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Avian Influenza

Colgate cares for the well-being and health of Colgate people and their families. Part of this caring is bringing you the most updated information about important health concerns, such as Avian Influenza. We believe that it is critical to provide you with information about Avian Influenza and how to protect yourself, your colleagues and your family from this disease, including: Personal Hygiene Workplace Hygiene Self-Care and Health Monitoring Traveler's Cautions

Introduction

The Company is also working on a comprehensive preparedness plan, and we will be sharing more details soon. Meanwhile, if you have any questions or need any assistance, please do not hesitate to contact your local Human Resources team. Please take good care of yourself. You may have questions

What Is Avian Influenza?


Avian influenza, or bird flu, is a contagious disease of animals caused by viruses that normally infect only birds and, less commonly, pigs. Avian Influenza viruses have, on rare occasions, crossed the species barrier to infect humans. The current outbreak is being caused by the H5N1 virus.

Q&A

Does the Virus Spread Easily from Birds to Humans?


No. Though more than 100 human cases have occurred in the current outbreak, this is a small number compared with the huge number of birds affected and the numerous associated opportunities for human exposure. In the current outbreak, laboratory-confirmed human cases have been reported in Cambodia, Indonesia, Thailand, Vietnam and China.

Q&A

How Do People Become Infected?


Direct contact with infected poultry, or surfaces and objects contaminated by their feces and blood, is presently considered the main route of human infection. Exposure is considered most likely during slaughter, de-feathering, butchering and preparation of poultry for cooking.

Q&A

Is It Safe To Eat Poultry and Poultry Products?


Yes, though certain precautions should be followed in countries currently experiencing outbreaks. In areas free of the disease, poultry and poultry products can be prepared and consumed as usual, with no fear of acquiring infection. In areas experiencing outbreaks, poultry and poultry products can also be safely consumed provided these items are properly cooked and properly handled during food preparation. The H5N1 virus is sensitive to heat. Normal temperatures used for cooking (70C in all parts of the food) will kill the virus. Please ensure all food is fully cooked. Avian Influenza is not transmitted through cooked food. To date, no evidence indicates that anyone has become infected following the consumption of properly cooked poultry or poultry products, even when these foods were contaminated with the H5N1 virus.

Q&A

How to Prevent the Spread of Avian Influenza


Manage Personal Hygiene

Manage Workplace Hygiene


Prevention

Self-care and Health Monitoring Safe Travel

How to Prevent the Spread of Avian Influenza


Manage Personal Hygiene

Manage Workplace Hygiene


Prevention

Self-care and Health Monitoring Safe Travel

Food Safety
Cooked poultry meat and eggs are safe for consumption. You should avoid eating poultry or their products which are raw or not thoroughly cooked. When preparing food:

Manage Personal Hygiene

Separate raw meat from cooked meat. Do not put cooked food back in containers that held raw meat, in order to prevent cross-contamination.
Wash your hands every time you handle food. All food prepared from poultry, including eggs and blood, must be cooked thoroughly. Egg yolk must be hardened, not half-cooked. Wash outer egg shell with soap and water before preparation. After handling poultry meat or raw egg, wash hands with soap and water. Utensils and kitchen equipment used for raw meat and raw egg must be washed with soap and water or dishwashing soap, every time.

Hand Washing
Wash hands frequently with soap and water or alcohol-based hand scrubs, especially after touching commonly used objects such as vehicles, stair rails, door knobs, elevator buttons or computer keyboards. Make hand washing a habit - it may also prevent other serious diseases, such as hepatitis A, meningitis, and infectious diarrhea.

Manage Personal Hygiene

Wash your hands: Before, during and after preparing food

Before eating
After using the toilet When your hands are dirty After coughing, sneezing or blowing your nose Wash your hands frequently if someone in your home is sick

Clean HandsGood Health


Clean HandsGood Health

1.
2.

1. Rub your palms together 2. Rub the back of each hand and fingers

7.

3. Rub your palms and fingers together

4. Rub your palm with your knuckles


5. Rub around your thumb

6. 3. 5.

6. Rub across your palm with your thumb tip 7. Rub around your wrists

4.

How to Prevent the Spread of Avian Influenza


Manage Personal Hygiene

Manage Workplace Hygiene


Prevention

Self-care and Health Monitoring Safe Travel

Stopping the spread of germs at work


Each of us has a responsibility to prevent the spread of illness in the workplace. Practicing healthy habits will help you stay well during flu season and all year long.

When you are in the workplace:


Cover your mouth and nose when you sneeze or cough if you do not have a tissue. Then clean your hands, and do so every time you cough or sneeze. Clean your hands often. When soap and water are not available, alcohol-based disposable hand wipes or gel sanitizers may be used. If using a gel, rub the gel in your hands until they are dry. Germs are often spread when a person touches something that is contaminated. Avoid touching your eyes, nose or mouth. Keep office objects clean, especially your telephone, computer keyboard and mouse. If you get sick, get plenty of rest and check with a health care provider as needed. Common symptoms of the flu include: fever (usually high); extreme tiredness; sore throat; muscle aches; headache; cough; vomiting; diarrhea; runny or stuffy nose.

Manage Workplace Hygiene

How to Prevent the Spread of Avian Influenza


Manage Personal Hygiene

Manage Workplace Hygiene


Prevention

Self-care and Health Monitoring Safe Travel

Should you suspect you have avian flu:


Should fever, cough, difficulty breathing or any other symptoms occur within 10 days, consult a doctor at once. Give details of symptoms, poultry or avian flu contact history and traveling history.

Self-Care and Health Monitoring

The symptoms of influenza include: fever between 37.7-40.5 C (100 and 105F) for 4-5 days; tiredness; headache; muscle aches; decreased appetite; runny nose; sore throat; mild nausea; vomiting; diarrhea. Seek advice from your local public health department Limit contact with other people to prevent the transmission of disease.

How to Prevent the Spread of Avian Influenza


Manage Personal Hygiene

Manage Workplace Hygiene


Prevention

Self-care and Health Monitoring Safe Travel

Before the journey:

Safe Travel

Consult your doctor about precautions you may need for the area where you are traveling.

During the journey:

Avoid traveling to areas where flu outbreaks in poultry have still been reported or where there are potential risks of poultry outbreak such as live animal markets or poultry farms.

Safe Travel

Avoid contact with natural birds and all kinds of poultry, including feces or excretion-contaminated surfaces where avian flu virus excreted from infected poultry would be present.

After the journey:

Safe Travel

Should fever, cough, difficulty breathing or any other symptoms occur within 10 days, consult a doctor at once. Give details of symptoms, poultry or avian flu contact history and traveling history.

Limit contact with other people to prevent the transmission of disease.