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Team Members

Ankit Shrestha (062/BIE/05)


Deepak Rana (062/BIE/11) Gopal Chaudhary (062/BIE/12)

Prakash Acharya (062/BIE/25)


Rojesh Man Bajracharya (062/BIE/33) Sangeet Lal Karna (062/BIE/36)

Shalabh Poudyal (062/BIE/39)


Spandan Sharma Mishra (062/BIE/42)

Background
Since 2005, global wind installations more than

doubled.
All wind turbines installed worldwide are generating

260 Tega Watts hour (TWh) per annum, equaling more than 1.5 % of the global electricity consumption.

Contd.
Alternative Energy Promotion Centre (AEPC) estimated that the gross potential of 3000 MW of electricity can be generated from wind energy in Nepal.
DANGRID, a Danish firm reported that 200 MW of potential electrical output with an annual energy production of 500 GWh can be produced between Kagbeni and Chusang in Mustang district alone.

INTRODUCTION
Wind energy is a form of solar energy
Generation of air currents is a direct affect of the

combination of two phenomena: circulation of hot air and earth rotation.


A wind turbine is a rotating machine which converts

the kinetic energy of wind into mechanical energy

Types of turbine:
Horizontal axis wind turbine (HAWT)

Horizontal-axis wind turbines (HAWT) have the main rotor shaft and electrical generator at the top of a tower, and must be pointed into the wind.

Vertical axis wind turbine (VAWT)

VAWT have the main rotor shaft arranged vertically and turbine does not need to be pointed into the wind to be effective.

HAWT & VAWT

Advantages of HAWT
Variable blade pitch, which gives the turbine blades

the optimum angle of attack.

Tall tower base allows access to stronger wind in sites

with wind shear & consistent lateral wind loading

Disadvantages of HWAT
The tall towers and blades up to 90 meters long are

difficult to transport.
Tall HAWTs are difficult to install. HAWTs require an additional yaw control mechanism

to turn the blades toward the wind

Advantages of VAWT
A massive tower structure is less frequently used. Designs without yaw mechanisms are possible with

fixed pitch rotor designs


VAWTs have lower wind startup speeds than HAWTs

Disadvantages of VAWT
Likelihood of blade failure by fatigue.
VAWTs may not produce as much energy at a given site

as a HAWT .
Changing

out parts nearly impossible without dismantling the structure if not designed properly.

Power in wind
The output from the wind machine depends upon

following factors:
Wind velocity The cross-sectional area swept by the rotor Overall efficiency of the wind power unit.

The power available in wind= 1/8***d2*v3.


Where,

=density of air.
d=diameter of the rotor. v=velocity of air.

Efficiency
Overall efficiency of the wind power

unit ( 0) = Useful output power


Wind power

Working Principle of wind turbine:

Working Principle of our blade design

Contd.
A rotating fan hits the air with its tilted wings at an

angle and if it is reversed, thats the principle in our design. The flowing air strikes the blades in our

turbine rotating the blades.

Methodology
Step I: Designing the turbine after accessing the

available resources.
Step II: Short listing and collecting the required

materials. The materials are:


V belt ( A type) Pulley ( A type) Automobile alternator (12 Volts, 60 Amperes) Car battery (12 Volts) Bearings

Contd
Circular cross section metallic parts
Rectangular cross section hollow metallic units Shaft ( 19 mm) Tail vane Pole Step III: Fabrication of rotor blades & hub

Contd.
Step IV: Fabricating the frame
Step V: All the parts were assembled and a wind

turbine was obtained


Step VI: A 12 Volts battery was employed to excite the

stator coil of the alternator. A 21 Watts bulb was lighted.

Findings
The maximum output generated in the lab was 14.45

Volts, 1.6 Ampere electrical current which was enough

to light a 21 Watt electric bulb

However the output was considerably less ie. 8.65

volts and 0.96 ampere in actual field due to reasons below:

Owing to heavy weight and improper alignment of flywheel and pulley of the alternator
Due to eccentric rotation of the flywheel. Due to high tension in the V-belt.

Future potential of wind technology of the world & Nepal:


The wind industry internationally is able to provide at

least 12% of the worlds future electricity needs by 2020.


In Nepal, Alternative Energy Promotion Centre

(AEPC) estimated that the gross potential of 3000 MW of electricity can be generated from wind energy.

Contd.
DANGRID, a Danish consulting firm working in Nepal

reported that 200 MW of potential electrical output with an annual energy production of 500 GWh.
This can be produced from the wind resources

between Kagbeni and Chusang in Mustang district alone.

Conclusion &

Recommendation