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A+ CERTIFICATION

Instructors Guide

Instructor's Guide

Copyright 2001 by Marcraft International Corporation


All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced in any form, electronic or mechanical, including photocopy, recording, or any information storage and retrieval system, without permission in writing from the publisher. No patent liability is assumed with respect to the use of the information contained herein. While every precaution has been taken in the preparation of this book, the publisher and author assume no responsibilities for errors or omissions. Neither is any liability assumed for damages resulting from the use of information contained herein.

Trademark Acknowledgments
All terms mentioned in this book that are known to be trademarks or service marks are listed below. Marcraft cannot attest to the accuracy of this information. Use of a term in this book should not be regarded as affecting the validity of any trademark or service mark. IBM, IBM-PC, PC/XT, PC-AT, and EGA are registered trademarks of International Business Machines Corporation PS/2, Personal System/2, Micro Channel, CGA, and VGA are trademarks of International Business Machines Corporation Microsoft and MS-DOS are registered trademarks of Microsoft Corporation Centronics is a registered trademark of Centronics Corp. Freon and Mylar are registered trademarks of E.I. du Pont de Nemours and Co., Inc. PAL is a registered trademark of Monolithic Memories AMI is a registered trademark of American Megatrends, Incorporated. Panasonic is a registered trademark of Matsushita Communication Industrial Co., Ltd Hercules is a registered trademark of Hercules Corp. Motorola is a registered trademark of Motorola Corp. Intel, 386, 387, 386SX, 387SX, i486, 486 and Pentium are trademarks of Intel Corporation NEAT is a registered trademark of Chip and Technologies, Inc.

Written by Anthony Tonda Original graphics created by Michael R. Hall

P/N IC-510 (Instructors Guide) Third Edition 4-4/01

ISBN 1-58122-039-1

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TABLE OF CONTENTS
INTRODUCTION ...............................................................................................................................1 USING THE LABS.............................................................................................................................2 SAMPLE CURRICULUM OUTLINES ......................................................................................3
12Week (240 Hour) Course Outline .................................................................................................3 18Week (90 Hour) Course Outline ...................................................................................................8 1 Year (36 Week/180 Hour) Course Outline .....................................................................................14

INSTRUCTOR WINDOWS INSTALLATIONS .................................................................23

Installing Windows Millenium .........................................................................................................25 Objectives..................................................................................................................................25 Resources ..................................................................................................................................25 Discussion .................................................................................................................................25 Procedure...................................................................................................................................26 Installing Windows 2000 ..................................................................................................................29 Objectives..................................................................................................................................29 Resources ..................................................................................................................................29 Discussion .................................................................................................................................29 Procedure...................................................................................................................................30 Installing Windows 2000 Virus Detection ........................................................................................31 Objectives..................................................................................................................................31 Resources ..................................................................................................................................31 Discussion .................................................................................................................................31 Procedure...................................................................................................................................31

CHAPTER REVIEW QUESTION ANSWERS...........................................................................33 Chapter 1 Basic PC Hardware........................................................................................................34 Chapter 2 Advanced System Boards..............................................................................................36 Chapter 3 Standard I/O Systems ....................................................................................................38 Chapter 4 Mass Storage Systems ...................................................................................................40 Chapter 5 Data Communications ...................................................................................................42 Chapter 6 Printers ..........................................................................................................................44 Chapter 7 Portable Systems ...........................................................................................................46 Chapter 8 Operating System Fundamentals...................................................................................48 Chapter 9 Windows 9x...................................................................................................................50 Chapter 10 Windows NT/2000 ......................................................................................................52 Chapter 11 Basic System Troubleshooting ....................................................................................54 Chapter 12 Operating System Troubleshooting .............................................................................56 Chapter 13 Preventive Maintenance ..............................................................................................58

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Instructor's Guide

CHAPTER TESTS ............................................................................................................................61

Chapter 1 ..........................................................................................................................................63 Chapter 2 ..........................................................................................................................................67 Chapter 3 ..........................................................................................................................................71 Chapter 4 ..........................................................................................................................................75 Chapter 5 ..........................................................................................................................................79 Chapter 6 ..........................................................................................................................................83 Chapter 7 ..........................................................................................................................................87 Chapter 8 ..........................................................................................................................................91 Chapter 9 ..........................................................................................................................................95 Chapter 10 ........................................................................................................................................99 Chapter 11.......................................................................................................................................103 Chapter 12 ......................................................................................................................................107 Chapter 13 ......................................................................................................................................111

CHAPTER TEST ANSWERS .....................................................................................................115 LAB ANSWERS..............................................................................................................................119


Lab Group 1 Hardware Setup ......................................................................................................120 Lab Procedure 1 Orientation.................................................................................................120 Tables ...............................................................................................................................120 Lab Question Answers .....................................................................................................121 Lab Procedure 2 Boot Sequence...........................................................................................121 Tables ...............................................................................................................................121 Lab Question Answers .....................................................................................................123 Lab Procedure 3 CMOS Passwords and Resources..............................................................123 Tables ...............................................................................................................................123 Lab Question Answers .....................................................................................................124 Lab Procedure 4 HDD Setting ..............................................................................................124 Tables ...............................................................................................................................124 Lab Question Answers .....................................................................................................125 Lab Procedure 5 Digital Multimeter.....................................................................................125 Tables ...............................................................................................................................125 Lab Question Answers .....................................................................................................127 Lab Procedure 6 PC-Check ..................................................................................................127 Tables ...............................................................................................................................127 Lab Question Answers .....................................................................................................130 Lab Procedure 7 IDE Troubleshooting .................................................................................131 Tables ...............................................................................................................................131 Lab Question Answers .....................................................................................................132 Lab Procedure 8 Hardware Troubleshooting ........................................................................132 Tables ...............................................................................................................................132 Lab Question Answers .....................................................................................................133 Lab Procedure 9 CPU Upgrade/Overclocking......................................................................134 Tables ...............................................................................................................................134 Lab Question Answers .....................................................................................................134 Lab Group 2 Operating Systems..................................................................................................135 Lab Procedure 10 Windows ME Video Drivers....................................................................135 Tables ...............................................................................................................................135 Lab Question Answers .....................................................................................................136 Lab Procedure 11 Windows ME Navigating ........................................................................136 Tables ...............................................................................................................................136 Lab Question Answers .....................................................................................................138

iv

Instructor's Guide Lab Procedure 12 Windows ME Command Prompt Navigating ..........................................138 Tables ...............................................................................................................................138 Lab Question Answers .....................................................................................................140 Lab Procedure 13 Advanced Windows ME..........................................................................140 Tables ...............................................................................................................................140 Lab Question Answers .....................................................................................................143 Lab Procedure 14 Windows ME Hardware Resources .........................................................143 Tables ...............................................................................................................................143 Lab Question Answers .....................................................................................................146 Lab Procedure 15 Windows 2000 Navigation ......................................................................147 Tables ...............................................................................................................................147 Lab Question Answers .....................................................................................................148 Lab Procedure 16 Windows 2000 Administrative Tools ......................................................148 Tables ...............................................................................................................................148 Lab Question Answers .....................................................................................................150 Lab Procedure 17 Windows 2000 Computer Management ..................................................151 Tables ...............................................................................................................................151 Lab Question Answers .....................................................................................................153 Lab Procedure 18 Windows ME Plug and Play ....................................................................153 Tables ...............................................................................................................................153 Lab Question Answers .....................................................................................................154 Lab Procedure 19 Windows 2000 Plug and Play ..................................................................154 Tables ...............................................................................................................................154 Lab Question Answers .....................................................................................................155 Lab Procedure 20 Windows ME Printers..............................................................................155 Tables ...............................................................................................................................155 Lab Question Answers .....................................................................................................156 Lab Procedure 21 Windows 2000 Printers............................................................................156 Tables ...............................................................................................................................156 Lab Question Answers .....................................................................................................157 Lab Group System Administration Tools ....................................................................................157 Lab Procedure 22 Windows ME System Information ..........................................................157 Tables ...............................................................................................................................157 Lab Question Answers .....................................................................................................160 Lab Procedure 23 Windows ME Disk Management.............................................................161 Tables ...............................................................................................................................161 Lab Question Answers .....................................................................................................161 Lab Procedure 24 Windows 2000 Accessories.....................................................................162 Tables ...............................................................................................................................162 Lab Question Answers .....................................................................................................163 Lab Procedure 25 Windows 2000 Disk Management...........................................................164 Tables ...............................................................................................................................164 Lab Question Answers .....................................................................................................165 Lab Procedure 26 Windows 2000 Registry ..........................................................................165 Tables ...............................................................................................................................165 Lab Question Answers .....................................................................................................166 Lab Procedure 27 Windows ME Safe Mode.........................................................................166 Tables ...............................................................................................................................166 Lab Question Answers .....................................................................................................166 Lab Procedure 28 Windows ME Setup Log Files .................................................................167 Tables ...............................................................................................................................167 Lab Question Answers .....................................................................................................169 Lab Procedure 29 Windows 2000 Safe Mode.......................................................................169 Tables ...............................................................................................................................169 Lab Question Answers .....................................................................................................170

Instructor's Guide Lab Procedure 30 Windows 2000 Virus Protection ..............................................................171 Tables ...............................................................................................................................171 Lab Question Answers .....................................................................................................173 Lab Group 4 Network Management ............................................................................................173 Lab Procedure 31 Windows ME Dial-Up Access.................................................................173 Tables ...............................................................................................................................173 Lab Question Answers .....................................................................................................174 Lab Procedure 32 Windows ME TCP/IP ..............................................................................174 Tables ...............................................................................................................................174 Lab Question Answers .....................................................................................................176 Lab Procedure 33 Windows ME TCP/IP Utilities ................................................................177 Tables ...............................................................................................................................177 Lab Question Answers .....................................................................................................179 Lab Procedure 34 Windows ME Network Operations..........................................................179 Tables ...............................................................................................................................179 Lab Question Answers .....................................................................................................180 Lab Procedure 35 Windows ME Accessories.......................................................................181 Tables ...............................................................................................................................181 Lab Question Answers .....................................................................................................182 Lab Procedure 36 Windows 2000 TCP/IP ............................................................................182 Tables ...............................................................................................................................182 Lab Question Answers .....................................................................................................183 Lab Procedure 37 Windows 2000 Networking.....................................................................184 Tables ...............................................................................................................................184 Lab Question Answers .....................................................................................................184 Lab Procedure 38 Internet Client Setup for IE 5.5................................................................185 Tables ...............................................................................................................................185 Lab Questions Answers....................................................................................................186 Lab Procedure 39 Windows ME FTP/Telnet ........................................................................186 Tables ...............................................................................................................................186 Lab Questions Answers....................................................................................................188 Lab Procedure 40 Windows ME Internet Domain Names....................................................188 Tables ...............................................................................................................................188 Lab Questions Answers....................................................................................................189 Lab Group System Maintenance..................................................................................................190 Lab Procedure 41 Windows ME Software Version Update ..................................................190 Tables ...............................................................................................................................190 Lab Questions Answers....................................................................................................191 Lab Procedure 42 Windows 2000 Software Version Update Management ..........................192 Tables ...............................................................................................................................192 Lab Questions Answers....................................................................................................192 Lab Procedure 43 Windows ME OS Faults ..........................................................................193 Tables ...............................................................................................................................193 Lab Questions Answers....................................................................................................193 Lab Procedure 44 Windows 2000 OS Faults ........................................................................194 Tables ...............................................................................................................................194 Lab Questions Answers....................................................................................................196

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Instructor's Guide

URL RESOURCES .........................................................................................................................197

Chapter 1 ........................................................................................................................................198 Chapter 2 ........................................................................................................................................199 Chapter 3 ........................................................................................................................................199 Chapter 4 ........................................................................................................................................199 Chapter 5 ........................................................................................................................................200 Chapter 6 ........................................................................................................................................200 Chapter 7 ........................................................................................................................................201 Chapter 8 ........................................................................................................................................201 Chapter 9 ........................................................................................................................................202 Chapter 10 ......................................................................................................................................202 Chapter 11.......................................................................................................................................203 Chapter 12 ......................................................................................................................................203 Chapter 13 ......................................................................................................................................204

USING FAULTS ..............................................................................................................................205

Using Software Faults ....................................................................................................................206 Windows ME...........................................................................................................................206 Disk One Fault One - MSDOS.SYS Fault.....................................................................206 Disk One Fault Two - IO.SYS Fault ..............................................................................206 Disk One Fault Three - Shell Fault ................................................................................206 Disk One Fault Four - Registry Run Fault .....................................................................207 Disk Two Fault Five - KEYBOARD.DRV Fault...........................................................207 Disk Two Fault Six - WIN.COM Fault..........................................................................207 Disk Two Fault Seven - EXPLORER.EXE Fault ..........................................................207 Disk Two Fault Eight - HIMEM.SYS Fault ..................................................................208 Disk Three Fault Nine - COMM.DRV Fault .................................................................208 Disk Three Fault Ten - Blank Registry Fault .................................................................208 Disk Three Fault Eleven - Slow Menu Fault .................................................................208 Disk Three Fault Twelve - VMM32.FXD Fault ............................................................209 Windows 2000 Fault CD ................................................................................................................209 Using the CD ...........................................................................................................................209 Fault One Invalid Shortcut Fault ...................................................................................209 Fault Two Incorrect File Association Fault ...................................................................209 Fault Three Invalid Startup Shortcut Fault ....................................................................210 Fault Four File Protection Error Fault ...........................................................................210 Fault Five Incorrect Sub-Menu Delay Fault ..................................................................210 Fault Six Startup Programs Fault...................................................................................210 Using Basic Hardware Faults .........................................................................................................211 FDD Signal Cable Faults.........................................................................................................211 HDD/CD-ROM Signal Cable Faults .......................................................................................211 Power Cable Faults..................................................................................................................212 BIOS IC Fault..........................................................................................................................212 RAM Module Faults................................................................................................................212 Using Configuration Faults ............................................................................................................213 Disconnected Speaker Fault ....................................................................................................213 Bad Keyboard Connection Fault .............................................................................................213 Parallel Port Disabled..............................................................................................................213 Serial Port Disabled ................................................................................................................213 Jumper Faults MC-8000 System Board .......................................................................................214 13-WEEK (78 HOUR) Suggested Course Outline.........................................................................217

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Instructor's Guide

INTRODUCTION
The primary purpose of this course is to prepare students to troubleshoot and repair microcomputer systems and their peripherals. This goal is achieved through a three-part effort: (1) solid theory presentation, (2) hands-on operation and exploration in lab experiments, and (3) troubleshooting applications in the lab procedures. Initially, a solid theory course thoroughly describes typical microcomputer architectures and operations. In each case, underlying topics are presented as concepts, advanced through actual applications, and presented as they are actually implemented in a typical PC. Secondly, the courses lab procedures give the students a practical, hands-on example of these theoretical concepts through actual experimentation with a live system. Finally, the course develops the students most advanced learning levels by causing them to analyze the system when faulty components are installed. In these situations, the student must understand how the system is supposed to operate as well as how various malfunctions could alter its operation. This Instructors Guide is intended to provide you, the instructor, with ready made tools to implement the computer repair course and evaluate the progress of your students in both theory and lab situations. The Instructors Guide contains a Chapter Test for each chapter. These tests may be photocopied and distributed to the students at the instructors discretion. Correct answers for the Chapter Quizzes (from the end of the theory chapter), the Chapter Test, the lab experiment steps, and the Lab Questions at the end of the lab are contained in this Guide, along with a list of faults and symptoms for troubleshooting exercises. It is hoped that this information will provide you with a great deal of flexibility in how the course is presented.

INTRODUCTION 1

Instructor's Guide

USING THE LABS


Forty-four hands-on lab procedures are included with this course, offering a variety of presentation styles. The first nine procedures cover hardware related topics. Several software oriented labs are also included, covering Windows ME, Windows 2000 and the command line. Various software diagnostic tools are covered, including PC-Check, McAfee VirusScan, Microsoft Scandisk, and Microsoft System Information. Troubleshooting topics are stressed throughout this course, starting with PC hardware difficulties. The student systematically induces faults into the system and notes the symptoms produced by the system. Other troubleshooting topics cover operating system difficulties in Windows ME and Windows 2000. The hands-on portion of the course begins with students disassembling the system and then putting it back together, for orientation purposes. The operating system labs introduce the student to the system and cover topics related to common computer management and repair. The system administration procedures offer a more detailed investigation of computer operations. These are followed by a group of networking labs and, finally, a series of system maintenance tools are investigated. There are three lab procedures included within this instructors guide that are not in the lab guide. The labs are to be used by the instructor for preparing the computer labs prior to the students implementing the lab guide. Specifically, the operating systems installed during these three labs, and it was considered prudent not to include them in the students lab guide.

2 USING THE LABS

Instructor's Guide

SAMPLE CURRICULUM OUTLINES


Introduction
The Marcraft A+ Certification Study Program is designed to be very flexible. It may be used in part or in whole as necessary to fit into your curriculum framework. If used in its entirety, this program is intended to fill approximately 240 hours of class time. This outline assumes that these hours will be part of a 12-week class, each week consisting of five (5) 4-hour class periods. In general, this will involve 2 hours of theory lecture, and 2 hours of lab time per day. The exception to this rule is Fridays, where the lab time is used for review examinations. These figures are not absolutes. The ratio of theory lecture to hands-on lab hours that you use will depend on your personal instructional methodology. In particular, this outline will need to be modified in order to accommodate holidays, and the midterm examination and quiz schedule for your school. You should also take into consideration a modification of the manner in which the instruction is implemented, depending on the age, experience and background of your students.

12WEEK (240 HOUR) COURSE OUTLINE


Prerequisites:
This outline presupposes that your students have at least some level of exposure to key electronic and computer concepts. The recommended minimum level of student preparation for this class would consist of an IT course that is the equivalent to the 45-hour Marcraft TE-2300 Introduction to Computer Technology course.

WEEK 1 Orientation and Basic PC Hardware


Theory Guide Chapter 1 Lab Guide Procedure 1, 2, 3 and 4

Day 1: Orientation and Theory Guide Chapter 1 Pages 2 through 24 Lab Guide - Procedure 1 Orientation Day 2: Theory Guide Chapter 1 Pages 24 through 41 Lab Guide Procedure 2 Boot Sequence Day 3: Theory Guide Chapter 1 Pages 41 through 62 Lab Guide Procedure 3 CMOS Passwords and Resources Day 4: Chapter 1 Review and Chapter 1 Review Questions Pages 62 through 64 Lab Guide Procedure 4 HDD Settings Day 5: Theory Chapter 1 Test (Instructors Guide)

SAMPLE CURRICULUM OUTLINES 3

Instructor's Guide

WEEK 2 Advanced System Boards


Theory Guide Chapter 2 Lab Guide Procedure 5, 6, 7 and 8

Day 1: Theory Guide Chapter 2 Pages 68 through 91 Lab Guide Procedure 5 Digital Multimeter Day 2: Theory Guide Chapter 2 Pages 91 through 113 Lab Guide Procedure 6 PC Check Day 3: Theory Guide Chapter 2 Pages 113 through 139 Lab Guide Procedure 7 IDE Troubleshooting Day 4: Chapter 2 Review and Chapter 2 Review Questions Pages 139 through 142 Lab Guide Procedure 8 Hardware Troubleshooting Day 5: Theory Guide Chapter 2 Test (Instructors Guide)

WEEK 3 Standard I/O Systems and Mass Storage Systems


Theory Guide Chapter 3 and 4 Lab Guide Procedure 9, 10, 11 and 12

Day 1: Theory Guide Chapter 3 Pages 146 through 171 Lab Guide Procedure 9 CPU Upgrading and Overclocking Day 2: Theory Guide Chapter 3 Pages 171 through 197 Lab Guide Procedure 10 Windows ME Video Drivers Day 3: Chapter 3 Review and Chapter 3 Review Questions Pages 190 through 197 Lab Guide Procedure 11 Windows ME Navigating Day 4: Theory Guide Chapter 3 Test (Instructors Guide Day 5: Theory Guide Chapter 4 Pages 202 through 225 Lab Guide Procedure 12 Windows ME Command Prompt Navigating

WEEK 4 Mass Storage Devices and Data Communications


Theory Guide Chapter 4 and 5 Lab Guide Procedure 13, 14, 15 and 16

Day 1: Theory Guide Chapter 4 Pages 225 through 244 Lab Guide Procedure 13 Advanced Windows ME Day 2: Chapter 4 Review and Chapter 4 Review Questions Pages 244 through 247 Lab Guide Procedure 14 Windows ME Hardware Resources Day 3: Theory Guide Chapter 4 Test (Instructors Guide) Day 4: Theory Guide Chapter 5 Pages 250 through 276 Lab Guide Procedure 15 Windows 2000 Navigation Day 5: Theory Guide Chapter 5 Pages 276 through 303 Lab Guide Procedure 16 Windows 2000 Administrative Tools

4 SAMPLE CURRICULUM OUTLINES

Instructor's Guide

WEEK 5 Data Communications and Printers


Theory Guide Chapter 5 and 6 Lab Guide Procedure 17, 18, 19 and 20

Day 1: Chapter 5 Review and Chapter 5 Review Questions Pages 303 through 307 Lab Guide Procedure 17 Windows 2000 Computer Management Day 2: Theory Guide Chapter 5 Test (Instructors Guide) Day 3: Theory Guide Chapter 6 Pages 310 through 334 Lab Guide Procedure 18 Windows ME Plug-and-Play Day 3: Theory Guide Chapter 6 Pages 334 through 359 Lab Guide Procedure 19 Windows 2000 Plug-and-Play Day 4: Chapter 6 Review and Chapter 6 Review Questions Pages 359 through 363 Lab Guide Procedure 20 Windows ME Printers Day 5: Theory Guide Chapter 6 Test (Instructors Guide)

WEEK 6 Portable Systems and Operating System Fundamentals


Theory Guide Chapter 7 and 8 Lab Guide Procedure 21, 22, 23 and 24

Day 1: Theory Guide Chapter 7 Pages 366 through 378 Lab Guide Procedure 21 Windows 2000 Printers Day 2: Theory Guide Chapter 7 Pages 378 through 393 Lab Guide Procedure 22 Windows ME System Information Day 3: Chapter 7 Review and Chapter 7 Review Questions Pages 393 through 395 Lab Guide Procedure 23 Windows ME Disk Management Day 4: Theory Guide Chapter 7 Test (Instructors Guide) Day 5: Theory Guide Chapter 8 Pages 398 through 434 Lab Guide Procedure 24 Windows 2000 Accessories

WEEK 7 Operating System Fundamentals and Windows 9x


Theory Guide Chapter 8 and 9 Lab Guide Procedure 25, 26, 27 and 28

Day 1: Theory Guide Chapter 8 Pages 434 through 459 Lab Guide Procedure 25 Windows 2000 Disk Management Day 2: Chapter 8 Review and Chapter 8 Review Questions Pages 459 through 462 Lab Guide Procedure 26 Windows 2000 Registry Day 3: Theory Guide Chapter 8 Test (Instructors Guide) Day 4: Theory Guide Chapter 9 Pages 466 through 495 Lab Guide Procedure 27 Windows ME Safe Mode Day 5: Theory Guide Chapter 9 Pages 495 through 520 Lab Guide Procedure 28 Windows ME Setup Log Files

SAMPLE CURRICULUM OUTLINES 5

Instructor's Guide

WEEK 8 Windows 9x and Windows NT/2000


Theory Guide Chapter 9 and 10 Lab Guide Procedure 29, 30, 31 and 32

Day 1: Theory Guide Chapter 9 Pages 520 through 551 Lab Guide Procedure 29 Windows 2000 Safe Mode Day 2: Chapter 9 Review and Chapter 9 Review Questions Pages 551 through 554 Lab Guide Procedure 30 Windows 2000 Virus Protection Day 3: Theory Guide Chapter 9 Test (Instructors Guide) Day 4: Theory Guide Chapter 10 Pages 558 through 583 Lab Guide Procedure 31 Windows ME Dial-Up Access Day 5: Theory Guide Chapter 10 Pages 583 through 610 Lab Guide Procedure 32 Windows ME TCP/IP Setup

WEEK 9 Windows NT/2000 and Basic System Troubleshooting


Theory Guide Chapter 10 and 11 Lab Guide Procedure 33, 34, 35 and 36

Day 1: Theory Guide Chapter 10 Pages 610 through 638 Lab Guide Procedure 33 Windows ME TCP/IP Utilities Day 2: Chapter 10 Review and Exam Questions Pages 638 through 644 Lab Guide Procedure 34 Windows ME Network Operations Day 3: Theory Guide Chapter 10 Test (Instructors Guide) Day 4: Theory Guide Chapter 11 Pages 648 through 677 Lab Guide Procedure 35 Windows ME Accessories Day 5: Theory Guide Chapter 11 Pages 677 through 700 Lab Guide Procedure 36 Windows 2000 TCP/IP

WEEK 10 Basic System Troubleshooting and Operating System Troubleshooting


Theory Guide Chapter 11 and 12 Lab Guide Procedure 37, 38, 39 and 40

Day 1: Theory Guide Chapter 11 Pages 700 through 732 Lab Guide Procedure 37 Windows 2000 Networking Day 2: Chapter 11 Review and Exam Questions Pages 732 through 736 Lab Guide Procedure 38 Internet Client Setup for IE 5 Day 3: Theory Guide Chapter 11 Test (Instructors Guide) Day 4: Theory Guide Chapter 12 Pages 740 through 767 Lab Guide Procedure 39 Windows ME FTP/Telnet Day 5: Theory Guide Chapter 12 Pages 767 through 794 Lab Guide Procedure 40 Windows ME Internet Domain Names

6 SAMPLE CURRICULUM OUTLINES

Instructor's Guide

WEEK 11 Operating System Troubleshooting and Preventive Maintenance


Theory Guide Chapter 12 and 13 Lab Guide Procedure 41, 42, 43 and 44

Day 1: Theory Guide Chapter 12 Pages 794 through 826 Lab Guide Procedure 41 Windows ME Software Update Management Day 2: Chapter 12 Review and Chapter 12 Review Questions Pages 826 through 829 Lab Guide Procedure 42 Windows 2K Software Update Management Day 3: Chapter 12 Test (Instructors Guide) Day 4: Theory Guide Chapter 13 Pages 832 through 848 Lab Guide Procedure 43 Windows ME OS Faults Day 5: Theory Guide Chapter 13 Pages 848 through 865 Lab Guide Procedure 44 Windows 2000 OS Faults

WEEK 12 Preventive Maintenance and A+ Review


Theory Guide Chapter 13 Theory Guide Review and Exam Challenge

Day 1: Chapter 13 Review and Chapter 13 Review Questions Pages 865 through 869 Day 2: Chapter 13 Test (Instructors Guide) Day 3: Review for A+ Certification Test Challenge Day 4: Review for A+ Certification Test Review Day 5: A+ Certification Final Exam

SAMPLE CURRICULUM OUTLINES 7

Instructor's Guide

18-WEEK (90 HOUR) COURSE OUTLINE


Introduction
Refer 13-WEEK (78 Hour) Suggested Course Outline on page 225

The Marcraft A+ Certification Study Program is designed to be very flexible. It may be used in part or in whole as necessary to fit into your curriculum framework. If used in its entirety, this program is intended to fill approximately 90 hours of class time. This outline assumes that these hours will be part of an 18-week class, each week consisting of five (5) 1-hour class periods. The ratio of theory lecture to hands-on lab hours will depend on your personal instructional methodology. In particular, this outline will need to be modified in order to accommodate holidays, and the midterm examination and quiz schedule for your school. You should modify the manner in which the instruction is implemented depending on the age, experience and background of your students. This course was originally designed as a 180-hour 36-week class. Due to the time constraints imposed by a shortened schedule, many of the lab procedures in the Lab Guide will not be listed below. Those lab procedures that are listed should be considered to be essential.

Prerequisites:
This outline presupposes that your students have at least some level of exposure to key electronic and computer concepts. The recommended minimum level of student preparation for this class would consist of an IT course that is the equivalent to the 45-hour Marcraft TE-2300 Introduction to Computer Technology course.

WEEK 1 Basic PC Hardware


Theory Guide Chapter 1 Lab Guide Procedure 1and 2

Day 1: Orientation Day Theory Guide Chapter 1 Pages 1 through 13 Day 2: Theory Guide Chapter 1 Pages 13 through 34 Lab Guide Procedure 1 - Orientation Day 3: Theory Guide Chapter 1 Pages 34 through 48 Lab Guide Procedure 2 Boot Sequence Day 4: Theory Guide Chapter 1 Pages 48 through 61 Chapter 1 Review and Chapter 1 Review Questions Pages 62 through 64 Day 5: Theory Chapter 1 Test (Instructors Guide)

8 SAMPLE CURRICULUM OUTLINES

Instructor's Guide

WEEK 2 Advanced System Boards


Theory Guide Chapter 2 Lab Guide Procedure 3 and 4

Day 1: Theory Guide Chapter 2 Pages 68 through 76 Day 2: Theory Guide Chapter 2 Pages 76 through 83 Lab Guide Procedure 3 CMOS Passwords and Resources Day 3: Theory Guide Chapter 2 Pages 83 through 91 Day 4: Theory Guide Chapter 2 Pages 91 through 98 Lab Guide Procedure 4 HDD Setting Day 5: Theory Guide Chapter 2 Pages 98 through 106

WEEK 3 Advanced System Boards


Theory Guide Chapter 2 Lab Guide Procedure 5 and 6

Day 1: Theory Guide Chapter 2 Pages 106 through 113 Day 2: Theory Guide Chapter 2 Pages 113 through 122 Lab Guide Procedure 5 Digital Multi-Meters Day 3: Theory Guide Chapter 2 Pages 122 through 130 Lab Guide Procedure 6 PC Check Day 4: Theory Guide Chapter 2 Pages 130 through 139 Chapter 2 Review and Chapter 2 Review Questions Pages 139 through 142 Day 5: Theory Chapter 2 Test (Instructors Guide)

WEEK 4 Standard I/O Systems


Theory Guide Chapter 3 Lab Guide Procedure 7, 8 and 9

Day 1: Theory Guide Chapter 3 Pages 146 through 159 Lab Guide Procedure 7 IDE Troubleshooting Day 2: Theory Guide Chapter 3 Pages 159 through 171 Lab Guide Procedure 8 Hardware Troubleshooting Day 3: Theory Guide Chapter 3 Pages 171 through 185 Lab Guide Procedure 9 CPU Upgrading/Overclocking Day 4: Theory Guide Chapter 3 Pages 185 through 197 Chapter 3 Review and Chapter 3 Review Questions Pages 197 through 199 Day 5: Theory Chapter 3 Test (Instructors Guide)

WEEK 5 Mass Storage Systems


Theory Guide Chapter 4 Lab Guide Procedure 10 and 11

Day 1: Theory Guide Chapter 4 Pages 202 through 212 Lab Guide Procedure 10 Windows ME Video Drivers Day 2: Theory Guide Chapter 4 Pages 212 through 223 Day 3: Theory Guide Chapter 4 Pages 223 through 233 Lab Guide Procedure 11 Windows ME Navigating Day 4: Theory Guide Chapter 4 Pages 233 through 244 Chapter 4 Review and Chapter 4 Review Questions Pages 244 through 247 Day 5: Theory Chapter 4 Test (Instructors Guide)

SAMPLE CURRICULUM OUTLINES 9

Instructor's Guide

WEEK 6 Data Communications

Theory Guide Chapter 5 Lab Guide Procedure 12, 13 and 14 Day 1: Theory Guide Chapter 5 Pages 250 through 265 Lab Guide Procedure 12 Windows ME Command Prompt Navigating Day 2: Theory Guide Chapter 5 Pages 265 through 277 Lab Guide Procedure 13 Advanced Windows ME Day 3: Theory Guide Chapter 5 Pages 277 through 288 Lab Guide Procedure 14 Managing Hardware Resources Day 4: Theory Guide Chapter 5 Pages 288 through 303 Chapter 5 Review and Chapter 5 Review Questions Pages 303 through 307 Day 5: Theory Chapter 5 Test (Instructors Guide)

WEEK 7 Printers

Theory Guide Chapter 6 Lab Guide Procedure 15 and 16 Day 1: Theory Guide Chapter 6 Pages 310 through 324 Lab Guide Procedure 15 Windows 2000 Navigation Day 2: Theory Guide Chapter 6 Pages 324 through 334 Day 3: Theory Guide Chapter 6 Pages 334 through 348 Lab Guide Procedure 16 Windows 2000 Administrative Tools Day 4: Theory Guide Chapter 6 Pages 348 through 359 Chapter 6 Review and Chapter 6 Review Questions Pages 359 through 363 Day 5:Theory Chapter 6 Test (Instructors Guide)

WEEK 8 Portable Systems

Theory Guide Chapter 7 Lab Guide Procedure 17, 18 and 19 Day 1: Theory Guide Chapter 7 Pages 366 through 374 Lab Guide Procedure 17 Windows 2000 Computer Management Day 2: Theory Guide Chapter 7 Pages 374 through 381 Lab Guide Procedure 18 Windows ME Plug and Play (Modem) Day 3: Theory Guide Chapter 7 Pages 381 through 385 Lab Guide Procedure 19 Windows 2000 Plug and Play Day 4: Theory Guide Chapter 7 Pages 385 through 393 Chapter 7 Review and Chapter 7 Review Questions Pages 393 through 395 Day 5: Theory Chapter 7 Test (Instructors Guide)

10 SAMPLE CURRICULUM OUTLINES

Instructor's Guide

WEEK 9 Operating System Fundamentals


Theory Guide Chapter 8 Lab Guide Procedure 20 and 21

Day 1: Theory Guide Chapter 8 Pages 398 through 415 Lab Guide Procedure 20 Windows ME Printers Day 2:Theory Guide Chapter 8 Pages 415 through 430 Day 3: Theory Guide Chapter 8 Pages 430 through 445 Lab Guide Procedure 21 Windows 2000 Printers Day 4: Theory Guide Chapter 8 Pages 445 through 459 Chapter 8 Review and Chapter 8 Review Questions Pages 459 through 462 Day 5: Theory Chapter 8 Test (Instructors Guide)

WEEK 10 Windows 9X

Theory Guide Chapter 9 Lab Guide Procedure 22, 23 and 24 Day 1: Theory Guide Chapter 9 Pages 466 through 474 Lab Guide Procedure 22 Windows 9X System Information Day 2: Theory Guide Chapter 9 Pages 474 through 485 Day 3: Theory Guide Chapter 9 Pages 485 through 495 Lab Guide Procedure 23 Windows 9X Disk Management Day 4: Theory Guide Chapter 9 Pages 495 through 505 Day 5: Theory Guide Chapter 9 Pages 505 through 512 Lab Guide Procedure 24 Windows 2000 Accessories

WEEK 11 Windows 9X

Theory Guide Chapter 9 Lab Guide Procedure 25, 26 and 27 Day 1: Theory Guide Chapter 9 Pages 512 through 520 Lab Guide Procedure 25 Windows 2000 Disk Management Day 2: Theory Guide Chapter 9 Pages 520 through 528 Lab Guide Procedure 26 Registry Day 3: Theory Guide Chapter 9 Pages 528 through 536 Lab Guide Procedure 27 Safe Mode Day 4: Theory Guide Chapter 9 Pages 536 through 551 Chapter 9 Review and Chapter 9 Review Questions Pages 551 through 554 Day 5: Theory Chapter 9 Test (Instructors Guide)

SAMPLE CURRICULUM OUTLINES 11

Instructor's Guide

WEEK 12 Windows NT/2000


Theory Guide Chapter 10 Lab Guide Procedure 28 and 29

Day 1: Theory Guide Chapter 10 Pages 558 through 578 Lab Guide Procedure 28 Setup Log Files Day 2: Theory Guide Chapter 10 Pages 578 through 598 Day 3: Theory Guide Chapter 10 Pages 598 through 618 Lab Guide Procedure 29 Windows 2000 Safe Mode Day 4: Theory Guide Chapter 10 Pages 618 through 638 Chapter 10 Review and Chapter 10 Review Questions Pages 638 through 644 Day 5: Theory Chapter 10 Test (Instructors Guide)

WEEK 13 Basic System Troubleshooting


Theory Guide Chapter 11 Lab Guide Procedure 30, 31 and 32

Day 1: Theory Guide Chapter 11 Pages 648 through 658 Lab Guide Procedure 30 Virus Detection Day 2: Theory Guide Chapter 11 Pages 658 through 667 Day 3:Theory Guide Chapter 11 Pages 667 through 675 Lab Guide Procedure 31 Dial-Up Access Day 4: Theory Guide Chapter 11 Pages 675 through 682 Day 5: Theory Guide Chapter 11 Pages 682 through 692 Lab Guide Procedure 32 TCP/IP Setup

WEEK 14 Basic System Troubleshooting


Theory Guide Chapter 11 Lab Guide Procedure 33, 34 and 35

Day 1: Theory Guide Chapter 11 Pages 692 through 700 Lab Guide Procedure 33 TCP/IP Utilities Day 2: Theory Guide Chapter 11 Pages 700 through 709 Lab Guide Procedure 34 Network Operations Day 3: Theory Guide Chapter 11 Pages 709 through 720 Lab Guide Procedure 35 Windows Me Accessories Day 4: Theory Guide Chapter 11 Pages 720 through 732 Chapter 11 Review and Chapter 11 Review Questions Pages 732 through 736 Day 5: Theory Chapter 11 Test (Instructors Guide)

12 SAMPLE CURRICULUM OUTLINES

Instructor's Guide

WEEK 15 Operating System Troubleshooting


Theory Guide Chapter 12 Lab Guide Procedure 36, 37, and 38

Day 1: Theory Guide Chapter 12 Pages 740 through 747 Lab Guide Procedure 36 Windows 2000 TCP/IP Day 2: Theory Guide Chapter 12 Pages 747 through 759 Day 3: Theory Guide Chapter 12 Pages 759 through 768 Lab Guide Procedure 37 Windows 2000 Networking Day 4: Theory Guide Chapter 12 Pages 768 through 780 Day 5: Theory Guide Chapter 12 Pages 780 through 788 Lab Guide Procedure 38 Internet Client Setup for IE5.5

WEEK 16 Operating System Troubleshooting


Theory Guide Chapter 12 Lab Guide Procedure 39, 40 and 41

Day 1: Theory Guide Chapter 12 Pages 788 through 797 Lab Guide Procedure 39 FTP & Telnet Day 2: Theory Guide Chapter 12 Pages 797 through 808 Lab Guide Procedure 40 Internet Domain Name Service Day 3: Theory Guide Chapter 12 Pages 808 through 817 Lab Guide Procedure 41 Windows ME Software Update Management Day 4: Theory Guide Chapter 12 Pages 817 through 826 Chapter 12 Review and Chapter 12 Review Questions Pages 826 through 829 Day 5: Theory Chapter 12 Test (Instructors Guide)

WEEK 17 Preventive Maintenance


Theory Guide Chapter 13 Lab Guide Procedure 42, 43, and 44

Day 1: Theory Guide Chapter 13 Pages 832 through 840 Lab Guide Procedure 42 Windows 2000 Software Version Update Management Day 2: Theory Guide Chapter 13 Pages 840 through 848 Lab Guide Procedure 43 Windows ME OS Faults Day 3: Theory Guide Chapter 13 Pages 848 through 856 Lab Guide Procedure 44 Windows 2000 OS Faults Day 4: Theory Guide Chapter 13 Pages 856 through 865 Chapter 13 Review and Chapter 13 Review Questions Pages 865 through 869 Day 5: Theory Chapter 13 Test (Instructors Guide)

WEEK 18 Review, Practice Exams & Final Exam


Review and Challenge Day 1: Review for A+ Certification Exam First Challenge Test Day 2: Review for A+ Certification Exam Review Day 3: Review for A+ Certification Exam Second Challenge Test Day 4: Review for A+ Certification Exam Review Day 5: A+ Certification Final Exam

SAMPLE CURRICULUM OUTLINES 13

Instructor's Guide

1 YEAR (36-WEEK/180 HOUR) COURSE OUTLINE


Introduction
The Marcraft A+ Certification Study Program is designed to be very flexible. It may be used in part or in whole as necessary to fit into your curriculum framework. If used in its entirety, this program is intended to fill approximately 180 hours of class time. This outline assumes that these hours will be part of a 36-week class, each week consisting of five (5) 1-hour class periods. The ratio of theory lecture to hands-on lab hours will depend on your personal instructional methodology. In particular, this outline will need to be modified in order to accommodate holidays, and the midterm examination and quiz schedule for your school. You should modify the manner in which the instruction is implemented depending on the age, experience and background of your students.

Prerequisites
This outline presupposes that your students have at least some level of exposure to key electronic and computer concepts. The recommended minimum level of student preparation for this class would consist of an IT course that is the equivalent to the 45-hour Marcraft TE-2300 Introduction to Computer Technology course.

WEEK 1 Basic PC Hardware


Theory Guide Chapter 1 Lab Guide Procedure 1

Day 1: Orientation Day Day 2: Theory Guide Chapter 1 Pages 1 through 13 Day 3: Theory Guide Chapter 1 Pages 13 through 28 Day 4: Theory Guide Chapter 1 Pages 28 through 41 Day 5: Lab Guide Procedure 1 - Orientation

WEEK 2 Basic PC Hardware


Theory Guide Chapter 1 Lab Guide Procedure 2

Day 1: Theory Guide Chapter 1 Pages 41 through 48 Day 2: Theory Guide Chapter 1 Pages 48 through 61 Day 3: Lab Guide Procedure 2 Boot Sequence Day 4: Chapter 1 Review and Chapter 1 Review Questions Pages 62 through 64 Day 5: Theory Chapter 1 Test (Instructors Guide)

14 SAMPLE CURRICULUM OUTLINES

Instructor's Guide

WEEK 3 Advanced System Boards


Theory Guide Chapters 2 Lab Guide Procedure 3 & 4

Day 1: Theory Guide Chapter 2 Pages 68 through 74 Day 2: Lab Guide Procedure 3 CMOS Passwords and Resources Day 3: Theory Guide Chapter 2 Pages 74 through 82 Day 4: Theory Guide Chapter 2 Pages 82 through 91 Day 5: Lab Guide Procedure 4 HDD Settings

WEEK 4 Advanced System Boards


Theory Guide Chapter 2 Lab Guide Procedure 5

Day 1: Theory Guide Chapter 2 Pages 91 through 98 Day 2: Theory Guide Chapter 2 Pages 98 through 106 Day 3: Theory Guide Chapter 2 Pages 106 through 113 Day 4: Theory Guide Chapter 2 Pages 113 through 122 Day 5: Lab Guide Procedure 5 Digital Multimeter

WEEK 5 Advanced System Boards


Theory Guide Chapter 2 Lab Guide Procedure 6

Day 1: Theory Guide Chapter 2 Pages 122 through 130 Day 2: Theory Guide Chapter 2 Pages 130 through 139 Day 3: Lab Guide Procedure 6 PC Check Day 4: Chapter 2 Review and Chapter 2 Review Questions Pages 139 through 142 Day 5: Theory Chapter 2 Test (Instructors Guide)

WEEK 6 Standard I/O Systems


Theory Guide Chapter 3 Lab Guide Procedure 7

Day 1: Theory Guide Chapter 3 Pages 146 through 150 Day 2: Theory Guide Chapter 3 Pages 150 through 159 Day 3: Theory Guide Chapter 3 Pages 159 through 165 Day 4: Theory Guide Chapter 3 Pages 165 through 171 Day 5: Lab Guide Procedure 7 IDE Troubleshooting

WEEK 7 Standard I/O Systems


Theory Guide Chapter 3 Lab Guide Procedure 8 and 9

Day 1: Theory Guide Chapter 3 Pages 171 through 175 Day 2: Lab Guide Procedure 8 Hardware Troubleshooting Day 3: Theory Guide Chapter 3 Pages 175 through 179 Day 4: Lab Guide Procedure 9 CPU Upgrading and Overclocking Day 5: Theory Guide Chapter 3 Pages 179 through 185

SAMPLE CURRICULUM OUTLINES 15

Instructor's Guide

WEEK 8 Mass Storage Systems


Theory Guide Chapter 4 Lab Guide Procedure 10

Day 1: Theory Guide Chapter 3 Pages 185 through 190 Day 2: Lab Guide Procedure 10 Windows ME Video Drivers Day 3: Theory Guide Chapter 3 Pages 190 through 197 Day 4: Chapter 3 Review and Chapter 3 Review Questions Pages 197 through 199 Day 5: Theory Chapter 3 Test (Instructors Guide)

WEEK 9 Mass Storage Systems


Theory Guide Chapter 4 Lab Guide Procedure 11

Day 1: Theory Guide Chapter 4 Pages 202 through 206 Day 2: Theory Guide Chapter 4 Pages 206 through 210 Day 3: Theory Guide Chapter 4 Pages 210 through 213 Day 4: Theory Guide Chapter 4 Pages 213 through 218 Day 5: Lab Guide Procedure 11 Windows ME Navigating

WEEK 10 Mass Storage Systems


Theory Guide Chapter 4 Lab Guide Procedure 12

Day 1: Theory Guide Chapter 4 Pages 218 through 224 Day 2: Theory Guide Chapter 4 Pages 224 through 228 Day 3: Theory Guide Chapter 4 Pages 228 through 233 Day 4: Theory Guide Chapter 4 Pages 233 through 237 Day 5: Lab Guide Procedure 12 Windows ME Command Prompt Navigating

WEEK 11 Mass Storage Systems


Theory Guide Chapter 4 Lab Guide Procedure 13

Day 1: Theory Guide Chapter 4 Pages 237 through 240 Day 2: Theory Guide Chapter 4 Pages 240 through 244 Day 3: Lab Guide Procedure 13 Advanced Windows ME Day 4: Chapter 4 Review and Chapter 4 Review Questions Pages 244 through 247 Day 5: Theory Chapter 4 Test (Instructors Guide)

WEEK 12 Data Communications


Theory Guide Chapter 5 Lab Guide Procedure 14

Day 1: Theory Guide Chapter 5 Pages 250 through 258 Day 2: Theory Guide Chapter 5 Pages 258 through 264 Day 3: Theory Guide Chapter 5 Pages 265 through 271 Day 4: Theory Guide Chapter 5 Pages 271 through 275 Day 5: Lab Guide Procedure 14 Windows ME Hardware Resources

16 SAMPLE CURRICULUM OUTLINES

Instructor's Guide

WEEK 13 Data Communications


Theory Guide Chapter 5 Lab Guide Procedure 15

Day 1: Theory Guide Chapter 5 Pages 276 through 279 Day 2: Theory Guide Chapter 5 Pages 279 through 285 Day 3: Theory Guide Chapter 5 Pages 286 through 289 Day 4: Theory Guide Chapter 5 Pages 290 through 295 Day 5: Lab Guide Procedure 15 Windows 2000 Navigation

WEEK 14 Data Communications and Printers


Theory Guide Chapter 5 and 6 Lab Guide Procedure 16

Day 1: Theory Guide Chapter 5 Pages 295 through 302 Day 2: Chapter 5 Review and Chapter 5 Review Questions Pages 303 through 307 Day 3: Theory Chapter 5 Test (Instructors Guide) Day 4: Lab Guide Procedure 16 Windows 2000 Administrative Tools Day 5: Theory Guide Chapter 6 Pages 310 through 316

WEEK 15 Printers

Theory Guide Chapter 6 Lab Guide Procedure 17 Day 1: Theory Guide Chapter 6 Pages 316 through 323 Day 2: Theory Guide Chapter 6 Pages 323 through 328 Day 3: Theory Guide Chapter 6 Pages 328 through 334 Day 4: Theory Guide Chapter 6 Pages 334 through 340 Day 5: Lab Guide Procedure 17 Windows 2000 Computer Management

WEEK 16 Printers

Theory Guide Chapter 6 Lab Guide Procedure 18 & 19 Day 1: Theory Guide Chapter 6 Pages 340 through 346 Day 2: Lab Guide Procedure 18 Windows ME Plug-and-Play Day 3: Theory Guide Chapter 6 Pages 346 through 351 Day 4: Lab Guide Procedure 18 & 19 & Windows 2000 Plug-and-Play Day 5: Theory Guide Chapter 6 Pages 351 through 354

WEEK 17 Printers and Portable Systems


Theory Guide Chapter 6 and 7 Lab Guide Procedure 20

Day 1: Theory Guide Chapter 6 Pages 354 through 359 Day 2: Chapter 6 Review and Chapter 6 Review Questions Pages 359 through 363 Day 3: Theory Chapter 6 Test (Instructors Guide) Day 4: Theory Guide Chapter 7 Pages 366 through 370 Day 5: Lab Guide Procedure 20 Windows ME Printers

SAMPLE CURRICULUM OUTLINES 17

Instructor's Guide

WEEK 18 Portable Systems

Theory Guide Chapter 7 Lab Guide Procedure 21 and 22 Day 1: Theory Guide Chapter 7 Pages 370 through 374 Day 2: Lab Guide Procedure 21 Windows 2000 Printers Day 3: Theory Guide Chapter 7 Pages 374 through 378 Day 4: Theory Guide Chapter 7 Pages 378 through 382 Day 5: Lab Guide Procedure 22 Windows ME System Information

WEEK 19 Portable Systems


Theory Guide Chapter 7 Lab Guide Procedure 23

Day 1: Theory Guide Chapter 7 Pages 382 through 386 Day 2: Theory Guide Chapter 7 Pages 386 through 392 Day 3: Lab Guide Procedure 23 Windows ME Disk Management Day 4: Chapter 7 Review and Chapter 7 Review Questions Pages 393 through 395 Day 5: Theory Chapter 7 Test (Instructors Guide)

WEEK 20 Operating System Fundamentals


Theory Guide Chapter 8 Lab Guide Procedure 24

Day 1: Theory Guide Chapter 8 Pages 398 through 404 Day 2: Theory Guide Chapter 8 Pages 404 through 410 Day 3: Theory Guide Chapter 8 Pages 410 through 416 Day 4: Theory Guide Chapter 8 Pages 416 through 423 Day 5: Lab Guide Procedure 24 Windows 2000 Accessories

WEEK 21 Operating System Fundamentals


Theory Guide Chapter 8 Lab Guide Procedure 25and 26

Day 1: Theory Guide Chapter 8 Pages 423 through 430 Day 2: Lab Guide Procedure 25 Windows 2000 Disk Management Day 3: Theory Guide Chapter 8 Pages 437 through 442 Day 4: Theory Guide Chapter 8 Pages 442 through 450 Day 5: Lab Guide Procedure 26 Windows 2000 Registry

WEEK 22 Operating System Fundamentals and Windows 9x


Theory Guide Chapter 8 and 9 Lab Guide Procedure 27

Day 1: Theory Guide Chapter 8 Pages 450 through 459 Day 2: Chapter 8 Review and Chapter 8 Review Questions Pages 459 through 462 Day 3: Theory Chapter 8 Test (Instructors Guide) Day 4: Theory Guide Chapter 9 Pages 466 through 474 Day 5: Lab Guide Procedure 27 Windows ME Safe Mode

18 SAMPLE CURRICULUM OUTLINES

Instructor's Guide

WEEK 23 Windows 9x

Theory Guide Chapter 9 Lab Guide Procedure 28 and 29 Day 1: Theory Guide Chapter 9 Pages 474 through 482 Day 2: Lab Guide Procedure 28 Windows ME Setup Log Files Theory Guide Chapter 9 Pages 482 through 489 Day 3: Theory Guide Chapter 9 Pages 489 through 496 Day 4: Theory Guide Chapter 9 Pages 496 through 501 Day 5:Lab Guide Procedure 29 Windows 2000 Safe Mode

WEEK 24 Windows 9x
Theory Guide Chapter 9 Lab Guide Procedure 30

Day 1: Theory Guide Chapter 9 Pages 501 through 508 Day 2: Theory Guide Chapter 9 Pages 508 through 515 Day 3: Theory Guide Chapter 9 Pages 515 through 522 Day 4: Theory Guide Chapter 9 Pages 522 through 530 Day 5: Lab Guide Procedure 30 Windows 2000 Virus Protection

WEEK 25 Windows 9x
Theory Guide Chapter 9 Lab Guide Procedure 31

Day 1: Theory Guide Chapter 9 Pages 530 through 540 Day 2: Theory Guide Chapter 9 Pages 540 through 550 Day 3: Lab Guide Procedure 31 Windows ME Dial-Up Access Day 4: Chapter 9 Review and Chapter 9 Review Questions Pages 551 through 554 Day 5: Theory Chapter 9 Test (Instructors Guide)

WEEK 26 Windows NT/2000


Theory Guide Chapter 10 Lab Guide Procedure 32 and 33

Day 1: Theory Guide Chapter 10 Pages 558 through 567 Day 2: Lab Guide Procedure 32 Windows ME TCP/IP Setup Day 3: Theory Guide Chapter 10 Pages 567 through 578 Day 4: Theory Guide Chapter 10 Pages 578 through 591 Day 5: Lab Guide Procedure 33 Windows ME TCP/IP Utilities

WEEK 27 Windows NT/2000


Theory Guide Chapter 10 Lab Guide Procedure 34 and 35

Day 1: Theory Guide Chapter 10 Pages 591 through 605 Day 2: Lab Guide Procedure 34 Windows ME Network Operations Day 3: Theory Guide Chapter 10 Pages 605 through 617 Day 4: Theory Guide Chapter 10 Pages 617 through 628 Day 5: Lab Guide Procedure 35 Windows ME Accessories

SAMPLE CURRICULUM OUTLINES 19

Instructor's Guide

WEEK 28 Windows NT/2000 and Basic System Troubleshooting


Theory Guide Chapter 10 and 11 Lab Guide Procedure 36

Day 1: Theory Guide Chapter 10 Pages 628 through 638 Day 2: Chapter 10 Review and Chapter 10 Review Questions Pages 638 through 644 Day 3: Theory Chapter 10 Test (Instructors Guide) Day 4: Theory Guide Chapter 11 Pages 666 through 663 Day 5: Lab Guide Procedure 36 Windows 2000 TCP/IP

WEEK 29 Basic System Troubleshooting


Theory Guide Chapter 11 Lab Guide Procedure 37 and 38

Day 1: Theory Guide Chapter 11 Pages 663 through 668 Day 2: Lab Guide Procedure 37 Windows 2000 Networking Day 3: Theory Guide Chapter 11 Pages 668 through 678 Day 4: Theory Guide Chapter 11 Pages 678 through 688 Day 5: Lab Guide Procedure 38 Internet Client Setup for IE 5

WEEK 30 Basic System Troubleshooting


Theory Guide Chapter 11 Lab Guide Procedure 39 and 40

Day 1: Theory Guide Chapter 11 Pages 688 through 699 Day 2: Lab Guide Procedure 39 Windows ME FTP/Telnet Day 3: Theory Guide Chapter 11 Pages 699 through 711 Day 4: Theory Guide Chapter 11 Pages 711 through 722 Day 5: Lab Guide Procedure 40 Windows ME Internet Domain Names

WEEK 31 Basic System Troubleshooting & Operating System Troubleshooting


Theory Guide Chapter 11 & 12 Lab Guide Procedure 41

Day 1: Theory Guide Chapter 11 Pages 722 through 732 Day 2: Chapter 11 Review and Chapter 11 Review Questions Pages 732 through 736 Day 5: Theory Chapter 11 Test (Instructors Guide) Day 4: Theory Guide Chapter 12 Pages 740 through 747 Day 5: Lab Guide Procedure 41 Windows ME Software Version Update Management

WEEK 32 Basic System Troubleshooting


Theory Guide Chapter 12 Lab Guide Procedure 42

Day 1: Theory Guide Chapter 12 Pages 747 through 761 Day 2: Theory Guide Chapter 12 Pages 761 through 777 Day 3: Theory Guide Chapter 12 Pages 777 through 790 Day 4: Theory Guide Chapter 12 Pages 790 through 811 Day 5: Lab Guide Procedure 42 Windows 20000 Software Version Update Management

20 SAMPLE CURRICULUM OUTLINES

Instructor's Guide

WEEK 33 Operating System Troubleshooting and Preventive Maintenance


Theory Guide Chapter 12 and 13 Lab Guide Procedure 43

Day 1: Theory Guide Chapter 12 Pages 811 through 826 Day 2: Chapter 12 Review and Chapter 12 Review Questions Pages 826 through 829 Day 3: Theory Chapter 12 Test (Instructors Guide) Day 4: Theory Guide Chapter 13 Pages 835 through 840 Day 5: Lab Guide Procedure 43 Windows ME OS Faults

WEEK 34 Preventive Maintenance


Theory Guide Chapter 13 Lab Guide Procedure 44

Day 1: Theory Guide Chapter 13 Pages 840 through 845 Day 2: Theory Guide Chapter 13 Pages 845 through 849 Day 3: Lab Guide Procedure 44 Windows 2000 OS Faults Day 4: Theory Guide Chapter 13 Pages 849 through 854 Day 5: Theory Guide Chapter 13 Pages 854 through 860

WEEK 35 Preventive Maintenance and A+ Preparation


Theory Guide Chapter 13 and Review /Test Prep Day 1: Theory Guide Chapter 13 Pages 860 through 865 Day 2: Chapter 13 Review and Chapter 13 Review Questions Pages 865 through 869 Day 3: Theory Chapter 13 Test (Instructors Guide) Day 4: Review for A+ Certification Test Review Day 5: Review for A+ Certification Test First Challenge Test

WEEK 36 Preventive Maintenance


Theory Guide Review and Test Prep Day 1: Review for A+ Certification Test Review Day 2: Review for A+ Certification Test Second Challenge Test Day 3: Review for A+ Certification Test Review Day 4: A+ Preparation Test Day 5: A+ Certification Final Exam

SAMPLE CURRICULUM OUTLINES 21

INSTRUCTOR WINDOWS INSTALLATIONS

Instructor's Guide

Installing Windows Millenium


OBJECTIVES
1. Install Windows Me on a system.

RESOURCES
1. 2. 3. 4.
Windows Me Installation CD Windows Me Users Guide 64 MB RAM installed Blank hard disk

DISCUSSION
Microsoft followed Windows 98 with Windows Millennium (Windows Me). Unlike previous versions of Windows that worked on top of a DOS operating system, Windows Me incorporates the operating system functions and requires no DOS platform to get started. Therefore, it is proper to refer to WindowsMe as an Operating System. In creating Windows Me, Microsoft fundamentally changed how it workshence, the designation as Windows Me instead of Windows 9x. Windows Me can be installed on any computer using a Pentium or equivalent microprocessor, with at least 32MB of RAM installed. Since an underlying DOS structure is not needed for Windows Me, the system is ready to load it if the hard drive has been partitioned. In this procedure you will partition and format half of the hard drive for use with Windows Me Installation(FAT32). The other Half will be used to Install Windows 2000(NTFS). The student will be able to use a dual-boot environment after this has been set up. In order to utilize the features of the 2 file systems, both are used in this lab guide. Pay attention to which drive letters are being used for each operating system. The Drive letters will be set up as follows: Operating System Windows Me CDROM Windows 2000 Drive Letter C D E

Installing Windows Millenium 25

Instructor's Guide

PROCEDURE
1. Preparing CMOS to install Windows Millennium ___a. Turn on the computer ___b. Press the DELETE key immediately and hold it down until the CMOS Setup Utility appears. ___c. Using the DOWN ARROW key, select the second option Advanced Settings and press the Enter ___d. ___e. ___f. ___g.

key. Using the ARROW keys, scroll down to where it says Boot Sequence Press the PAGE DOWN key until CD-ROM is the first drive listed. It should say something similar to CD-ROM, C, A. Press the ESC key to exit the Advanced settings Press the F10 key to save the new settings, then Y and then ENTER to confirm and reboot the computer.

2. Preparing the Hard Drive ___a. Insert the Windows Me CD in the appropriate drive. ___b. Choose to boot the computer to the CDROM. ___c. At the Startup menu, choose Start computer with CD-ROM support and press ENTER. ___d. At the command prompt type FDISK. ___e. Press ENTER to enable large disk support. ___f. Press 1 and ENTER to create a partition. ___g. Press 1 and ENTER to create a primary partition. ___h. Press N and ENTER to not use the maximum available size. ___i. Enter 50% as the partition size to use. Press ENTER. ___j. Press ESC to continue. ___k. Press 2 and ENTER to Set active the partition. ___l. Enter 1 and press ENTER to specify the partition. ___m. Press ESC 3 times to exit fdisk. ___n. Restart the computer. 3. Run Windows Millennium Setup ___a. Boot the computer to the CDROM. ___b. Choose selection 1, Start Setup From CD-ROM and press ENTER. ___c. At the Setup screen, press ENTER to continue. ___d. Press ENTER to Format this drive. ___e. Press ENTER to perform a routine check on the system. 4. Answer the questions presented by the Setup program ___a. At the Welcome window, click on the Next button. ___b. Click Next to accept the default C:\Windows directory for the install. ___c. Check the radio button next to Custom and click Next 2 times. ___d. In the Network Identification window, enter your station number for the computer name and leave ___e. ___f. ___g. ___h. ___i. ___j. ___k. ___l.

Workgroup as the default workgroup name. (example: Station01) Choose the correct language and click next. Select your Country/Region, keyboard layout, and the correct time zone and click Next after each selection. Click Finish to begin Copying Files. After rebooting and installing drivers, youll be prompted to enter User information. Enter your Station number next to Name and your school name next to Company. Click Next. Check the radio button to Accept the License Agreement, and click Next. Enter the product code in the space provided and click Next. Click Finish and the computer will reboot.

Installing Windows Millenium 26

Instructor's Guide

___m. Enter the station number for the user name, and leave the password blank. ___n. Click OK and the installation of Windows Millennium is finished.

Installing Windows Millenium 27

Installing Windows 2000


OBJECTIVES
1. Install Windows 2000

RESOURCES
1. 2. 3. 4.
Windows 2000 Installation CD Windows 2000 Users Guide 64 MB RAM installed Blank hard disk

DISCUSSION
Microsoft followed Windows 98 with Windows Millennium (Windows Me). Unlike previous versions of Windows that worked on top of a DOS operating system, Windows Me incorporates the operating system functions and requires no DOS platform to get started. Therefore, it is proper to refer to WindowsMe as an Operating System. In creating Windows Me, Microsoft fundamentally changed how it workshence, the designation as Windows Me instead of Windows 9x. Windows Me can be installed on any computer using a Pentium or equivalent microprocessor, with at least 32MB of RAM installed. Since an underlying DOS structure is not needed for Windows Me, the system is ready to load it if the hard drive has been partitioned. In this procedure you will partition and format half of the hard drive for use with Windows Me Installation(FAT32). The other Half will be used to Install Windows 2000(NTFS). The student will be able to use a dual-boot environment after this has been set up. In order to utilize the features of the 2 file systems, both are used in this lab guide. Pay attention to which drive letters are being used for each operating system. The Drive letters will be set up as follows: Operating System Windows Me CDROM Windows 2000 Drive Letter C D E

Installing Windows 2000 29

Instructor's Guide

Procedure
1. Installing Windows 2000 ___a. Click Start/Shut Down and select Restart from the drop down menu. Click OK. ___b. Insert the Windows 2000 CD and boot from it by pressing any key when prompted. ___c. After setup files are loaded, press ENTER to set up Windows 2000. ___d. Press F8 to agree to the license. ___e. Use the DOWN ARROW key to select the Unpartitioned space and press ENTER. ___f. Press ENTER to continue and format the partition using the NTFS file system. ___g. Disks will be checked and files copied. Press ENTER to restart the computer when prompted. ___h. Windows 2000 Setup will automatically start installing devices when the computer has restarted. ___i. ___j. ___k. ___l. ___m. ___n. ___o. ___p. ___q. ___r. ___s. ___t.

When you are prompted to change Regional Settings click Next and type your Name and Organization as you did for the Windows Me setup. Click Next. Enter the Windows 2000 product Key and click Next. Enter the station number for the computer name. Enter and confirm marcraft for the administrator password. Click Next. Confirm the Date and Time, Click Next. Choose the typical Network Settings and click Next. Leave the default selection to use this computer in a workgroup, enter the workgroup name in the field if it is something other than WORKGROUP. Click Next. Windows will now install, after it has completed click Finish. The computer will restart. Enter setup as before and change the boot sequence back to boot from the C drive first. At Startup you can now select which operating system to start, Select Windows 2000 Professional and press ENTER. You may be prompted to enter the network identification wizard, click Next. Verify that Windows always assumes the following user has logged on to this computer is selected. Select Administrator for the user name, and enter marcraft for the password and confirm the password. Click Next and Finish.

2. Edit Boot.ini ___a. From the Windows 2000 Desktop click Start/Run. Type C:\boot.ini and click OK. ___b. Edit line 5 to say C:\ = Microsoft Windows Millennium ___c. Click the X to close the window and click Yes to save the changes. ___d. Shut down the computer by clicking Start/Shut Down, verify that the Shut Down drop down
menu item is selected and click OK.

Installing Windows 2000 30

Installing Windows 2000 Virus Detection


Objectives
1. Install and Configure McAfee Virus Scan

Resources
1. A PC with Windows 2000 installed 2. The McAfee Virus Scan 5.12 Install CD

Discussion
This setup will be used in conjunction with the Virus Detection Lab. The Virus program needs to be installed but not running for the students to use it.

Procedure
1. Install Virus Scan ___a. Insert the Virus Scan Install CD into the CDROM drive. ___b. Auto run should open the install program. Click Install Virus Scan. ___c. Click next for the Product ___d. ___e. ___f. ___g. ___h.
Information screen. You will see a window similar to Figure IG-VS-1, click the I agree button, and click next. Verify that Standard Security is selected and click next. Verify that Typical Installation is selected, click next, and click install. After the install has completed you will be prompted to configure. Click Skip Config. Verify that Enable McAfee VirusScan Protection is selected and click Finish.

Figure IG-VS-1: License Agreement

Installing Windows 2000 Virus Detection 31

Instructor's Guide

___i. ___j.

The VirusScan CD window similar to Figure IG-VS-2 will still be open click Exit. Remove the Virus Scan CDROM out of the drive.

2. Configure Virus Scan ___a. In the taskbar double click ___b. ___c.
Figure IG-VS-2: Virus Scan CD on the Virus Scan Console. It looks like a magnifying glass icon. Select Vshield and click Properties. Under the Program Tab click Configure You will see a window similar to IGVS3. Uncheck Enable System scan.

___d. ___e. ___f. ___g. ___h. ___i. ___j.

Click Apply. You will be prompted to Unload System Scan, click Yes. Click OK to System Scan Properties. Click OK to Task Properties. Close the VirusScan Console window. You can now restart Windows 2000 and the computer will be ready for the student.

Figure IG-VS-3: System Scan Properties

Installing Windows 2000 Virus Detection 32

REVIEW QUESTION ANSWERS

Instructor's Guide

CHAPTER 1 Basic PC Hardware


Review Question Answers
1. Connection to the System Board, the AT power supply uses two 6 pin system board power connectors (P8/P9) while the ATX power supply uses a single 20-pin system board power connector. The ATX power supply provides an additional +3.3V level to the system board that is used by the microprocessor. The AT power supply cooling fan produces the cooling air from front to rear of the system case while the ATX power supply produces the cooling air from rear to front of system case. The ATX power supply uses special Soft Switch that is capable of shut off by the system software. The shapes ans hole patterns are also different between the AT and ATX power supplies. For more information, see the section Power Supplies The components inside the system unit can be divided into four distinct sub-units: a switching Power Supply, the Disk Drives, the System Board, and the Options Adapter cards For more information, see the section The System Unit. The pins of this Game Ports 15-pin D-Shell are arranged differently than those in the 15-pin VGA connector. In the VGA connector, the pins are arranged in three rows while the pins in the Game Port are arranged in two rows. For more information, see the section External Connections and Devices. ROM, RAM, and Cache memory. For more information, see the section Memory Units. Data is stored as magnetized spots arranged in concentric circles around the disk. The circles are referred to as tracks, numbered , beginning with 0, from the outside edge inward. The number of tracks may range from 40 up to 2048, depending on the type of disk and drive being used. Specifically, data is stored on the disk in the form of positive and negative charged magnetized spots which are encoded to represent bits. The bits are formed into bytes, stored in sectors along the tracks of the disk. For more information, see the section Storage Devices. The keyboard, the mouse, and the monitor. For more information, see the section Peripherals. Legacy cards must be configured manually. For more information, see the section Adapter Cards. That the black wires from the P8 and P9 connectors are side-by-side. For more information, see the section Power Supplies. SIMM stands for Single In-line Memory Module while DIMM stands for Dual In-line Memory Module. Both devices are types of RAM memory modules. For more information, see the section Memory Units. Microprocessors read, interpret, execute software instructions, and carries out arithmetic and logical operations for the system. For more information, see the section Microprocessors. The ventilation characteristics of tower units tend to be inadequate. For more information, see the section Towers. A typical magnetic disk is made up of a number of tracks having a varying number of sectors which holds 512 bytes of data. Each sector contains the following fields: ID Address (1 byte); Track/Sector ID Field (6 bytes); ID Gap (17 bytes); Data Field Header (1 byte); Data Field (512 bytes); Error Check Correcting (2 Bytes). For more information, see the section Storage Devices. The ESCD or Extended System Configuration Data is a special section of the CMOS RAM where the BIOS stores the PnP information it collects from the devices in the system. For more information, see section Plug and Play. The typical CD can hold upwards of 600 MB of programs and data. For more information, see section CD-ROM Drives. The three major sets of operations performed by the BIOS during startup are: a) The BIOS performs a series of diagnostic tests on the system, called POST or Power-On Self-Tests, to verify that it is operating correctly. b) The BIOS program places starting values in the systems various programmable devices. c) The BIOS checks the system for a special program, the Master Boot Record (MBR), that it can use to load other programs into RAM. For more information, see the section Basic Input/Output Systems.

2. 3.

4. 5.

6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12.

13. 14. 15.

34 REVIEW QUESTION ANSWERS

Instructor's Guide

Chapter 1 Basic PC Hardware


Exam Question Answers
1. d The microprocessor. The microprocessor thinks for the computer by processing instructions and data for the system. The BIOS simply stores the systems native intelligence, while the other devices provide support for the microprocessor. For more information, see the section System Boards. 2. b Air flow through tower cases is generally not good. Additional fan units are almost always installed in tower cases to overcome this draw back. The other options in the test are not true of tower case designs. For more information, see the section Towers. 3. a In ROM ICs located on the system board. The BIOS is always located in the ROM BIOS IC on the system board. The information in the BIOS is used to initialize the contents of the keyboard controller. The BIOS does check the battery-powered information stored in the CMOS area for configuration settings. The L2 cache is used by the microprocessor to hold temporary information during the operation of the system. For more information, see the section Memory Units. 4. a Enables system to automatically configure itself. Plug-and-Play enables the system to automatically determine what hardware devices are actually installed in the system and to allocate system resources to the devices to configure and manage them. For more information, see the section Plug-and-Play. 5. b On the system board. In pre-Pentium systems, the MI/O functions were located on adapter cards that plugged into the system boards expansion slots. By the time Pentium systems began to appear, the basic MI/O functions were being built into the system board. This made it very convenient to add directly into the new system board designs. By doing so, only a single adapter card was required to create a basic PC-compatible Pentium system. For more information, see the section Adapter Cards. 6. a The BIOS must perform the same functions as the BIOS in an IBM PC. For more information, see the section Basic Input/Output Systems. 7. b Cold boot. For more information, see the section Basic Input/Output Systems. 8. d Executing utility files. POST tests, system initialization and bootstrapping are the three major operations that occur during the bootup process. For more information, see the section Basic Input/Output Systems. 9. b Initializing. For more information, see the section Basic Input/Output Systems. 10. c Provide information to the system about loading the operating system. The Master Boot Record allows the system to load a much more powerful control program, the operation system into RAM memory to oversee the operation of the system. For more information, see the section Basic Input/Output Systems.

REVIEW QUESTION ANSWERS 35

Instructor's Guide

CHAPTER 2 Advanced System Boards


Review Question Answers
1. 2. 3. An Intel Pentium MMX running at 233 MHz. For more information, see the section Configuring Microprocessors. JP15=Short, JP14=Open, JP13=Open, JP22=pins 1 and 2 Open, pins 3 and 4 shorted, JP10= pins 1 and 2 shorted. For more information, see the section Configuring Microprocessors. The L1 cache is a first-level cache that is built into the Pentium microprocessor and is controlled and handled directly by the microprocessor. The L1 cache is used for both instructions and data and it is divided into four 2 kB blocks containing 128 sets of 16-byte lines each. For more information, see the section I/O Connections. An advanced Accelerated Graphics Port (AGP) interface for video graphics. For more information, see the section AGP Slots. To allow microprocessors that use different core and processor voltages to be used with the system board design. For more information, see the section Socket Specifications. In the video memory section of the PC system. Windows RAM (WRAM) is a special memory device designed to optimize video memory-related activities. For more information, see the section Advance SDRAM. Parity checking is a method of checking stored data for errors by adding an additional bit to it when it is read from memory. It is a simple self-test used to detect RAM read-back errors. For more information, see the section Parity Checking. In AT -compatible systems, the output of the secondary interrupt controller is cascaded through the IRQ2 input of the master controller, thus allowing the system to see all of the devices attached to the secondary controller as IRQ2. For more information, see the section Major Components. IRQ-6 is dedicated to the FDD. For more information, see the section System Board Evolution. No. The Pentium 66 is a first generation Pentium device. The socket specification for these devices were not compatible with the second and third generation . For more information, see the section The Pentium Processor. DIMMs. SIMMS are available in 30-pin an d72-pin versions, while DIMMs are larger 168-pin boards. For more information, see the section SIMMs, DIMMs, and Banks. Both JP14 and JP15 must be shorted. For more information, see the section Configuring Microprocessors. The local bus is designed to run directly between the I/O device and the microprocessor and operate at speeds compatible with the microprocessor. For more information, see the section Local Bus Slots. Synchronous SRAM. Synchronous SRAM uses special clock signals and buffer storage to deliver data to the CPU in one clock cycle after the first cycle. For more information, see the section SRAM. Decreased size and decreased production costs. For more information, see the section Chipsets.

4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15.

36 REVIEW QUESTION ANSWERS

Instructor's Guide

Chapter 2 Advanced System Boards


Exam Question Answers
1. b The EISA bus. The EISA bus is the 32-bit extension of the ISA bus, which, in turn, is an extension of the PC Bus specification. The MCA and PCI buses are proprietary designs that have no compatibility with the original PC/PC-XT/PC-AT buses. For more information, see the section System Board Compatibility. 2. d Eight. The PC and PC-XT employed an 8259 Programmable Interrupt Controller. This device provided 8 channels of programmable interrupt service. For more information, see the section Major Components. 3. c 166. 66MHz x 2.5 = 166. For more information, see the section Configuring Microprocessors. 4. b DRAM. Dynamic RAM devices require that data stored in them be refreshed, or rewritten, periodically to keep it from fading away. Each bit in the DRAM must be refreshed at least once every two milliseconds or data will dissipate. For more information, see the section DRAM Refresh. 5. a AMD Athlon. AMD produced a reversed version of the Slot 1 specification for its athlon processor by turning the contacts of the Slot 1 design around. They titled the new design Slot A. While serving the same ends as the Slot 1 design, the Slot A and Slot 1 microprocessor cartridges are not compatible. For more information, see the section Socket Specifications. 6. b It drives the systems time-of-day clock. IRQ-0 has always been used for time-of-day clock tick functions in PC-compatible systems. For more information, see the section Major Components. 7. d Four. The PC and PC-XT employed an 8237 Programmable DMA Controller. This device provided 4 high speed DMA channels for the system. For more information, see the section Major Components. 8. c It provides the systems FDD DMA channel. DRQ-2 has always been used to service the floppy disk drive in a PC-compatible system. For more information, see the section Major Components. 9. b D:\. The primary partition of ID2 will be designated as a logical D: drive because the primary partition of ID1 is designated as the logical C: drive. For more information, see the section On-Board Disk Drive Connections. 10. b Pentium III. Later versions of the Pentium III and Celeron were developed for the Intel Socket 370 specification. For mor information, see the section Socket Specifications.

REVIEW QUESTION ANSWERS 37

Instructor's Guide

CHAPTER 3 Standard I/O Systems


Review Question Answers
1. 2. 3. 4. The recommended length for a standard parallel printer cable should be kept to less then 10 feet. For more information, see the section The Centronics Standard. The standard system resources allocated to the LPT1 Parallel Port are IRQ5 or IRQ7 and physical address 378h. For more information, see the section LPT Handles. The standard system resources allocated to the COM1 Serial Port are IRQ4 and port address hex 3F8h. For more information, see the section DOS Serial Port Names. The type of data transfer is Direct Memory Access (DMA) and generally involves a high-speed I/O device taking over the systems buses to perform Read and Write operations with the primary memory, without the intervention of the system microprocessor. For more information, see the section Direct Memory Access. Serial Port #1. For more information, see the section Hexadecimal Addresses. The shadow mask ensures that an electron gun assigned to one color doesnt strike a dot of another color. For more information, see the section Color Monitors. Dot pitch is a term used to express how close pixels can be grouped together on the screen. For more information, see the section Screen Resolution. IRQ3 is normally assigned to the COM2 port. For more information, see the section DOS Serial Port Names. 127 peripheral devices can be connected to a computer. For more information, see the section Universal Serial Bus. The maximum recommended distance for an IrDA link is 1 meter (3 feet). For more information, see the section Infrared Ports. The maximum segment length for a low speed connection is 9 10 (3 meters) and the maximum segment length for a high speed connection is 16 5 (5 meters). For more information, see the section USB Architecture. A single IEEE-1394 connection can be used to connect up to 63 devices to a single port. For more information, see the section Firewire. The high-speed capabilities of Firewire make it well suited for handling components, such as video and audio devices, which require real-time, high-speed data transfer rates. For more information, see the section Firewire. The primary IDE controller normally uses IRQ14 in an ATX system. For more information, see the section Interrupts. The EPP mode is enabled through the CMOS Setup Screen. For more information, see the section LPT Handles.

5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15.

38 REVIEW QUESTION ANSWERS

Instructor's Guide

Chapter 3 Standard I/O Systems


Exam Question Answers
1. d 2. b Real Time Clock Module. In an ATX PC system IRQ8 is used by the system for as the Real-Time Clock interrupt. For more information, see the section Interrupts. 1F0-1f8h. The IO Port addresses used by the system to communicate with the primary hard disk controller is 0F8-0FF. For more information, see the section Hexadecimal Address.

3. a/b A 6-pin mini-DIN connector and a 5-pin DIN connector. AT and older systems use the 5-pin DIN connector for keyboards. The ATX systems use the PS/2 6-pin mini-DIN connector for keyboards. For more information, see the section Standard I/O Ports. 4. d 5. c 6. c 7. d Game port. The game port connector is a 15-pin D-shell female type connector. For more information, see the section Game Ports. ECP. The ECP port employs DMA operations to provide the highest data throughput for a parallel port. For more information, see the section ECP Mode. 278. A second parallel printer port is assigned at address location 278. For more information, see the section LPT Handles. SPP parallel cable. The original Centronics interface employed a 36-pin D-shell connector on the adapter and a 36-pin Centronics connector on the printer end. The IBM version of the interface, which became known as the Standard Parallel Port (SPP) specification for printers, reduced the pin count to 25 at the computer end of the connection. For more information, see the section The Centronics Standard. A pointing device. A mouse is a pointing device. For more information, see the section Pointing Devices. Channel 2 for the FDD controller. DMA channel 2 is used for the FDD in a standard PC. For more information, see the section Direct Memory Access. Adapter card error. The NMI, Non-Maskable Interrupt signal occurs when an active IO Channel Check (IOCHCK) input is received from an options adapter card located in one of the system boards expansion slots. For more information, see the section Interrupts.

8. c 9. b 10. a

REVIEW QUESTION ANSWERS 39

Instructor's Guide

CHAPTER 4 Mass Storage Systems


Review Question Answers
1. 2. 3. 4. The logical structure that replaced the function of the FAT on a NTFS drive is the Master File Table (MFT). For more information, see the section Logical and Physical Drives. In operation the floppy disk controller is assigned to the IRQ6 line. For more information, see section Floppy Disk Drives. In Windows NT and Windows 2000 the partitioning process should be performed through the Disk Administrator and Disk Management utilities respectively. For more information, see sections Logical and Physical Drives. The A: drive is located at the end of the signal cable, but the B: drive is always connected to the middle of the signal cable. A twist of wires in the cable between the A: and B: connectors creates the difference between the two connections. For more information, see sections Floppy Drive Cables and FDD Installation. Two types of HDD interfaces that are most commonly used with PC systems are the IDE and SCSI interfaces. For more information, see the section Installing and Configuring Disk Drives. Using the FDISK utility, the EIDE hard disk would be partitioned to have the C: drive as a Primary partition, the D: drive as an Extended partition, and the E: drive as a Logical drive. For more information, see the section Logical and Physical Drives. The partitioning program for MS-DOS and Windows 9x is FDISK. For more information, see the section Logical and Physical Drives. The Windows operating system uses the CDFS (CD-ROM File System) driver for protected mode operation. For more information, see section Configuring CD-ROM Drives. Data is stored on the disk in the form of positively and negatively charged spots. The spots are encoded to represent bits. The bits are formed into bytes that are stored in sectors along the tracks of the disk. For more information, see the section Reading and Writing On Magnetic Surfaces. Obtain the drives type information, check its Single/Master/Slave/Termination settings, slide it into a drive bay and insert the retaining screws in the drive, connect the signal cable(s) between the drive and the controller, connect the HDD power connector, start the system and enter the CMOS setup screen, load the HDD parameters, partition/format the drive. For more information, see the section HDD Installation. The first drive array type is used as a data backup method. The second type of drive array uses multiple drives to store large amounts of data in a manner that provides high reliability and recoverability. For more information, see the section RAID Systems. The cartridge tape is driven by a belt instead of two capstans. This provides smoother operation than what is possible with an audio tape. For more information, see the section Tape Standards. As it applies to a magnetic disk, formatting is the process of preparing the disk to hold data. For more information, see the section Magnetic Disks. The HDDs type and operating parameter information must be installed in the CMOS setup. The HDD unit must be partitioned and formatted before it can be used. For more information, see the section HDD Installation. The main function of the high-level format is to create the logical structures on the disk and depending on the operating system, produces the FAT and root directories or the MFT and directory structures. For more information, see the section Logical and Physical Drives.

5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10.

11. 12. 13. 14. 15.

40 REVIEW QUESTION ANSWERS

Instructor's Guide

Chapter 4 Mass Storage Systems


Exam Question Answers
1. a Ultra SCSI. A newer update, referred to as Ultra SCSI, makes provisions for a special high-speed serial transfer mode and special communications media, such as fiber-optic cabling. For more information, see the section SCSI Specifications. 2. c The contents of the installed drive should be backed up to some other media. For more information, see the section HDD Installation. 3. a A head crash. For more information, see the section Contact Versus. Non-Contact Recording. 4. a Low level format it. SCSI drives require no low-level formatting. For more information, see section SCSI Addressing. 5. b ATAPI. The AT Attachment Packet Interface (ATAPI) specification provides improved IDE drivers for use with CD-ROM drives and new data transfer methods. For more information, see the section Advanced EIDE Specifications. 6. a Active. The partition must be set to Active for the system to boot up from the drive. The Active partition is the logical drive the system will boot to. For more information, see section Logical and Physical Drives. 7. c FDISK. The FDISK utility is not a disk optimization utility, it is the utility used to create partitions on a hard disk. Partitioning a hard disk is not a disk optimization . For more information, see sections Logical and Physical Drives and HDD Upgrading. 8. c To act as a redundant data-backup method. For more information, see the section RAID Systems. 9. b It creates partitions on the physical disk. FDISK is the utility used to manage partitions on a hard disk drive. For more information, see the section Logical and Physical Drives. 10. c ATA-66. The ATA4/Ultra ATA 66 doubles the number of conductors in the IDE signal cable. For more information, see section Advanced EIDE Specifications.

REVIEW QUESTION ANSWERS 41

Instructor's Guide

CHAPTER 5 Data Communications


Review Question Answers
1. Client/Server systems use centrally located computers to handle programs and data for the entire system. Peer-to-peer networks connect otherwise autonomous stations together so that they can share information and resources. For more information, see the section Network Control Strategies. IRQ channel, base I/O port address, and base memory address settings. For more information, see the section Installing LANs. Possession of the networks token. For more information, see the section Token Ring. TCP/IP is Transport Control Protocol/Internet Protocol and is a network protocol driver that operates between the adapter and the initial layer of network software, to package and un-package data for the LAN. For more information, see sections LAN Adapter Cards and TCP/IP. The protocol only allows one node in the network to control the packet (Token) at a time. Even then, the node can only hold onto the packet for a predetermined amount of time. This concept is referred to as Token Passing. For more information, see the section Token Ring. The LAN cards Users Manual is normally a requirement for properly setting it up. For more information, see the section LAN Adapter Cards. It can be used to install a boot up ROM to allow the unit to be used as a diskless workstation. For more information, see the section LAN Adapter Cards. A system that ties together the resources of the Internet. For more information, see the section The World Wide Web. A router is an intelligent device that receives data and directs it toward a designated IP address. For more information, see the section IP Addresses. Browsers allow users to move around the Internet and make selections from graphically designed pages and menus, instead of operating from a command line. For more information, see the section Web Browsers. The Domain Name System tracks IP addresses of all the computers attached to the Internet. This system is a method of organizing the members of the Internet into a hierarchical management structure. For more information, see the section Internet Domains. URL is Universal Resource Locator, and it is the address assigned to a web site on the Internet. For more information, see the section The World Wide Web. Organizations that provide the technical gateway to the Internet. For more information, see the section Internet Service Providers (ISPs). The standard protocol for transferring large files across the Internet is the File Transfer Protocol (FTP). For more information, see the section File Transfer Protocol. The term NIC stands for Network Interface Card and is also known as a Network Adapter or LAN Adapter. For more information, see the section LAN Adapter Cards.

2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15.

42 REVIEW QUESTION ANSWERS

Instructor's Guide

Chapter 5 Data Communications


Exam Question Answers
1. d Modems. Hayes-compatible AT commands are the industry standards for modem control. The other components may be programmable devices, but they have no connection to the Hayes/AT standard. For more information, see the section Communication Software. 2. d A bus topology. Ethernet typically uses a bus topology. For more information, see the section Ethernet Specifications. 3. b 185 meters. The BASE2 designation implies 200 feet. However, for this one IEEE standard, the length is slightly off 185 feet (nearly 200 they must have taken equipment drop lengths at each end into account when they rolled out this designation. For more information, see the section Ethernet Specifications. 4. b Its maximum data rate is 100 Mbps and that it uses UTP cabling. For more information, see the section Ethernet Specifications 5. a At least one unit is reserved just to serve the other units, In client server networks, at least one unit is reserved to be the master (server) of the other units on the network. Part of the servers responsibilities is to answer service requests from the client units for programs, data, and security. For more information, see the section Network Control Strategies. 6. d Unshielded twisted-pair cabling. The standard connector for UTP cable is a modular RJ-45 registered jack. Coaxial cables use BNC connectors, while fiber optic cable uses special connectors designed for fiber. Disk drive cables use BERG pin or edge connectors for connections. For more information, see the section Ethernet Connections. 7. b Ethernet. In a token ring architecture, only the unit that has captured the token can use the network to move data. All other units are prohibited from accessing the communications link until their turn to hold the token comes about. In other topologies, such as Ethernet, nodes listen for an opportunity to put information on the communication link while it is quiet. For more information, see the section Token Ring. 8. c 500 meters. The XXBASE5 nomenclature indicates that the maximum segment length is limited to 500 meters. For more information, see the section Ethernet Specifications. 9. c EPS. EPS is a graphics format. For more information, see the section Wide Area Networks. 10. d TCP/IP. The Internet uses the TCP/IP protocol. For more information, see the section TCP/IP.

REVIEW QUESTION ANSWERS 43

Instructor's Guide

CHAPTER 6 Printers
Review Question Answers
1. The transfer corona wire (transfer roller) is responsible for transferring the toner from the drum to the paper. The toner is transferred to the paper because of the highly positive charge the transfer corona wire applies to the paper. The positive charge attracts the more negative toner particles away from the drum, and onto the page. A special, static-eliminator comb acts to prevent the positively-charged paper from sticking to the negatively-charged drum. For more information, see the section Laser Printing Operations. Speed, parity type, character frame, and control protocol. For more information, see the section Printer Installation. The platen pin-feed method allows heavier grades of paper of only one width to be pulled through the printer without slippage or to become misaligned. For more information, see the section Paper Handling. A tractor feed is used with very heavy forms, such as multiple-part forms and can be adjusted to handle various paper widths. For more information, see the section Paper Handling. When the print becomes noticeably faint, or the resolution becomes unacceptable the cartridge needs to be replaced. For more information, see the section Ink Cartridges. The fuser melts the toner particles onto the paper and then presses it into the paper. For more information, see the section Laser Printing Operations. The term font refers to variations in the size and style of characters. With true fully-formed characters, there is typically only one font available without changing the physical printing element. With all other printing methods, however, it is possible to include a wide variety of font types and sizes. For more information, see the section Fonts. An interlock problem has occurred. It will be necessary to open the unit to clear the interlock error. For more information, see the section Paper Will Not Feed, or Is Jammed. The pickup area, the registration area, and the fusing area. If optional output devices are included, such as collators and duplexers, then jams can occur there as well. For more information, see the section Troubleshooting Laser Printers. Dropon-demand and continuous stream. For more information, see the section Ink-Jet Printers. If the printer runs the self-test, and prints clean pages, then most of the printer has been eliminated as a possible cause of problems. The problem could be in the computer, the cabling, or the interface portion of the printer. For more information, see the section Troubleshooting Dot-Matrix Printers. The designated pins of the print head are extended from the face of the print head due to an electrical charge. The pins strike an inked ribbon which in turn, impacts the paper. For more information, see the section Printhead Mechanisms. It receives data and control signals from the host computer through the interface circuit and generates all of the control signals necessary to carry out the operation of the printer as directed. For more information, see the section Printer Controls. Light, dust and other particles, high temperature and high humidity. For more information, see the section Laser Printing Operations. The power supply, the interface/controller board, the paper feed motor and gear set, the print head mechanism, the print head positioning motor and belt, and the sensors. For more information, see the section Ink Jet Printer Components.

2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7.

8. 9. 10. 11.

12. 13. 14. 15.

44 REVIEW QUESTION ANSWERS

Instructor's Guide

Chapter 6 Printers
Exam Question Answers
1. c 9, 18, and 24 pins. Dot Matrix printers have commonly been produced in 9-pin, 18-pin, and 24-pin versions. Currently, most all dot matrix printers use 24-pin printheads. For more information, see the section Character Types. 2. b Toner supply, corona wire, drum assembly, and developing roller. A Hewlett Packard laser cartridge contains: the toner supply, a corona wire, the drum assembly, and the developing roller. Toner cartridges for other makes of laser printers may contain other components, or variations of these components. For more information, see the section Component Variations. 3. b It conditions the paper as it enters the printer. The primary corona wire conditions the photosensitive drum by applying a uniform electrical charge to it after it has been cleaned. For more information, see the section Laser Printing Operations. 4. a Change the ribbon cartridge. The printing process in a dot matrix printer is mechanical and therefore, many things wear. The ink ribbon is the first place to look when print begins to degrade. This is the cheapest, easiest, and usually the only part that needs to be replaced when print quality diminishes. For more information, see the section Ribbon Cartridges. 5. b Translates between the application and the printer hardware. Software producers often develop the Core Hardware of a program and then offer a disk full of printer drivers to translate between the software package and different standard printers. For more information, see the section Print On Page Is Missing or Bad. 6. d Positive. The Transfer corona wire applies a highly positive charge to the paper so that it attracts the negatively charged toner particles. For more information, see the section Laser Printing Operations. 7. c Cleaning, conditioning, writing, developing, transferring, and fusing. The six stages of the laser printing process, in order, are: Cleaning, conditioning, writing, developing, transferring, and fusing. For more information, see the section Laser Printer Components. 8. b Power supply, interface board, paper feed motor, printhead mechanism, printhead positioning motor, and sensors. All dot matrix printers consist of a power supply, an interface board, a paper feed motor, a print head mechanism, a print head positioning motor, and various sensors. They do not necessarily possess a tractor feed and they do not use ink cartridges. For more information, see the section Dot-Matrix Printers. 9. a Drop-on-demand on ink delivery. Drop on demand ink delivery is used in consumer-oriented ink-jet printers. This is used for relatively low cost printers verses that of a continuous stream ink delivery system which is more often used in commercial applications . For more information, see the section Ink-Jet Printers. 10. d 500 22 x 17 sheets weigh 60 pounds. All paper is specified by weight expressed in terms of 500 sheets of paper that measures 22 x 17 (envision 4, standard 8.5 x 11 sheets organized to create the standard-weight sheet). For more information, see the section Paper Specifications.

REVIEW QUESTION ANSWERS 45

Instructor's Guide

CHAPTER 7 Portable Systems


Review Question Answers
1. 2. 3. Mobile microprocessors are optimized for reduced size, power consumption, and improved heat reduction. For more information, see the section Microprocessors. Its physical size and layout, its power consumption, and whether the BIOS supports it. For more information, see the section Drives. A docking station is a specialized structure that the portable is inserted into to extend its expansion bus so that a collection of desktop devices can be used with it. In this way one can use a desktop monitor, mouse and keyboard for a portable notebook computer. For more information, see the section Docking Stations. Standby mode, suspend mode, and hibernate mode. Standby mode turns off selected system components until a system event occurs. Suspend mode places the system in a shut down condition except for its memory units. Hibernate mode writes the contents of RAM memory to a hard drive file and completely shuts the system down. For more information, see the section Power Consumption. The Fn function key activates special functions in the portable, such as display brightness and contrast. For more information, see the section Keyboards. Notebook computers are physically smaller and generally weigh less than laptop computers. For more information, see the section Portable Computer Types. In a portable computer the network card is installed into a PCMCIA slot. For more information, see the section Networking. Non-standard printed circuit boards, proprietary battery case designs, and difficult internal structure creating difficult access to many parts of the system. For more information, see the section Portable Drawbacks. The active matrix display uses a transistor at each row and column intersection to improve pixel switching times and provide a sharper screen image. For more information, see the section Liquid Crystal Displays. A stationary pointing device. For more information, see the section Touch Pads. Through a SCSI port or through an enhanced parallel port. For more information, see the section External CD-ROM Drives. Passive matrix LCD designs use less power than active matrix designs. For more information, see the section Liquid Crystal Displays. A PC-Card network adapter can be used, or a USB or parallel port-based pocket LAN adapter can be used. For more information, see the section Networking. Active matrix LCD designs produce sharper images. For more information, see the section Liquid Crystal Displays. Socket services is a methodology for software programmers to write standard drivers for PC Card devices and provides for a software head to identify the type of card being used, its capabilities, and its requirements. For more information, see the section PC Cards (PCMCIA).

4.

5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15.

46 REVIEW QUESTION ANSWERS

Instructor's Guide

Chapter 7 Portable Systems


Exam Question Answers
1. d None. One of the major drawbacks of portable systems is their lack of standard system boards. Every notebook and laptop design employs a unique system board design. For more information, see the section Portable Drawbacks. 2. a 3.3 mm. The Type-I card is 3.3 mm thick. For more information, see the section PC-Card Types. 3. b 5.0 mm. The Type-II card is 5.0 mm thick, regardless of the type of device it holds. For more information, see the section PC-Card Types. 4. d 10.5 mm. The Type-III card is 10.5 mm thick, regardless of the type of device it holds. For more information, see the section PC-Card Types. 5. c In a notebook computer. Although available for standard desktop and tower-style PCs, PCMCIA cards were developed primarily for notebook and laptop computers. For more information, see the section PC-Cards (PCMCIA). 6. a Memory expansion functions. The Type-I PC-Card was designed for system RAM expansion. For more information, see the section PC-Card Types. 7. b Removable hard drive functions. Only a Type-III PC-card can be used for removable disk drive functions. All of the other functions are acceptable in the Type-II design. For more information, see the section PC-Card Types. 8. c Nickel Cadmium. Although Ni-Cad batteries have been widely used in a support function in desktop and tower designs, they are not used to power portable computers. Even in desktop and tower systems they are being replaced by newer battery technologies that offer longer life and charge/discharge cycle times. For more information, see the section Batteries. 9. b The users guide. The non-standardized designs of notebook computers make it necessary for most people to read the systems Users Guide for directions in replacing or upgrading components (including RAM). For more information, see the section Memory. 10. d PCI modem. One of the major items that you notice in a portable computer system is that none of the standard expansion slots or adapter cards are present. This would naturally rule out the use of any PCI type adapter. For more information, see the section System Boards.

REVIEW QUESTION ANSWERS 47

Instructor's Guide

CHAPTER 8 Operating System Fundamentals


Review Question Answers
1. 2. The Path statement is an AUTOEXEC.BAT statement that instructs the operating system where to look for the executable version of a file name entered at the command prompt. For more information, see the section AUTOEXEC.BAT. The multiple-process operating system breaks the tasks associated with a process into various threads for execution. Typically, one thread may handle video output, another would handle mouse input, and another output from the printer. For more information, see the section Operating System Basics. The HIMEM.SYS command is on the first line of the CONFIG.SYS file. For more information, see the section Memory Managers. The * symbol is used as wild card character that can be substituted for an unknown character or character string in DOS commands. For more information, see the section DOS Shortcuts. The command PROMPT=$P$G will cause the complete path from the main directory to the current directory to be displayed at the command line. For more information, see the section Directories. The buffers command sets aside blocks of RAM memory space for storing data being transferred to and from disks. For more information, see the section Files, Buffers, and Stacks. When HIMEM.SYS is loaded into memory, it shifts most of the operating system functions into the High Memory area (HMA) of extended memory. The HMA takes up the first 64 kB of address above the 1 MB boundary. For more information, see the section Extended Memory. When the system is started from an off condition, a cold boot is being performed. However, by pressing the reset button or by simultaneously pressing the CTRL, ALT, and DEL keys while the system is in operation, it will generate a reset signal in the system and cause it to perform a shortened bootup routine. This operation is referred to as a warm boot allowing the system to be shut down and restarted without turning it off. For more information, see the section Initial POST Checking. Press the F5 key to skip the CONFIG.SYS and AUTOEXEC.BAT portions of the bootup process . For more information, see the section Altering CONFIG.SYS Steps. The IO.SYS file is the secondary operating system bootstrap loader and is responsible for loading MSDOS.SYS into memory and managing the operating system boot process. For more information, see the section DOS Configuration. The three main files in the MS-DOS operating system structure are the IO.SYS, MSDOS.SYS, and COMMAND.COM files. For more information, see the section MS-DOS Bootup. The System attribute indicates that the file has been reserved for exclusive use by the operating system. For more information, see the section Files and Filenames. Directory tree. For more information, see the section The Root Directory. Each directory and subdirectory (including the root directory) can hold up to 512 32-byte entries that describe each of the files in them. For more information, see the section The Root Directory. Operating system memory management software and a hard disk drive. For more information, see the section Virtual Memory.

3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8.

9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15.

48 REVIEW QUESTION ANSWERS

Instructor's Guide

Chapter 8 Operating System Fundamentals


Exam Question Answers
1. c Format /s. The FORMAT command used with the /S (System) switch creates a self-booting disk by moving the IO.SYS, MSDOS.SYS, COMMAND.COM files to the disk. For more information, see the section "Drive-level DOS Operations." A single-process, interactive-mode operating system. MS-DOS is a single process operating system (it has no provisions for multitasking/multiuser operations) and it allows interaction with its system from outside sources. For more information, see sections "Operating System Basics and Booting the System." In the CONFIG.SYS file. The system's memory managers must be listed in the CONFIG.SYS file to be functional. The first memory manager is typically HIMEM.SYS, followed by an EMM386 statement. For more information, see the section "CONFIG.SYS." The IO.SYS file. The root directory typically contains the IO.SYS, MSDOS.SYS and COMMAND.COM files. The IO.SYS and MSDOS.SYS files are hidden, read-only system files that will not normally show up in a directory listing of the root directory. For more information, see the section "The Root Directory." It governs the use of extended memory. HIMEM.SYS is the extended memory manager for Microsoft operating systems. It must be installed at the top of the CONFIG.SYS file and oversees the operation of any other memory managers loaded into the system including expanded memory managers. For more information, see the section "Extended Memory." Conventional Memory. MS-DOS applications run in the Conventional Memory area established by the original version of PC-DOS and the original IBM PC system. For more information, see the section "Conventional Memory." A master boot record. The system searches for a Master Boot Record that it can execute. This file can be located on one of the system's disk drives, or in a remote computer connected by a communications path. For more information, see the section "MS-DOS Bootup." MSDOS.SYS, IO.SYS, and COMMAND.COM. The files IO.SYS, MSDOS.SYS and COMMAND.COM must be in the root directory to boot DOS (or Windows for that matter. For more information, see the section "MS-DOS Bootup." The cluster. The smallest unit of storage that can be accessed in a MS-DOS operating system is the cluster. A cluster is a group of logically related disk sectors. For more information, see the section "File Allocation Tables." It creates more total memory for applications. By tricking the system into thinking that there is more RAM available than actually exists, virtual memory in effect creates more total memory for applications to run in. For more information, see the section "Virtual Memory."

2. d

3. a

4. d

5. c

6. c

7. c

8. a

9. a

10. a

REVIEW QUESTION ANSWERS 49

Instructor's Guide

CHAPTER 9 Windows 9X
Review Question Answers
1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. From the Windows Explorer window, right click on the file, select the Properties option from the list, move to the General page, and click on the boxes to create check marks in the desired boxes. For more information, see the section Windows Explorer. Click the View option on the Menu Bar, select the Folders option from the list, select the View tab, and click on Show Hidden Files radio button. For more information, see the section Windows Explorer. Hard drive mapping is performed in Windows 9x to allow the resources of another computer to be used over a network. For more information, see the section Mapping a Drive. Windows 9x requires a FAT 16 partition to be present on the drive where it is to be installed. For more information, see the section Installing Windows 9x. Pressing the ALT/TAB key combination in Windows, including Windows 95, will cause the system to switch between running applications. For more information, see the section DOS and Windows 9x. Pressing the CTRL and ESC keys simultaneously will cause Windows 95 to display the Start menu and move the focus to the Taskbar. For more information, see sections DOS and Windows 9x and Taskbar. 255. In Windows 9xm long filenames of up to 255 characters can be used, so that they can be more descriptive. For more information, see the section Windows 9x Files. The Windows 95 SYSEDIT tool will bring all the indicated files to the screen simultaneously for editing. For more information, see the section Windows 9x Structure. The Network Control Panel screen is used to establish all networking functions in Windows 95. For more information, see the section The Networking icon in Control Panel. The Reconnect at Logon option has not been selected. This option must be set for the drive mapping to remain in effect when the system is rebooted. For more information, see the section Mapping a Drive. The system may be using different protocols. This is the number one reason for users being unable to connect with other computers across the network. For more information, see the section Installing Network Components. Each time Windows 95 boots up successfully, these files are backed with a .DA0 file extension. For more information, see the section Windows 9x Registries. The procedure for viewing information about the networks connections from the Network Neighborhood is: Double-clicking the Network Neighborhood icon displays the printers and folders available in the workgroup in either a list or an icon format. For more information, see the section Network Neighborhood. An 80486DX-66 or higher microprocessor must be used to run Windows 98. For more information, see the section Installing Windows 9x. The Windows 98 installation routine runs a real-mode ScanDisk inspection of the drive before installing the operating system on it. It performs FAT, directory, and file checks on the drive and creates a ScanDisk log file. For more information, see the section Installing Windows 9x.

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50 REVIEW QUESTION ANSWERS

Instructor's Guide

Chapter 9 Windows 9X
Exam Question Answers
1. d In a Windows LAN. NetBEUI is the Microsoft Windows local area network protocol. It is non-routable and therefore not used for wide area network applications. For more information, see the section Installing Network Components. 2. a Novell LAN protocol. IPX/SPX is the Novell NetWare LAN transport protocol. For more information, see the section Installing Network Components. 3. b Plug-and-Play. The Windows 95 Plug-and-Play feature checks the system during bootup to determine what types of devices are installed in the system and what resources each device requires. Then, the PnP function assigns resources to the various PnP devices. The Configuration Manager oversees the complete Plug-and-Play configuration process for Windows 9x. For more information, see the section Configuration Manager. 4. a IO.SYS, MSDOS.SYS, COMMAND.COM, SYSTEM.DAT, USER.DAT, WIN.COM. The sequence IO.SYS, MSDOS.SYS, COMMAND.COM, SYSTEM.DAT, USER.DAT, WIN.COM, best describes the Windows 95 bootup sequence. For more information, see the section Windows 9x Startup. 5. d XXXX.CAB. Windows 95 stores its installation files in a compressed XXXX.CAB (Cabinet) format. These files must be expanded to be used. For more information, see the section Windows 9x Registries. 6. b The F8 key. The F8 key is used during boot to access the Windows 9x Startup Menu. For more information, see the section Phase 1: The Bootstrap Process. 7. c MYDOCU~1.TXT. In Windows 95, the tilde character is placed in the seventh character position of a long filename, to show that the filename is being displayed in a shortened manner for DOS compatible directory listings. The tilde character is inserted into the seventh character space for up to 9 iterations of similar filenames. After that, Windows will replace the sixth character for iterations up to 99. For more information, see the section Windows 9x Files. 8. b The BIOS is not PnP compatible. Even though Windows 95 features PnP-compatible hardware detection, it cannot perform the PnP function alone. The systems BIOS and I/O devices must also support PnP for hardware detection to occur. For more information, see the section Windows 95. 9. c Protocol. Protocols provide rules so that network devices can communicate with one another. For more information, see the section Installing Network Components. 10. c TAPI. Under Windows 9x, applications can cooperatively share the dial-up connections through its Telephony Application Programming Interface (TAPI). This interface provides a universal set of drivers for modems and COM ports to control and arbitrate telephony operations for data, faxes, and voice. For more information, see the section Wide Area Networking With Windows 9x.

REVIEW QUESTION ANSWERS 51

Instructor's Guide

CHAPTER 10 Windows NT/2000


Review Question Answers
1. 2. 3. The central feature of the Windows 2000 architecture is the Active Directory structure. Active Directory is a distributed database of user and resource information that describes the makeup of the network. For more information, see the section Active Directory. In the Windows NT Client/Server environment, two types of domain controllers exist Primary Domain Controllers (PDC) and Backup Domain Controllers (BDC). For more information, see the section Windows NT Server. The four types of security found in Windows 2000 environment are described as follows: 1) The Kerberos authentication protocol determines that users on the network are who they say they are; 2) Digital certificates are password-protected, encrypted data files that include data that identifies the transmitting system and can be used to authenticate external users to the network through Virtual Private Networks (VPNs). When the certificates are combined with security standards such as the IP Security Protocol (IPSec) secure, encrypted TCP/IP data can be passed across public networks, such as the Internet; 3) Point-to-Point Tunneling Protocol (PPTP); and 4) Layer 2 Tunneling Protocol (L2TP) as alternative security technologies for VPNs. For more information, see the section Windows 2000 Security. The core component of the NTFS system is the Master File table (MFT). This table replaces the FAT in a MS-DOS compatible system and contains information about each file being stored on the disk. For more information, see the section Windows NT File System. There is no method for upgrading any part of the Windows 9x Registry to a Windows NT Registry. For more information, see the section Windows 2000 Registry. The recommended amount of memory for installing Windows 2000 Professional is 64MB, and 4GB maximum. For more information, see the section Installing Windows 2000 Professional. The Windows NT Hive files are stored in \WINNT\SYSTEM32\CONFIG along with a backup copy and log file for each hive. For more information, see the section Windows 2000 Registry. The actual user configuration file is named NTUSER.DAT. In Windows 2000 , the NTUSER.DAT file is stored in \Document_and_Settings\username. For more information, see the section Windows 2000 Registry. The Control Panel Wizards are designed to correctly make changes to the Registry in a a manner that the operating system can understand. For more information, see the section Windows 2000 Registry. A list of Microsoft verified devices can be read from the HCL.TXT file on the Windows 2000 Professional distribution CD. For more information, see the section Installing Windows 2000 Professional, Hands-On Activity. The boot.ini file is used to generate the Boot Loader Menu. For more information, see the section Windows NT Startup. Two factors that must be taken into consideration are compatibility with current hardware and which file management system to use. For more information, see the section Installing Windows NT/2000. The Windows 2000 tool used for implementing changes for computers and users throughout an enterprise is Group Policy. For more information, see the section Windows NT/2000 Group Policies. The advantages of the Windows NT file system over FAT16 and FAT32 are: 1) more efficient drive management due to its smaller cluster size capabilities; 2) support for very large drives made possible by its 64-bit clustering arrangement; 3) increased folder and file security capabilities; 4) recoverable file system capabilities; and 5) built-in RAID support. For more information, see the section NTFS Advantages. The Rdisk.exe utility can be used to create a backup copy of the Registry. It is located in the \Winnt\System32 folder and will create a backup copy of the Registry in the \Winnt\Repair folder. For more information, see the section Windows 2000 Registry.

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Instructor's Guide

Chapter 10 Windows NT/2000


Exam Question Answers
1. a NTLDR. The NTLDR file is responsible for loading the NT operating system into memory, after which it passes control the system over to the Windows NT operating System.manages the Windows NT bootup process. For more information, see the section Windows NT Startup. 2. c 32-bit Windows 98 applications. All 32-bit Windows 98 applications are managed by the Win32 Subsystem. For more information, see the section User Mode. 3. b The cluster. Like the FAT systems, NTFS systems use the cluster as the basic unit of disk storage For more information, see the section Windows NT File System. 4. c A tree. A tree is a collection of objects that share the same DNS name. For more information, see the section Active Directory. 5. a Trusts. Trusts are relationships that enable users to move between domains and perform prescribed types of operations. For more information, see the section Active Directory. 6. c The HAL. The HAL accomplishes its tasks by providing a standard access port for all system hardware operations. In this manner, the rest of the operating system never sees, or deals with the hardware, only the HAL. For more information, see the section The Hardware Abstraction Layer. 7. b 26. In Windows, the number of recognizable drive letters is 26 (A-Z). For more information, see the section Mapping a Drive. 8. b 215 characters. Filenames in Windows 2000 can be up to 215 characters long including spaces. For more information, see the section Windows 2000 Files. 9. a The \Winnt directory. The Setup program will install the Windows 2000 files in the \WINNT folder.For more information, see the section Installing Windows 2000 Professional, Hands On Activity. 10. d Domain. A client/server network is one in which standalone computers, called clients, are connected to, and administered by, a master computer called a server. Collectively, the members of the group make up a body called a domain. The members of the domain share a common directory database and are organized in levels. Every domain is identified by a unique name and is administered as a single unit having common rules and procedures. For more information, see the section Windows NT.

REVIEW QUESTION ANSWERS 53

Instructor's Guide

CHAPTER 11 Basic System Troubleshooting


Review Question Answers
1. 2. The system has successfully booted up to the operating system prompt. For more information, see the section Determining Hardware/Software/Configuration Problems. The floppy disk, the floppy drive, the FDD signal cable, the FDC controller (MI/O or system board), and the FDDs power connector. A number of things can cause improper floppy disk drive operation or disk drive failure. These items include the use of unformatted disks, incorrectly inserted disks, damaged disks, erased disks loose cables, drive failure, adapter failure, system board failure, or a bad or loose power connector. For more information, see the section Troubleshooting FDDs. When installing a new system, after replacing the CMOS backup battery, and when a new option is installed in the system. It is usually necessary to run the systems CMOS setup utility in the following three situations: 1) The first situation occurs when the system is first constructed; 2) The second occurrence happens if it becomes necessary to replace the CMOS backup battery on the system board; 3) Whenever a new or different option is added to the system (such as a hard drive, floppy drive, or video display), it may be necessary to run the Setup utility. For more information, see the section Determining Hardware/Software/Configuration Problems. The system has encountered invalid configuration information during the boot up process. Either the configuration has been set incorrectly, or the hardware was unable to confirm the configuration settings. For more information, see the section Determining Hardware/Software/Configuration Problems. The leads of the meter should be placed so that the meter is in parallel with the device being checked. The tests must be performed while power is applied to the component. For more information, see the section Using a Multimeter. It can reasonable be assumed that at least the last component removed is defective. For more information, see the section FRU Troubleshooting. The three items commonly tested using the resistance function of a multimeter are fuses, the systems speaker, and the continuity of cables and connectors. For more information, see the section Using a Multimeter. The resistance that should be read on a digital multimeter of a functioning fuse is near 0 ohms. For more information, see the section Using a Multimeter. The voltage across most of the capacitors on the system board using a digital multimeter is 5 Vdc. For more information, see the section Using a Multimeter. The operator should be eliminated as a possible source of the problem. For more information, see section Information Gathering. The multimeter should be set for the highest range possible. It is normal practice to first set the meter to its highest voltage range to make certain that the voltage level being measured does not damage the meter. For more information, see the section Using a Multimeter. Logon passwords are designed to keep unauthorized personnel from accessing the system, or its contents. For more information, see the section Security Access Problems. In a LAN environment, access and privileges to programs and data can be established by the network administrator through the softwares security system. For more information, see the section Security Access Problems. Determine what has changed since the system was last running. If the unit is a new installation, treat it as a setup problem. For more information, see the section Network Repair. Check the Print Spooler, or Print Manager, in the print server to see if an error has occurred and check the hard disk space and memory usage in the print server. For more information, see the section Network Printing Problems.

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Instructor's Guide

Chapter 11 Basic System Troubleshooting


Exam Question Answers
1. d The problem is hardware related. A hardware problem has occurred. Before this beep, the system is sorting out, testing and configuring its hardware. After the beep, it begins to boot up the system and software configuration issues are taken into account. Recall that BIOS code is firmware and is, therefore, not likely to become defective. For more information, see the section Determining Hardware/Software/Configuration Problems. 2. a The problem is probably associated with the operating system. After the beep in the startup sequence, the system performs the boot up routine to hand off control to the operating system. For more information, see the section Isolating Undefined Problems. 3. c A setup or configuration problem has occurred. When a new component is installed and the system will not run properly, a configuration (or setup) problem is usually indicated. Either a configuration setting on the new device has conflicted with that of another device over some system resource, or the system may just not be able to identify the settings for the new device. For more information, see the section Determining Hardware/Software/Configuration Problems. 4. a The power supply. The power supply unit affects most of the systems components directly, and the rest (such as adapter cards and peripherals) it affects indirectly. Therefore, symptoms caused by power supply problems can appear anywhere. The power supply unit is one of the few components in the system that is connected to virtually every other component in the system.Therefore, it has the ability to affect all of the other components if it fails. For more information, see the section Isolating Power Supply Problems. 5. d 8 ohms. Most PC speakers are rated for 8 ohms of resistance. This is the reading that should be found across a speaker that has been disconnected from the system. If the speaker is good, the meter should read near 8 ohms. If the speaker is defective, the resistance reading should be 0 or infinite. For more information, see the section Using a Multimeter. 6. a A power supply failure. A power supply problem produces a continuous beep tone in most PC-compatible systems. For more information, see the section Isolating Power Supply Problems. 7. d The power supply. If the system appears to be completely dead, the power supply unit (or the wall socket) are the most likely culprits. Failure of other system components generally leaves some appearance of life in the system (fan running, front-panel light on, etc.). For more information, see the section Checking A Dead System. 8. d A bootup. The FAT on the systems boot disk is checked during the bootup process. Therefore, if any problems occur with this table they will produce the Bad Table error message at that time. For more information, see the section Isolating Undefined Problems. 9. c A setup or configuration problem. A Display Type Mismatch error occurs during the system configuration checks, when the system is checking to make sure that the list of components it has in CMOS actually match what it finds in the system. For more information, see the section Isolating Undefined Problems. 10. d A video controller IC. In modern PCs, integrated circuits are not considered replaceable units, much less FRUs. Most ICs in PCs are large, surface-mounted devices that require complex equipment to remove. The time and expense of identifying and replacing a defective IC far outweighs any reason for replacing it. It is normally not practical to troubleshoot failed components to the IC level. For more information, see the section Field-Replaceable Unit Troubleshooting.

REVIEW QUESTION ANSWERS 55

Instructor's Guide

CHAPTER 12 Operating System Troubleshooting


Review Question Answers
1. 2. The first thing that should be checked is that the applications properties are set to run in MS-DOS mode. For more information, see the section Windows 9x Operating Problems. The four preliminary steps used to troubleshoot operating system startup problems are: 1) Try to reboot the system; 2) Check system log files if available to determine where the process was interrupted; 3) Perform a clean boot with minimal configuration settings to remove non-essential elements from the process; 4) Perform a single-step bootup to isolate any driver problems that are preventing bootup from taking place. For more information, see the section Troubleshooting Startup Problems. If an application will not start in Windows 9x, you have four basic possibilities to consider: 1)The application is missing; 2) Part or all of the application is corrupted; 3) The applications executable file is incorrectly identified; or 4) Its attributes are locked or restricted. For more information, see the section Windows 9x Application Problems. A memory management conflict has occurred in the Windows 9x environment and the application should be saved and restarted. The is typically referred to as a Software Exception Error. Applications attempting to access unallocated memory areas, or attempting to access another applications designated memory areas create a software exception error in the system. Windows 9x responds to these errors by placing a The Program Has Performed an Illegal Operation message on the screen. For more information, see the section Windows 9x Operating Problems. To rearrange information on the disk in a logical sequence so it is quicker to read and write. The Defrag utility is used to realign files on the drive that may have become fragmented after being moved back and forth between the drive and the system. For more information, see the section Using Windows HDD Utilities. To locate and remove lost file chains, lost allocation units (clusters) that slow down the operation of the drive. For more information, see the section Using Windows HDD Utilities. Windows includes the System Editor utility or Sysedit.exe for performing this function. For more information, see the section Operating System Utilities. Check the applications properties to verify that the filename, path, and syntax are correct. For more information, see the section Windows 9x Application Problems. Set up the system so that it prints directly to the printer. From the Printer Properties page select Details and select Spool Settings and select Print Directly to the printer option. If the print job goes through there is a spooler problem. For more information, see the section Windows Printing Problems. Two very good tools to use in these situations are an Emergency Startup Disk and the Startup Menu. For more information, see sections Creating a Windows 95 Emergency Start Disk and Windows 9x Startup Modes. In Safe Mode, the minimal device drivers (keyboard, mouse, and standard-mode VGA drivers) are active to start the system. As a side note, the CD-ROM drive will not be active in Safe Mode. For more information, see the section Safe Mode. Check the Print Spooler to see whether any particular type of error has occurred. For more information, see the section Windows Printing Problems The Step-by-Step Confirmation mode displays each startup command line-by-line and waits for a confirmation from the keyboard before moving ahead. This allows an offending startup command to be isolated and avoided, so that it can be replaced or removed. For more information, see the section Safe Mode. Device Manager is used to set the configuration for devices such as the network adapter. For more information, see the section Windows 9x Networking Problems. The disk can run out of disk space, files can become corrupt, or the system can lock up due to software errors. For more information, see the section Windows 9x Operating Problems.

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Instructor's Guide

Chapter 12 Operating System Troubleshooting


Exam Question Answers
1. a Windows will not start. With Windows 9x the HIMEM.SYS statement must be present and correct in the CONFIG.SYS for the operating system to run. Also the HIMEM.SYS must be the correct version and in the correct location. For more information, see the section Windows 9x Startup Problems. 2. a Scandisk. The ScanDisk utility can locate and fix several types of problems on the hard drive. These problems include corrupted FATs, long filenames, lost clusters and cross-linked files, tree structure problems, and bad sectors o the drive. For more information, see the section Windows 9x Startup Problems. 3. c Device Manager. Although the Registry can be altered through the Regedit function, the safest method of changing registry settings is to change values through the Device Manager. For more information, see the section Using Device Manager. 4. b The device is experiencing a direct hardware conflict with another device. The Device Manager will display an exclamation point inside a yellow circle icon whenever a device is experiencing a direct hardware conflict with another device. For more information, see the section Using Device Manager. 5. a The device has been disabled by a user selection conflict. When a red X appears at the devices icon, the device has been disabled due to a user-selection conflict. For more information, see the section Using Device Manager. 6. a It tracks the events of the Startup procedure. When logged mode startup is activated, the system will create the BOOTLOG file. The BOOTUPLOG.TXT file tracks the events of the startup procedure and can show which step of the bootup process caused problems. For more information, see the section Windows 9x Log Files. 7. b The IP address is incorrect, invalid, or conflicting with another computer. If a client cannot see any other computers on the network, improper IP addressing may be occurring,. This is one of the most common problems associated with TCP/IP. Users must have a valid IP address and subnet to communicate with other computers. If the IP address is incorrect, invalid, or conflicting with another computer in the network, you will be able to see your local computer, but will not be able to see others on the network. For more information, see the section Windows 2000 Networking Problems. 8. d The Add New Hardware wizard. In Windows 9x, device drivers can be installed manually through the Control Panels Add New Hardware icon. The driver can be selected from a supported devices list, or from a manufacturers support disk through the Have Disk button. You must use the Control Panels Add New Hardware Wizard to install device drivers when the PnP detection function does not work. For more information, see the section Windows 9x Startup Problems. 9. c Click the Resources tab and check for conflicts. If a modem listed in the Device Manager indicates a resource conflict by displaying an exclamation point next to the modem listing check for resource conflicts. For more information, see the section Troubleshooting WAN Problems. 10. c WIN /B. The WIN /B switch causes Windows to start in logged mode and to produce a BOOTLOG.TXT file during startup. This option enables you to determine whether specific device drivers are stalling the system. For more information, see the section Safe Mode.

REVIEW QUESTION ANSWERS 57

Instructor's Guide

CHAPTER 13 Preventive Maintenance


Review Question Answers
1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. The inside of the monitor and the inside of the power supply. Both units house potentially dangerous voltage levels inside their housings. For more information, see the section Avoiding High-Voltage Hazards. An antistatic wrist strap, rubber antistatic mats, and a humidifier. For more information, see the section MOS Handling Techniques. A damp cloth is the best general-purpose cleaning tool for use with computer equipment. For more information, see the section Cleaning. Dust build-up, rough handling, smoke, and heat build-up as in extremes in temperature. For more information, see the section PM (Preventive Maintenance) Procedures. A sag is an under-voltage condition that typically lasts only a few milliseconds. For more information, see the section Power Line Protection. There are currently no restrictions on disposing of a spent toner cartridge. However, for economical reasons toner cartridges should be recycled unless very good resolution from the printer is required. For more information, see the section Disposal Procedures. MOS devices in general, and CMOS devices in particular, are most likely to be affected by ESD damage. For more information, see the section MOS Handling Techniques. No, this is not a safe practice, since the resistive feature of a true wrist strap is missing. True ESD protection devices have resistive elements built into them to protect the user (human) from shock hazards. For more information, see the section MOS Handling Techniques. The most effective method of dealing with EMI problems is good grounding. For more information, see the section Checking the Grounds. Because the computer system is connected to an actual earth ground, it should always be turned off and disconnected from the wall outlet during electrical storms. This includes the computer and all of its peripherals. For more information, see the section Checking the Grounds. The best method for transporting electronic equipment is to place them in an antistatic bag. For more information, see the section MOS Handling Techniques. Reformat the hard drive after backing up its contents, reinstall all the applications software from original media, reinstall all user files from backup system, check all floppy disks with antivirus program, clean the R/W heads in the floppy drive, and then perform the steps outlined in the monthly, and semi-annual guidelines. For more information, see the section Annual Activities. When dealing with a UPS system, the most important characteristic is the Volt-Ampere (VA) rating which indicates the ability of the UPS system to deliver both voltage (V) and current (A) to the computer simultaneously. The other significant characteristic for UPS Systems is the length of time that the UPS can supply power. For more information, see the section Uninterruptible Power Supplies. Over-voltage conditions classified as spikes have a normal duration that is measured in nanoseconds. For more information, see the section Power Line Protection. When the system is on, active viruses can be found in RAM memory. However, the virus must also be stored on a non-volatile media in locations such as the MBR or hidden in files on the active partition. For more information, see the section Viruses.

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Instructor's Guide

Chapter 13 Preventive Maintenance


Exam Question Answers
1. b No, viruses do not normally attack CMOS settings. Most viruses attack files on disk drives and hang out in memory when the system is running. Only one type of infrequently encountered virus, known as CMOS virus, attacks the information stored in the CMOS area. For more information, see the section Viruses. 2. b By sharing infected files between individuals. Although viruses can be passed on through any of the answers listed, the number 1 method of transmitting viruses is through infected diskettes shared between individuals. For more information, see the section Viruses. 3. a Moving people. People moving around is the number one source of ESD. Clothing rubbing against other materials or the body can create it, as can moving across certain types of carpeting. ESD is more likely to happen in times of low humidity. Rubber mats and grounded conductors are the best methods of preventing and safely removing ESD. For more information, see the section Identifying and Avoiding Electrostatic Discharge. 4. c While working on CRT video monitors. Antistatic ESD wrist straps should never be worn while working on higher-voltage components, such as monitors and power supply units. Due to the dangerous voltage levels present inside these units, it is not a place to be wearing a conductive strap attached to your body. It may also be dangerous to wear an antistatic strap in some areas of a printer. However, printers are generally thought of as safe for such devices. For more information, see the section MOS Handling Techniques. 5. a A water fabric softener solution. A solution composed of 10 parts water and one part common household fabric softener makes an effective and economical antistatic solution.Using a soft cloth with the solution is the best tool for cleaning the plastic surfaces of the system, as well as the monitor face. The antistatic properties of the fabric softener removes static build up from the surfaces in addition to removing dust and dirt. For more information, see the section Cleaning. 6. a A spike. A short over-voltage condition or power surge lasting for periods ranging into the nanosecond range are called spikes. For more information, see the section Power Line Protection. 7. a Low humidity. ESD is most likely to occur during periods of low humidity. If the relative humidity is below 50%, static charges can accumulate easily,. ESD generally does not occur when the humidity is above 50%. Anytime the charge reaches around 10,000 volts, it is likely to discharge to grounded metal parts. The other conditions decrease the likelihood of ESD. For more information, see the section Identifying and Avoiding Electrostatic Discharge. 8. c A UPS. In the case of a complete shutdown, or a significant sag, the best protection from losing programs and data is an Uninterruptible Power Supply. Surge suppressors and line filters can protect against small power variations, but cannot handle sustained power line problems. Tape drives offer the best protection for data that has been backed up to a storage media, but cannot protect data that has been entered since the last backup. For more information, see the section Surge Suppressers. 9. d An under-voltage condition that lasts for a few milliseconds. A voltage sag is an under-voltage condition that typically lasts for a few milliseconds, while a brownout can last for a protracted period of time. For more information, see the section Power Line Protection. 10. b The safety ground plug at a commercial AC receptacle. The ground lead of a commercial 3-prong power receptacle generally provides the best grounding source available, because it is tied to the true (earth) ground. The commercial power system provides a well planned grounding system. For more information, see the section Checking the Grounds.

REVIEW QUESTION ANSWERS 59

CHAPTER TESTS

Chapter 1
1. Which type of data access is fastest? a. RAM b. ROM c. Disk d. CD All system boards use ____________ to store the systems basic input/output system (BIOS). a. CACHE b. ROM c. RAM d. PROM The brains of any microcomputer system is the ________. a. coprocessor b. RAM c. chipset d. microprocessor Accountants typically use ___________ to prepare financial reports. a. Spreadsheets b. data-bases c. word processors d. graphics programs A good example of firmware is ___________. a. CONFIG.SYS b. Windows 95 c. DOS d. ROM BIOS When a computer boots up, the first set of instructions it receives is stored in ___________. a. the CMOS memory b. the ROM BIOS chip c. RAM d. the CPU

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CHAPTER TESTS 63

Instructor's Guide 7. When software is stored in non-volatile memory chips, it is called _____. a. shareware b. hardware c. Vaporware d. firmware Which system component executes software instructions and carries out arithmetic operations for the system? a. The microprocessor b. The CMOS RAM c. The ALU unit d. The U and V pipes A proper power supply connection in a desktop or tower PC results in _____. a. the red wires of P8 and P9 being side by side b. the black wires of P8 and P9 being side by side c. the white wires of P8 and P9 being side by side d. the orange wires of P8 and P9 being side by side

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10. On a typical US, 120 Vac, 3-prong power outlet, the smaller slot is what side of the connection. a. The hot or phase side. b. The cold or phase side. c. The phase or neutral side. d. The neutral or cold side. 11. Another name for planar boards is _____________. a. I/O cards b. all-in-one boards c. bus extender cards d. system boards 12. In Figure A at the right, the component labeled B is a _______________? a. system board b. multi-I/O card c. floppy disk drive d. power supply 13. Which memory package uses a 168-pin slot or socket? a. SIP b. DIP c. SIMM d. DIMM Figure A

CHAPTER TESTS 64

Instructor's Guide 14. If the memory slots have 30 pins, then the chip is a _____________. a. CIP b. DIMM c. SIMM d. PRAM 15. Basic instructions for communication between the microprocessor and the I/O devices are located in ___________. a: CMOS b: the bootstrap loader program c: DOS d: the BIOS 16. What is the first action of the POST program? a: Sets the instruction address to F0000h. b: Initializes the system board's intelligent components. c: To perform a series of diagnostic tests on the system to verify it is operating correctly. d: Checks the disk drive for startup information. 17. If any systems basic components are malfunctioning the POST indicates this by ________. a: three short beeps b: an error message to the screen and/or an audio code c: one long and one short beep d: a Press F1 to continue message 18. What is the primary user interface for Windows 9x? a: The monitor b: The GUI c: The command prompt d: The keyboard 19. If you are replacing 168-pin RAM modules, they are called ________. a. SIMMs b. DIMMs c. DRAMs d. PRAMS 20. Which video standard is superior to the others listed? a. VGA b. SVGA c. XGA d. S3TV

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Chapter 2
1. A Flash BIOS is used for ___________. a. resetting the default BIOS settings b. upgrading the BIOS without additional hardware c. inputting temporary BIOS settings for troubleshooting purposes d. making newer motherboards backward compatible Which type of RAM module are you likely to find in a notebook computer? a. SDRAM b. WRAM c. RIMM d. SODIMM Another name for the VESA bus is _________. a. the V pipe b. the VL bus c. the Virtual Extension Service Access bus d. the Vertical Evolution Sensitive Architecture bus Which of the following are not capable of handling 16-bit pathways? a. The EISA bus b. The VL bus c. The MCA bus d. The PC bus Most Pentium system boards use which combination of extension bus types? a. VESA and PCI b. ISA and MCA c. ISA and VESA d. ISA and PCI In a ribbon cable installation, the red stripe should point to _____________. a. pin #1 b. pin #34 c. pin #40 d. pin #2

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Instructor's Guide 7. Which processor cannot be used in a Socket 370 system? a. Cyrix III b. AMD Athlon c. Pentium III d. Intel Celeron Cache memory is used to _________________. a. increase the speed of data accesses b. increase the size of memory available to programs c. store data in non-volatile memory d. augment the memory used for the operating system kernel What system structure contains the PC's time, date and configuration information? a. The ROM BIOS b. The CMOS RAM c. The RAMDAC d. The Upper Memory Block (UMB)

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10. The RAM type most often used for caching is __________. a. DRAM b. SRAM c. EDO RAM d. video RAM 11. In a Pentium II-based system board, the L2 cache would be located _____. a. on an expansion card b. in the microprocessor cartridge c. on the system board d. on the microprocessor 12. You should flash the ROM BIOS whenever you upgrade the _____. a. peripherals b. monitor c. CPU d. RAM 13. The original Pentium processor used what power supply voltage? a. 3.3 volts dc b. 5.0 volts dc c. 11.5 volts dc d. 15.0 volts dc

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Instructor's Guide 14. The buses that run between the microprocessor and the system boards (North Bridge) is the _____________. a. local bus b. front side bus c. backside bus d. expansion bus 15. Which bus standard provides a 124-pin interface at a speed of 132 MBytes/Sec? a. ISA b. PCI c. VL d. EISA 16. A computer system that uses a 64-bit bus is based on the ____________ microprocessor. a. 286 b. 386 c. 486 d. 586 17. EDO memory chips are known for their _____________. a. parity checking features b. low cost c. universal compatibility d. speed characteristics 18. An AGP slot is used with which type of device? a. infrared mouse b. video adapter c. hard disk drive d. modem 19. Other than increased operating speeds, how do Pentium III processors differ from Pentium II processors? a. They have larger L2 caches. b. The Pentium III uses Super Socket 7 technology. c. The Pentium III uses a 128 bit bus. d. They have higher back side bus speeds. 20. Which IRQ signal is given the highest priority in a PC-compatible system? a. IRQ 8 b. IRQ 3 c. IRQ 15 d. IRQ 7

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Chapter 3
1. In which I/O method does the microprocessor examine the status of the peripheral under program control? a. Polling b. Programmed I/O c. Interrupt-driven I/O d. DMA Another name for a CRT is ____________. a. a digital television b. a monitor c. a color radiant tele-viewer d. a cathode ray transmitter The purpose of a DMA channel is ________________. a. to allow high-speed peripheral devices to conduct data transfers on the systems bus without involving the microprocessor b. to query I/O devices to see if they have data available for transfer c. to interrupt the current operation being performed by the microprocessor for an I/O operation d. to facilitate I/O devices in conducting direct transfers with the microprocessor What is the recommended maximum range for an IrDA connection? a. 1 meter (3 ft) b. 3 meters (10 ft) c. 30 meters (100 ft) d. 15 meters (50 ft) Each device in a PC that is capable of interrupting the system, has _________________. a. a unique IRQ number b. an interrupt service routine c. an interrupt acknowledgment d. a specific handshake What is the I/O address range of the first hard drive controller in a PC-compatible system? a. 1F0-1F8 b. 3F8-3FF c. 278-3FF d. 000-FFF

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Instructor's Guide 7. How many devices can be attached to the USB port of a computer? a. 127 b. 255 c. 7 d. 15 When a microprocessor receives an interrupt request, it _________. a. stops what it is doing and goes into a high impedance state b. stops what it is doing so that the interrupting device can access the system buses c. stops what it is doing and allows the interrupt controller to service the interrupting device d. stops what it is doing and services the interrupting device Which DMA channel is reserved for floppy-disk drives? a. Channel 0 b. Channel 2 c. Channel 4 d. Channel 8

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10. To be able to work with a microprocessor, what must a device have? a. Internal RAM b. a floppy drive c. an I/O address d. a serial port 11. A serial cable that directly connects two computers together is called a _______________. a. straight through cable b. null modem c. SPP cable d. EPP cable 12. Serial ports transmit data _______________. a. one bit at a time b. one byte at a time c. when a clock pulse is applied to them d. in one direction only 13. Parallel ports transmit data ______________. a. one bit at a time b. one byte at a time c. when a clock pulse is applied to them d. in only one direction

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Instructor's Guide 14. A 9-pin, male, D-shell connector, located on the back of a PC, is normally used for _____________. a. a game port b. the LPT 1 parallel port c. the COM 1 serial port d. the COM 2 serial port 15. A 25-pin, male D-shell connector, on the back of a PC, is used for _______________. a. the COM 1 serial port b. the COM 2 serial port c. the LPT 1 parallel port d. a game port 16. The LPT 1 parallel printer port is normally assigned to _______________. a. IRQ 1 b. IRQ 5 c. IRQ 6 d. IRQ 7 17. _____________ transmissions are conducted at irregular intervals, using start, stop and parity bits. a. Serial b. Parallel c. Synchronous d. Asynchronous 18. The COM 2 and COM 4 serial port settings are normally assigned to ____________. a. IRQ 1 b. IRQ 2 c. IRQ 3 d. IRQ 4 19. How many devices can be attached to a single Firewire port? a. 127 b. 1023 c. 255 d. 63 20. An address of 3F8h would correspond to a _____________. a. COM 1 serial port b. COM 2 serial port c. LPT 1 parallel port d. LPT 2 parallel port

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Chapter 4
1. A 3 1 2 DS-HD disk can hold ____________ of information. a. 360 KB b. 720 KB c. 1.2 MB d. 1.44 MB Disk drive tracks are composed of ______________. a. Sectors b. clusters c. FRUs d. magnetic spots When installing an IDE drive in a system, which of the following jumper settings do not apply? a. Single b. Slave c. Master d. Terminal Which HDD interface employs a 40 pin/80 conductor cable? a. ATA-2 b. EIDE c. Ultra ATA 100 d. SCSI-3 The term RAID stands for ______________. a. Random Access Identification Devices b. Redundant Array of Inexpensive Disks c. Rapid Access Input Device d. Resistance Activated Incidence Data Which item is not an important consideration when selecting a hard disk drive for a specific application? a. Access time b. Seek time c. Capacity d. Number of heads

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Instructor's Guide 7. The fastest HDD interface is? a. MFM b. ESDI c. EIDE d. SCSI-II Which RAID type provides error detection and correction capabilities? a. RAID 0 b. RAID 1 c. RAID 2 d. RAID 3 The maximum length of a wide SCSI cable is _______________. a. 1 meter b. 2 meters c. 3 meters d. 4 meters

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10. How does the system identify the correct designation for a floppy drive? a. From jumper settings of the drive. b. From CMOS information. c. From PnP capabilities built into the motherboard. d. From the drive's position on the signal cable. 11. A floppy-disk drive uses which of the following IRQs? a. IRQ 2 b. IRQ 5 c. IRQ 6 d. IRQ 9 12. The driver normally associated with a CD-ROM drive is ______________. a. CDDRIVE.COM b. MSCDEX.EXE c. CDX.EXE d. CDROM.EXE 13. A typical 4.7 inch CD-ROM disk stores about _____________ of data. a. 400 MB b. 680 MB c. 1 GB d. 1.5 GB

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14. What type of interface is typically used to support an external CD-ROM? a. IDE b. RS232C c. SCSI d. MFM 15. What is the highest number that can be referenced by a 3-position jumper block on an adapter card? a: 3 b: 5 c: 7 d: 10 16. How many devices are supported on a Wide SCSI interface? a. 7 b. 15 c. 2 d. 8 17. What size is the data bus in a standard SCSI interface? a. 8 b. 16 c. 32 d. 64 18. In a computer with multiple logical drives, what factor determines which drive the system will boot up to? a. FDISK b. The active partition setting. c. The extended partition setting. d. The system must always bootup to the C:\ drive. 19. In a Microsoft-based system, how many logical drives can be established on its drives? a. 4 b. 7 c. 23 d. 528 20. How many devices are supported by a system board that has an EIDE interface? a. 1 b. 2 c. 4 d. 8

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Chapter 5
1. How many computers are required to implement a true LAN? a. 1 b. 2 c. 3 d. 4 Which system can be classified as a BUS topology? a. Ethernet b. Wireless c. Token Ring d. Fiber-Optic Which system can be classified as a RING topology? a. Ethernet b. Wireless c. Token Ring d. Fiber-Optic A modem that conducts communication in only one direction at a time is called _______________. a. a simplex modem b. a full-duplex modem c. a half-duplex modem d. a full-simplex modem The definition of the RTS pin in an RS-232 modem connection is? a. Return To Sender. b. Request To Survey data. c. Reverse The Series. d. Request To Send. In a client/server network, _____________________. a. at least one unit is reserved just to serve the other units b. at least one unit depends on the other units for its information c. each unit has its own information and can serve as either client or server d. each unit handles some information for the network

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Instructor's Guide 7. When exchanging an ISA network interface card with an identical replacement, you should first _______________. a. save the configuration settings of the current card b. use the default settings of the replacement card c. replace all the network cabling d. disable the entire network Which of the following is not a valid network? a. LAN b. WAN c. MAN d. NAN The term NIC stands for _____. a. Non-Interleaved Capacity. b. Network Interface Card. c. National Internet Community. d. Numerical Internal Coprocessor.

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10. To connect to the Internet, a computer must be able to use the protocol _______________. a. MAU b. NIC c. PPP d. TCP/IP 11. Internet Service providers ________________. a. install modems b. provide Internet addresses c. install cable d. create Internet browsers 12. A customer wants to use an installed modem for Internet operation. You should _______________. a. install another modem and get the ISP information b. get the ISP information c. install Dial-up Networking and enter the ISP information d. install Dial-up Networking 13. If a system has a 100BASE-FX NIC installed, how fast will it operate? a. 185 Mbps b. 100 Mbps c. 10 Mbps d. 50 Mbps

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Instructor's Guide 14. In a system using a 100BASE-T network card, what is the maximum segment length that can be used? a. 185 M b. 500 M c. 100 M d. 412 M 15. Which AT command is used to reset a modem? a. ATA b. ATDn c. ATZn d. ATn 16. A _______________ is a combination of hardware and software components that provide a protective barrier between networks with different security levels. a. Router b. Gateway c. Firewall d. Bridge 17. _______________ IP addresses are normally used with smaller networks. a. Class D b. Class C c. Class B d. Class A 18. Which Internet protocol is used to automatically assign IP address to devices on a TCP/IP network? a. DHCP b. PPP c. SLIP d. IETF 19. Which Internet protocol is used to upload and download files to and from the Internet? a. HTTP b. FTP c. PPP d. TCP/IP 20. Identify the protocol used to handle outgoing email. a. TCP/IP b. POP3 c. POTS d. SMTP

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Chapter 6
1. A cable with a male, 9-pin connector at one end and a female, 9-pin connector at the other is ______________. a. a game port cable b. a serial port cable c. a parallel port cable d. a keyboard cable Which is not a common pin configuration for a dot-matrix printhead? a. 9-pin b. 12-pin c. 18-pin d. 24-pin Which of the following is not a parameter used to set up a serial printer for operation? a. Parity type b. Baud rate c. Handshaking sequence d. Character cell type What is the most likely action indicated by light printout of a dot-matrix type of printer? a. Printhead misalignment. b. Worn platen. c. Spent ribbon. d. Incorrect printer setup. Which component of a laser printer transfers toner to the paper? a. The drum. b. The corona wire. c. The fuser assembly. d. The platen. The second thing to check when a laser printer produces blank pages is _____________. a. the fuser assembly b. the toner cartridge c. the transfer corona d. the conditioning roller

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Instructor's Guide 7. What type of printer delivers ink to the page by applying power to an electromagnet, which, in turn, forces a wire to strike an inked ribbon? a. A laser printer. b. A drum printer. c. An ink-jet printer. d. A dot-matrix printer. In a laser printer, a positive charge on the transfer corona wire causes __________________. a. the positive image to appear on the print drum b. the toner to be transferred from the drum to the paper c. the excess toner to be dislodged from the drum after printing d. the negative image to appear on the print drum The flow of operations in a laser printer can be summarized as: a. condition, clean, transfer, fuse b. condition, transfer, fuse c. clean, condition, transfer, fuse d. clean, condition, write, develop, transfer, fuse

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10. Paper jams are most likely to occur in which laser-jet operation? a. Paper pickup b. Cooling c. Fusing d. Registration 11. Tractor feeds are most commonly found on ________________ printers. a. chain b. ink-jet c. laser d. Dot-matrix 12. What part of a laser printer is sensitive to light? a. Fuser Unit b. Drum Unit c. Toner Cartridge d. Developer Unit 13. The advantage of vector-based fonts over bit-mapped fonts is _________________. a. that vector-based fonts require more storage space than bit-mapped fonts b. that vector-based fonts can be scaled and rotated, but bit-mapped fonts cannot c. that vector-based fonts load from the hard drive much quicker than bit-mapped fonts d. that vector-based fonts load into the printer much faster than bit-mapped fonts

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Instructor's Guide 14. If a laser printer passes an image registration but outputs blank pages, the problem is ___________. a. an empty toner cartridge b. a broken corona wire c. a blown thermal fuse d. the type of paper being used 15. The thermal fuse found in laser printers ___________________. a. protects the fuser assembly from overheating b. provides a special circuit for warming up the printer c. resets itself five minutes after blowing d. protects the toner from clumping 16. You have just replaced a toner cartridge, but the printouts still appear with toner specks on the page, what should be done? a. Replace the separator module. b. Replace the toner cartridge again. c. Run a few copies to get rid of the excess toner. d. Change the type of printer paper you are using. 17. Which of the following will not cause a paper jam? a. A faulty separator. b. Scanning a document. c. Overloading the paper tray. d. Paper that is too thick. 18. In an ink-jet printer, the ink is directed to the page by _______________. a. air pressure b. gravity c. the printhead d. squirting 19. If an ECP device successfully runs a self test but will not communicate with the host system, what should be checked? a. The BIOS Configuration. b. The COM port configuration. c. The devices main control board. d. The host computers I/O port adapter. 20. How can you identify a network-ready printer? a. By the computer it is attached to. b. By the lack of a computer gateway. c. By appearance of its icon in the printers folder. d. By the router it is attached to.

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Chapter 7
1. A Type I PCMCIA card is ______________ thick. a. 3.3 mm b. 5.0 mm c. 7.5 mm d. 10.5 mm A type II PCMCIA card is ______________ thick. a. 3.3 mm b. 5.0 mm c. 7.5 mm d. 10.5 mm PCMCIA cards were originally designed for ___________________. a: desktop PC systems b: PC-compatible system c. notebook systems d. low-profile systems Which type of PC Card (PCMCIA) slot will facilitate the insertion of a hard drive? a. Type I b. Type II c. Type III d. Type IV What must occur so that a PC Card (PCMCIA) will work properly? a. TCP/IP must be disabled. b. COM3 must be disabled. c. A jumper must be set on the motherboard. d. The systems PC Card enabler must be loaded. What item would need to be checked on an external CD ROM drive that is not normally checked with an internal drive? a. The signal cable. b. The disk drive controller. c. The power supply. d. The hard drive.

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Instructor's Guide 7. What type of power is required to drive the LCD display used in most notebook computers? a. High current ac power. b. High voltage dc power. c. Low current ad power. d. Low voltage dc power. Identify the major drawback associated with notebook computers. a. Heat buildup. b. Small disk drives. c. Lack of RAM capacity. d. Trackballs are required. What type of microprocessor is typically used in compact computers? a. PGA packaged processors. b. SPGA packaged processors. c. TCP packaged processors. d. VRT packaged processors.

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10. Which type of LCD panel offers the best display characteristics? a. Dual scan displays. b. TFT displays. c. CSTN displays. d. DSTN displays. 11. What is the major drawback of using a Gas Plasma display in a portable computer? a. Its small size. b. Its 16-color limit. c. Its power consumption. d. Its heat dissipation levels. 12. Which Win Key stroke combination will display the Run dialog box from anywhere within Windows? a. WIN/E b. WIN/F c. WIN/R d. WIN/F1 13. What is the major advantage of trackballs that have made them desirable pointing devices for portable computers? a. They never stick like mice do. b. They dont require space to operate. c. They use more stable USB connectors. d. They are designed to integrate directly into most notebook computers.

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Instructor's Guide 14. What type of expansion bus is normally used with portable computers? a. ISA b. PCI c. AGP d. PCMCIA 15. What is the normal recharge time for a NiMH battery used in a typical portable computer? a. 24 hours b. 8 hours c. 1 hour d. 3 hours 16. Identify the best policy for operating a notebook computer on battery power. a. Use the system on battery power until the system goes to sleep. b. Keep the system attached to the AC power as much as possible to keep the battery charged to maximum potential. c. Plug the system into an ac power source periodically to keep the battery from running completely down. d. Store the battery in a refrigerator until you need to use it. 17. Identify the power management mode that writes the contents of RAM to the hard drive and shuts down the system. a. Standby mode. b. Suspend mode. c. Hibernate mode. d. Sleep mode. 18. On a newer notebook computer which drive type is most likely to be external? a. The floppy drive. b. The hard drive. c. The CD-ROM drive. d. The DVD drive. 19. Which interface is an external CD-ROM drive likely to use in a portable computer? a. IDE b. EIDE c. ECP d. IEEE-1394 20. The major function of a docking port is to _________________. a. supply a larger keyboard b. supply a larger video display c. extend the expansion bus of the notebook computer d. supply a bi-directional printer port

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Chapter 8
1. The POST program can be found in __________. a. the BIOS chips b. the DOS disk c. the Windows program d. the CMOS RAM chip Which of the following constitutes a valid bootup sequence? a. BIOS, OS, Application b. OS, BIOS, Application c. Application, OS, BIOS d. BIOS, Application, OS Which program causes the system to load the COMMAND.COM file into the system? a. The POST program b. The IO.SYS program c. The BIOS program d. DOS.SYS The POST program displays a memory count during bootup to _____________. a. show that it is testing and verifying continuous memory b. show how much base memory is installed c. show how much extended/expanded memory is installed d. show how much RAM/ROM memory is installed The purpose of a device driver is to ______________. a. tell operating system how to control specific devices b. provide more useful memory by moving device control data to extended memory c. improve performance of installed devices by optimizing access patterns d. modify application programs to work correctly with devices attached to the system During bootup, which software or firmware routine is executed second? a. BIOS b. CMOS c. CONFIG.SYS d. AUTOEXEC.BAT

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Instructor's Guide 7. Which of the following file types cannot be run from the command prompt? a. .BAT b. .EXE c. .RUN d. .COM The 64k memory area just above the 1MB level is referred to as ______________. a. the High Memory Area (HMA) b. extended memory (XMS) c. expanded memory (EMS) d. the Upper Memory Block (UMB) Which of the following is not a function associated with the HIMEM.SYS utility? a. To create the High Memory Area (HMA). b. To manage extended memory (XMS). c. To free up conventional memory by loading TSR programs into the HMA. d. To support expanded memory drivers such as EMM386.EXE.

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10. Which of the following statements does not accurately apply to Expanded Memory (EMS)? a. It was developed to work around the physical addressing limits of microprocessors prior to the 80386. b. It is another term used for extended memory. c. It requires a memory management card for pre-386 processors. d. It is simulated by EMM386.EXE and XMS with 386 and newer processors. 11. The entire memory of a computer is tested by ______________. a. the CPU b. the CMOS setup program c. the POST d. the Interrupt Controller 12. If Plug-and-Play is not working for a particular device, how can the system be configured to use it? a. Reboot the computer after the hardware installation has been accomplished. b. It can't be configured if the device is not PnP-compatible. c. Use the manufacturer's setup disk and perform a manual configuration. d. None of the above answers is correct. 13. What is meant by the term Virtual Memory?" a. This is a section of hard-drive space that works like RAM. b. This is a section of RAM that works like hard-drive space. c. This is an area of programmable RAM that retains its programming after the power is turned off. d. This is a section of floppy drive space that works like RAM.

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Instructor's Guide 14. The smallest unit of storage in a DOS-based system is called ______________. a. an FRU b. a cylinder c. a sector d. a cluster 15. What activities occur during the system initialization phase of the bootup process? a. The systems intelligent devices are supplied with starting values. b. The systems microprocessor is directed toward the first memory address in RAM. c. The system gets starting files from the hard drive. d. The microprocessor loads the system memory with startup information. 16. In a PC-compatible system, the sectors on the disk drive are ____________ in length. a. 50 bytes b. 512 bytes c. 210 Kbytes d. 10 Kbytes 17. How many partitions can be created on a DOS-based hard drive? a. 1 b. 2 c. 4 d. 8 18. In a PC-compatible FAT-based system, each directory and sub-directory can hold up to __________ entries. a. 512 b. 1024 c. 32 d. 65,356 19. The first 640k of memory in a PC-compatible system is known as _____________. a. DOS memory b. conventional memory c. video memory d. extended memory 20. Which of the following lines would you expect to find in a config.sys file? a. Path = C:\;C:\DOS b. Set Temp = C:\Temp c. Prompt = $P$G d. Device = C:\DOS\HIMEM.SYS

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Chapter 9
1. Which function key will allow you to selectively bypass individual startup entries when pressed during the Starting Windows portion of the bootup? a: F1 b: F4 c: F8 d: F10 Which Windows 9x file would be modified for dual-booting purposes? a. CONFIG.SYS b. WIN.SYS c. IO.SYS d. MSDOS.SYS Device Manager can do all of the following except _____. a: update drivers b: change peripheral I/O settings c: check for viruses d: identify installed ports The boot sequence for Windows 9x is _____. a. POST, BIOS, IO.SYS, MSDOS.SYS, COMMAND.COM, CONFIG.SYS, OS b. POST, BIOS, IO.SYS, CONFIG.SYS, COMMAND.COM, MSDOS.SYS, AUTOEXEC.BAT, OS c. POST, BIOS, IO.SYS, CONFIG.SYS, MSDOS.SYS, COMMAND.COM, AUTOEXEC.BAT, OS d. POST, IO.SYS, OS, CONFIG.SYS, MSDOS.SYS, COMMAND.COM, AUTOEXEC.BAT Which type of partition is required on the hard drive for Windows 9x installation? a. FAT 16 b. FAT 32 c. NTFS d. None Identify the minimum processor specification for installing Windows 98. a. Pentium 133 b. 80486DX-66 c. Pentium 50 d. Celeron 100

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Instructor's Guide 7. What is the minimum amount of RAM required to install Windows 98? a. 8 MB b. 16 MB c. 32 MB d. 64 MB In a custom Windows 9x installation, _____________________. a. most of the Windows 9x files are installed to the C:\Windows directory b. the files associated with notebook computers are installed in C:\Windows to conserve disk space c. the minimum file structure for running the system is installed in C:\Windows d. only those device configurations selected by the user are installed When upgrading from Windows 95 to Windows 98, what precaution should be taken? a. Save all group and INI settings before upgrading. b. Save the Windows 95 system files to disk. c. Disable any anti-virus utilities before upgrading. d. Move the contents of the C:\Windows directory to another location before upgrading.

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10. Which command line utility is used to view and manipulate hidden, read only, and system files? a. View b. Attrib c. Sys d. FDISK 11. How does the Windows 9x startup sequence differ from the DOS startup? a. IO.SYS loads and executes the CONFIG.SYS file before the MSDOS.SYS file in Windows 9x. b. MSDOS.SYS loads the COMMAND.COM file in Windows 9x. c. The PNP configuration manager loads the IO.SYS file in Windows 9x. d. IO.SYS loads the Windows 9x core files. 12. How do you access the Properties of a folder in Windows 9x? a. Double-click the icon and select the Properties option from the menu. b. Right-click the icon and select the Properties option from the menu. c. Click the Start button on the desktop and select the Run option and enter Properties in the dialog box. d. Right-click the My Computer icon, select the Properties option from the menu, and click on the Device Manager. 13. Where can you change the attributes of files in the Windows 9x environment? a. Click Start/Programs/Folder Options/View. b. Click Start/Control Panel/System/Attributes. c. Right-click Start/Explore/View/Attributes. d. Double-click My Computer, select the View option, select Folder Options and then click the View tab.

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Instructor's Guide 14. How can you access the Windows 9x Device Manager? a. Start/Settings/Control Panel/System b. My Computer File/Properties/System c. Start/Programs/Accessories/System Tools d. Start/Run/Device Manager 15. Which of the following options will help you find a missing Taskbar on a Windows 9x system? a. Move the cursor along the edges of the screen until the taskbar appears. b. Click the Start button, select Run and enter Taskbar in the dialog box. c. Click Start and then Taskbar. d. Click Start and then Settings. 16. Identify the Windows 9x wizard that should be used to install device drivers to support new hardware. a. Install New Hardware b. Add New Hardware c. Add/Remove Hardware d. Add/Remove Programs 17. In Windows 9x, where can you create a new startup disk after the installation has been completed? a. Add/Remove Programs/Startup Disk b. Add/Remove Hardware/Properties/Startup Disk c. Device Manager/Properties/Startup Disk d. My Computer/File/New/Startup Disk 18. If the Device Manager displays a Red X at a devices icon what condition is indicated? a. The device is experiencing a direct hardware conflict with another dev ice. b. A User Selection Conflict has disabled the device. c. The devices driver has been removed from Windows. d. The device has stopped communicating with the system. 19. Which of the following is a correct representation of a duplicate long filename in Windows 9x? a. Old long file.txt = oldlong1.txt b. Old long file.txt = oldlong~.txt c. Old long file.txt = ~ldlongf.txt d. Old long file.txt = oldlo~63.txt 20. Which types of files are not displayed in Windows Explorer by default? a. sys b. exe c. doc d. Dll

CHAPTER TESTS 97

Chapter 10
1. Identify the file system that you would not encounter in a Windows 2000 system. a. FAT 16 b. FAT 32 c. NTFS d. HPFS Which of the following is an appropriate Windows 2000 filename? a. next.doc.topic b. next>doc.topic.exe c. ?next.doc.topic d. next\doc.topic.? If you wanted to make a backup copy of the Windows 4.0 Registry before upgrading to Windows 2000, what utility would you use? a. Rdisk.exe b. Regedit c. Regedit32 d. Add/Remove Programs Which tool would you use to edit the Registry in Windows 2000 Professional? a. Rdisk.exe b. MMC c. Regedit32 d. Add/Remove Programs Where are the user settings portion of the Registry stored in Windows 2000? a. Winnt\Profiles\User\ b. \Documents and Settings\ c. User.dat d. System.dat What is the minimum microprocessor specification for installing Windows 2000 Professional? a. Pentium 133 b. Pentium 233 c. 80486-66 d. Pentium II

2.

3.

4.

5.

6.

CHAPTER TESTS 99

Instructor's Guide 7. Which utility should be run on a system before upgrading it to Windows 2000 and where can it be found? a. HCL.TXT at \winnt b. Scandisk at Start/Programs/Accessories/System Tools c. Checkupgradeonly at \i386\winnt32 d. upgrade.txt at \Windows If your system contains a component not found on the Windows 200 HCL what should you do? a. Upgrade the component to one on the list. b. Contact Microsoft for a new driver. c. Contact the device manufacturer for a new driver. d. Install Windows and use a generic driver. Which file does Windows NT use to perform the Bootstrap operation? a. BOOT.INI b. NTLDR c. BOOTSECT.DOS d. NTDETECT.COM

8.

9.

10. The swap file in Windows NT/2000 is ___________________. a. swap.tmp b. temp.swp c. 386.swp d. pagefile.sys 11. The ______________ file is responsible for collecting information about the Windows 2000 system during the startup process. a. NTDETECT.COM b. BOOT.INI c. NTLDR d. BOOTSECT.DOS 12. Using the TCP/IP protocol in Windows 2000, computer names can be __________ characters long. a. 15 b. 63 c. 123 d. 256 13. Which Windows 2000 utility should be used to make changes to hardware settings? a. Device Manager b. RegEdit32 c. Regedit d. Control Panel

CHAPTER TESTS 100

Instructor's Guide 14. Where are the standard set of tools for maintaining the systems disk drives located in Windows 2000? a. Control Panel/System Tools b. Start/Accessories c. Computer Management Console/Storage d. Control Panel/System 15. _______________ is a TCP/IP network designed to share information within an organization. a. The Internet b. The Arpanet c. The Extranet d. An Intranet 16. In Windows 2000, navigating the local area network is performed through ______________. a. My Network Places b. Nethood c. Network Neighborhood d. Network Explorer 17. What Windows NT component works between the operating system and the system hardware to provide standard access for all system hardware operations? a. The kernel b. The HAL c. The microkernel d. executive services 18. _______________ are the permission settings that control a users access to objects. a. Trees b. Trusts c. Rights d. Leafs 19. In Windows 2000, the Device Manager is typically accessed through _________________. a. the system tools menu b. the Computer Management Console c. the Run dialog box d. the Disk Management snap in 20. Which of the following is not a Windows 2000 GPO? a. Software Installation Settings b. Windows Settings c. Administrative Templates d. User Profiles

CHAPTER TESTS 101

Chapter 11
1. What setting would you use on a multimeter to read common household voltage? a. 50 volts dc b. 100 volts ac c. 200 volts ac d. 400 volts dc What system component can cause problems to appear in all the system's other components? a. The system board b. The expansion slots c. The power supply d. The hard-disk drive After replacing the battery on the PC's system board, you should ______________. a. reset the CPU b. turn the system on so that the battery can charge up c. run SETUP to reconfigure the system d. reinstall DOS in the system When using a voltmeter to make tests in a live circuit, you should ________. a. set the range to the highest possible setting b. set the range to the lowest possible setting c. remove power from the unit under test d. disconnect one side of the test circuit from the other Which of the following is generally considered to be the first step in troubleshooting a PC problem? a. Taking the outer cover off the machine. b. Unplugging the system from the commercial power lines. c. Removing all peripherals from the unit. d. Eliminating the operator as a possible source of the problem. A voltmeter should be connected _________. a. in series with the item being checked b. in line with the item being checked c. in parallel with the item being checked d. in place of the item being checked

2.

3.

4.

5.

6.

CHAPTER TESTS 103

Instructor's Guide 7. If a diagnostic program indicates that three items should be replaced, how should the information be applied? a. Replace all three items and return the unit to the customer. b. Replace each item and test the unit until the bad component is located. c. Replace the components one at a time until the system starts, reinstall the previously removed good components, and deliver the unit to the customer. d. Remove all three of the items and test them in a known good unit. If the system fails after adding a new adapter board, you should __________. a. return the adapter card for a new one b. refer to the adapter's User's Manual for suggested settings c. change the card's interrupt settings d. reseat the card in another expansion slot The most frequent problems encountered with PCs occur ________. a. on the system board b. with hard drives c. in peripheral cards d. in software and configuration settings

8.

9.

10. If a hardware problem is indicated, which action should be taken first? a. Remove the system's outer cover so that internal components can be checked by substitution. b. Check the system's power cord to see that it is plugged in. c. Determine that any peripheral devices are not causing the problem. d. Remove and check the keyboard and monitor. 11. Speakers are checked using the _________ setting of a multimeter. a. volt b. amp c. capacitance d. Ohm 12. When checking for a good 2-amp fuse, the VOM should read ___________. a. 30 ohms b. 15 ohms c. 2 ohms d. 0.0 ohms 13. When measuring the resistance of a good 15-amp fuse, the multimeter's reading would be ________ ohms. a. 0.0 b. .15 s. 15 d. 150

CHAPTER TESTS 104

Instructor's Guide 14. Before replacing a keyboard on a computer system, make sure you ___________. a. use a replacement of the same type b. are wearing a grounding strap c. power down the system d. replace the mouse 15. If the system produces an error message before the single beep during bootup, what type of problem is indicated? a. configuration b. Hardware c. operating system d. bootup 16. In an IBM-compatible BIOS, a memory error is signified by a _______. a. 100 error code b. 301 error code c. 201 error code d. 601 error code 17. If a PC will not maintain the time and date after replacing the system board battery, what should be considered next? a. The power supply b. The system board c. The front panel connections d. The battery connectors 18. If a replacement keyboard fails to correct a keyboard error situation, what is the likely cause of the problem? a. The second keyboard is also defective. b. The system board is defective. c. The CMOS setup is incorrect for the keyboard. d. The BIOS setting for the keyboard is incorrect. 19. Which of the following is not a symptom associated with a hard-disk drive failure? a. No boot up when turned on. b. Checksum error messages. c. System will boot from a system disk. d. A continuous HDD activity light. 20. What action is indicated if the system responds with a Drive Mismatch Error message after installing a larger hard-disk drive unit? a. Reinstall the old drive because the new unit cannot access all of its available space. b. Run SETUP and reset the CMOS parameters to fit the new drive unit. c. Install a newer version of DOS that is capable of handling the larger drive size. d. Reinstall the old drive as the boot drive and add the new drive as drive D:\.

CHAPTER TESTS 105

Chapter 12
1. What are three of the most important tools for troubleshooting operating systems? a. Backup copies of the OS disks, a POST card, and a Software Diagnostic program. b. System log files, Emergency Boot disks, and Single-step Startup procedures. c. OS installation disks, Emergency Boot disks, and Software Diagnostic programs. d. Backup copies of the OS installation disk, copies of the BIOS configuration, and copies of the CMOS setup. If a PC locks up during bootup, press the ___________ key when the Starting Windows message appears. a. F1 b. ESC c. F8 d. PAUSE Which startup mode is not a Windows 9x mode? a. Normal Mode b. Safe Mode c. Standard Mode d. MS-DOS Mode To locate and install a missing or corrupt Windows 9x file from the Win9x CD, use ____________. a. the SUBTRACT.EXE program b. the COMPACT.EXE program c. the EXTRACT.EXE program d. the LOCATE.EXE program The Windows 98 System Monitor can be used to ______________. a. view monochrome graphics in color b. input TV signals directly c. reproduce U.S. currency d. track the performance of system resources In comparing thorough SCANDISK operation with standard SCANDISK operation, ___________. a. thorough operation checks the directory and file structure on the drive b. standard operation checks the disk surface on the drive c. thorough operation checks the disk surface, directory, and file structure on the drive d. standard operation checks the disk surface, files, and folders on the drive

2.

3.

4.

5.

6.

CHAPTER TESTS 107

Instructor's Guide 7. The system is running in Windows 9x and then stops. Restarting the system is unsuccessful. What is the problem? a. The power supply is bad. b. The Virtual Memory is enabled. c. The Virtual Memory is disabled. d. The hard-drive controller is defective. The Safe Recovery utility in Windows 9x is used to recover from________________. a. setup problems b. operational problems c. startup problems d. upgrade problems If the system continually reboots during the Windows 2000 installation process, what should you do? a. Reinstall the old operating system. b. Perform an FDISK operation and do a clean install of Windows 2000. c. Remove the installation CD. d. Install Windows 2000 in a new partition.

8.

9.

10. If the system hangs up between the single beep in the bootup sequence and the appearance of the Starting Windows screen, what type of error is occurring? a. Setup errors. b. Startup errors. c. Operational errors. d. Upgrade errors. 11. What action is required to move into Safe Mode in Windows 9x and 2000? a. Press F5. b. Press F8. c. Press F4. d. Press SHIFT + F5. 12. When Safe Mode is selected to start the system what items are loaded during the startup process? a. Standard mouse, SVGA driver and the hard disk drive. b. Keyboard, standard mouse, and VGA driver. c. Keyboard, hard drive and VGA driver. d. Hard drive, SVGA driver and standard keyboard. 13. Under what conditions is a Bootlog.txt file created? a. When the system crashes during bootup. b. When the system has been shutdown correctly. c. When Logged Mode is selected from the startup menu. d. Each time the system is started.

CHAPTER TESTS 108

Instructor's Guide 14. Identify the Windows 98 utility that should be used if a startup problem disappears when the system is started in a Safe Mode. a. Device Manager b. MSCONFIG.EXE c. Scan Reg d. Windows Troubleshooters 15. The ___________________ startup option will start Windows 2000 using the setting that existed the last time a successful user logon occurred. a. Safe Mode b. Debugging Mode c. Last Known Good Configuration d. Directory Services Restore Mode 16. In Windows 2000, the __________________ is a command-line interface that provides access to the hard drive and command line utilities when the operating system will not boot. a. MSCONFIG.EXE file b. Recovery Console c. Safe Mode startup d. Windows Troubleshooter 17. The Windows 2000 Emergency Repair Disk is created in __________________. a. the Backup utility b. the Add/Remove Programs applet c. the Run dialog box d. the System Tools 18. What action should be taken to clear a stalled application in Windows 9x or Windows 2000? a. Press ALT+F4. b. Press CTRL+ALT+DEL. c. Press ALT+TAB. d. Press CTRL+ESC. 19. _______________ is the command line utility used to convert FAT16 partitions to FAT32 partitions. a. FDISK.EXE b. CVT1.EXE c. FIXDISK.EXE d. CHKDSK.EXE 20. Which Windows 2000 utility is used to determine whether different applications are running or stopped? a. Device Manager b. MMC Snap In c. Event Viewer d. Task Manager

CHAPTER TESTS 109

Chapter 13
1. How often should the platen assembly of a dot-matrix printer be lubricated? a. Monthly b. Annually c. Never d. Quarterly To properly ground a conductive workbench mat, you would use ________________. a. an ac receptacle ground b. a metal chair c. a computer case d. the closest water pipe When operating a computer under low-voltage conditions, use a _______________. a. UPS b. surge protector c. separate ac outlet for the monitor d. shorter power cable Which item is best suited for general cleaning of monitors? a. An antistatic spray. b. A common flower mister. c. A glass cleaner. d. A damp cloth. Which of the following does not have an adverse affect on microcomputers? a. Smoke. b. Dust. c. Room temperatures above 85F. d. On/Off cycles. Which of the following presents the least likely cause of computer virus infections? a. Shareware programs. b. Bulletin board software. c. User copied software. d. Shrink-wrapped original software.

2.

3.

4.

5.

6.

CHAPTER TESTS 111

Instructor's Guide 7. Which of the following is an acceptable part of preventive maintenance for a laser printer? a. Shaking the toner cartridge. b. Wiping out the interior of the printer with a wet cloth. c. Vacuuming the ozone filter. d. Sweeping the toner cartridge with a small broom. A short over-voltage occurrence (nanoseconds) is called ________________. a. a spike b. a surge c. a brownout d. a sag What is the best substance for cleaning the plastic surfaces of a computer system? a. A water and fabric softener solution. b. A water and ammonia solution. c. A water and bleach solution. d. A hydrogen tetrachloride solution.

8.

9.

10. A good preventive maintenance measure is to run CHKDSK/F on all working hard drives _____________. a. daily b. weekly c. monthly d. bi-monthly 11. _____________ is used to find and clear lost clusters on a disk. a. DEFRAG b. MWSAV c. CHKDSK d. FDISK 12. The shortcut icons for Backup, ScanDisk, and Defrag can be found where? a. Programs\Windows\System Tools b, Programs\Accessories\System Tools c. Programs\Help\System Tools d. Windows\Programs\Accessories\System Tools 13. Input devices such as keyboards and trackball items can be plagued by ________________. a. surface contamination b. dust c. smoke d. oxidation

CHAPTER TESTS 112

Instructor's Guide 14. Which of the following would not be considered a source of heat build-up in a computer system? a. An outside window. b. A portable heater. c. Papers piled up around the computer. d. A high-speed printer near the computer. 15. Which of the following is more likely to cause serious damage to a computer system? a. ESD b. EMI c. RFI d. A power sag 16. When replacing the fuser assembly in a laser printer, be careful because _______________. a. it has sharp edges b. it may leak toner c. it may be hot d. it may be broken 17. What is the best method of removing excess toner from a laser printer? a. denatured alcohol b. compressed air c. vacuum d. damp sponge 18. Which item should not be attached to a UPS? a. A laser printer. b. A monitor. c. A notebook computer. d. An external tape drive. 19. What type of fire extinguisher should be used with electronic equipment? a. Class A b. Class B c. Class C d. Halon 20. The proper disposal of a battery from a notebook computer is _______________________. a. in the garbage (its not hazardous) b. in a sub-title D dump site c. in a protective wrapper d. to recycle it

CHAPTER TESTS 113

CHAPTER TEST ANSWERS

Instructor's Guide

Chapter 1
1. 2. 3. 4. 5. A B D A D 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. A D A C A 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. D C D C D 16. 17. 18. 19. 20. C B B B B

Chapter 2
1. 2. 3. 4. 5. B D B B D 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. A B A B B 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. B C B B B 16. 17. 18. 19. 20. D D B A A

Chapter 3
1. 2. 3. 4. 5. A B A A A 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. A A D B C 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. B A B C B 16. 17. 18. 19. 20. D D C D A

Chapter 4
1. 2. 3. 4. 5. D A D C B 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. D D C C D 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. C B B C A 16. 17. 18. 19. 20. B A B C C

Chapter 5
1. 2. 3. 4. 5. C A C C D 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. A A D B D 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. B C B C C 16. 17. 18. 19. 20. A B A B D

Chapter 6
1. 2. 3. 4. 5. B B D C B 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. C D B D A 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. D B B B A 16. 17. 18. 19. 20. C B D A C

CHAPTER TEST ANSWERS 116

Instructor's Guide

Chapter 7
1. 2. 3. 4. 5. A B C C D 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. C D A C B 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. C C B D D 16. 17. 18. 19. 20. B C A C C

Chapter 8
1. 2. 3. 4. 5. A A B A A 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. B C A C B 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. C C B D A 16. 17. 18. 19. 20. B B A B D

Chapter 9
1. 2. 3. 4. 5. C D C C A 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. B B D C B 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. A B D A A 16. 17. 18. 19. 20. B A B D A

Chapter 10
1. 2. 3. 4. 5. D A A C B 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. A C C B D 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. A B A C D 16. 17. 18. 19. 20. A B C B D

Chapter 11
1. 2. 3. 4. 5. C C C A D 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. C C B D C 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. D D A C B 16. 17. 18. 19. 20. C D B B B

Chapter 12
1. 2. 3. 4. 5. B C C C D 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. C C A C B 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. A B C B C 16. 17. 18. 19. 20. B A B B D

CHAPTER TEST ANSWERS 117

Instructor's Guide

Chapter 13
1. 2. 3. 4. 5. C A A D D 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. D C A A B 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. C B B D A 16. 17. 18. 19. 20. C C A C D

CHAPTER TEST ANSWERS 118

LAB ANSWERS

Instructor's Guide

LAB GROUP 1 HARDWARE SETUP


LAB PROCEDURE 1 Orientation TABLES
TABLE 11
Adapter Card Video Card Modem Card Network Card Slot PCI Slot 1 PCI Slot 3 PCI Slot 2

TABLE 12
Cable Power Switch: Speaker: Power LED: #1 HDD LED: #2 HDD LED: Reset Switch: Color Red / Black Red / Black Green / White Red / White None Blue / White

NOTE: The Front Panel wire colors above are normally standard for Mid-Tower Cases.

120 LAB ANSWERS

Instructor's Guide

LAB PROCEDURE 1 Question Answers


1. This is the Pin-1 indicator stripe and it points to pin 1 on both ends of the cable. 2. Care should be taken so that you dont connect the signal cable backwards and the connector having a cable twist is connected to the floppy drive that will be used as Drive A:. 3. The proper Shut Down Steps for closing Windows Millenium is : a. Click the Start button; b. Click on Shut Down; c. In the dialog box that appears select Shutdown; d. Click the OK button. 4. The Network Interface Card can be identified by the oversized phone port (RJ45 Jack) or 10-BaseT jack on the metal backing plate of the card. 5. If a floppy drive is plugged in backwards, the floppy drive light will come on and stay on and the system will not Boot. 6. The power connectors from the power supply have four (4) wires, (1 red, 1 yellow, and 2 black). 7. From right to left.

LAB PROCEDURE 2 Boot Sequence TABLES


TABLE 21
The Copyright Data Displayed on your system

TABLE 22
The Type and Number of your CD-ROM Drive that appears on the screen. NOTE: Your answer may vary depending on the type of CD-ROM drive installed.

LAB ANSWERS 121

Instructor's Guide

TABLE 23 System Information


CPU Type: Co Processor: CPU Clock: Drive A: Drive B: Primary Master: Primary Slave: Secondary Master: Secondary Slave: Power Management: AMD-K6-2 Installed 366 1.44, 3.5 in. None 2 GB None CDROM, Mode 4 None Enabled Base Memory: Extended Memory: Cache Memory: Display Type: Serial Ports: Parallel Ports: Cache L2 Type: SDRAM at Rows: EDO RAM at Rows: Fast-Page RAM at Rows: 640k 130048k 512k EGA/VGA 3f8 378 Pipe-Burst 0,2 None None

NOTE: Your answers may be different depending on the system being used.

TABLE 24 System Configuration


Device No. 2 8 9 15 6 Device Class Serial Bus Network Controller Display Controller IDE Controller Simple Communications Device IRQ Number 11 11 12 14/15 3

NOTE: Your answers may be different depending on the system being used.

TABLE 25 Standard CMOS Setup


Halt On: All Errors All, But Diskette No Errors All, But Disk / Key All, But Keyboard

TABLE 26
Keyboard Removed Keyboard error or no keyboard present

122 LAB ANSWERS

Instructor's Guide

TABLE 27
Quick Power on Self-test Disabled Memory Counted Three Times instead of once

TABLE 28
Drive LED Sequence FDD LED, HDD LED

LAB PROCEDURE 2 Question Answers


1. 2. 3. 4. 5. Pressing the DEL key while the memory is counting at Boot Up. Pressing the PAUSE key will pause the Boot Up process. The System Configuration Box. Pressing the F10 Key and the letter Y to confirm. When the Quick Power On Self-test is Enabled memory is checked once; when the Quick Power On Self-test is Disabled memory is checked three times.

LAB PROCEDURE 3 CMOS Passwords And Resources TABLES


TABLE 31
You are prompted to enter a password about the time it should start to boot-up

TABLE 32
CMOS checksum error - Defaults loaded Error Message Warning: PowerOn three times fail! Please enter SETUP to slow down DRAM timing

LAB ANSWERS 123

Instructor's Guide

TABLE 33
Power Management HDD Power Down Doze Mode Suspend Mode Min Savings Disable 1 hour 1 hour Max Savings Disable 1 min 1 min

TABLE 34
Options available for Serial Port 1 Auto 3E8/IRQ4 3F8/IRQ4 2E8/IRQ3 2F8/IRQ3 Disabled

LAB PROCEDURE 3 Question Answers


1. When the Security Option is Setup the user will be prompted for a Setup Password when trying to enter the CMOS Setup Utility. 2. When the Security Option is System the user will be prompted for a System Password when trying to boot-up the computer. 3. To reboot the computer without pressing the reset switch or power switch you must press and hold the CTRL and ALT keys and press the DEL key. 4. To get into the CMOS Setup Utility, if the system password is not known, clear the CMOS by shorting a motherboard jumper. See the owners manual of your system board for the jumper used. 5. When clearing the CMOS settings with the jumper, the time that displays should be the date and time that the BIOS was manufactured, usually around 1998. 6. The Minimum Savings Power Management setting is most useful on a portable of laptop computer, because it will save the battery usage. 7. The CMOS is capable of six Serial Port Settings Auto, 3F8/IRQ4, 2F8/IRQ3, 3E8/IRQ4, 2E8/IRQ3, Disabled.

LAB PROCEDURE 4 HDD Setting TABLES


TABLE 41
14, 15

124 LAB ANSWERS

Instructor's Guide

TABLE 42
14

TABLE 43
Available Selections for the IDE Primary Master PIO Auto Mode 0 Mode 1 Mode 2 Mode 3 Mode 4

TABLE 44
Available Selections for the Boot Sequence A, C, SCSI D, A, SCSI SCSI, C, A C, A, SCSI E, A, SCSI C Only C, CDROM, A F, A, SCSI LS120, C CDROM, C, A SCSI, A, C ZIP100, C

LAB PROCEDURE 4 Question Answers


1. 2. 3. 4. 5. In the drives documentation or on a sticker on the drive. This answer will vary and will depend on the type of system the user has. The introduction of the ATAPI standard. Yes, if the drive and the boot option is available. Turn on the computer, enter CMOS setup, choose BIOS Features Setup, Change the boot sequence Option.

LAB PROCEDURE 5 Digital Multimeter TABLES


TABLE 51
Speaker Resistance: 8.1W

LAB ANSWERS 125

Instructor's Guide

TABLE 52
ATX Voltages Pin No. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 Voltage 3.30 V 3.30 V 0.00 V 5.00 V 0.00 V 5.00 V 0.00 V 5.00 V 5.00 V 12.00 V Pin No. 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 Voltage 3.30 V -12.00 V 0.00 V 0.05 V Approx. 0.00 V 0.00 V 0.00 V -5.00 V 5.00 V 5.00 V

NOTE: Your answers may vary from the above table, but should be reasonably close to the answers above.

TABLE 53
4Pin Internal Drive Power Connector Voltages Pin No. 1 2 3 4 Voltage 12.0 V 0.00 V 0.00 V 5.0 V

NOTE: Your answers may vary from the above table, but should be reasonably close to the answers above.

TABLE 54
Zero Resistance: Should be very close to 0, maybe .4 depending on multi-meter

TABLE 55
Maximum Resistance: Multimeter leads not touching results in an resistance reading Infinite Resistance.

126 LAB ANSWERS

Instructor's Guide

TABLE 56
Good Fuse Resistance: 5 Amp good fuse results in a 00.5W resistance reading. Should be the same as Zero Resistance value.

TABLE 57
Bad Fuse Resistance: A bad fuse results in an resistance reading. - Infinite Resistance. Should be the same as the Maximum resistance value

LAB PROCEDURE 5 Question Answers


1. 2. 3. 4. The ATX Power Connector has 20 pins. The multimeter can be used to measure resistance, current and AC/DC Voltage. The range of voltages across the power supply are from -12 volts to +12 volts for a total of 24 volts. DC Voltages supported by the multimeter will be dependant on the type of multimeter in use, but should basically cover the range: 20 volts; 200 volts; 1000 volts; 200 mvolts; and 2000 mvolts. 5. The resistance of a good fuse should be zero W.

LAB PROCEDURE 6 PC-Check TABLES


TABLE 61
Microprocessor Type: Microprocessor Speed: AMD K6-2 3D MMX

NOTE: The above answer will vary depending on what microprocessor is installed in the system being used.

TABLE 62
Bus Types PCI ISA IDE USB NOTE: Your answer will vary depending on what is provided with the system board in the system being used.

LAB ANSWERS 127

Instructor's Guide

TABLE 63
Installed Memory: Main Memory: Free Memory: Extended Memory: Expanded Memory: 128MB 640KB 589KB 127MB 64,448KB

NOTE: The above answer will vary depending on the amount and type of Memory is installed in the system being used.

TABLE 64
Level 1 Cache: Level 2 Cache: 16+16 KB 128KB

NOTE: The above answer will vary depending on the CPU installed. With a Pentium CPU the internal cache will always by 16+16, and the external cache will be dependent on the CPU.

TABLE 65
IRQ No. IRQ0 IRQ1 IRQ2 IRQ4 IRQ6 Active Device System Timer Keyboard (cascade) Mouse Floppy IRQ No. IRQ8 IRQ9 IRQ13 IRQ14 IRQ15 (cascade) Co-Processor Hard Disk CDROM Active Device Real-Time Clock

NOTE: The answers in the above table are pretty much the default BIOS settings for the devices shown. Your actual answers should not vary by much.

TABLE 66
Primary HDD Controller Port Address: 1F0

TABLE 67
Port Addresses Serial Port 2: Parallel Printer Port 1: Primary Serial Port: 2F8 378 3F8

128 LAB ANSWERS

Instructor's Guide

TABLE 68
No. of Cylinders: No. of Sectors: No. of Heads: 8944 63 15

NOTE: The answers in the above table may vary depending on the Hard Drive installed in the system being used. The No. of Sectors will usually be the same.

TABLE 69
Interrupt Level: Port Type: IRQ4 16550A/C FIFO

TABLE 610
Fail Serial Port Loopback plug test Hand shake test NOTE: The above answer may vary depending on whether or not there were any errors in the system.

TABLE 611
Data Bits Per Track: 258048

NOTE: The above answer will vary depending on the Hard Drive installed in the system.

TABLE 612
Linear Seek Time: Full Stroke Seek Time: Random Seek Time: 3.78 ms 16.52 ms 9.42 ms

NOTE: The answers in the above table will vary depending on the Hard Drive installed in the system.

TABLE 613
Mean Throughput: 9509.8

NOTE: The above answer will vary depending on the Hard Drive installed in the system.

TABLE 6-14
I/O Base Address Parallel Port LPT!: 378H

LAB ANSWERS 129

Instructor's Guide

TABLE 6-15
No tests failed All tests, Controller Test, Status Port Test, and IRQ Test, Passed. NOTE: The above answer may vary depending on whether or not there were any errors in the port test.

TABLE 6-16
Motherboard Test System Board Devices Tested DMA Controller System Timer Interrupts Keyboard Controller PCI Bus CMOS RAM Battery Check Reading and Writing Checksum Clock Ticking Status Registers Alarm Check Synchronicity System Date CMOS Date System Time CMOS Time

TABLE 6-17
Video Adapter Memory Size: 4096K

NOTE: The above answer will vary depending on the Video Adapter installed in the system.

LAB PROCEDURE 6 Question Answers


1. The burn-in tests can be set up to run continuously, but the standard diagnostic tests are basically one-shot tests. 2. INT 5, F000:FF54 3. 1E, 30, 0000:0522 4. The Motherboard. 5. The HDD Park utility moves the R/W heads to the landing zone for parking during shipping. This function was very important in older drives that required the R/W heads to be safely parked before moving the system. Failure to do so often resulted in damaged R/W heads and disk surfaces. 6. Partition number, type, Bootable/non-bootable, Starting Cylinder/Head/Sector, Ending Cylinder/Head/Sector, number of Reserved sectors, and Total number of sectors. 7. DMA Controller, System Timer, Interrupts, keyboard Controller, PCI Bus, CMOS RAM, battery 8. The systems basic CMOS configuration information.

130 LAB ANSWERS

Instructor's Guide

LAB PROCEDURE 7 IDE Troubleshooting TABLES


TABLE 71
HDD Parameters From Information Book or Sticker Cylinders 4190 Heads 16 Sectors 63

NOTE: The above answer will vary depending on the Hard Disk Drive installed in the system.

TABLE 72
DISK BOOT FAILURE

TABLE 73
The HDD is now the primary slave

TABLE 74
Results The computer boots into Windows. During the booting the computer selects the CD-ROM drive as the Primary Master.

TABLE 75
The computer boots normally

TABLE 76
The computer will boot. It gives the message that not 80 conductor cable is installed.

TABLE 77
The error message displayed will be DISK BOOT FAILURE, INSERT SYSTEM DISK AND PRESS ENTER

LAB ANSWERS 131

Instructor's Guide

LAB PROCEDURE 7 Question Answers


1. A backup of the drives contents and configuration parameters recorded should be performed before exchanging or re-formatting a hard-disk drive. 2. Master and Slave. 3. Slave. 4. No. 5. During Bootup the system will detect No Primary Master, No Secondary Master, No Secondary Slave, and the computer will likely not boot.

LAB PROCEDURE 8 Hardware Troubleshooting TABLES


TABLE 81
No Keyboard Connected: Keyboard error or no keyboard present.

TABLE 82
No Mouse Connected: There is no pointer (cursor) and moving the mouse has no effect.

TABLE 83
L2 Cache Disabled: The computer boot s normally but is slightly slower.

TABLE 84
No Video Adapter: The computer beeps 1 long and 3 short, and no video display.

NOTE: The number of beeps may vary

TABLE 85
No Memory: The computer makes continuous short beeps.

TABLE 86
No Floppy Drive Interface: The error Floppy disk(s) fail (40) appears.

132 LAB ANSWERS

Instructor's Guide

TABLE 87
No Floppy Drive Power: The error Floppy disk(s) fail (40) appears.

TABLE 88
No CD-ROM Drive Power: Computer boots to operating system without CD-ROM support.

TABLE 89
My Computer Contents: 3.5 Floppy A:, Local Disk C:, Control Panel

TABLE 810
No Hard Drive Power: The error DISK BOOT FAILURE, INSERT SYSTEM DISK AND PRESS ENTER appears.

TABLE 8-11
For AT power supply all components will come on but nothing No Power to Motherboard: happens. For ATX power supply nothing happens, power switch has no effect.

LAB PROCEDURE 8 Question Answers


1. Your answer will vary depending the type of mouse installed, either a Serial mouse or a PS2 mouse. 2. Your answer will vary depending on the number of memory modules removed, either 1, 2, 3, or 4 modules. 3. Your answer will vary depending on the type of video card is installed, either a PCI or AGP. 4. The CDROM. 5. There is no differing results, in both instances the computer will still boot up only without CDROM support.

LAB ANSWERS 133

Instructor's Guide

LAB PROCEDURE 9 CPU Upgrade / Overclocking TABLES


TABLE 91
Documented CPU Parameters Voltage: FSB: Internal Frequency Usually 2.0V or 1.7V Usually 66, 100, or 133 Anywhere from 300MHz to 1000+MHz

NOTE: Your answers may vary, the above answers indicate the possibilities that you should obtain.

TABLE 92
CPU Parameters in Chipset Features Setup CPU Name: CPU Speed: CPU Clock Frequency: CPU Clock Ratio: Answer will vary Answer will vary Answer will vary Answer will vary

NOTE: The answers you obtain will be dependant on your system. Your particular system may or may not provide results in the Chipset Features Setup screen.

TABLE 93
Increasing BUS Speed Results: The CPU may generate a higher frequency.

NOTE: The above answer will vary depending on the system in use.

LAB PROCEDURE 9 Question Answers


1. 2. 3. 4. 5. Physical Jumpers, or software settings. 2 Answers will vary; an example may be 10MHz. Answer may vary; in all probability it may be Chipset features. Yes.

134 LAB ANSWERS

Instructor's Guide

LAB GROUP 2 OPERATING SYSTEMS


LAB PROCEDURE 10 Windows ME Video Drivers TABLES
TABLE 101
No. Of Colors: Screen Area Settings: High Color (16 bit) 800 by 600 pixels

NOTE: The above answer is an example. Your answer may vary depending on the system setup and configuration.

TABLE 102
16 Colors 256 Colors High Color (16 bit) True Color (24 bit) True Color (32 bit)

TABLE 103
Memory Range Memory Range I/O Range I/O Range IRQ Memory Range Memory Range I/O Range Memory Range Memory Range 000A0000-000AFFFF 000B0000-000BFFFF 03B0-03BB 03C0-03DF 11 E3000000-3FFFFFF E2000000-E2000FFF B800-B8FF 000C0000-000C7FFF 04000000-0401FFFF

NOTE: The above answers are examples. The answers you obtain will depend on the video card installed in the systems. Most systems should have at least 2 I/O addresses and 1 IRQ and 2 memory ranges.

LAB ANSWERS 135

Instructor's Guide

TABLE 104
Home/Office Desk Portable/Laptop Always On

TABLE 105
After 1 minute the screen saver comes on and 1 minute after that the monitor turns off.

TABLE 106
The desktop wallpaper reappears.

LAB PROCEDURE 10 Questions Answers


1. By selecting the Display icon in the Control Panel, or right-clicking an empty area of the Desktop and selecting Properties. 2. 640 by 480; 720 by 480, 800 by 600, 848 by 480, 1024 by 768, 1152 by 864, 1280 by 1024, 1600 by 1200. 3. Through the Display Properties Dialog box, under the Screen Saver tab, in the Screen Saver Section. 4. Turning off the Monitor and turning off the Hard Disks 5. The driver that is most current on the Windows ME CD.

LAB PROCEDURE 11 Windows ME Navigating TABLES


TABLE 111
Start Menu Options Windows Update Documents Search Run Shutdown Programs Settings Help Log Off Station

136 LAB ANSWERS

Instructor's Guide

TABLE 112
Program Menu Options Accessories StartUp Outlook Express Games Internet Explorer Windows Media Player

NOTE: The above answers are basic examples, your answer may vary depending on the individual setup of the Task Bar Properties.

TABLE 113
Accessory Menu Options Accessibility System Tools Imaging Paint Windows Movie Maker Communications Address Book MS-DOS Prompt Synchronize Wordpad Entertainment Calculator Notepad Windows Explorer

NOTE: The above answers are examples, your answer may vary depending on the individual setup of the Task Bar Properties.

TABLE 114
Table 11-4a Table 11-4b Table 11-4c Table 11-4d Table 11-4e Table 11-4f 22 objects 3.47GB free disk space 0 objects 1.38MB 263 objects 3,444

NOTE: The above answers are examples, your answers may vary depending on the contents of the specific folders on the system in use.

TABLE 115
Number of Text Document Files: 21 Text Document files

NOTE: The number of Text Document files above are examples. The number you obtain may vary depending on the contents of the Windows folder on the system in use.

LAB ANSWERS 137

Instructor's Guide

TABLE 116
Number of .TXT Files Search 54 .txt files

NOTE: The number of .txt files above are examples. The number you obtain may vary depending on the contents of the results of the Search on the system in use.

TABLE 117
Total Bytes Available: 1,457,664 bytes available on disk

TABLE 118
Number of Component Options: 12 components

LAB PROCEDURE 11 Question Answers


1. 2. 3. 4. It closes the active window. Icons for the Floppy drive(s), hard drive(s), CD-ROM drive(s), and the Control Panel. Windows Explorer. First click the Start button, then Programs, then select Accessories and click on the MS-DOS prompt selection. 5. You can go to the recycle bin and choose to restore the file. 6. A context menu appears.

LAB PROCEDURE 12 Windows ME Command Prompt Navigating TABLES


TABLE 121
DOS Ver Command Operating System: Version Number: Windows Millennium [Version 4.90.3000]

138 LAB ANSWERS

Instructor's Guide

TABLE 122
Current Directory Listing Number of Directories: Number of Files: 30 211

NOTE: The above answers are example. Your answers may vary depending on the contents of the Windows directory.

TABLE 123
Number of Files Copied to Your Directory: 8 files

TABLE 124
Listing of Root Directory Number of Files: Number of Directories: 4 16

NOTE: The above answers are example. Your answers may vary depending on the contents of the Root directory.

TABLE 125
Access denied message appears

TABLE 126
Memory Type -------------------------------Conventional Upper Reserved Extended (XMS) -------------------------------Total memory Total under 1MB Total Expanded (EMS) Free Expanded (EMS) Largest executable program size Largest free upper memory block MS-DOS is resident in the upper memory area. Total -------------640K 0K 0K 65,524K -------------66,164K 640K Used --------60K 0K 0K 1,204K --------1,264K 60K 64M 16M 580K 0K Free -------------580K 0K 0K 64,320K -------------64,900K 580K (67,108,864 bytes) (16,777,216 bytes) (593,904 bytes) (0 bytes)

NOTE: The above is an example, your answers may differ depending on how much memory you have installed.

LAB ANSWERS 139

Instructor's Guide

TABLE 127
Name ---------------MSDOS VMM32 COMMAND DOSKEY FREE Total ---------------------45,184 (44K) 3,968 (4K) 7,248 (7K) 4,688 (5K) 594,048 (580K) Conventional -----------------------45,184 (44K) 3,968 (4K) 7,248 (7K) 4,688 (5K) 594,048 (580K) Upper Memory -------------------0 (0K) 0 (0K) 0 (0K) 0 (0K) 0 (0K)

NOTE: The above is an example, your answers may differ depending on what software is running.

LAB PROCEDURE 12 Question Answers


1. XCOPY allows you to copy directories and subdirectories and their contents. Copy only allows copying files or groups of files. 2. The DIR command. 3. The DELTREE command. 4. The MEM /C /P command 5. The /P switch. 6. The VER command 7. CD and name of the directory to change to.

LAB PROCEDURE 13 Advanced Windows ME TABLES


TABLE 131
Files Created on Start Disk aspi2dos.sys aspi4dos.sys aspi8dos.sys aspi8u2.sys aspicd.sys autoexec.bat btcdrom.sys btdosm.sys checksr.bat command.com config.sys ebd.cab ebd.sys ebdundo.exe, extract.exe fdisk.exe findramd.exe fixit.bat flashpt.sys hibinv.exe himem.sys io.sys, msdos.sys oakcdrom.sys ramdrive.sys readme.txt setramd.bat

140 LAB ANSWERS

Instructor's Guide

TABLE 132
Subheadings in Config.sys File [menu] [help] [cd] [nocd] [quick] [common]

TABLE 133
Number of Files & Directories In C:\ Root Directory Files: Directories: 30 10

NOTE: The above answer is an example, your answers may differ depending on the contents of the Hard Drive.

TABLE 134
Steps for Restoring the Registry 1. Click Start, and then click Run. 2. In the Open box, type: scanregw /restore. 3. Click OK. 4. A dialog box appears recommending that you close all applications and asks if you wish to continue. When you are ready, click Yes. 5. From the list in the Restore System Registry dialog box, click the registry backup that you want to restore.

TABLE 135
Windows ME File Type Definitions a. ani b. avi c. bmp d. jpeg anifile avifile, video/avi Paint.Picture, image/bmp jpegfile, image/jpeg

NOTE: The above answer is an example, your answers may differ depending on your file type association.

LAB ANSWERS 141

Instructor's Guide

TABLE 136
Available Font Types Courier MsSansSerif MsSerif SmallFonts Symbol NOTE: The above answer is an example, your answers may differ depending on the fonts installed on your system.

TABLE 137
Display Setting Values Setting AttachToDesktop BitsPerPixel DesktopPos DPILogicalX DPILogicalY DPIPhysicalX Value 1 32 -112,-84 96 96 96 Setting DPIPhysicalY fixedfon.fon fonts.fon oemfonts.fon Resolution UpgradeToDefaultMode Value 96 vgafix.fon vgasys.fon vgaoem.fon 800.600

TABLE 138
Installed Printers (Default) Default (Value not set) HP LaserJet 5/5M Postscript

NOTE: Your answer will be different than above depending on whether a printer and type is installed.

TABLE 139
Color Setting of Active Title Table 13-9a 13-9b 13-9c 13-9d 13-9e Value 0 0 128 159 159 Table 13-9f 13-9g 13-9h 13-9i 13-9j Value 164 159 159 164 159 159 164 0 0 128 0 0 128

142 LAB ANSWERS

Instructor's Guide

TABLE 1310
System Devices Under Control Panel Accessibility Appearance Colors Cursors Desktop International Microsoft Input Devices PowerCfg

LAB PROCEDURE 13 Questions Answers


1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. Control Panel/Add Remove Programs/Windows Setup tab. For troubleshooting Windows boot problems Regedit Hkey_Users/default/control panel/colors Type of data, name of the value, and the value setting By clicking on the [+] sign next to the folder or double-clicking on the folder.

LAB PROCEDURE 14 Windows ME Hardware Resources Instructors Note Prior to Performing Lab 14
Before starting this lab the Windows System Monitor must be installed in the operating system. This tool component does not get installed under a normal Windows Installation. It must be installed under a Custom Install. The System Monitor is on the Windows Installation CD and can be added by accessing the Add/Remove Program Properties page and selecting the Windows Setup tab. Then scroll to the System Tools selection and click the Details button and browse the System Tools page to the System Monitor tool. Click on the check box and click the OK button. You will be prompted for the Windows CD and the System Monitor tool will be installed.

TABLES
TABLE 14-1
Performance Tab Memory: System Resources: 128.0 MB of RAM 90% free

NOTE: Your answer will vary depending on the amount of memory is installed.

LAB ANSWERS 143

Instructor's Guide

TABLE 14-2
Swappable Memory/Unused Physical Memory Swappable Memory: Unused Physical Memory: 30.2M 38.4M

NOTE: Your answer will vary depending on the amount of memory is installed.

TABLE 14-3
Swappable Memory/Unused Physical Memory Swappable Memory: Unused Physical Memory: 71.4M 2.5M

NOTE: Your answer will vary depending on the amount of memory is installed.

TABLE 14-4
View Devices by Type: 12 Types of Devices

NOTE: Your answer may vary depending on what total devices are installed.

TABLE 14-5
View Devices by Connection: 6 Types of Devices

NOTE: Your answer may vary depending on your motherboard and what other connections are installed.

144 LAB ANSWERS

Instructor's Guide

TABLE 14-6
IRQ Assignments IRQ Setting 00 01 02 03 03 04 05 05 06 07 08 09 10 10 11 11 12 13 14 14 15 15 System timer Standard 101/102-key or Microsoft Natural Keyboard Programmable interrupt controller NVIDIA RIVA TNT 2model 64 Video Card IRQ Holder for PCI Steering Communications Port (COM1) SiS 7001 PCI to USB Open Host Controller IRQ Holder for PCI Steering Standard Floppy Disk Controller ECP Printer Port (LPT1) System CMOS/real time clock Creative SB16 Emulation Creative SB Live Value IRQ Holder for PCI Steering D-Link DFE-538TX 10/100Adapter IRQ Holder for PCI Steering Kensington MouseWorks Driver Numeric Data Processor SiS 5513 Dual PCI IDE Controller Primary IDE controller (dual fifo) SiS 5513 Dual PCI IDE Controller Secondary IDE controller (dual fifo) Hardware Using Setting

NOTE: Your answer will vary depending the devices installed in the system.

TABLE 14-7
Current I/O Resource 0060 -0071 Assignments I/O Setting 0060 - 0060 0061 - 0061 00602 - 0063 0064 - 0064 0065 - 006F 0071 - 0071 System Speaker In use by unknown device Standard 101/102-key or Microsoft Natural Keyboard In use by unknown device System CMOS/real-time clock Hardware Assignment Standard 101/102-key or Microsoft Natural Keyboard

NOTE: Your answer may vary depending on the devices installed in the system.

LAB ANSWERS 145

Instructor's Guide

TABLE 14-8
Your Keyboard: Standard 101/102-key or Microsoft Natural Keyboard

NOTE: Your answer may vary depending of the keyboard installed in the system.

TABLE 14-9
Resources Used by Keyboard Resource Type Interrupt Request Input/Output Range Input/Output Range Setting 01 0060 - 0060 0064 - 0064

NOTE: Your answer may vary depending on how the system installs your keyboard.

TABLE 14-10
Resources Used by Master IDE Controller Resource Type Input/Output Range Input/Output Range Interrupt Request Input/Output Range Input/Output Range Interrupt Request Input/Output Range Setting 01F0 - 01F7 03F6 - 03F6 14 0170 - 0177 0376 - 0376 15 D000 - D00F

NOTE: Your answer will be whatever your resources page shows.

LAB PROCEDURE 14 Question Answers


1. 2. 3. 4. 5. Swapfile, and its name is Win386.swp. Device Manager. Reboot the computer. The free space on the hard drive. A black exclamation mark in a Yellow circle.

146 LAB ANSWERS

Instructor's Guide

LAB PROCEDURE 15 Windows 2000 Navigation TABLES


TABLE 151
Hard Drive Free Space: 2,914,504,704 bytes 2.71GB

NOTE: Your answer will vary depending of the size of the hard drive installed in the system.

TABLE 152
In Folder: Size: Type: Modified: C:\Windows 11KB Text Document 09/09/2000 10:28 AM

NOTE: Your answer will vary depending on your file search.

TABLE 153
View Item With a Dot: Large Icons

NOTE: Your answer may vary an d could show one of the following: Large Icons; Small Icons; List; Details; or Thumbnails.

TABLE 154
Size of Explorer Application: 233KB

TABLE 155
Bitmap Image Filename: Can be any filename with an extension of .bmp

TABLE 156
The My Documents icon disappears from the desktop

TABLE 157
22 NOTE: Your answer may vary depending on the number of Control Panel items available on your system.

LAB ANSWERS 147

Instructor's Guide

TABLE 158
Whatever color you select - its your choice.

LAB PROCEDURE 15 Question Answers


1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. The start menu and file system are organized into a hierarchical structure. Dragging. Right-click and drag. Cut, Copy, Paste, and Rename. Similar file manipulations and operations can be performed. Change settings that affect browsing local items, file types, and offline file configurations. Change settings for your background, screen saver, windows colors, screen effects, and display adaptor settings. 8. It shows a small representation of a picture file. 9. View ICONS and Tools/Folder Options. 10. Scroll Bars, Menus, Window Borders, etc..

LAB PROCEDURE 16 Windows 2000 Administrative Tools TABLES


TABLE 16 1
Com+ Applications Folder: COM+ QC Dead Letter Queue Listener COM+ Utilities System Application

TABLE 16 2
An ODBC System data source stores information about System DSN Explanation: how to connect to the indicated data provider. A System data source is visible to all users on this machine, including NT services.

148 LAB ANSWERS

Instructor's Guide

TABLE 16 3
Number of ODBC Drivers: 22

NOTE: Your answer may vary depending on the number of ODBC Drivers installed on your system.

TABLE 16 4
ODBC is a programming interface that enables applications to ODBC About Description: access data in database management systems that use Structured Query Language (SQL) as a data access standard.

TABLE 16 5
Event Viewer System Log - First event Type: Date: Source: Information 1/17/2001 Event Log

NOTE: Your answer may vary and will depend on the event that was last entered on your system.

TABLE 16 6
Security Log Events: 2

NOTE: Your answer may vary and will depend on any recent security events that may be taking place on your system.

TABLE 16 7
Maximum Password Age: 19 days

NOTE: Your answer may vary depending on when the Password was last prompted to be changed.

TABLE 16 8
Administrators Users Assigned to Shut Down the System: Backup Operators Power Users Users

TABLE 16 9
First Listed Policy: Additional restrictions for anonymous connections

LAB ANSWERS 149

Instructor's Guide

TABLE 16 10
Client (Respond Only) IP Security Policies: Secure Server (Require Security) Server (Request Security)

TABLE 16 11
Colors % Processor Time: % Committed Bytes In Use: Red Green

NOTE: Your answer may vary depending on what colors were last selected.

TABLE 16 12
The % Committed Bytes In Use line has increased

TABLE 16 13
Number of Services Started: 28

NOTE: Your answer may vary depending on the number of services that have been started during this session.

LAB PROCEDURE 16 Question Answers


1. Your answer will vary and may be more than 200. 2. Event viewer is a useful tool for diagnosing hardware, software, and system problems with Windows. 3. It will automatically change colors of graphing lines. 4. Option 4. 5. Start/Settings/Control Panel/Administrative Tools/Services.

150 LAB ANSWERS

Instructor's Guide

LAB PROCEDURE 17 Windows 2000 Computer Management TABLES


TABLE 171
System Information - System Summary OS Name: Version: Total Physical Memory: Available Physical Memory: Microsoft Windows 2000 Professional 5.0.2195 Build 2195 May vary, should be at least 128,000 KB May vary, should be less than 128,000 KB

TABLE 172
Sample PCI Bus Address Range: 0x022-0x003F

TABLE 173
Keyboard IRQ: 1

TABLE 174
Display Information Adapter Name: Adapter Type: Resolution: Bits / Pixels: All-In-Wonder 128 Pro PCI English Rage 128 Pro (PCI) 1024 X 768 X 80 32

NOTE: Your answer will vary depending on the Display Adapter Card is installed in your system.

TABLE 175
COM1 Baud Rate: 9600

LAB ANSWERS 151

Instructor's Guide

TABLE 176
Admin$ Shared Folders C$ IPC$ NOTE: Your answer will vary depending on what if any folders are shared.

TABLE 177
Open Files: None

NOTE: Your answer will vary depending on what if any files ore open.

TABLE 178
Items listed in Mice and Other Pointing Devices: The name(s) or type(s) of mouse or pointing devices connected to the computer.

TABLE 179
Keyboard Input / Output Ranges: NOTE: Your answer could will vary. 0060 0060, 0064 0064

TABLE 1710
Administrators Description: Administrators have complete and unrestricted access to the computer/domain.

TABLE 1711
File System of (C:): NTFS

NOTE: The answer will be FAT32 if the computer has Windows 2000 installed over Windows Me. If only Windows 2000 is installed the file system will probably be NTFS.

TABLE 1712
Indexing Service Catalogs: System

TABLE 1713
Processes Running on System: 18 Processes Running

NOTE: Your answer may vary depending on what processes are running on your system.

152 LAB ANSWERS

Instructor's Guide

TABLE 1714
System Idle Process Memory Usage: 16K

TABLE 1715
Total Physical Memory: 130612K

NOTE: Your answer may vary depending on the amount of memory installed in your system.

LAB PROCEDURE 17 Questions Answers


1. From this menu you can view properties of your hardware resources and components, software environment, and Internet Explorer settings. 2. Through Control Panel/Administrative Tools/Computer Management/Shared Folders. 3. This is a useful tool for viewing any conflicts or hardware setup problems with various components on the computer. 4. Administrator and Guest. 5. Disk Defragmenter moves the pieces of each file or folder to one location on the volume, so that each occupies a single, contiguous space on the disk drive.

LAB PROCEDURE 18 Windows ME Plug and Play TABLES


TABLE 181
Network Adapter Name: D-Link DFE-530TX+ 10/100 PCI Adapter

NOTE: Your answer will vary depending on the Network Adapter card installed in your system.

TABLE 182
Hardware Changes: Network adapter is no longer present.

TABLE 183
Network Adapter Added: Network adapter is present.

LAB ANSWERS 153

Instructor's Guide

TABLE 184
Modem Name: Zoom 556K PCI.

NOTE: Your answer will vary depending on the Modem installed in your system.

TABLE 185
Hardware Changes: Modem is no longer present.

TABLE 18-6
Modem Added: Modem is present.

LAB PROCEDURE 18 QUESTION ANSWERS


1. 2. 3. 4. 5. Plug and Play. Add New Hardware wizard inside the Control Panel. Device Manager. False, it's under the modem icon in the Control Panel. System properties in the Control Panel, Device Manager.

LAB PROCEDURE 19 Windows 2000 Plug and Play TABLES


TABLE 191
Network Adapter : D-Link DFE-530TX+ 10/100 PCI Adapter.

NOTE: Your answer will vary depending on the Network Adapter installed in your system.

TABLE 192
Observation After Removal: Network Adapter is no present.

154 LAB ANSWERS

Instructor's Guide

TABLE 193
Observation After Adding: Network Adapter is present.

LAB PROCEDURE 19 Question Answers


1. 2. 3. 4. 5. Plug and Play. Most new hardware is PNP compatible. You may be able to install it manually through Add/Remove Hardware in Control Panel. Not necessarily, none may display when installing ta Plug and Play device. By right clicking on the top icon in Hardware Manager and selecting Scan for hardware changes.

LAB PROCEDURE 20 Windows ME Printers TABLES


TABLE 201
Parallel Port Modes [Normal] [EPP] [ECP] [EPP+ECP]

NOTE: Your answer may vary but should similar.

TABLE 202
Printer Manufacturer and Model Manufacturer: Model: [Answer will vary depending on the printer installed in your system.] [Answer will vary depending on the printer installed in your system.]

TABLE 203
Printer Driver Name: (Answer will vary, but should be similar to [DRIVERNAME.DLL].)

TABLE 204
Printer Port Printer Connected To: LPT1

NOTE: Your answer may vary depending on how the printer was setup and installed in your system.

LAB ANSWERS 155

Instructor's Guide

TABLE 205
Fonts Tab: NOTE: Your answer will vary. Abadi MT Condensed Extra Bold Abadi MT Condensed Light

LAB PROCEDURE 20 QUESTION ANSWERS


1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. Local LPT1 No From this tab you can change the printers resolution and intensity. Possibly various paper and cartridge settings. These settings are specific to the printer. Clicking the Print Test Page on the General Tab in the Printer Properties Window. While in the CMOS/BIOS use the SHIFT/PRINT SCREEN key combination. The answers may vary, but most likely the delete key is the standard key.

LAB PROCEDURE 21 Windows 2000 Printers TABLES


TABLE 211
Printer Manufacturer and Model Manufacturer: Model: Hewlett Packard 895Cse

NOTE: Your answer will vary depending on the printer that is installed on your system.

TABLE 212
Printer Driver Name: [DRIVERNAME.DLL]

NOTE: Your answer will vary depending on the printer that is installed on your system.

156 LAB ANSWERS

Instructor's Guide

LAB PROCEDURE 21 Question Answers


1. 2. 3. 4. Local LPT1 No From this tab you can change the printers availability schedule, spool settings, defaults, print processing format, and separator page settings. 5. The Settings tab are specific to the installed printer. Possible answers are, various paper and cartridge settings.

LAB GROUP 3 SYSTEM ADMINISTRATION TOOLS


LAB PROCEDURE 22 Windows ME System Information TABLES
TABLE 221
Hardware Resources System Summary Subtopics: Components Software Environment Internet Explorer8

LAB ANSWERS 157

Instructor's Guide

TABLE 222
Resources IRQ No. O 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 10 11 11 12 13 14 14 15 15 Numeric Data Processor ALiM5219 PCI Bus Master IDE Controller Primary IDE Controller (Single fifo ALiM5219 PCI Bus Master IDE Controller Secondary IDE Controller (Single fifo) IRQ Holder for PCI Steering D-Link DFE-530TX+ 10/100 PCI Adapter IRQ Holder for PCI Steering ATI-264VT4 (English) System Timer Standard 101/102-Key or Microsoft Natural Keyboard Programmable Interrupt Controller Communications Port (COM2) Communications Port (COM1) [BLANK} Standard Floppy Disk Controller Printer Port (LPT1) System CMOS/real time clock Device Names

NOTE: Your answer may vary depending on your system Installation

TABLE 223
Display Subcomponents Adapter Name: Adapter Type: Resolution: Bits/Pixel: ATI-264VT4(English) Mach64VT Rev, ATI Tech. - Enhance Compatible 800 X 600 X -1 hertz 32

NOTE: Your answer will vary depending on the Video Adapter Installed on your system.

158 LAB ANSWERS

Instructor's Guide

TABLE 224
COM1 Baud Rate: 9600 Baud

TABLE 225
Summary File Versions Internet Explorer Subcomponents: Connectivity Cache Content Security

TABLE 226
Restore Point Date: Time: Thursday, January 11, 2001 10:28 AM

NOTE: Your answer will vary depending on the Restore Point selected.

TABLE 227
Disable System ROM Breakpoint Disable Virtual HD IRQ EMM Exclude A000 - FFFF Optional Settings Under Advanced Troubleshooting Settings: Force Compatibility mode disk access VGA 640x480x16 Enable Startup Menu Disable Scandisk after bad shutdown Limit memory to _____MB Disable UDF file system Enable DeepSleep

LAB ANSWERS 159

Instructor's Guide

TABLE 228
Specific Programs Loaded at Startup ScanRegistry TaskMonitor PC Health SystemTray Load Power Profile AtiCwd32 Ati Key Load Power Profile Scheduling Agent StateMgr

NOTE: Your answer will vary depending on specific programs that load at startup Restore Point selected.

TABLE 229
Process System.ini file General Program Selections Loaded at Startup: Process Win.ini file Load static VxD's Load Startup group items Load environment variables

TABLE 22-10
1. Normal Diagnostic Startup Boot Options: 2. Logged (\Bootlog.txt) 3. Safe mode 4. Step-by-Step Confirmation

LAB PROCEDURE 22 Question Answers


1. Yes 2. System Restore 3. System Information collects your system configuration information and provides a menu for displaying the associated system topics. Support technicians require specific information about your computer when they are troubleshooting your configuration. You can use System Information to quickly find the data they need to resolve your system problem.

160 LAB ANSWERS

Instructor's Guide

LAB PROCEDURE 23 Windows ME Disk Management TABLES


TABLE 231
Display Summary The 5 settings in the Scandisk Advanced Section : Lost file fragments Log file Check files for Cross-linked files

TABLE 232
ScanDisk Results Total Disk Space: Number of Bad Sectors: Size of Each Allocation Unit: 4,200,768 KB 0 bytes 4,096 bytes

NOTE: Your answer will vary based on the size of your hard drive.

TABLE 233
Select Colors From Defrag Legend Unoptimized data that belongs at beginning of drive: Optimized (defragmented) data: Data thats currently being written: Cyan Blue Red

LAB PROCEDURE 23 Question Answers


1. 2. 3. 4. 5. Storage media consists of Hard Disk Drive, Floppy Disk Drive, Magnetic Tape, CD-R, DVD-R. Disk fragmentation. Through Disk Cleanup or Control Panel/Add/Remove Programs. Zero ratio. No

LAB ANSWERS 161

Instructor's Guide

LAB PROCEDURE 24 Windows 2000 Accessories TABLES


TABLE 241
Power Options Properties Turn off monitor: Turn off hard disks: After 20 mins Never

TABLE 242
Observations After One Minute: The monitor shuts off or turns black after one minute.

TABLE 243
Display Observations: The monitor changes to black with very large white fonts.

TABLE 244
Observations of Use MouseKeys: The mouse cursor moves up

TABLE 245
Regional Options Your Locale: Digit Grouping: Currency Symbol: Time Format: Date Separator: Input Language: English (United States) 123,456,789 $ h:mm:ss:tt / English (United States)

NOTE: Your answer will vary depending on how the Regional Settings were established during Windows setup.

162 LAB ANSWERS

Instructor's Guide

TABLE 246
Asterisk Event Sound File Name: Chord.wav or just Chord

NOTE: Your answer may vary depending on whether the sound file events were changed.

TABLE 247
Preferred Device for Sound Playback: Creative Labs SoundBlaster Live!

NOTE: Your answer will vary depending on or if a Sound Card is installed in the system.

TABLE 248
Speaker Setup: Desktop Stereo Speakers

NOTE: Your answer will vary depending on if speakers are installed in system.

TABLE 249
Number of Hardware Devices: 10

NOTE: Your answer will vary depending on the devices installed in system.

TABLE 2410
Name of Window: ATAPI CDROM Properties

LAB PROCEDURE 24 Question Answers


1. 2. 3. 4. 5. Turn off monitor, and Turn off hard disks. High Contrast and MouseKeys. The Regional Options in Control Panel Changes the range and format of the date display. Go to Start/Settings/Control Panel/Sounds and Multimedia/Hardware and double click on the device.

LAB ANSWERS 163

Instructor's Guide

LAB PROCEDURE 25 WINDOWS 2000 Disk Management TABLES


TABLE 251
Downloaded Program Files Files to delete: Temporary Internet Files Temporary Offline Files NOTE: Your answer may vary depending on the state of the hard disk.

TABLE 252
Boot Files System State (right hand pane): Com+ Class Registration Database Registry

TABLE 253
Backup Drive and Filename: A:\backup.bkf

TABLE 254
Observation About Files: The deleted file was restored to My Documents folder

TABLE 255
File Size on Disk: 8.00KB

TABLE 256
New File Size on Disk: 4.00 KB

164 LAB ANSWERS

Instructor's Guide

LAB PROCEDURE 25 Question Answers


1. 2. 3. 4. 5. Storage media consists of Hard Disk Drive, Floppy Disk Drive, Magnetic Tape, CD-R, DVD-R. Encrypting File System. Through Disk Cleanup or Control Panel/Add/Remove Programs. 200% No.

LAB PROCEDURE 26 Windows 2000 Registry TABLES


TABLE 261
Menu Key Type String: REG_SZ

TABLE 262
Menu Value Data: If it has not changed it should be 212 208 200 by default.

TABLE 263
Reboot Observation With New Value Data: The menu has changed to Bright Green.

TABLE 264
Color Palette Values Red 0 Green 255 Blue 0

TABLE 265
Reboot Observation With Restored Value Data: The string is back to its original value.

TABLE 266
File Size of Sample Registry Export: Should be about 15 MB

LAB ANSWERS 165

Instructor's Guide

LAB PROCEDURE 26 Question Answers


1. 1. The registry contains information for: users; system hardware; and software 2. Try restoring a registry backup, if that fails, then re-Install Windows. 3. With Regedt32 you can set the security for registry keys and you can view or edit the value data types REG_EXPAND_SZ and REG_MULTI_SZ. 4. They are equal. 5. 5. Changes in windows settings are changed in the registry database.

LAB PROCEDURE 27 Windows ME Safe Mode TABLES


TABLE 271
The print option is grayed out. It is unavailable because Safe mode doesn't load the drivers for the printer.

TABLE 272
Device Status: Status is not available when Windows is running in Safe Mode.

TABLE 273
Device Status Printer Port (LPT1): Status is not available when Windows is running in Safe Mode.

LAB PROCEDURE 27 Question Answers


1. 2. 3. 4. There are few programs that will run in Safe Mode: Notepad and Explorer.are two main ones. Bootlog.txt No When restarting Windows will suggest a to restart in Safe Mode after a crash.

166 LAB ANSWERS

Instructor's Guide

LAB PROCEDURE 28 Windows ME Setup Log Files TABLES


TABLE 281
BOOTLOG.TXT Search Results of *log.txt Search: DETLOG.TXT NETLOG.TXT SETUPLOG.TXT C:\ C:\ C:\ C:\ 52 KB 48 KB 22 KB 183 KB Text Document Text Document Text Document Text Document

TABLE 282
First Group Drivers Load Status Which One 1st Driver Last Driver Driver VMM.VXD VKD.VXD Status LoadSuccess LoadSuccess

TABLE 283
System Critical Drivers Load Status Which One 1st Driver Last Driver Critical Driver VMM SHELL Status SYSCRITINITSUCCESS SYSCRITINITSUCCESS

TABLE 284
Device Drivers Load Status Which One 1st Driver 2nd Driver Device Driver VMM CONFIGURING Status DEVICEINITSUCCESS DEVICEINITSUCCESS

LAB ANSWERS 167

Instructor's Guide

TABLE 285
Dynamically Loaded & Device Initialization Load Status Which One 1st Driver 2nd Driver Device bios.vxd pci.vxd Status Dynamic load success Dynamic load success

TABLE 286
Initialization of System VxD Device Load Status Which One 1st Device 2nd Device Device VMM SHELL Status INITCOMPLETESUCCESS INITCOMPLETESUCCESS

TABLE 287
Initialization of Kernel Driver & Load Status Which One 1st Kernel Device Last Kernel Device Kernel Driver system.drv msgsrv32.exe Status LoadSuccess LoadSuccess

TABLE 288
1st Line of DETLOG.TXT File [System Detection: 12/12/00 - 16:21:27] NOTE: Your answer will probably have a different date and time.

TABLE 289
Checking For: System Bus

TABLE 2810
Functions Called: Devices Detected/Verified: 298 0

168 LAB ANSWERS

Instructor's Guide

TABLE 2811
[Realtek Rtl8029(AS)-based PCI Ethernet Adapter] = OK (This will Depend on the network adapter installed in your system) [Dial-Up Adapter] = OK [TCP\IP] = OK

NdiCreate Items:

TABLE 2812
Name of First Section [SETUPLOG.TXT] [OptionalComponents]

TABLE 2813
Name of Last Section [SETUPLOG.TXT] [NotConfigured]

LAB PROCEDURE 28 Question Answers


1. 2. 3. 4. "DEVICEINITSUCCESS" Bootlog.txt 0=no It is used in the troubleshooting of network problems.

LAB PROCEDURE 29 Windows 2000 Safe Mode TABLES


TABLE 291
Colors Drop Down Menu Observation There is only one option, namely 16 Colors.

TABLE 292
Network Observations: I can now view other computers in the network

LAB ANSWERS 169

Instructor's Guide

TABLE 293
Bytes Free on C:\ at Command Prompt 186,744,832 bytes free NOTE: Your answer will vary depending on the size your hard drive.

TABLE 294
Operating Environment Changes Observations The taskbar and windows desktop appears

TABLE 295
Boot Log Date: 10 27 2000

NOTE: Your answer will probably have a different date.

TABLE 296
Display Colors: Display Screen Area: 256 Colors 640 X 480

LAB PROCEDURE 29 Question Answers


1. 9 2. Safe Mode will start Windows with a minimal set of drivers used to run windows, including mouse; monitor; keyboard; hard drive; base video; default system services. 3. VGA Mode is useful when you have display problems, i.e., installed a video driver and have configured it incorrectly. 4. Type and execute the "explorer" command. 5. Hardware Profiles can be useful for saving hardware specific information when transporting a hard drive between two computers.

170 LAB ANSWERS

Instructor's Guide

LAB PROCEDURE 30 Windows 2000 Virus Protection TABLES


TABLE 301
Scan Memory What to Scan: Compressed files Scan boot sectors Program files only

TABLE 302
Prompt user for action When a Virus is found Options: Quarantine Clean infected files automatically Delete infected files automatically Continue scanning

TABLE 303
Excluded Item: \Recycled\

TABLE 304
VirusScan Download Scan Enable logging for: VShield Internet Filtering E-Mail Scan Update

TABLE 305
Scan Observations The path and filename of the current item being scanned are displayed.

LAB ANSWERS 171

Instructor's Guide

TABLE 306
Details Window - Required Values Scan engine version: Scan Item 1: Scan all files: 4.0.70 C:\ 1

TABLE 307
Scan Summary Details Virus in memory: Files infected: Zero (Hopefully) Zero (Hopefully)

TABLE 308
Schedule Options: Once Daily At Startup Weekly Hourly Monthly

TABLE 309
Differences Memory Used During Disable: Memory Used During Enable: 58,000k 60,000k (should be 2MB larger than Disable)

TABLE 3010
E-Mail Scan System Scan Status Tabs: Download Scan Internet Filter

172 LAB ANSWERS

Instructor's Guide

LAB PROCEDURE 30 Question Answers


1. Varies approximately 20,000 with Windows 2000 and Millennium installed 2. My Computer including A:, C:, D:, Control Panel. My Network Places and My Documents. Any other drives under these folders. 3. Under Activity Log/Virus Scan Log. 4. Virus Scan Console/Scan Drive C/Schedule Tab. 5. New viruses can change every day. The most recent viruses are always being defeated, and the latest .DAT files have new cures.

LAB GROUP 4 NETWORK MANAGEMENT


LAB PROCEDURE 31 Windows ME Dial-Up Access TABLES
TABLE 311
Modem Connection Preferences Data Bits: Parity: Stop Bits: 8 None 1

TABLE 312
Hardware and Software Flow Control Settings: Hardware(RTS/CTS) Software (XON/XOFF)

LAB ANSWERS 173

Instructor's Guide

LAB PROCEDURE 31 Question Answers


1. User name, Password, Phone number to connect to, and in some instances you need the Primary and Secondary DNS server IPs. 2. TCP/IP 3. A DNS address is the Internet Protocol (IP) address of a Domain Name Server. 4. DHCP server 5. 56K

LAB PROCEDURE 32 Windows ME TCP/IP Setup TABLES


TABLE 321
ATM Call Manager ATM LAN Emulation Client Network Protocols: IPX/SPX-compatible Protocol NetBEUI PPP over ATM (protocol) TCP/IP

TABLE 322
Client for Microsoft Network Dial-up Adapter NetBEUI -> Dial-up Adapter Current Configuration: 3Com TX+ 10/100 PCI Adapter TCP/IP -> Dial-up Adapter NetBEUI -> 3Com TX+ 10/100 PCI Adapter TCP/IP -> 3Com TX+ 10/100 PCI Adapter File and Print Sharing for Microsoft Networks NOTE: Your answer may vary depending on the specific network configuration of you r system, but should be similar.

174 LAB ANSWERS

Instructor's Guide

TABLE 323
Current TCP/IP Configuration Computer name: Workgroup or Domain Name: Is the IP address obtained automatically from DHCP?: IP Address: Subnet Mask: WINS Resolution: Installed Gateway: Host: Domain: DNS Server Search Order: Domain Suffix Search Order: NOTE: Your answer may vary but should be very similar. EVAN PRODUCTION No 192.168.0.53 255.255.255.0 Disabled 192.168.0.36 EVAN EDITING 192.168.0.36 none

TABLE 324
Computer and Workgroup Names Computer name: Workgroup or Domain Name: Is the IP address obtained automatically from DHCP? IP Address: Subnet Mask: WINS Resolution: Installed Gateway: Host: Domain: DNS Server Search Order: Domain Suffix Search Order: NOTE: Your answer may vary but should be very similar. EVAN PRODUCTION Yes none none Disabled none none none none none

LAB ANSWERS 175

Instructor's Guide

TABLE 325
Changes in Desktop The My Network Places Icon has disappeared.

TABLE 326
TCP/IP Bindings: Client for Microsoft Windows

NOTE: Your answer may vary with additional entries, i.e., File and printer sharing for Microsoft Networks.

LAB PROCEDURE 32 Question Answers


1. 2. 3. 4. 5. TCP/IP TCP/IP was created for the Department of Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency. Network administrators often use Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol (DHCP) addressing. The Network Control Panel. No one owns the rights to it. It can service networks that include a wide variety of computer types. It is very resistant to hacking.

176 LAB ANSWERS

Instructor's Guide

LAB PROCEDURE 33 Windows ME TCP/IP Utilities TABLES


TABLE 331
MS-DOS IPConfig Information Host Name DNS Servers Node Type NetBIOS Scope ID IP Routing Enabled WINS Proxy Enabled NetBIOS Resolution Uses DNS Description Physical Address DHCP Enabled IP Address Subnet Mask Default Gateway DHCP Server Primary WINS Server Secondary WINS Server Lease Obtained Lease Expires EVAN 204.118.6.2 204.118.6.14 Broadcast [BLANK] No No No NDIS 4.0 Driver 00-50-BA-D8-3E-0D Yes 192.168.0.8 255.255.255.0 192.168.0.36 192.168.0.36 [BLANK] [BLANK] 11 03 00 10:59:31 AM 11 03 00 11:59:31 AM

NOTE: Your answer may vary based on your current network configuration settings.

TABLE 332
More Info - Current Lease Information Lease Obtained Lease Expires 11 13 00 10:39:52 AM 11 13 00 11:39:52 AM

NOTE: Your answer may vary based on your IP Config settings.

LAB ANSWERS 177

Instructor's Guide

TABLE 333
New Lease Information Lease Obtained Lease Expires 11 13 00 10:46:18 AM 11 13 00 11:46:18 AM

TABLE 334
IP Addresses of Host Computer Interface Line 192.168.0.8 on Interface 0x2

NOTE: Your answer may vary based on your IP Config settings.

TABLE 33-5
IP and Physical MAC addresses IP Address 192.168.0.27 192.168.0.31 192.168.0.36 Physical MAC Address 00-50-ba-d8-5a-5e 00-50-ba-d8-55-a5 00-50-ba-74-93-69 Type dynamic dynamic dynamic

NOTE: Your answer may vary based on your IP Config settings.

TABLE 336
Net View Host Names \\CAPTURE \\CATHY \\EDITOR \\EVAN \\HALL NOTE: Your answer may vary based on your network settings. \\MARCRAFT1 \\MARCRAFT2 \\TONY \\YU-WEN

TABLE 337
IP Address IP Address for www.microsoft.com: NOTE: Your answer will vary. 207.46.230.218

178 LAB ANSWERS

Instructor's Guide

TABLE 33-8
New IP Address New IP Address for www.microsoft.com: NOTE: Your answer will vary. 207.46.130.45

LAB PROCEDURE 33 Question Answers


1. 2. 3. 4. 5. NETSTAT -r (NetBIOS), and -n (IP address) At the MS-DOS Prompt. At the command prompt, type "nbtstat -c". At the command prompt, type "arp -a". www.microsoft.com

LAB PROCEDURE 34 Windows ME Network Operations TABLES


TABLE 341
Listed Computer Name: NOTE: Your answer will vary. STATION05

TABLE 342
Change in Appearance: The folder now has a hand holding it, denoting that it is a shared folder.

TABLE 343
Read-Only Access Type Options: Full Depends on Password

LAB ANSWERS 179

Instructor's Guide

TABLE 344
My Network Places Icon Icon Name Add Network Place Home Networking Wizard Entire Network Icon Description Connects to shared folders, Web folders and FTP sites. Sets up your computers to share resources and an Internet connection. A list of nodes (computers, printers, shared folders, and other devices) connected to your network.

TABLE 345
Adding a Network Place Icon Name Add Network Place Home Networking Wizard Entire Network Lab35 Sharing Icon Description Connects to shared folders, Web folders and FTP sites. Sets up your computers to share resources and an Internet connection. A list of nodes (computers, printers, shared folders, and other devices) connected to your network. \\"name of mapped computer"\"student's first name"

LAB PROCEDURE 34 Question Answers


1. 2. 3. 4. 5. True Read-only and Full. It can be a shared folder, a Web folder on the Internet, or an FTP site. You must go into the Network control panel and enable File sharing. Both My Computer and Windows Explorer will show the mapped drive icon as an additional drive attached to your system.

180 LAB ANSWERS

Instructor's Guide

LAB PROCEDURE 35 Windows ME Accessories TABLES


TABLE 351
Observations of High Contrast: Background color changed to black and the fonts are larger.

TABLE 352
Observations of Pressing the UP (8) Key: The mouse moves the direction of whichever arrow key is pressed.

TABLE 353
Locale: Measurement System: Currency Symbol: Time Style: Short Date Style: NOTE: Your answer may vary. English United States U.S. $ h:mm:ss:tt M/d/yyyy

TABLE 354
Critical Stop Event Name: Chord.wav

TABLE 355
Preferred Sound Device: [The name of your sound card.]

NOTE: Your answer will vary depending on the sound card installed in the system.

TABLE 356
Speaker Setup: Desktop speakers

NOTE: Your answer will vary depending on the speakers installed in the system.

LAB ANSWERS 181

Instructor's Guide

TABLE 357
Number of Video Compression Devices: 10 Devices

NOTE: Your answer will vary depending on the number of devices installed in the system.

LAB PROCEDURE 35 Question Answers


1. 2. 3. 4. High Contrast and MouseKeys. Regional Options Changes the range and format of the date displayed. Go to Start/Settings/Control Panel/Sounds and Multimedia/Hardware and double click on the device.

LAB PROCEDURE 36 Windows 2000 TCP/IP TABLES


TABLE 361
Host Nam: Primary DNS Suffix: Node Type: IP Routing Enabled: WINS Proxy Enabled:. Description: Physical Address: DHCP Enabled: Autoconfiguration Enabled: IP Address: Subnet Mask: Default Gateway: DHCP Server: DNS Servers: Lease Obtained: Lease Expires: evan [Blank} Broadcast No No D-Link DFE-530TX+ 10/100 PCI Adapter 00-50-BA-D8-38-B6 Yes Yes 192.168.0.20 255.255.255.0 192.168.0.36 192.168.0.36 204.118.6.2, 204.118.6.14 Wednesday, November 01, 2000 1:20:24 PM Wednesday, November 01, 2000 2:20:24 PM

NOTE: Your answer will vary based on your current network configuration settings.

182 LAB ANSWERS

Instructor's Guide

TABLE 362
Host Computer Interface IP Address: 192.168.0.20

NOTE: Your answer will vary based on your current network configuration settings.

TABLE 363
IP and MAC Addresses IP Address 192.168.0.31 192.168.0.36 Physical MAC Address 00-50-ba-d8-55-a5 00-50-ba-74-93-69 dynamic dynamic Type

TABLE 364
\\CAPTURE \\CATHY \\EDITOR5 Net View Host Names: \\EVAN \\HALL \\MARCRAFT2 \\TONY] YU-WEN NOTE: Your answer will vary based on your current network.

TABLE 365
IP Address for www.mic-inc.com: 206.61.210.100

LAB PROCEDURE 36 Question Answers


1. 2. 3. 4. 5. At the command prompt, type "tracert hostname" (e.g. tracert www.marcraft.com). At the MS-DOS Command Prompt. TRACERT arp -a TRACERT

LAB ANSWERS 183

Instructor's Guide

PROCEDURE 37 Windows 2000 Networking TABLES


TABLE 371
Contents of Shared Folder : New Text Document.txt

TABLE 372
Drive Letter Selected: F

NOTE: Your answer will vary based on your available drive selections.

TABLE 373
\\server\share (shared folder) Network Place Examples: http://webserver/share (Web folder) ftp://ftp.microsoft.com (FTP site)

TABLE 374
Number of Items: 20

NOTE: Your answer will vary based on the FTP Server.

TABLE 375
My Network Places - New Items : The ftp connection that was just created will appear.

LAB PROCEDURE 37 Question Answers


1. 2. 3. 4. 5. Everyone Through "My Network Places" you can view contents of the LAN, and create shortcuts to FTP sites. This displays the computers in your local workgroup. For computers other than Windows 2000 that print over the network. Most FTP sites allow an anonymous logon to view public files.

184 LAB ANSWERS

Instructor's Guide

PROCEDURE 38 Internet Client Setup for IE 5.5 TABLES


TABLE 381
a) Name: b) Dial-up Phone #: c) DNS Server Address: d) Login/User Name: e) Dial-up Password: f) Email Address: g) POP3 Server Address: h) POP3 Login Name: i) POP3 Password: j) SMTP Server Address: k) NEWS Server Address: Evan Samaritano 800-555-1234 208.218.121.84 and/or 208.218.78.83 LN_techeditor z00tsu1t techeditor@marcraft.com 208.218.122.51 (mail.marcraft.com) techeditor z00tsu1t smtp.marcraft.com news.marcraft.com

NOTE: Your answer will vary based on particular Internet Configuration Information.

TABLE 382
Version Number: 5.50.4134.0100

TABLE 383
Microsoft Windows 3.11 Microsoft Windows 95 Microsoft Windows 98 Listed Operating Systems: Microsoft Windows ME Microsoft Windows NT 4.0 Microsoft Windows 2000 Apple Macintosh OS

LAB ANSWERS 185

Instructor's Guide

TABLE 384
Distance To Marcraft: 9.4 Miles

NOTE: Your answer will vary based on your location from Marcraft.

LAB PROCEDURE 38 Question Answers


1. Name, Dial-up Phone Number, DNS Server Address, Login/User Name, Dial-up Password, Email Address, POP3 Server Address, POP3 Login Name, POP3 Password, SMTP Server Address, NEWS Server Address. 2. Computer technicians often need to use an Internet browser client to locate and download vital applications, demos, drivers and patches. 3. Yahoo is an Internet Portal/Directory service. Or, as Yahoo's press release states - Yahoo is "...the first online navigational guide to the Web". 4. Run IE, then click on Tools/Internet Options.../Advanced tab. Or, use the path Start/Settings/Control Panel/Internet Options.../Advanced tab. 5. Open IE. Click on Tools/Internet Options.../General tab/Use Current button.

PROCEDURE 39 Windows ME FTP/Telnet TABLES


TABLE 391
Full Name: AriZona TElecommunications Community

TABLE 392
Provided Login Name: guest

TABLE 393
Provided Password: visitor

186 LAB ANSWERS

Instructor's Guide

TABLE 394
ASCII-Text File Bytes received: Time To Download: Speed Of Download: 146 bytes 0.01 Seconds 14.60 KB/second

NOTE: Your answer will vary based on a variety of conditions, i.e., type of connection, ISP Speed, etc..

TABLE 395
Binary File Bytes received: Time To Download: Speed Of Download: 638111 bytes 77.50 Seconds 8.23 KB/second

NOTE: Your answer will vary based on a variety of conditions, i.e., type of connection, ISP Speed, etc..

TABLE 396
FTP site address: Path: ftp.microsoft.com /deskapps/games/public/baseball2001/

TABLE 397
Permission Flags Upload Directory: Incoming Directory: drwxrwx--x drwxrwxrwx

TABLE 398
Downloads Directory Error Message: ! Upload failed on 206.61.210.168 (/pub/downloads/upldeps.txt). (upload not allowed)

TABLE 399
Upload Directory Error Message: ! Upload failed on 206.61.210.168 (/pub/upload/upldeps.txt). (upload not allowed)

LAB ANSWERS 187

Instructor's Guide

TABLE 3910
Incoming Directory Message: ~ Upload complete on ftp.mic-inc.com (/pub/incoming/upldeps.txt).

LAB PROCEDURE 39 Question Answers


1. A telnet client, or terminal emulation software like HyperTerminal. 2. Arizona State University. 3. Send a large file via FTP, and measure the size of the file divided by the time it took to complete transmission (KB/second). 4. This traditionally means that a user of a public FTP site would enter "anonymous" for the requested login name, and "anonymous" for the password. This would allow the user limited guest privileges to use the site. Currently, most sites that allow anonymous FTP use "ftp" for the login name, and the most common requested password is your e-mail address. 5. A - LeechFTP, WS_FTP LE, CuteFTP or FTP Voyager.

PROCEDURE 40 Windows ME Internet Domain Names TABLES


TABLE 401
Cisco Home Page Address: http://www.cisco.com/

NOTE: Your answer may vary, but should be similar.

TABLE 402
Map/Help Page Address: http://www.cisco.com/public/help/navigate.shtml

NOTE: Your answer may vary, but should be similar.

TABLE 403
Windows Update Page Address: http://windowsupdate.microsoft.com/default.htm

NOTE: Your answer may vary, but should be similar.

188 LAB ANSWERS

Instructor's Guide

TABLE 404
Company Name: FQDN Address: Marcraft http://206.61.210.100/

TABLE 405
NETSTAT Connections Foreign Addresses: directdl.Tucows.com:http games.Tucows.viclink.com:http

NOTE: Your answer may vary, but should be similar.

TABLE 406
NETSTAT -N Connections Foreign Addresses: 207.136.66.80:80 204.201.255.22:80

NOTE: Your answer may vary, but should be similar.

TABLE 407
FQDN IP Address: 204.201.255.22

NOTE: Your answer may vary, but should be similar.

LAB PROCEDURE 40 Question Answers


1. An FQDN, or Fully Qualified Domain Name, is a combination of the host computer name and the domain name. 2. .COM, .EDU, .ORG, .GOV, .MIL 3. The FQDN only shows the server name/ID. A URL also provides the location and name of a particular file on the Web site. 4. A Subnet Mask defines which part of the IP address is translated into the domain name. For example, a Class C subnet mask (255.255.255.0) will use the first three numbers to define the domain name, and the last number as the host identifier. 5. When you enter the FQDN, you will first be directed to a root DNS server that knows all of the appropriate suffix entries on the Internet. The root DNS server provides the IP addresses of all of the DNS servers providing services to the particular domain. Now you will be put in contact with one of the domain's DNS servers to get the IP address for the required host server.

LAB ANSWERS 189

Instructor's Guide

LAB GROUP 5 SYSTEM MAINTENANCE


PROCEDURE 41 Windows ME Software Version Update Management TABLES
TABLE 411
File Name: File Size: Predicted Download Time: Critical Updates Package 416 KB 2 minutes

NOTE: Your answer may vary, but should be similar.

TABLE 412
Windows Media Player Version Before Upgrade: 7.00.00.1440

NOTE: Your answer may vary depending on the version you currently have.

TABLE 413
Windows Media Player Version After Upgrade: 7.00.00.1956

NOTE: Your answer may vary depending on the last version downloaded.

190 LAB ANSWERS

Instructor's Guide

TABLE 414
Display Adapter Driver Name: Manufacturer: Driver File Version: Chip Type: Current Driver Files: Rage Pro Turbo PCI ATI Technologies Inc. 4.10.00.3000 Mach64: Rage Pro ati_drae.drv, ati_vxae.vxd, vdd.vxd, vflatd.vxd

NOTE: Your answer will vary based on your Video Adapter installed.

TABLE 415
Display Driver Updates Driver Name: Driver File version: Current Driver Files: Xpert@Play 98 PCI (English) 4.11.2628 ati_2ddad.drv, ati_sddad.vxd, vdd.vxd, vflatd.vxd

NOTE: Your answer will vary based on your Video Adapter installed.

LAB PROCEDURE 41 Question Answers


1. At a minimum, you should check for operating system updates once a month, and application/driver updates at least once every six months. 2. In order to view a driver's file version number you must open Device Manager in the System control panel. Then you must locate and highlight the driver in question, and then double-click on it, or click the Properties button. Now, click on the Driver tab, and then click the Driver File Details button to reveal the detailed information about the driver. 3. Device Manager is not used to manage Printer drivers. Printer drivers are managed through the Add Printers wizard located in the Printers folder. The Printers folder is accessed using the path Start/Settings/Printers. 4. Normally, an application's internal information display will be fairly comprehensive. Running the application, then selecting About from the Help menu will usually access the most comprehensive information on a particular application. 5. If you are connected to the Internet, the Windows Update feature will take you to the Windows Update Web site, which will list all available updates.

LAB ANSWERS 191

Instructor's Guide

PROCEDURE 42 Windows 2000 Software Version Update Management TABLES


TABLE 421
Windows Media Player Update Update File Name: Update File Size: Download Time: Windows Media Player 7 9319 KB 8 Minutes

NOTE: Your answer may vary depending on the version update downloaded.

TABLE 422
New Desktop Shortcuts: A shortcut to Windows Media Player

TABLE 423
Change or Remove Programs Three Buttons: Add New Programs Add/Remove Windows Components

TABLE 424
Current version: New version: 6.4.09.1109 greater than 7

NOTE: Your answer may vary depending on the available versions of Media Player.

LAB PROCEDURE 42 Question Answers


1. 2. 3. 4. 5. In the Help/About menu. Windowsupdate.microsoft.com. No. Through the Help/Upgrade menu or Windows Update. Start/Control Panel/Add-Remove Programs.

192 LAB ANSWERS

Instructor's Guide

PROCEDURE 43 Windows ME OS Faults TABLES


TABLE 431
Results of Missing io.sys: Invalid system disk. Replace the disk then press any key.

TABLE 432
Cannot find System.ini. Results of Missing system.ini: You need to run Windows Setup again to install the file. Press any key to continue. Computer shuts down.

TABLE 433
Results of Missing explorer.exe: Error loading Explorer.exe. You must reinstall Windows.

TABLE 434
While Initializing device IFSMGR, the Microsoft Installable File System Results of Missing ifshlp.sys: Manager cannot find the helper driver. Please ensure that IFSHLP.SYS has been installed. System halted. Windows 98 says: Vfat device Initialization failed. A device or resource required by Vfat is not present or is unavailable. Vfat cannot continue loading.

LAB PROCEDURE 43 Question Answers


1. You can't remove a file from within Windows when it is in use by the system.

LAB ANSWERS 193

Instructor's Guide

PROCEDURE 44 Windows 2000 OS Faults TABLES


TABLE 441
Observations: The system files are now visible

TABLE 442
New message at startup: Invalid BOOT.INI file, booting from c:\\

TABLE 443
Observation: Windows redirected the shortcut and opened the file that was moved

TABLE 444
Observations: Conf.exe is restored!

TABLE 445
Observations: nmchat.dll is restored

TABLE 446
TXT File Type: Text Document

TABLE 447
TXT File Opens With: Notepad

TABLE 448
Observations: The imaging program opens and gives an error that "The document's format is invalid or not supported."

194 LAB ANSWERS

Instructor's Guide

TABLE 449
Before Restore TXT File Opens With: After Restore TXT File Opens With: Imaging Notepad

TABLE 4410
Observations: Notepad opens the document correctly.

TABLE 4411
A Problem with Shortcut window opens. "The drive or network connection that the shortcut 'Shortcut to New Bitmap Observations at startup: Image.bmp.lnk' refers to is unavailable. Make sure that the disk is properly inserted or the network resource is available, and then try again."

TABLE 4412
Network Observations: I see the other computers in the LAN

TABLE 4413
Network Adapter Name: D-Link DFE-530TX+ 10/100 PCI Adapter

NOTE: Your answer will vary based on the Network Adapter installed in your system.

TABLE 4414
Network Observations: I cannot see any computers in the LAN

TABLE 4415
Network Observations: I see the other computers in the LAN

TABLE 4416
Display Adapter Name: All-In-Wonder 128 Pro PCI

NOTE: Your answer will vary based on the Display Adapter installed in your systems.

LAB ANSWERS 195

Instructor's Guide

TABLE 4417
Desktop Observations: The colors have changed, similar to VGA Mode

TABLE 4418
Video Adapter Device Status: This device cannot start. (Code 10)

TABLE 4419
Desktop Changes: The colors have changed back to their previous settings

LAB PROCEDURE 44 Question Answers


1. 2. 3. 4. 5. A yellow exclamation point is added. A mode similar to VGA Mode. 11 Approximately 10 seconds. An invalid shortcut in the Startup menu.

196 LAB ANSWERS

URL RESOURCES

Instructor's Guide

CHAPTER 1 Basic PC Hardware


http://www.islandnet.com/~kpolsson/comphist/ http://www.levin.co.nz/pages/bios_survival/bios_sg.htm http://www.tomshardware.com/mainboard/99q1/990208/index.html http://www.pcguide.com/ref/fdd/ http://www.pctechguide.com/15tape.htm http://www.pctechguide.com/06crtmon.htm http://www.pctechguide.com/11sound.htm http://www.cs.uregina.ca/~bayko/cpu.html http://www.intel.com/education/ http://www.tomshardware.com/guides/ram.html http://www.driverzone.com/drivers/mscdex/ http://www.computerhope.com/mscdex.htm http://burks.bton.ac.uk/burks/foldoc/61/30.htm http://www.starkelectronic.com/czp33a.htm http://www.connectworld.net/c2.html http:// www.eia.org http://chac.sco.com/HW_modem/CTOC-modem.intro.html http://www.phoenix.com http://www.tomshardware.com/guides/storage/index-01.html http://www.webopedia.com Access Webopedia.com and search for the desired word. Webopedia Keywords: BIOS Docking Station Floppy Drive Hard Disk Drive IRQ Keyboard Modem Motherboard PCI Vesa XGA http://ww.whatis.com Access Whatis.com and search for the desired word. Whatis Keywords IDE LBA

198 URL RESOURCES

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CHAPTER 2 Advanced System Boards


http://www.sandpile.org http://www.sandpile.org/impl/p55.htm http://www.cyrix.com http://www.intel.com http://www.amd.com http://www.viatech.com/products/cyrindex.htm http://developer.intel.com/sites/developer/contents.htm http://www.kingston.com/tools/umg/ http://www.ami.com http://developer.intel.com/design/flash/

CHAPTER 3 Standard I/O Systems


http://desperado.blinncol.edu/newcisc/1301/notes/vii.htm http://www.sysopt.com/compex.html http://www.fapo.com/ecpmode.htm http://www.fapo.com/eppmode.htm http://www.sysopt.com/bios.html

CHAPTER 4 Mass Storage Systems


http://www.acnc.com/raid.html http:// www.scsita.org http://www.paralan.com/sediff.html http://www.adaptec.com http://www.seagate.com http://www.westerndigital.com http://www.plextor.com

URL RESOURCES 199

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CHAPTER 5 Data Communications


http://desperado.blinncol.edu/na00/main/index.htm http://academic.emporia.edu/pheattch/cs410f97/CD-ROM/subjindx/page032.htm http://www.otex.org/manual/chap10.htm http://www.bris.ac.uk/is/services/computers/operatingsystems/win3/3comcfg.htm http://www.cit.rcc.on.ca/nm210/netcards.htm http://www.host.ots.utexas.edu/ethernet/descript-troubleshoot.html NOTE: The following entry (www.cisco.com) has a lot of good information in it, but youll need to look around for it. Also check out the /knowledge and /pin-outs sections of this site. http://www.cisco.com/warp/public/779/smbiz/service/troubleshooting/ http://www.otex.org/manual/chap13.htm http://www.otex.org/manual/chap12.htm#C1211 http://www.cit.rcc.on.ca/win311/win311a.htm http://www.globetrotting.com/windows95/networks.htm http://www.cit.rcc.on.ca/internet/instart.htm http://www.cit.rcc.on.ca/internet/inet3.htm#ftp http://www.anderbergfamily.net/ant/history/ http://www.cit.rcc.on.ca/internet/default.htm http://www.cisco.com/warp/public/779/smbiz/service/knowledge/wan/ppp_auth.htm http://www.cisco.com/warp/public/779/smbiz/service/knowledge/tcpip/dhcp.htm

CHAPTER 6 Printers
http://www.pcguide.com/ts/x/comp/io.htm http://www.anselm.edu/homepage/ptaglini/inkjet.html http://www.epson.com http://www.hp.com http://www.canon.com http://www.lexmark.com http://www.panasonic.com/office/printer/print.html http://www.minolta.com http://www.globetrotting.com/windows95/printers.htm http://www.webopedia.com Access Webopedia.com and search for the desired word. Webopedia Keywords: Driver Handshaking

200 URL RESOURCES

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CHAPTER 7 Portable Computer Systems


http://www.pc-card.com/pccardstandard.htm http://www.laptopguide.com/ http://www.css.edu/depts/adep/laptop/laptop_user.html http://pcsupport.about.com/compute/pcsupport/cs/laptopsupport/ http://www.webopedia.com Access Webopedia.com and search for the desired word. Webopedia Keywords: LCD Notebook Computer

CHAPTER 8 Operating System Fundamentals


http://www.okc.cc.ok.us/weaver/ http://www.cit.rcc.on.ca/os100/os01.htm http://www.cit.rcc.on.ca/os100/msdos06.htm http://www.cit.rcc.on.ca/os100/msdos08.htm http://www.cit.rcc.on.ca/os100/msdos11.htm http://www.cit.rcc.on.ca/os100/msdos22.htm http://www.execpc.com/~iniman/ex_1.html http://www.pctusa.com/pcdos.htm http://www.pctusa.com/pc02001.htm http://www.pctusa.com/tips.html http://www.codemicro.com/badsector.htm http://www.pcguide.com/ref/mbsys/res/pnp.htm http://www.pcguide.com/ref/mbsys/res/ http://www.webopedia.com Access Webopedia.com and search for the desired word. Webopedia Keywords: DLL Configuration INI Server Spooling

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CHAPTER 9 Windows 9X
http://www.cit.rcc.on.ca/os100/win9501.htm http://www.cit.rcc.on.ca/os100/win9503.htm http://www.cit.rcc.on.ca/os100/win9505.htm http:// www.cit.rcc.on.ca/os100/win9508.htm http://www.bus.msu.edu/nrc/class/95/desktop.html http://www.bus.msu.edu/nrc/class/95/explorer.html http://www.bus.msu.edu/nrc/class/95/upgrade.html http://www.bus.msu.edu/nrc/class/95/startapp.html http://www.pctusa.com/win95/win95_12.html http://www.globetrotting.com/windows95/utilitie.htm http://www.webopedia.com Access Webopedia.com and search for the desired word. Webopedia Keywords: PIF Registry ScanDisk

CHAPTER 10 Windows NT/2000


http://pclt.cis.yale.edu/pclt/BOOT/Chicago.htm http://www.drivershq.com/ http://pclt.cis.yale.edu/pclt/BOOT/nt.htm http://cit..on.ca/win2000/default.htm http://www.cit..on.ca/winnt/default.htm http://www.microsoft.com/windows2000/default.asp http://www.webopedia.com Access Webopedia.com and search for the desired word. Webopedia Keywords: Kernel32.dll

202 URL RESOURCES

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CHAPTER 11 Basic System Troubleshooting


http://www.pctusa.com/pcerror.htm http://www.sysopt.com/biosbmc.html http://www.sysopt.com/post.html NOTE: The following two sites (www.pctestpro.com and www.windsortech.com) are included to show some of the types of diagnostic tools available in the industry. We have no experience with the free downloadable demo software available from these two locations. http://www.pctestpro.com/demo.htm http://www.windsortech.com/ http://www.pcguide.com/ts/gen/index.htm http://november.dtc.net/HW_config/hwconfigC.tshoot.html http://citabria.westmont.edu/tech/hardware.html http://www.co.umist.ac.uk/~ch/psinfo/psinfo.2.0568.html http://www.pcguide.com/ts/x/comp/mbsys/index.htm http://www.anselm.edu/homepage/ptaglini/kbmouse.html http://www.colosys.net/computeraid/t6.htm http://www.pctusa.com/ide.htm http://www.pumatech.com/index.html http://ftp.unina.it/pub/electronics/repairfaq/REPAIR/F_crtfaq.html NOTE: The following site (www.plustekusa.com) contains information about a specific set of products. however, its troubleshooting information is somewhat universal in nature. http://www.plustekusa.com/technicalsupport/troubleshoot.html http://ftp.unina.it/pub/electronics/repairfaq/REPAIR/F_crtfaq.html http://www.troubleshooters.com/.htm

CHAPTER 12 Operating System Troubleshooting


http://comminfo.com/pages/tips.htm http://www.windrivers.com/tech/troubleshoot/winexceptions.htm http://www.codemicro.com/windows.htm http://pclt.cis.yale.edu/pclt/BOOT/DOS.HTM http://www.fixwindows.com/win95/index.htm http://www.fixwindows.com/win98/index.htm http://www.fixwindows.com/nt40/index.htm http://www.fixwindows.com/win2000/index.htm http://www.fixwindows.com/winME/index.htm http://www.globetrotting.com/windows95/troubles.htm http://w3.one.net/~alward/gpf.html http://www.windrivers.com/tech/troubleshoot/registry.htm http://www.cisco.com/warp/public/779/smbiz/service/troubleshooting/ts_wan.htm

URL RESOURCES 203

Instructor's Guide

CHAPTER 13 Preventative Maintenance


http://www.halloa.com.tw/ http://suttondesigns.com/upssizing.htm#CLONES http://www.heco.com/ http://www.netlabs.net/hp/echase/

204 URL RESOURCES

USING FAULTS

Instructor's Guide

USING SOFTWARE FAULTS


To insert or remove a Marcraft software fault, place the disk holding the desired fault in drive A: and reboot the system. Select the desired fault option from the menu. At any time you may use the CONTROL+ ALT+DELETE keys to reboot while holding down the LEFT SHIFT key. This action will enable you to get to the DOS prompt and reboot with the fault disk to remove the fault. During each Bootup when testing the faults you will need to be booting to Windows Millenium not Windows 2000.

WINDOWS ME
DISK ONE FAULT ONE
MSDOS.SYS FAULT This fault causes the system to boot up improperly, and defaults to the DOS prompt. The computer is fooled into looking in the wrong directory for Windows. The computer may attempt to load Windows in SAFE mode, but will fail. To correct this fault, use a boot disk and copy over the MSDOS.SYS on the hard drive. Another solution is to use the SYS.COM command to restore proper operation.

DISK ONE FAULT TWO


IO.SYS FAULT This fault causes the computer to attempt accessing drive A when booting up. When any key is pressed, the startup screen is displayed. There are two ways to manually fix this fault. a. Boot the computer with a system disk. From the Root Directory on the C:\ drive, change the attributes of the IO.SYS file, by typing attrib io.sys -s -r -h and pressing the ENTER key. Copy the IO.SYS file from the boot disk to the C:\ drive b. Use the SYS.COM command to restore proper operation.

DISK ONE FAULT THREE


SHELL FAULT This fault causes Windows ME to boot up directly to NOTEPAD.EXE and treats the program as a shell. You can run some programs, but no desktop displayed. Edit the SYSTEM.INI file, and change the Shell line to equal EXPLORER.EXE.

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DISK ONE FAULT FOUR


REGISTRY RUN FAULT This fault causes Windows 95 to load a handful of default Windows programs on startup. Machines with low amounts of RAM may crash. Boot Windows in SAFE mode and run the REGEDIT.EXE program. Modify the following portion of the Registry: HKEY_CURRENT_CONFIG\Microsoft\Windows\Current\Version\Run. Remove the references to any programs shown. NOTE: This fault will have no effect on a Windows ME system.

DISK TWO FAULT FIVE


KEYBOARD.DRV FAULT This fault corrupts the KEYBOARD.DRV file, causing Windows ME to DISPLAY Error loading warewrap.drv. Please reinstall Windowsor display the ....safe to turn off your computer message. There are two ways to manually fix this fault. a. Boot the computer with a system disk. From the Windows Directory on the C:\ drive, edit the SYSTEM.INI. Under the [Boot] section, change the Keyboard.drv=wavewrap.drv line to read Keyboard.drv=keyboard.drv. b. Boot the computer with a system boot disk. From the Windows directory on the C:\ drive, delete the SYSTEM.INI file. Change the attributes of the original SYSTEM.INI file, that has been renamed and hidden, by typing attrib system.bak -s -r -h and pressing the ENTER key. Rename this file back to SYSTEM.INI.

DISK TWO FAULT SIX


WIN.COM FAULT This fault corrupts the WIN.COM file so that Windows will not load. Instead, only the title screen appears. Either reinstall Windows 95 completely, or get the WIN.COM file from another computer that is running the identical version of Windows 95. NOTE: This fault will have no effect on a Windows ME system.

DISK TWO FAULT SEVEN


EXPLORER.EXE FAULT This fault corrupts the EXPLORER.EXE file so that Windows loads improperly and displays an illegal operation dialog box. Closing the dialog box results in a background color with no icons displayed. Either reinstall Windows ME completely, or get the EXPLORER.EXE file from another computer that is running the identical version of Windows ME.

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Instructor's Guide

DISK TWO FAULT EIGHT


HIMEM.SYS FAULT This fault corrupts the HIMEM.SYS file so that the system will lock up right after the Windows 95 title screen appears. Either reinstall Windows 95 completely, or get the HIMEM.SYS file from another computer that is running the identical version of Windows 95. NOTE: This fault will have no effect on a Windows ME system.

DISK THREE FAULT NINE


COMM.DRV FAULT This fault corrupts the COMM.DRV so that Windows ME will not boot correctly. The ....safe to turn off your computer message appears. Either reinstall Windows ME completely, get the COMM.DRV file from another working computer, or use the DOS EXTRACT command to get it from the Windows ME CD ROM disk.

DISK THREE FAULT TEN


BLANK REGISTRY FAULT This fault installs a blank registry into Windows 95. Windows will display an error message and will not boot. Instead, it will report a system error if it attempts to access drive A when no disk is installed. If a disk is installed in drive A, the Windows Setup Wizard is activated. To correct this fault, reinstall Windows 95. NOTE: This fault will have no effect on a Windows ME system.

DISK THREE FAULT ELEVEN


SLOW MENU FAULT This fault will cause the submenu displays on the Start menu to delay for 10 seconds before appearing, unless the user clicks the LEFT mouse button on a submenu name. To correct this fault, locate the entry MenuShowDelay in the registry and delete the string shown. Otherwise, reinstall Windows 95. NOTE: This fault will have no effect on a Windows ME system.

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DISK THREE FAULT TWELVE


VMM32.VXD FAULT This fault corrupts the VMM32.VXD in the /windows/system directory, causing the system to hang up after displaying the title screen. Either reinstall Windows ME, or copy a known working VMM32.VXD file from another machine that is running an identical version of Windows.

WINDOWS 2000 FAULT CD


USING THE CD
This CD is bootable from a Windows 2000 machine. The default boot option is usable with the dual-boot Windows ME/2000 setup. It has several boot options at startup that can be used as faults. If the user selects to boot Windows 2000 from an invalid partition a ntoskrnl.exe error will be encountered. If the user selects to boot Windows 95/98/ME from an invalid partition the computer will simply restart. To install the software faults in Windows click Start/Run and type D:\faultX.exe and click the OK button. Where X is the fault number. Run D:\faultXu.exe to uninstall the fault. Some of the faults will require restarting the operating system before they are apparent. The Windows 2000 support tools need to be installed on each machine. Run from the Windows 2000 CDROM D:\Support\Tools\Setup.exe and follow the prompts

FAULT ONE
INVALID SHORTCUT FAULT This fault copies an invalid shortcut to the desktop. When the shortcut is executed windows tries to search for the target location but is unable to find it. The solution for correcting this fault is to delete the shortcut from the desktop or modify the shortcut to point to a valid file.

FAULT TWO
INCORRECT FILE ASSOCIATION FAULT This fault changes the file type associations of the operating environment. It associates a text file with the MS Paint program. When a shortcut to a text file is opened the image editing program returns an error. The solution to correct this fault is to re-associate the .txt extension with the correct program, i.e. Notepad.

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Instructor's Guide

FAULT THREE
INVALID STARTUP SHORTCUT FAULT This fault copies an invalid shortcut to the Startup folder. When Windows is restarted an error is returned. To correct the fault delete the invalid shortcut from the Startup folder or modify the shortcut to point to a valid file.

FAULT FOUR
FILE PROTECTION ERROR FAULT This fault moves keyboard.drv and keyboard.sys from the dllcache and system32 folders to the temp folder. Windows returns a File Protection error when the files are deleted from system32 because the cached system files have been removed. The solution to correct this fault is to restore keyboard.drv and keyboard.sys to both the system32 and dllcache folders from a valid location or reinstall Windows.

FAULT FIVE
INCORRECT SUB-MENU DELAY FAULT This fault will cause the sub-menus in windows to have a 10 second delay. Normally they have a 400-millisecond delay. This fault is corrected by searching the registry for MenuShowDelay and restore it to its default value of 400.

FAULT SIX
STARTUP PROGRAMS FAULT This fault simulates too many programs opening at startup. It loads 8 Windows programs when the operating system is booted. To correct this fault delete the unwanted values in HKEY_Local_machine\software\microsoft\windows\currentversion\run to stop the programs from running at startup.

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USING BASIC HARDWARE FAULTS


In most parts of the system, two simple methods exist for introducing hardware faults. The first is to simply disalign or interrupt a connection. The second involves inserting a defective component. The Marcraft fault kit contains seven faulted hardware pieces. These faults are designed so that they will not harm other components when inserted into the system. These are quick and easy items to insert. We also offer an extended fault kit that contains defective FRU equipment. However, these items take some effort to install and remove. The Marcraft fault kits can be purchased separately. However, if you do not yet have access to these kits you can skip this section.

FDD SIGNAL CABLE FAULTS


1. Install the defective FDD signal cable from the kit. No error message is generated, but the FDD will not work when called upon. 2. Reverse the normal signal cable to the FDD. One long beep and the "Drive not ready" error displays. FDD LED stays on. Possible bad M I/O card, FDD, cable.

HDD/CD-ROM SIGNAL CABLE FAULTS


1. Install the defective HDD signal cable from the kit. Locks up after counting RAM. The system may or may not give an error message depending on the systems BIOS. 2. Reverse the signal cable to the HDD. One long beep and HDD controller failure displays. HDD LED stays on. Possible bad M I/O card, HDD, signal cable.

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Instructor's Guide

POWER CABLE FAULTS


1. Install defective options power connector from the kit. (a) With fault cable connected to the HDD and CD-ROM, a hard-disk fail error 80 is displayed after the memory count and the system will not boot up. (b) With the cable connected to the FDD, the drive will not be accessible but the system will boot to Drive C: without an error message. 2. Disconnect the power supply cable from the system board and set it aside making certain that electrical contact is disturbed. System will not boot. 3. Disconnect the power connector from the FDD. Disconnection of power will cause a Drive not ready error.

BIOS IC FAULT
Carefully remove the BIOS IC chip from the motherboard and insert the faulty BIOS IC chip in the empty BIOS IC socket. No beeps, no screen display, and no bootup will occur.

RAM MODULE FAULTS


Carefully remove a RAM module from the motherboard and replace the vacant RAM slot or socket with a faulty RAM module. Symptoms generated by these faults depend on where the RAM module is inserted. Possible faults include: (a) No screen, no beeps, no bootup; (b) System counts to some level of RAM and then locks up; (c) Strange characters are displayed on the screen, no memory count is generated, no beeps and no bootup.

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USING CONFIGURATION FAULTS


Configuration faults represent some of the most common and most frustrating problems associated with personal computers. These faults are particularly common when new pieces of hardware and or software are added to the system. Configuration problems can be created by improperly set hardware switches or jumpers. They can also be caused by incorrect CMOS settings. Finally, incorrect software setup can also cause configuration problems. All three of these elements must agree and be correct for the system to work correctly as a unit.

DISCONNECTED SPEAKER
Disconnect the speaker connection from the front panel jumper and place it back on with only 3 of the 4 pins connected. The speaker will not function - no sound will be produced.

BAD KEYBOARD CONNECTION


Disconnect the keyboard connector and lightly seat it back it place. Make certain that electrical contact is not made. This action will cause a keyboard error and display a Press F1 to resume error message.

PARALLEL PORT DISABLED


Disable the printer port either by setting its hardware jumper(s) to the disable position (on the M I/O card or the system board), or through the CMOS Setup screens. This action does not cause error messages during bootup but the printer will not function in DOS, Windows, or Print Manager. Print Manager may give a notice to add paper.

SERIAL PORT DISABLED


Disable the serial port either by setting its hardware jumper(s) to the disable position (on the M I/O card or the system board), or through the CMOS Setup screens. This action does not give an error during bootup, but the mouse will not work in DOS or Windows.

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Instructor's Guide

MC 8000 JUMPER FAULTS


To be able to create the following jumper faults the computer system being used must have the MC-8000 motherboard installed. TYPE OF FAULT 1. DIMM Fault 1 SOURCE OF FAULT Remove Jumper JP94 only. SYMPTOM This action causes the POST test to report only half as much memory than there actually is and beeping occurs. This action causes the memory size to be cut in half and may cause some programs not to load on install/startup. This action causes the system to not bootup and creates repeated single long beeps. This action causes the memory size to be cut in half and may cause some programs to not load on install/startup. This action causes the memory size to be cut in half and may cause some programs to not load on install/startup. This action causes the system to not bootup and creates repeated single long beeps. This action causes the system to not bootup and causes continuous beeping. This action causes the system to not boot. This action causes a Floppy Disk fail (40) error for drive A:. This action causes a Floppy Disk fail (40) error for drive B:. This action disables the ability to format a floppy disk. This action disables the ability to read a floppy disk. This action causes a Floppy Disk fail (40) error to occur. This action results in the system to not be able to read a floppy disk. This action causes the hard disk to not be recognized at boot up. This action causes the hard disk to not be recognized at boot up.

2.

DIMM Fault 2

Remove Jumper JP93 only.

3.

DIMM Fault 3

Remove both Jumpers JP93 and JP94. Remove Jumper JP87 only.

4.

DIMM Fault 4

5.

DIMM Fault 5

Remove Jumper JP10 only.

6.

DIMM Fault 6

Remove both Jumpers JP87 and JP10. Remove Jumper JP79.

7.

AGP Video Fault

8. 9.

PCI Fault Floppy Disk Drive Fault 1

Remove Jumper JP80. Remove Jumper JP40. Remove Jumper JP41. Remove Jumper JP42. Remove Jumper JP43 Remove Jumper JP44 Remove Jumper JP45 Remove Jumper JP46 Remove Jumper JP47

10. Floppy Disk Drive Fault 2 11. Floppy Disk Drive Fault 3 12. Floppy Disk Drive Fault4 13. Floppy Disk Fault 1 14. Floppy Disk Fault 2 15. IDE 1 Fault 1 16. IDE 1 Fault 2

214 USING FAULTS

Instructor's Guide 17. IDE 2 Fault 1 18. IDE 2 Fault 2 19. USB 1 Fault 1 20. USB 1 Fault 2 21. USB 2 Fault 1 22. USB 2 Fault 2 23. ATX Power Fault 24. COM1 Fault 1 Remove Jumper JP48 Remove Jumper JP49 Remove Jumper JP66 Remove Jumper JP92 Remove Jumper JP68 Remove Jumper JP69 Remove Jumper JP90 Remove Jumper JP52 This action causes the hard disk to not be recognized at boot up. This action causes the hard disk to not be recognized at boot up. This action causes a connected USB device not to respond. This action causes Windows to see the USB port as an unknown device. This action causes a connected USB device not to respond. This action causes Windows to see the USB port as an unknown device. This action disables the On/Off functionality. This action causes a receive data failure when a troubleshooter program is run. This action causes a connected device not to respond. This action causes a carrier detect and a Ring Indication error when a troubleshooter program is run. This action causes a Clear to Send and a receive data error when a troubleshooter program is run. This action causes a Data Send Ready error when a troubleshooter program is run. This action causes a Serial Port test Failure when a troubleshooter program is run. This action causes a Serial Port test Failure when a troubleshooter program is run. This action causes a connected device not to respond. This action causes a Serial Port test Failure when a troubleshooter program is run. This action causes a Serial Port test Failure when a troubleshooter program is run. This action causes a status port test failure when a troubleshooter program is run. ( With a printer connected to the LPT1 port,the printer will function incorrectly or improperly.)

25. COM1 Fault 2 26. COM1 Fault 3

Remove Jumper JP53 Remove Jumper JP54

27. COM1 Fault 4

Remove Jumper JP55

28. COM1 Fault 5

Remove Jumper JP56

29. COM2 Fault 1

Remove Jumper JP57

30. COM2 Fault 2

Remove Jumper JP58

31. COM2 Fault 3 32. COM2 Fault 4

Remove Jumper JP59 Remove Jumper JP60

33. COM2 Fault 5

Remove Jumper JP61

34. LPT1 Fault 1

Remove Jumper JP62

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Instructor's Guide 35. LPT1 Fault 2 Remove Jumper JP63 This action causes a status port test failure when a troubleshooter program is run. This action causes a print job to lock up the computer/Print Manager. This action causes a status port test failure when a troubleshooter program is run. (With a printer connected to the LPT1 port,the printer will function incorrectly or improperly.) This action causes the keyboard to stop respond when keys are pressed. This action causes the keyboard to stop respond when keys are pressed. This action causes the PS2 Mouse Port to stop functioning. This action causes the PS2 Mouse Port to stop functioning. This action causes the line in left channel to stop functioning. This action causes the line in right channel to stop functioning. This action causes the line out left speaker to stop functioning. This action causes the line out right speaker to stop functioning. This action causes the microphone input to stop functioning.

36. LPT1 Fault 3 37. LPT1 Fault 4

Remove Jumper JP64 Remove Jumper JP65

38. Keyboard Fault 1 39. Keyboard Fault 2 40. PS2 Mouse Fault 1 41. PS2 Mouse Fault 2 42. Line In Fault 1 43. Line In Fault 2 44. Line Out Fault 1 45. Line Out Fault 2 46. Microphone Fault

Remove Jumper JP76 Remove Jumper JP91 Remove Jumper JP78 Remove Jumper JP77 Remove Jumper JP70 Remove Jumper JP71 Remove Jumper JP72 Remove Jumper JP73 Remove Jumper JP74

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13-WEEK (78 Hour) Suggested Course Outline

# Week 1

Session Type Theory Guide Lab Guide Theory Guide Lab Guide Theory Guide Lab Guide Theory Guide Lab Guide Theory Guide Lab Guide Theory Guide Lab Guide Theory Guide Lab Guide Theory Guide Lab Guide Theory Guide Lab Guide Theory Guide Lab Guide Theory Guide Lab Guide Theory Guide Lab Guide Theory Guide Lab Guide

OCR 1 Chapter 1, Page 1-34 Procedure 1 Chapter 2, Page 83-98 Procedure 4 Chapter 2, Page 130-139 Chapter 4, Page 202-223 Procedure 10 Chapter 5, Page 277-303 Procedure 14 Chapter 7, Page 366-381 Procedure 17-18 Chapter 8, Page 430-459 Procedure 21 Chapter 9, Page 505-520 Procedure 24-25 Chapter 10, Page 558-598 Procedure 28 Chapter 11, Page 667-682 Procedure 31 Chapter 11, Page 720-732 Chapter 12, Page 780-797 Procedure 38-39 Chapter 13, Page 832-848 Procedure 42-43

OCR 2 Chapter 1, Page 34-61 Procedure 2 Chapter 2, Page 98-113 Chapter 3, Page 146-171 Procedure 7-8 Chapter 4, Page 223-244 Procedure 11 Chapter 6, Page 310-334 Procedure 15 Chapter 7, Page 381-393 Procedure 19 Chapter 9, Page 466-485 Procedure 22 Chapter 9, Page 520-536 Procedure 26-27 Chapter 10, Page 598-638 Procedure 29 Chapter 11, Page 682-700 Procedure 32-33 Chapter 12, Page 740-759 Procedure 36 Chapter 12, Page 797-817 Procedure 40-41 Chapter 13, Page 848-865 Procedure 44

OCR 3 Chapter 2, Page 68-83 Procedure 3 Chapter 2, Page 113-130 Procedure 5-6 Chapter 3, Page 171-197 Procedure 9 Chapter 5, Page 250-277 Procedure 12-13 Chapter 6, Page 334-359 Procedure 16 Chapter 8, Page 398-430 Procedure 20 Chapter 9, Page 485-505 Procedure 23 Chapter 9, Page 536-551 Chapter 11, Page 648-667 Procedure 30 Chapter 11, Page 700-720 Procedure 34-35 Chapter 12, Page 759-780 Procedure 37 Chapter 12, Page 817-826 Review & Practice Exam

10

11

12

13

SAMPLE CURRICULUM OUTLINES 217