Vous êtes sur la page 1sur 21

SEGMENTATION in the Industrial Markets

Vinod Puri 98206 94960; 26314644 vunsum@hotmail.com; sumanpuri@eth.net

Segmentation Benefits
First, the marketer to become more attuned to the unique needs of customer segments. Second, focus product development efforts, develop profitable pricing strategies, select appropriate channels of distribution. Third, provides guidelines that are of significant value in allocating marketing resources.

High-Growth Companies Succeed By


Selecting a well-defined group of potentially profitable customers.
Focusing marketing resources on acquiring, developing, and retaining profitable customers.

Developing a distinctive value proposition.

Five Criteria for Evaluating Potential Market Segments


1. Measurability
2. Accessibility 3. Substantiality 4. Compatibility 5. Responsiveness

By industry in which the customer participates


By product offered

By size of the customers company

Common Bases for Segmentati on

By geographic region

By size of account

By buying behavior

By technology used by the customer

Measureability

Can we understand the size and needs of the market segment? Can we communicate with the segment so that serving the segment is possible? Does the segment desire that values that an offering presents? Can we create a competitive advantage with respect to the needs of the segment?

Accessibility

Substantiality

Actionability

Analytic Approach to Segmentation


Analytic approaches need two sets of data:
1) Information about segment size and growth
Standard Industrial Classification (SIC) and North American Industrial Classification System (NAICS) codes are useful.

2) Information about each targeted segments needs and buying behavior.

Technological Environment Assessment


1. Product technologythe set of ideas embodied in the product or service. 2. Process technologythe set of ideas or steps involved in the production of a product or service.

3. Management technologythe management procedures associated with selling the product.

Segmentation Benefits
First, the marketer to become more attuned to the unique needs of customer segments. Second, focus product development efforts, develop profitable pricing strategies, select appropriate channels of distribution. Third, provides guidelines that are of significant value in allocating marketing resources.

By industry in which the customer participates


By product offered

By size of the customers company

Common Bases for Segmentati on

By geographic region

By size of account

By buying behavior

By technology used by the customer

Bases for Segmenting Business Markets


Macrosegmentati on. Microsegmentatio n.

Selected Macrolevel Bases of Segmentation

Developed by Cool Pictures and MultiMedia Presentations

Macrolevel bases of segmentation are concerned with general characteristics of the buying organization, the nature of the product application, and the characteristics of the buying situation.

Copyright 2004 by South-Western, a division of Thomson Learning, Inc. All rights reserved.

Selected Microlevel Bases of Segmentation

Developed by Cool Pictures and MultiMedia Presentations

The marketer often finds it useful to divide each macrosegment into smaller microsegments on the basis of the similarities and differences

Copyright 2004 by South-Western, a division of Thomson Learning, Inc. All rights reserved.

Purchasing Strategies Classifications


1. Satisficers approach a given purchasing requirement by contacting familiar suppliers and placing the order with the first supplier to satisfy product and delivery requirements. 2. Optimizers consider numerous suppliers, familiar and unfamiliar, solicit bids, and examine all alternative proposals carefully before selecting a supplier.

Meaningful Microsegments
Importance of Purchase -- appropriate when the product is applied in various ways by various customers. Attitudes toward Vendors an analysis of how various clusters of buyers view alternative sources of supply often uncovers opportunities. Organizational Innovativeness some organizations are more innovative and willing to purchase new industrial products than others. Personal Characteristics although some interesting studies have shown the viability of segmentation on the basis of individual characteristics, further research is needed to explore its potential as a firm base for

Attractiveness of Segments
Market Attractiveness Competitive Attractiveness

Channel Attractiveness
Internal Attractiveness Attractiveness Other Considerations

Market Attractiveness
Large and fast growing segments are more attractive than smaller and slow-growing Competitive segments Attractiveness This necessitates accurately predicting future growth. Channel Other issues include Attractiveness Adaptability of market segments, Internal Existing relationships with Attractiveness the buying center members, and Attractiveness Other Available customers Considerations budget Market Attractiveness

Competitive Attractiveness
Market Attractiveness Competitive Attractiveness What is the likely existence or emergence of competition in the market segment? Are there barriers to entry facing competitors? Does being first to market provide an advantage?

Channel Attractiveness
Internal Attractiveness Attractiveness Other Considerations

Channel Attractiveness
It is preferable to target customers already served by well-established marketing Competitive channels, or if an existing Attractiveness channel can be adapted, it may serve the segment. Channel When there is no suitable Attractiveness existing channel, a market view of competition may be Internal necessary. Attractiveness How is the existing need being met? Attractiveness Other Will customers switch? Considerations Market Attractiveness

Internal Attractiveness
Market Attractiveness Competitive Attractiveness A segment is more attractive when the segments needs can be met by the firms core competencies. This is identified through environmental analysis.

Channel Attractiveness
Internal Attractiveness Attractiveness Other Considerations

Attractiveness Other Considerations


Market Attractiveness Competitive Attractiveness Other factors that might cause a segment to rated higher or lower include: Public policy (excessive government regulation can cause a segment to be downgraded) Organizational goals (market share goals may make firms more aggressive in targeting)

Channel Attractiveness
Internal Attractiveness Attractiveness Other Considerations