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DSL

DSL
Digital Subscriber Line

DSL
originally digital subscriber loop is a family of technologies that provide Internet access by transmitting digital data over the wires of a local telephone network

DSL
It's possible for DSL subscribers to share the same line for their digital and analog traffic play web + receive a call.

The History of DSL

It began with the telephone


Its history goes all the way back to the 1800s when Alexander Graham Bell invented the telephone. For the first time, people were able to transmit data through a copper wire.

The History of DSL

Then came the Internet


At first, Internet users were content viewing simple mono-colored screens without any graphics. But as technology advanced and the Internet started featuring full-color web pages and images.

The History of DSL

In the 1980s Joseph Lechleider figured out how to transmit data over broadband signals. For this, he is credited as being the father of broadband technologies. Along with the idea of broadband, he came up with the idea of ADSL (Asymmetrical DSL).

DSL Technology
Speed
DSL offers more than 100 times the network performance of a traditional analog modem. DSL modems contain an internal signal splitter that carries voice signals on the usual low frequencies (from 0 up to 4kHz) and data signals above that.

SPLITTER

DSL Technology
Availability
The technology used to implement DSL only works over a limited physical distance. At the maximum, DSL runs about 18,000 feet (3.5 miles or 5.5 kilometers) from a telephone exchange.

DSL availability of bandwidth


Cable length (feet) 18,000 16,000 Bandwidth availability (kbps) 1,544 2,048

12,000
9,000

6,312
8,448

xDSL family tree


Asymmetric DSL (ADSL) - It is called "asymmetric" because the download speed is greater than the upload speed. ADSL works this way because most Internet users look at, or download, much more information than they send, or upload.

xDSL family tree


High bit-rate DSL (HDSL) - Providing transfer rates comparable to a T1 line (about 1.5 Mbps), HDSL receives and sends data at the same speed, but it requires two lines that are separate from your normal phone line.

xDSL family tree


ISDN DSL (ISDL) - ISDL is slower than most other forms of DSL, operating at fixed rate of 144 Kbps in both directions.

xDSL family tree


Multirate Symmetric DSL (MSDSL) This is Symmetric DSL that is capable of more than one transfer rate. The transfer rate is set by the service provider, typically based on the service (price) level.

xDSL family tree


Rate Adaptive DSL (RADSL) - This is a popular variation of ADSL that allows the modem to adjust the speed of the connection depending on the length and quality of the line.

xDSL family tree


Symmetric DSL (SDSL) - Like HDSL, this version receives and sends data at the same speed. While SDSL also requires a separate line from your phone, it uses only a single line instead of the two used by HDSL.

xDSL family tree


Very high bit-rate DSL (VDSL) - An extremely fast connection, VDSL is asymmetric, but only works over a short distance using standard copper phone wiring.

xDSL family tree


Voice-over DSL (VoDSL) - A type of IP telephony, VoDSL allows multiple phone lines to be combined into a single phone line that also includes data-transmission capabilities.

The chart below provides a comparison of the various DSL technologies: