Découvrez votre prochain podcast préféré

Devenez membre aujourd'hui et lisez gratuitement pendant 30 jours
Laura R. Barraclough, "Charros: How Mexican Cowboys Are Remapping Race and American Identity" (U California Press, 2019): Barraclough writes the history of elite Mexican and Mexican-American cowboys – charros – and how charro culture served as a site of contested national identity in the mid twentieth century United States...

Laura R. Barraclough, "Charros: How Mexican Cowboys Are Remapping Race and American Identity" (U California Press, 2019): Barraclough writes the history of elite Mexican and Mexican-American cowboys – charros – and how charro culture served as a site of contested national identity in the mid twentieth century United States...

DeNew Books in Sociology


Laura R. Barraclough, "Charros: How Mexican Cowboys Are Remapping Race and American Identity" (U California Press, 2019): Barraclough writes the history of elite Mexican and Mexican-American cowboys – charros – and how charro culture served as a site of contested national identity in the mid twentieth century United States...

DeNew Books in Sociology

évaluations:
Longueur:
70 minutes
Sortie:
Jul 1, 2019
Format:
Épisode du podcast

Description

In Charros: How Mexican Cowboys Are Remapping Race and American Identity (University of California Press, 2019), Dr. Laura R. Barraclough tells a surprising story about the urban American West. Barraclough, the Sarai Ribicoff Associate Professor in American Studies at Yale University, writes the history of elite Mexican and Mexican-American cowboys – charros – and how charro culture served as a site of contested national identity in the mid twentieth century United States. In Western cities such as Los Angeles, Denver, and San Antonio, Chicano men and women used charro organizations and events as places where one could assert both Mexican and American, as well as middle- and upper-class, identities. Rather than the archetypical image of a white, dusty, cowboy riding alone across a desolate mesa, Charros portrays a Western ranching culture that is more urban, more flamboyant, more crowded, and less white than many Americans may assume.Stephen Hausmann is a doctoral candidate at Temple University and Visiting Instructor of history at the University of Pittsburgh. He is currently writing his dissertation, a history of race and the environment in the Black Hills and surrounding northern plains region of South Dakota, Wyoming, and Montana.Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Sortie:
Jul 1, 2019
Format:
Épisode du podcast