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Kezar Food Forest

• Intro
• Vision/Goals
• Site Analysis
• Kezar Food Forest Design
• Methods of Implementation
• Management
• Summary

   
Golden Gate Park: Kezar Triangle

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Golden Gate Park: Kezar Triangle

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Golden Gate Park: Kezar Triangle

   
Vision & Goals: Overview
 We have designed a two-acre food forest for an
underutilized area of Golden Gate Park.
 The forests and meadows will have the look and feel of
a park, while the trees and plants themselves serve
multiple functions such as providing fruits, nuts,
medicinal plants, teas, berries, leafy greens, edible
roots and bulbs.
 All the plant guilds are designed into our scheme. We
saw that the original Park owed its successes to the
many Permaculture Principles that its’ founders
applied.
 We will show you these innovations used particularly
by William Hammond Hall, the designer and first
superintendent of the Park.
   
Vision & Goals: Historical Precedence
 Our support for the vision of the Park as a valuable
resource is also historical. During times of financial
depression and the 1906 earthquake and fire, the Park
was an invaluable resource to the people of San
Francisco.

 Creative schemes were used to hire the unemployed


who built the bridges and roads and plant trees in the
Park. Meadows became tent cities. Children attended
outside schools and tended the many vegetable
gardens.

   
History: Tent Cities

   
Vision & Goals: Building Community
 Today it is estimated that 1,500 people live within the
park. The City’s lack of resources for the homeless
and mentally ill are putting a huge strain on the Park.

 We see our sample food forest not as a way to attract


more homeless and unemployed but as a way for
more citizens to get involved in creative solutions that
could ease and eliminate this poverty and lack of care.

 To such an end, we have suggested a mobile produce


market and food exchanges. Our experimental model
could be applied to many other places in the Park as
well as empty lots in neighborhoods and smaller parks
in the City.
   
Resource: Homeless in the Park

   
Site for Farmer’s Market Off Stanyan

   
Vision & Goals: Wildlife Habitats

 Our choice of a food forest is also a way to restore


wildlife. Food and habitats will attract birds, bats,
small rodents, gopher snakes (right now gophers
have a monopoly), butterflies, and bees.

 Wildlife corridors are becoming recognized more and


more as valuable resources to all communities.

   
Vision & Goals: Wildlife Habitats

   
Vision & Goals: Utilize Permaculture
Principles to Lower Costs & Reduce Maintenance

 We have designed a forest garden that will develop


over time; from pioneer plant communities to more
diverse and stable communities.

 By mimicking complex forest ecosystems, we learn


how to rebuild self-maintaining landscapes. Wild
ecosystems contain webs of cooperation and
interdependence.

 The goal of forest garden design is to generate such


self-maintaining, networked ecosystems.

   
Site Analysis: Sector Map

 Dogs
 Street Noise
 Shortcut for pedestrians
 Recreational use
     Existing Vegetation
Site Analysis: Sector Map
 Low Organic Matter
 Sandy Soil
 Sun
 Water
 Community/Political

   
Sectors: Windbreak to the NW

   
Sectors: Native Plant Nursery

   
Site Analysis: Zone Map

   
History: Succession Planting

   
History: William Hammond Hall

   
History: Tent Cities

   
History: Golden Gate Park Then

   
Kezar Food Forest: A City Park with Multiple Functions

   
Kezar Stadium - Then

   
   
   
Olive/Fruit Tree Guild

   
Olive/Fruit Tree Guild

   
Olive/Fruit Tree Guild

   
Olive/Fruit Tree Guild
 Function: Produce food, herbs, dynamic
accumulators
 Chop and drop the understory plants to create a
walkable space under tree during olive harvest.
 Understory:
• Fava beans- could be cut down in spring
• Comfrey- dies down in winter
• Dandelions
• Clovers- N fixer
• Borage- herb, dies down in summer
• Oregano- can be harvested in spring
• Lemon verbena
• Purslane
• Daffodils

   
Healing Labyrinth

   
Healing Labyrinth

   
Healing Labyrinth

 Function: Produce herbs, medicinals, meditation,


sacred space
 Plants:
• Rosemary
• Mint
• Chamomile
• Thyme
• Sage
• Lavender

   
Hedgerow

   
Hedgerow

   
Hedgerow

   
Hedgerow

   
Hedgerow
 Function: Barrier from sound/wind/dogs, habitat,
and bird food
 Plants:
• Plum Trees
• Hawthorne Trees
• Crabapple
• Elderberry
• Hollyleaf Cherry
• Honeysuckle
• Climbing Roses
• Dutchman’s Pipe
• Quince
• Herbs

   
Central Meadow & Wetland Area

   
Central Meadow & Wetland Area
 Function: Habitat for birds, space for people activity
 Sheep Mow Meadow
 Plants:
• Yarrow
• Poppies
• Seed Wild Flowers
• Meadow grasses w/ wild flowers
• Tule Marsh
• Cattail
• Clover
• Buckwheat

   
Oak and Native Grass Guild

   
Oak and Native Grass Guild

   
Oak and Native Grass Guild
 Function: Windbreak, Bird Cover, Habitat, Insectary
 Oak, Buckeye, Vine Maple, Toyon
 Plants:
• Seaside Daisy
• Sticky Monkey Flower (Mimulus)
• Artemesia
• Elderberries
• Ceanothus
• Mimulus
• Wild Currants
• Gooseberries
• Lemonade Berry
• Coffee Berry
• Douglas Iris
• Lupine
• Yerba Buena
   
Fig Grove

   
Fig Grove

   
Fig Grove
 Function: Picnic Area, Food, Shelter
 Plants:
• Bracken Fern
• Violas
• Oregon grape

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Berry Border

   
Berry Border
 Function: Protect park from dogs, barrier from cars,
food
 Plum, Apple, Pear, Loquat Trees
 Plants:
• Comfrey
• Fava beans
• Nasturtium
• Olallieberry
• Thornless Blackberry
• Thimbleberry

   
Outdoor Classroom Area & Pond

   
Outdoor Classroom Area & Pond

   
Outdoor Classroom Area & Pond

   
Outdoor Classroom Area & Pond

   
Outdoor Classroom Area & Pond

   
Outdoor Classroom Area & Pond

   
Outdoor Classroom Area & Pond

QuickTimeª and a
QuickTimeª and a
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decompressor
are needed to see this picture.

   
Outdoor Classroom Area & Pond

   
Outdoor Classroom Area & Pond

   
Outdoor Classroom Area & Pond

   
Outdoor Classroom Area & Pond
 Function: Educational Area,
Experimental Area
 Plants:
• Old Roses (for oils, rosehips)
• Lavenders
• Lemons
• Limes
• Kumquats
• Seasonal Veggies/Herbs

   
Method of Succession: Nuclei That Merge

   
Method of Succession: Soil Building

   
Method of Succession: Mid-Succession

   
Method of Succession: Mature Forest

   
Method of Succession: Mature Forest

   
Method of Succession: Species Niche

   
Forest Management: Coppice

   
Efforts in the Park have already begun…

   
Other Resources

   
   
References

Suddenly San Francisco: The Early Years. by Charles Lockwood.


The Making of Golden Gate Park, The Early Years: 1865 – 1906 by
Raymond H. Clary, c. 1980, A California Living Book
The Making of Golden Gate Park, The Growing Years: 1906 – 1950.
Raymond H. Clary, c 1987, Don’t Call It Frisco Press
Permaculture: A Designer’s Manual, by Bill Mollison, c. 1988
Edible Forest Gardens, Vol. 1. By Dave Jacke with Eric
Toensmeier, c. 2005, Chelsea Green Pub.
Forest Gardening: Cultivating an Edible landscape. By Robert
Hart, C. 1991
Pacific Coast Trees. By McMinn & Maino, c. 1935 Univ. of
California Press
Sacred Trees, Nathaniel Altman, Sierra Club Books

   
Thanks to everyone who
helped and inspired us…

   
Special thanks to Kevin Bayuk and the SF Permaculture Guild
“Start small(ish) and establish a pattern that could be rolled out
when success is proven and learnings integrated.”…Kevin Bayuk

   

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