Vous êtes sur la page 1sur 15

ETHICAL ISSUES IN BUSINESS RESEARCH

Dr. Sasmita Mishra KSOM, KIIT University

ETHICAL ISSUES
Ethical questions are philosophical questions; There is no general agreement among philosophers about the answers to such questions; The rights and obligations of individuals are generally dictated by the norms of society; Social norms are codes of behavior adopted by group.

ETHICAL ISSUES
Philosophical questions Societal norms Codes of behavior

GENERAL ETHICS AND OBLIGATIONS OF


CONCERNED PARTIES Three parties are involved Researcher Respondent Client

THE RESEARCHER
The purpose of research is research Objectivity Misrepresentation of research Protecting the right to confidentiality of both subjects and clients Dissemination of faulty conclusion Competing research proposal

RIGHTS AND OBLIGATIONS OF THE RESPONDENT


The obligation to be truthful; Privacy (e.g., collecting and giving out of personal information without their (US citizens) knowledge is a serious violation of their privacy); Deception (i. e., creating a false impression by disguising the purpose of the research); The right to be informed.

RIGHTS AND OBLIGATIONS OF THE CLIENT SPONSOR (USER)

Ethics between buyer and seller


An open relationship with research suppliers An open relationship with interested parties Privacy Commitment to research Pseudo-pilot studies (suggested by the clients) Advocacy research (Research undertaken to support a specific claim in a legal action)

ADVOCACY RESEARCH

Research to support a specific legal claim

PSEUDO-PILOT STUDIES

The researcher is told by the clients that the study is the first of many in a more comprehensive study. It is important for clients to be open about the business problem to be investigated.

ETHICAL AND SOCIAL ISSUES IN PSYCHOLOGICAL TESTING

ISSUES
The concern that currently shape testing include professional, moral and social issues. Ethical issues underlie each of these concerns. Professional Moral Social

PROFESSIONAL ISSUES
Theoretical concerns Adequacy of tests Actual vs. clinical prediction

MORAL ISSUES

Human rights

Right not to be tested Right to know the test score Right to know who will have access to test data

Labeling Invasion of privacy Divided loyalties Responsibilities of test users and test conductors

SOCIAL ISSUES
Dehumanization Usefulness of Tests Access to psychological testing services

T H A N K Y O U