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Storage Devices

PRESENTATION BY.ARUN.K.N MCSA VENUE: CFIL CONFERENCE ROOM

Presentation By: Arun.K.N

Hard Disk
Hard Disk Drive - It is a non-volatile storage device which stores

digitally encoded data on rapidly rotating platters with magnetic surface.


Types of HDD :
IDE : Integrated Drive Electronics. IDE drives are also known as

PATA drives( Parallel advance technology attachment ) SATA : Serial advance technology attachment SCSI : Small Computer System Interface. SAS : Serial Attached SCSI

Presentation By: Arun.K.N

IDE/PATA
IDE/PATA Drives have usually 40 pins. IDE/PATA Drives offer 133 MB/sec transfer rate. It sends 8 bit data at a time.

PATA Cables are used to connect PATA HDD. Two

drives can be connected in a single pata cable. One as master and other as slave. The configuration of master and slave is done by different combination of jumpers in the hdd

Presentation By: Arun.K.N

IDE

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SATA
SATA Drives have usually 7 pins, 4 pins in pair of

two for sending and receiving data and rest 3 pins are grounded. SATA Drives offers generally 300MB/sec transfer rate. It sends data bit by bit. SATA Cables are used to connect SATA HDD. Only one drive can be connected in a single sata cable.

Presentation By: Arun.K.N

SATA

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SCSI
SCSI Drives have usually 50 to 68 pins. SCSI Drive offers generally 640MB/sec transfer rate. This drives are hot swappable.

SCSI cables are used to connect SCSI HDD.

Maximum of 16 drives can be connected in a single scsi cable. Each hdd have a 8 bytes hexadecimal code known as WWN (world wide name) for its identification in the cable. And have terminator at the end of the cable.

Presentation By: Arun.K.N

SCSI

Presentation By: Arun.K.N

SAS
SAS Drives generally offers 805 MB/sec transfer

rate. This drives are hot swappable. SAS Cables are used to connect SAS Drives. Maximum of 128 drives can be connected in a single sas cable.

Presentation By: Arun.K.N

SAS

Presentation By: Arun.K.N

NAS
Network-attached storage (NAS) is hard disk storage that is set up with

its own network address rather than being attached to the computer A specialized file server that connects to the network. A NAS device contains a slimmed-down operating system and a file system and processes only I/O requests by supporting the popular file sharing protocols, primarily CIFS for Windows and NFS for Unix.

Presentation By: Arun.K.N

NAS

Presentation By: Arun.K.N

SAN
(Storage Area Network) A network of storage disks. In large enterprises, a SAN

connects multiple servers to a centralized pool of disk storage. Compared to managing hundreds of servers, each with their own disks, SANs improve system administration. By treating all the company's storage as a single resource, disk maintenance and routine backups are easier to schedule and control. In some SANs, the disks themselves can copy data to other disks for backup without any processing overhead at the host computers. High Speed: The SAN network allows data transfers between computers and disks at the same high peripheral channel speeds as when they are directly attached. Fibre Channel is a driving force with SANs and is typically used to encapsulate SCSI commands SAN protocols are SCSI, Fibre Channel, iSCSI, ATA over Ethernet (AoE), or HyperSCSI.

Presentation By: Arun.K.N

SAN

Presentation By: Arun.K.N

NAS vs SAN
One way to loosely conceptualize the difference

between a NAS and a SAN is that a NAS appears to the client OS (operating system) as a file server (the client can map network drives to shares on that server) whereas a disk available through a SAN still appears to the client OS as a disk, visible in disk and volume management utilities (along with client's local disks), and available to be formatted with a file system and mounted.

Presentation By: Arun.K.N