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Performance Management and Employee Development: Overview

Personal Developmental Plans Direct Supervisors Role 360-degree Feedback Systems

Prentice Hall, Inc. 2006

Herman Aguinis, University of Colorado at Denver

Stakeholders in the Development Process


Employees
Help plan their own development Improve their own performance

Managers
Help guide the process of development Support success of process

Prentice Hall, Inc. 2006

Herman Aguinis, University of Colorado at Denver

Personal Developmental Plans


Specify actions necessary to improve performance Highlight employees
Strengths Areas in need of development

Prentice Hall, Inc. 2006

Herman Aguinis, University of Colorado at Denver

Personal Developmental Plans answer:


How can I continuously learn and grow in the next year? How can I do better in the future? How can I avoid performance problems of the past?

Prentice Hall, Inc. 2006

Herman Aguinis, University of Colorado at Denver

Personal Developmental Plans: Overview


Developmental Plan Objectives Content of Developmental Plan Developmental Activities

Prentice Hall, Inc. 2006

Herman Aguinis, University of Colorado at Denver

Overall Developmental Plan Objectives


Encourage:
Continuous learning Performance improvement Personal growth

Prentice Hall, Inc. 2006

Herman Aguinis, University of Colorado at Denver

Specific Developmental Plan Objectives


Improve performance in current job Sustain performance in current job Prepare employee for advancement Enrich employees work experience

Prentice Hall, Inc. 2006

Herman Aguinis, University of Colorado at Denver

Content of Developmental Plan


Developmental objectives
New skills or knowledge Timeline

How the new skills or knowledge will be acquired


Resources Strategies

Standards and measures used to assess achievement of objectives

Prentice Hall, Inc. 2006

Herman Aguinis, University of Colorado at Denver

Content of Developmental Plan


Based on needs of organization and employee Chosen by employee and direct supervisor Taking into account
Employees learning preferences Developmental objective in question Organizations available resources

Prentice Hall, Inc. 2006

Herman Aguinis, University of Colorado at Denver

Developmental Activities On the job


On-the-job-training Mentoring Job rotation Temporary assignments

Prentice Hall, Inc. 2006

Herman Aguinis, University of Colorado at Denver

Developmental Activities In addition to on the job


Courses Self-guided reading Getting a degree Attending a conference Membership or leadership role
in professional or trade organization

Prentice Hall, Inc. 2006

Herman Aguinis, University of Colorado at Denver

Direct Supervisors Role: Explain what is necessary Refer employee to appropriate developmental activities Review & make suggestions regarding developmental objectives

Prentice Hall, Inc. 2006

Herman Aguinis, University of Colorado at Denver

Direct Supervisors Role (ongoing): Check on employees progress Provide motivational reinforcement

Prentice Hall, Inc. 2006

Herman Aguinis, University of Colorado at Denver

360-degree Feedback Systems


Tools to help employees
Improve performance by using Performance information Gathered from many sources
Superiors Peers Customers Subordinates The employee
Herman Aguinis, University of Colorado at Denver

Prentice Hall, Inc. 2006

360-degree Feedback Systems


Anonymous feedback Most useful when used
For DEVELOPMENT NOT for administrative purposes

Internet used for collecting data

Prentice Hall, Inc. 2006

Herman Aguinis, University of Colorado at Denver

Prentice Hall, Inc. 2006

Herman Aguinis, University of Colorado at Denver

Prentice Hall, Inc. 2006

Herman Aguinis, University of Colorado at Denver

Prentice Hall, Inc. 2006

Herman Aguinis, University of Colorado at Denver

Prentice Hall, Inc. 2006

Herman Aguinis, University of Colorado at Denver

Necessary organizational norms include:


Cooperation Openness and trust Input and participation valued Fairness

Prentice Hall, Inc. 2006

Herman Aguinis, University of Colorado at Denver

Overview of 360-degree Feedback Systems


Advantages of 360-degree Feedback Systems Risks of 360-degree Feedback Systems Characteristics of a Good 360-degree Feedback System

Prentice Hall, Inc. 2006

Herman Aguinis, University of Colorado at Denver

Advantages of 360-degree Feedback Systems


Decreased possibility of biases Increased awareness of expectations Increased commitment to improve Improved self-perception of performance Improved performance Reduction of undiscussables Increased employee control of their own careers

Prentice Hall, Inc. 2006

Herman Aguinis, University of Colorado at Denver

Risks of 360-degree Feedback Systems


Unconstructive negative feedback hurts. Are individuals comfortable with the system? User acceptance is crucial. If few raters, anonymity is compromised. Raters may become overloaded. Stock values may drop.

Prentice Hall, Inc. 2006

Herman Aguinis, University of Colorado at Denver

Characteristics of a Good 360-degree Feedback System


Anonymity Observation of employee performance Avoidance of survey fatigue Raters are trained Used for developmental purposes only Emphasis on behaviors Raters go beyond ratings Feedback interpretation Follow-up

Prentice Hall, Inc. 2006

Herman Aguinis, University of Colorado at Denver