Vous êtes sur la page 1sur 24

Chapter 2 Appendix:

Internet Technology

For use with Strategic Electronic Marketing: Managing E-Business, 2e Copyright 2003 South-Western College Publishing

Chapter 2A Slide: 1

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:
1. Understand how information is routed through the Internet. 2. Be able to explain current and evolving Internet backbones. 3. Specify how businesses and home users can implement security measures. 4. Outline the importance of open standards for the Internet and specify those standards. 5. Understand site hosting and ISP choice.
For use with Strategic Electronic Marketing: Managing E-Business, 2e Copyright 2003 South-Western College Publishing

Chapter 2A Slide: 2

Data Packets
Data are sent around the Internet backbone in packets.
E-mail files, HTML files, sound files, and so forth are split into small sections and then routed to different locations based on the packets address.

This strategy allows digital backbones to maximize the amount of data that flows through their networks. Broadband applications stream in, or receive, large numbers of packets of information that are assembled at the users end. How many packets move through the Internet at a given time depends on carrier and router speeds.

For use with Strategic Electronic Marketing: Managing E-Business, 2e Copyright 2003 South-Western College Publishing

Chapter 2A Slide: 3

Figure A2.1: Packet Routing


Browser A 010001101

Router
110101101010 Data Packet From Y To: B 110101101010 Data Packet From Z To: C

Browser B 010101101

Backbone Line

Browser C 010001111

For use with Strategic Electronic Marketing: Managing E-Business, 2e Copyright 2003 South-Western College Publishing

Chapter 2A Slide: 4

Figure A2.1: Packet Routing (XP)


Browser A 010001101

Router
110101101010 Data Packet From Y To: B 110101101010 Data Packet From Z To: C

Browser B 010101101

rom X To: A

Backbone Line

Browser C 010001111

For use with Strategic Electronic Marketing: Managing E-Business, 2e Copyright 2003 South-Western College Publishing

Chapter 2A Slide: 5

Speed Considerations
A large number of hops (places where two networks meet) slows data. Congestion at peering points (points of Internet backbone connection) slows the routing of packets. Each Web address is stored in a name server, and congested name servers can slow access to addressed information, and thus to the addressed data. These speed considerations affect the type of content that should be developed for the market served.

For use with Strategic Electronic Marketing: Managing E-Business, 2e Copyright 2003 South-Western College Publishing

Chapter 2A Slide: 6

Figure A2.2: Data Packets Sent Around The World (In Billions)
30000 25000 20000 15000 10000 5000 0 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002
Source: Michael C. Hulfactor and Bob Klessig, The Problem of the Bandwidth Bottleneck, ISPWorld, August 2000, pp. 44-48.

Data Voice

For use with Strategic Electronic Marketing: Managing E-Business, 2e Copyright 2003 South-Western College Publishing

Chapter 2A Slide: 7

Home-User Internet Delivery Options


Term MODEM (14.4, 28.8, 56 Kbps) T1 or T3 DSL (ADSL: 1.54 Mbps) Cable Modems (800 Kbps 3 Mbps) Direct Broadcast Satellite (200 - 400 Kbps) Fiber Optic (10 Gbps) G3 Cellular Phones (projected 2 Mbps maximum) Speed in Seconds for 10 megabits of data @ 56 Kbps: 179 seconds T1 @ 1.5 Mbps: 6.6 seconds @ 1.5 Mbps: 6.6 seconds 3.3 - 20 seconds

80 - 40 seconds @ 10 Gbps: < .01 seconds .5 - 1 second

For use with Strategic Electronic Marketing: Managing E-Business, 2e Copyright 2003 South-Western College Publishing

Chapter 2A Slide: 8

New Data Lines


Building A

Line-of-site microwave or lasers:

Analog waves that must be modulated and demodulated,


High-voltage electrical lines can be modulated and demodulated to carry digital information, allowing electrical utilities to become broadband providers.

or radio waves.
For use with Strategic Electronic Marketing: Managing E-Business, 2e Copyright 2003 South-Western College Publishing

Chapter 2A Slide: 9

Building B

Pure digital

Figure A2.3: Firewall Protection


Individual PC Firewall
Users Browser

Internet Backbone

System Firewall

Business Network Server

Blocks Cybercriminal s Virus, Worm, Pornography, Spam, ect.

Cybercriminal sends Virus, Worm, Pornography, Spam, ect.

Blocks Cybercriminal s Virus, Worm, Pornography, Spam, ect.


Chapter 2A Slide: 10

For use with Strategic Electronic Marketing: Managing E-Business, 2e Copyright 2003 South-Western College Publishing

Table A2.1: Internet Security Recommendations


Action Control Access Set up Firewalls Use management and administration tools Use auditing, monitoring, and alert technology Antivirus products Use cryptography technology Description Authenticate users and authorize the type of action taken. Set up to permit and deny traffic flows for networks. Centrally manage and report usage of site. These monitor and record events to determine if actions occur outside of set perimeters. Prevent, detect and correct virus codes. Provides information confidentiality.

For use with Strategic Electronic Marketing: Managing E-Business, 2e Copyright 2003 South-Western College Publishing

Chapter 2A Slide: 11

Table A2.1: Internet Security Recommendations


Action Certification and key management Enhance user authentication Use biometrics Description Supports encryption and digital signatures to authenticate users. Use token or smart cards to enhance password protection. Systems that confirm users identities using a personal measure such as fingerprints, iris scans, voice prints, etc. Scans networks to detect incidents of intrusion. Controls physical access to hardware and software. To bring in experts.

Intrusion detection Physical security Use consultants

For use with Strategic Electronic Marketing: Managing E-Business, 2e Copyright 2003 South-Western College Publishing

Chapter 2A Slide: 12

Table A2.3: Internet Protocols


Term TCP/IP EMAIL Meaning Transport Control Protocol/Internet Protocol Electronic Mail Used For Set of standards that are used on the Internet. Allows for the transport of text between users over the Internet. Allows for computer files or software to be transferred online. This is most often used as an attachment with email. Allows a computer to connect into other computer systems, in essence becoming one of their terminals. Like a chat room, it is a place for online discussions of areas of interest.

FTP

File Transfer Protocols

TELNET

Uses TCP/IP to exchange packets of data between computers. Standard for sites to share and forward discussion information.

USENET

For use with Strategic Electronic Marketing: Managing E-Business, 2e Copyright 2003 South-Western College Publishing

Chapter 2A Slide: 13

World Wide Web Protocols (1)


Protocol World Wide Web Meaning Set of standard that allows for hyperlinks and graphics to move through the Internet. Hypertext Underlying protocol to the Web allows Transport for linking to other sites and retrieving Protocol (HTTP) information. Virtual Reality Allows for 3D models to be displayed Markup Language and rotated in a Web page. (VRML)

For use with Strategic Electronic Marketing: Managing E-Business, 2e Copyright 2003 South-Western College Publishing

Chapter 2A Slide: 14

World Wide Web Protocols (2)


Protocol Common Gateway Interface (CGI) Meaning An interface for providing links to other programs from Web servers such as when a Web form is used to collect information. Universal The address used to find a site at a Resource Locator server on the Web. Code (URL) Secure Electronic Protocols to allow for secure Transaction purchases on the Internet. (SET)

For use with Strategic Electronic Marketing: Managing E-Business, 2e Copyright 2003 South-Western College Publishing

Chapter 2A Slide: 15

HTML Tags
Webpage coding can also be complex as shown in the following example:
Hypertext markup language tag for locating a URL:
<A HREF=

To call a file on a local disk drive:


<A HREF=file:///c|home/example.htm

To call a Web site:


<AHREF=http://www.mssc.edu/home/example.htm/

To call a Web site and display in a separate window:


<AHREF=http://www.mssc.edu/home/example.htm/" target="_blank">

For use with Strategic Electronic Marketing: Managing E-Business, 2e Copyright 2003 South-Western College Publishing

Chapter 2A Slide: 16

Web Browser Language


Code Hypertext Markup Language (HTML 4) Use Text-based markup language, or set of codes which give design (fonts, position, colors, etc.) to the Web page. Dynamic HTML Allows for movement and layering of text and images on a page adding multimedia effects. Extendable markup Adds intelligence to Web pages. language (XML) JAVA Allows Web developers to add programming applets to Web pages.
For use with Strategic Electronic Marketing: Managing E-Business, 2e Copyright 2003 South-Western College Publishing

Chapter 2A Slide: 17

Web Browser Plug-Ins


Plug-ins: Video Video and Audio Multimedia Examples QuickTime RealPlayer Shockwave Use Downloads and plays video. Streams in video and audio. Allows for the streaming of multimedia and interactive games. Real-time text conversations Allows phone calls to be placed over the Internet.

Chat IP Telephony

iChat Phone Calls

For use with Strategic Electronic Marketing: Managing E-Business, 2e Copyright 2003 South-Western College Publishing

Chapter 2A Slide: 18

Case A2.1: He Who Controls the Standard Controls the World


Thinking Strategically
Specify why standards are important to the future of the Internet. Outline how Internet standards are a threat to Microsoft. Indicate why a company such as Microsoft should or should not be allowed to use it dominance to develop standards. Consider the overall consumer welfare question and argue for or against the open standard process being fostered by the Internet.
For use with Strategic Electronic Marketing: Managing E-Business, 2e Copyright 2003 South-Western College Publishing

Chapter 2A Slide: 19

Choosing an ISP
Network reliability. What percentage of time is the network up? Value for price. Which services are offered for the price charged? Network performance. Number of delays and packet losses. Customer service responsiveness. Does the ISP provide quick attention to problems and answers to questions? Technical support. How responsive is technical support? Start-up time. How quickly can services be readied? Service-level agreements. What types of services and training does the ISP offer?
For use with Strategic Electronic Marketing: Managing E-Business, 2e Copyright 2003 South-Western College Publishing

Chapter 2A Slide: 20

Choosing an ISP
Disk space. What is the cost, and how much disk space does the business get? Programming support. What capabilities does the ISP have to provide database access, programming help, or special design skills? E-commerce support. Does the site allow for shopping carts, online transactions, and individualized marketing programs? E-mail services. How many accounts can be provided, and how can they be accessed? Security. Does the ISP ensure security for data transfer and for transactions conducted online?
For use with Strategic Electronic Marketing: Managing E-Business, 2e Copyright 2003 South-Western College Publishing

Chapter 2A Slide: 21

Internet Delivery
Question Do you have the technology staff to develop and maintain a web site? Are you willing to pay the cost of continually upgrading the software and hardware necessary to maintain adequate resources? Will you have a large number of hits in a short time? Do you need high levels of security? Will your technology needs change rapidly? Do your users require round the clock access to support?
For use with Strategic Electronic Marketing: Managing E-Business, 2e Copyright 2003 South-Western College Publishing

Outsource In-house No Yes No Yes

Yes Yes Yes Yes

No No No No

Chapter 2A Slide: 22

Exercise A2.1 HTML Code


Open a browser and go to www.msn.com on the Web.
Take a look at the HTML code for this page.
In MS Explorer, go to View Source (or use whatever HTML viewer your browser uses).

Scroll through this text and view the source code.


Dont try to understand the coding. Afterward viewing, close the window.

Notice that unless you were trained in this code you would likely have no idea what it means.
Now highlight about a third of the Web page. Copy this and paste it into your word processor. This should show you a table-based structure. Many web pages use tables to control the look and feel of content on the page.
For use with Strategic Electronic Marketing: Managing E-Business, 2e Copyright 2003 South-Western College Publishing

Chapter 2A Slide: 23

Exercise A2.2 ISP Evaluation Exercise


Investigate several ISPs based on the criteria in the text. Discuss this with your classmates and determine which ISP would be the best to use. Explore both large and small ISPs.

For use with Strategic Electronic Marketing: Managing E-Business, 2e Copyright 2003 South-Western College Publishing

Chapter 2A Slide: 24