal and Folk Art, Jewelry, Books, Antiques, Furniture, Textiles and Beads
www.travelersmarket.net
52 2012 Santa Fe International FOLK ART MARKET

TURKEY
Caucasian embroidered silk wall hangings, pillow covers and hats Mehmet Cetinkaya Gallery Booth 25 The embroidery arts of Armenia have been passed down from mother to daughter through the generations for over 300 years. Originally used to create dowry pieces that demonstrated the skill and aesthetic of the bride, each piece contains intricate geometric

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Booth 37 ANSI is an 18-member cooperative dedicated to preserving Turkmen folk art traditions, especially weaving and embroidery. Keteni, a silk fabric traditionally used by the Turkmen people as the cloth on which they embroider, provides a shimmering background for their complex designs. Jewel-tone colors further distinguish the array of items ANSI makes, including traditional clothing, accessories, coats, bags, bed covers, pillows and decorative panels. Red, the most popular color, was incorporated into clothing as a talisman against the evil eye.

UGANDA
Baskets woven from raffia, banana stems, desi (reed), seaweed and millet stem Nusulah Kinene Booth 132 Basket weavers make up the majority of the more than 300 artisans who contribute work to Uganda Crafts 2000 LTD. Since 1983, Uganda Crafts has been providing income to some of the most disadvantaged Ugandans: the disabled, widows and people living with HIV/ AIDS. Nusulah Kinene, one of the founders, is herself disabled. Nusulah, like many of the basket makers, learned to weave baskets from her mother and grandmothers. The baskets balance tradition and creativity with ingenuity. Natural materials such as raffia, banana and millet stems, reeds and seaweed are interwoven to create patterns in a range of colors, soft and vibrant. Ugandan households use baskets for food preparation and for gifts.
Uganda Crafts 2000 LTD Supported by USAID COMPETE

Gulnora uses cotton, silk, velvet and canvas to produce traditional vests, jackets, clothing, suzanis, pillow bolsters and pillowcases with remarkable color and detail. Hand-knotted, natural-dye wool and silk tribal carpets Khomid Zukhurutdinov
Cooperative Mulkijakhon

Booth 12 In 2002, Khomid Zukhurutdinov helped found Cooperative Mulkijakhon for the purpose of weaving carpets in the styles and techniques of different regions of Uzbekistan styles using distinctive designs that had been lost. The weavers of Mulkijakhon make handknotted, natural-dye tribal carpets using wool, silk, vertical and horizontal looms, and special scissors for the pile. Starting with 12 members, the cooperative has grown to 38 weavers. The homes of Uzbeks are decorated with carpets, which are an indicator of well being. Traditionally, the Uzbek bride is expected to bring at least three to four ornamental carpets when she arrives at her husbands house. Silk and wool carpets Fatullo Kendjaev and Feruza Khamraeva
UNESCO Award of Excellence Winner

I got it at wink!
Sanbusco Market 988-3840

UKRAINE
Embroidered clothing, household goods and bead jewelry Nataliya Tereshchak Booth 29 Nataliya began learning embroidery at age eight, and has continued to create embroidered clothing and beading throughout her life. Using traditional techniques such as reverse fabric tweed effect embroidery, cross stitch and whiteon-white embroidery to feature the geometric designs of the Pokuttya region, Nataliya creates clothing and household decorations that are connected with beliefs and myths. Handwoven accessories, carpets, household goods, embroidered clothing and pysankas wax-resist decorated eggs Lesia Pona Booth 29 Geometrical forms, such as the diamond, rosette and the cross, typify embroidery motifs of the Ukraines Pokuttya region. Lesia Pona embroiders using several stitching techniques, including merezshka, a technique that creates a lace effect, and nyzynka, done on the fabrics reverse side to produce the effect of tweed. Lesia first learned to embroider from her mother and went on to study with one of the Ukraines most renowned embroidery artists, a master of white-on-white embroidery. In the Ukraine, white-on-white embroidered clothing is worn for special occasions such as weddings, baptisms and first communions. Pysankas, wax-resist decorated eggs, are made during Holy Week for Easter. The pysak is the stylus with which intricate patterns are drawn using beeswax in a process that involves layering colors.

Booth 48 After graduating from the School of Art at Bukhara University, Fatullo was drawn to silk carpet designs from the Timurid Era (13701507), one of Islamic arts most brilliant periods. When he learned many old patterns had been lost, he copied carpet designs depicted in antique miniature paintings and recreated them with traditional weaving methods and natural dyes. Feruza Khamraeva, Fatullos wife, is also a master weaver and dyer. She works with Fatullo at his Carpet Weaving Training School, teaching weaving, developing designs and assisting with dyeing. Feruza is a master of suzani embroidery. With support from UNESCO, Fatullo founded and heads the training school in Bukhara. Its success was rewarded with UNESCO aid enabling him to open a second school in the historic town of Khiva. In 2005, the training school won the UNESCO Seal of Excellence. Suzani embroidery, tapestries, curtains and pillows Zarina Kendjaeva
UNESCO Award of Excellence Winner

1000s of Ready Made Frames!


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UZBEKISTAN
Embroidered textiles, suzanis, clothing, accessories and home furnishings Gulnora Chorieva Booth 6 Embroidery from the Shakhrisabz district of southern Uzbekistan is densely covered with 3540 iroqi cross-stitches per square centimeter. Every detail is thought out because patterns, colors and images all have symbolic meanings and values. Needles, hooks and sewing machines are used to create the image. Gulnora learned from her grandmothers and received a degree from Tashkent University for Textiles.

Booth 48 Zarina uses silk threads dyed with madder, indigo, pomegranate and onion skins and a variety of stitches including the hook stitch. She was taught by her mother, a master of embroidery, and learned hook work from a Bukhara woman, one of the last artisans who knew the technique. Zarina bases her designs on 18th and 19th century museum pieces. Suzani was used for decorative wall hangings, curtains and bedcovers, functional household items and pillow covers. Suzani is part of a renowned tradition of textile production in Uzbekistan and Cental Asia. Traditionally, because young people never met before the wedding, young girls used the suzani patterns and workmanship to demonstrate their skills to impress potential suitors. The mothers of young men presented their sons with several suzani works from which the boys chose a bride. Bukhara-style jewelry Izzatillo Ruziev Booth 52 Working in a range of techniques molding or imprinting, filigree, embossing, forging and engraving Izzatillo combines gold,

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silver, german silver and other metals with semiprecious stones to create jewelry that continues centuries of fine craftsmanship. Apprenticed at a young age to a master goldsmith, he was schooled in the molding, forging and gem incrustation techniques used in 19th century Bukhara. Izzatillo has been involved in reviving jewelry-making techniques from the 16th and 17th centuries. Izzatillos necklaces, bracelets, rings, pendants and earrings elaborate styles and designs within the Bukhara tradition of Central Asia. This jewelry not only adorned but signified origin, social, marital status, and continues to be an important part of dowry and heritage. Carpets and kilims Ikhtiyor Kendjaev Booth 55 Ikhtiyors ancestors were carpet makers from Afghanistan and brought this skill with them when they moved to Uzbekistan long ago. The familys skills were passed from generation to generation and Ikhtiyor learned carpet making from his grandfather and his father, who also taught him the art of natural dying. The patterns are from ancient Afghan designs and they carry out this craft using natural dyes, which enhances the value and beauty of each carpet. Miniature painting on lacquered boxes Kamoliddin Shamansurov Booth 58 Ornate and complex, the lacquer drawings of Kamoliddin Shamansurov adorn papier-mch boxes that fit in one hand. With intensive floral patterns, elegant symmetry and caravan scenes, Kamoliddin brings forward traditions that began in the 15th century. After learning from his father and grandfather, Kamoliddin attended art school when he was 12 years old to learn the craft. Now he is a teacher in Tashkent. Embroidered, woven and quilted clothing and accessories Nargis Bekmuhamedova Booth 64 The clothing that Nargis Bekmuhamedova makes in the Uzbek and Tajik traditions often requires collaboration because of the varied skills required. The arts of pattern making (naqqosh), embroidery (kashida) and quilting can all be involved in creating an item as basic as a chapan or quilted long coat. Transferred from generation to generation, all of this knowledge continues to connect to the cycle of life through the traditional clothing worn at important events such as birth, coming-of-age, marriage and death. For example, upon marrying, the groom is given a special wedding chapan by the brides relatives, while the bride brought for the first time to the grooms home arrives dressed in multilayered traditional clothing and jewelry. Blue Rishtan pottery Rustam Usmanov and Damir Usmanov Booth 65 The blue ceramics of the village of Rishtan, made from local clay, have been famous for centuries. Forms are made on a foot-kicked pottery wheel, then hand painted and glazed with metal oxide. When the collapse of the Soviet Union closed the local factory in 1998, Rustam, who designed patterns there, continued production in his home workshop. While ceramics historically reflect intricate geometric forms and designs common in the region, Rustam and Damir combine traditional forms and designs with original shapes and
UNESCO Award of Excellence Winner

motifs. Rustams work is exhibited at the Hermitage Museum. Woven silk and ikat clothing, accessories and home furnishings Rasuljon Mirzaahmedov Booth 73 The region of the Ferghana Valley (Margilan) is famous for its handmade silk ikat production. Rasuljon represents five generations of ikat weavers in Margilan City, the most famous place for silk production in Central Asia. His family is at the vanguard of a revival of velvet ikat weaving in which white silk threads are dyed and placed on a narrow loom, a technique that is complicated and practiced by few. The process requires a month to produce just a few yards of fabric. Rasuljon has created ikat cloth for international designers to use in their yearly collections and in 2005 his work was awarded a Seal of Excellence by UNESCO. In 2007 UNESCO helped Rasuljon establish a training center in Margilan City. Rasuljon has authored and published a book on natural dyes. Forged metal with decorative natural materials Sayfullo Ikromov Booth 81 Swords, sabers, daggers and knives comprise the craft of Sayfullo Ikromov, an independent artist and blacksmith. Sayfullo uses a variety of metals, from stainless steel for utility knives to Damascus steel for swords. His wares range from the utilitarian to the dramatic, with intricate engraving and handles made of horn, bone and precious metals. Whimsically curved scissors in the shape of birds are part of this collection. The Ikromovs are blacksmiths in the Bukhara style. Sayfullos father and five brothers all learned the trade, though at 16 he was already prepared to teach the craft to his younger brothers. A fourth-generation knife maker, Sayfullo has won international competitions. Musical instruments of Uzbekistan Akbarali Alijanovich Aliev Booth 91 A master of musical instrument design and production, Akbarali Alijanovich Aliev is making his first appearance at the market from his hometown, the tradition-rich city of Bukhara. He specializes in creating traditional lutes, stringed instruments and wind instruments that display the elegant, long-necked designs of Uzbekistan tradition. He plays many of the instruments doira, tar and rubab with the stirring, mysterious sound of his homeland. Akbarali uses bulberry, nut, grapewood, calfskin, leather from goats, deer and fish skin for some applications. Inlays and engraving adorn the work. Blue Rishtan pottery Firdavs Yusupov Booth 97 Firdavs is an eighth generation ceramicist and master of his craft. He works using a kick wheel and clay from his backyard to create plates, bowls, vases and more. He uses a variety of motifs, ornaments and rare techniques, painting with brushes made from goat hair. His pieces feature alkaline glazes and colors in blue and white. Rishtan is known for its potters who use traditional designs to make decorative pieces and for everyday use.
UNESCO Award of Excellence Winner UNESCO Award of Excellence Winner

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54 2012 Santa Fe International FOLK ART MARKET

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Suzani embroidery, tapestries, clothing, hats and shoes Matluba Bazarova Booth 98 Bogiafzal, the cooperatives name, means beautiful garden and derives from poets comparing suzani embroidery to a blossoming garden. Cooperative Bogiafzal brings together women from Savrak, Shurobod, Talisafed and other villages of the Shafirkan district in Bukhara province to create suzanis in the traditional way. Handwoven, dyed or natural cotton, silk and adras silk combined with cotton form the base for the embroidery work. Because the handwoven cloth can often be narrow, several panels are sewn together before a design is drawn on the cloth by an artist. The panels are then separated and distributed among the members to embroider a portion of the overall design. Each suzani is a collaborative effort that benefits all members of Cooperative Bogiafzal.
Cooperative Bogiafzal

ZAMBIA
Makenge tree root baskets and gwembe, plateau and cizongo tonga baskets Hipego Ltd. Booth 100 Established in 2006 by Julia Mutale and located in Lusaka, Zambias capital, Hipegos mission is the promotion and preservation of Zambian handicrafts, including basketry. Makenge tree root baskets are unique to the Lozi/Mbunda tribes of Western Zambia. Gwembe, plateau and cizongo baskets are made by the Tonga people of Southern Zambia. Traditionally, Zambian baskets were marriage gifts. Households use the baskets for winnowing and storing grain. Upon graduation from high school, Julia Mutale, a member of the Tonga tribe, was selected to attend the University of Zambia, earning a degree in development studies and economics. But her passion for arts and crafts led her to work with Save the Children, the European Union and USAID in carrying out rural development projects in crafts development, as well as education, sanitation and infrastructure.

VANUATU
Drums and flutes, kava bowls, black palm sculptures, jewelry and tapa cloth Zilo Bong Booth 79 Zilo is representing Vanuatu (formerly New Hebrides), a small Pacific nation of 83 islands east of Australia. The arts of Vanuatu include the impressive carved tam-tams, slit drums carved from tree trunks that are planted in the ground to provide rhythm for singing and dancing in traditional rituals. In late 2005, an entire coastal village in northern Vanuatu was relocated to higher ground because of rising sea levels attributed to climate change. Vanuatus people and their culture are highly threatened.
Supported by Vanuatu Cultural Center and Vanuatu Tourism Office

ZIMBABWE
Tonga baskets and mats woven from palm fiber Matron Mwembe Booth 9 Matron is a member of the Busungu Mbubupa basket weaving group, an income-generation project of Ntengwe for Community Development. The group consists of 56 women of the Tonga tribe. The nsangwa baskets that they make are hand made from natural fibers and dyes with traditional designs. The baskets are used for everything from fruit collection to wedding gifts. Ntengwe for Community Development is an organization that teaches HIV/AIDS awareness and develops projects to improve the standard of living in the Binga District where Matron lives. Santa Fe International Folk Art Market Best of the Best
Supported by all market participants Busungu Mbubupa Basket Making Cooperative, Ntengwe for Community Development

VENEZUELA
Wuwa, jojo and wapa baskets Maigualida Edith Martnez Nuez Booth 83 Maigualida is the daughter of a renowned basket weaver of Santa Mara de Erebato, an indigenous Yekwana community of southern Venezuela. She learned to weave baskets by the time she was eight years old, and belongs to the only Amazon womens group that works with color and design in this way. Skills are passed from mother to daughter, father to son. The only tool used to make the baskets is a knife for slicing and scraping the fibers of vines or palm leaves into perfectly even strips. These strips are dried and then dyed using a variety of leaves, roots and mud. Most baskets are made by women who weave the wuwa, an hourglassshaped burden basket. There are also round storage baskets called jojos. Both types incorporate decorative designs of geometric shapes and animals. The painted wapa, woven by men, is a ceremonial basket.
Medewa Cooperative Supported by Earth Bound, Inc.

Booths 93, 94 The Best of the Best booth is made possible through the generous contributions of all market participants. Each piece is selected by the Best of the Best Folk Art Expert Shoppers. All proceeds benefit the markets support of artists. UNESCO Award of Excellence Program Representing Award of Excellence Winners from Central Asia, East Asia, South Asia and Southeast Asia Booths 111, 112, 113, 114 The Award of Excellence is the UNESCO flagship program for handicrafts. It is part of UNESCOs Division of Cultural Expressions and Creative Industries. The Award of Excellence objectives are to provide market opportunities to ensure sustainability of handicraft industries, to establish rigorous standards of excellence for handicrafts, to encourage innovativeness, and to offer training and support services. The handicraft sector plays an increasingly significant role in local economic development and poverty eradication, as new opportunities help establish sustainable livelihoods. The award provides a credible quality control mechanism that assures buyers award products are culturally authentic and have been manufactured in a socially responsible manner with respect for the environment. 2012 Santa Fe International FOLK ART MARKET 55

56 2012 Santa Fe International FOLK ART MARKET

2012 Santa Fe International FOLK ART MARKET 57

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