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CONJUNCTIONS

LANGUAGE ARTS QUARTER 4TH PROJECT

Chayanisa, Phoom 8C

What is a conjunction?

Conjunction is a word that links multiple sentences into one. There are coordinating conjunctions, subordinating conjunctions, and Correlative conjunctions. Coordinating conjunctions connect words, phrases, and clauses.

Form of Conjunctions

Single Word for example: and, but, because, although


Compound (often ending with as or that) for example: provided that, as long as, in order that Correlative (surrounding an adverb or adjective) for example: so...that

Function of Composition

Coordinating conjunctions are used to join two parts of a sentence that are grammatically equal. The two parts may be single words or clauses, for example: - Jack and Jill went up the hill. - The water was warm, but I didn't go swimming.
Subordinating conjunctions are used to join a subordinate dependent clause to a main clause, for example: - I went swimming although it was cold.

Position of Conjunctions

Coordinating conjunctions always come between the words or clauses that they join. Subordinating conjunctions usually come at the beginning of the subordinate clause.

Coordinating conjunctions

Coordinating conjunctions are the main conjunction. You use in sentences. A conjunction is a word that "joins". A conjunction joins two parts of a sentence. Coordinating conjunctions always come between the words or clauses that they join. Coordinating conjunctions are used to join two parts of a sentence that are grammatically equal.

FANBOYS is an acronym about conjunctions, this is what it stands for: F-for A-and N-nor B- but O-or Y-yet S-so
Those are the main coordinating conjunctions. There are, more, but those are the main ones.

Example

The bowl of squid is hot and delicious. Bobby, my orange tomcat, loves having his head scratched but hates getting his claws trimmed. Rocky refuses to eat dry cat food, nor will he touch a saucer of squid eyeball stew.

Practice

1. I'm going to go shopping on Sunday (and ,or) buy some new clothes. 2. I was in the area (and, so) I thought I'd drop in and say hello. 3. You've been working hard in the garden all day. Why don't you sit down (and, or) I'll bring you a cold drink.

Answer:
1.And

2.So
3.And

Subordinating conjunctions

A subordinating conjunction is a word which joins together a dependent clause and an independent clause. There are numerous subordinating conjunctions. The majority of conjunctions are subordinating conjunctions. The subordinating conjunction provides a necessary transition between the two ideas in the sentence. This transition will indicate a time, place, or cause and effect relationship.
BECAUSE, AS, SINCE SO ALTHOUGH, THOUGH,EVEN THOUGH,WHILE AFTER

Example

After she had learned to drive, Alice felt more independent. Gerald had to begin his thesis over again when his computer crashed. If he doesnt come on Wednesday, he will come on Friday.

Practice

1. Jerry passed the exam first time (as ,while) I had to retake it three times. 2. I will be late today (because, though) my car has broken down. 3. I don't drink coffee (as, although) it makes me nervous.

Answer:
1.While 2.Because

3.As

Correlative conjunctions
Some conjunctions combine with other words to form what are called correlative conjunctions. both . . . and, not only . . . but also, not . . . but, either . . . or , neither . . . nor, whether . . . or, as . . . as

When you use correlative conjunctions, be careful about verb agreement.


If you connect two subjects with a correlative conjunction, the second one must agree with the verb that follows. Or you can shorten the sentence with two prepositional phrases
Example:

Every single evening either the horned owl or the squabbling cats wake Samantha with their racket. Every single evening either the squabbling cats or the horned owl wakes Samantha with its racket.

When you use correlative conjunctions, be careful about parallel structure.


Either ... or, neither ... nor, and not only ... but also require special attention when you are proofreading for parallelism. Be sure that you have equal grammatical units after both parts of the conjunction.

Eitheror, neithernor, and not only connect two equal grammatical items.

Example

The explosion destroyed not only the school but also the factory. Both Anuthep and Kornravee love to play football. Bring either the salad or the soup Kelly is going to decide whether to go Japan or Taiwan.

Practice
1. _____ Alex _____ Carlos applied for the job. (Whether ... or, Both and) 2. I found _____ my homework _____ my textbook under my bed. (both ... and, whether ... or) 3. I cant decide _____ I should take French next year _____ take Spanish. (either ... or, whether ... or)
Answer: 1.Bothand 2.Bothand

3.Whetheror

Resources

http://www.englishclub.com/grammar/conjunctionssubordinating.htm http://www.writingcentre.uottawa.ca/hypergrammar/conjunct.html http://www.chompchomp.com/terms/correlativeconjunction.htm http://www.chompchomp.com/terms/subordinateconjunction.htm

http://www.chompchomp.com/terms/coordinatingconjunction.htm
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