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Repeatability

Three models to address repeatability: Hardware/Software MSFT 134 Beginning, Intermediate, Advanced PHYE 159 A,B,C ARTF A, B, C, D

Hardware/Software MSFT 134


Microsoft 134 Implementing, Managing, and Maintaining Network Infrastructure I 1.5 Units

CATALOG COURSE DESCRIPTION:

This course is the first part of the Microsoft Implementing, Managing, and Maintaining a Microsoft Server Network Infrastructure series and provides students with the knowledge and skills necessary to configure, manage, and troubleshoot a Windows Server network infrastructure. The students learn to

implement routing; plan, implement, manage, and maintain Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol (DHCP), Domain Name System (DNS), and Software Update Services (SUS); implement security, and implement a network access infrastructure through various techniques. This course follows the Microsoft Official Curriculum (MOC) and it is intended to prepare students to take the Microsoft's Implementing, Managing, and Maintaining a Microsoft Windows Server 2003 Network Infrastructure (Network Services) component of the Microsoft Certified Systems Engineer(MCSE) certification exam (Microsoft Exam # 70-291). This course may be taken

three times with new technologies.

Hardware/Software MSFT 134 (contd)


Microsoft 134 Implementing, Managing, and Maintaining Network Infrastructure I 1.5 Units
STUDENT LEARNING OUTCOMES:

Upon successful completion of the course the student will be able to: 1. Identify and describe the techniques used in routing configuration using Microsoft's Routing and Remote Access Service. 2. Implement Internet Protocol (IP) addressing by using DHCP. 3. Maintain, manage, and monitor DHCP. 4. Define, distinguish and evaluate the processes that govern name resolution. 5. Identify, plan, design, and set-up strategies to resolve host names by using DNS. 6. Manage and monitor DNS.

7. Identify, plan, design, and set-up strategies to resolve network basic input/output system (NetBIOS) names with Windows Internet Naming Service (WINS).
8. Define, describe, and setup the IP Security (IPSec) protocol and security certificates to secure network traffic. 9. Manage and monitor network access. 10. Configure, manage, and monitor network access.

Beginning, Intermediate, Advanced PHYE 159


Physical Education 159 Tennis - .5-1 Units

CATALOG COURSE DESCRIPTION: This course provides instruction and on-court experience in the skills, strategies, rules and behaviors necessary to play tennis at the beginning, intermediate or advanced recreational level and is intended for novices and students currently playing at any of these levels. This course may be taken four times for credit. Students must demonstrate increased proficiency and skill attainment with each repetition. When this course is offered for three hours per week, the additional time is utilized for stroke development drills and application of strategies in playing situations. STUDENT LEARNING OUTCOMES: Upon successful completion of the course the student will be able to: 1 17 ETC

18. Explain advanced consideration in singles and doubles strategies; analyze own ability and utilize appropriate strategies.All objectives are covered in this course whether offered for 0.50 or 1.00 units. When this course is offered for more than 2 hours per week, additional practice time is allotted for development of strokes and game strategies in the attainment of the objectives listed above. Additionally, all students must demonstrate increased skill proficiency and command of course objectives with each repetition of the course.

Beginning, Intermediate, Advanced PHYE 159 (contd)


Physical Education 159 Tennis - .5-1 Units

A. OUTLINE OF TOPICS: The following topics are included in the framework of the course but are not intended as limits on content. The order of presentation and relative emphasis will vary with each instructor. Beginning:
I. Forehand drive, backhand drive, volley and overhand serve.
A. Grip, footwork, swing. B. Trajectory and use of stroke.

II. ETC.

Intermediate: In addition to the beginning topics above:


I. Volley, topspin, forehand and backhand drives, spin serve.
A. Grip, footwork, swing. B. Trajectory and use of stroke.

II. ETC.

Advanced: In addition to the beginning and intermediate topics above:


I. Defensive lob, offfensive lob, overhead.
A. Grip, footwork, swing. B. Trajectory and use of stroke.

II. ETC.

A,B,C Model ARTF 165A


Art-Fine Art 165A Composition in Painting I 3 Units

CATALOG COURSE DESCRIPTION:

This course is an introduction to oil and acrylic painting methods and techniques with emphasis on composition, color, and application of general design principles. A variety of subject matter

such as still-life, landscape, portrait and non-objective subjects, and a variety of stylistic approaches such as cubism, collage, realism and expressionism, are explored. This course is designed to develop students' creative abilities and critical thinking in visual terms. The course is designed for students who are pursuing an Associate in Arts degree, preparing for a major in Art, as well as for those who wish to improve their artistic skills. STUDENT LEARNING OUTCOMES: Upon successful completion of the course the student will be able to: 1. Distinguish among basic painting tools, materials, methods, and techniques. 2. Utilize design principles to compose visually successful works. 3. Develop compositional skills and explore new approaches to two-dimensional pictorial presentation. 4. Experiment with various methods and concepts in order to demonstrate critical awareness of "visual thinking." 5. Create projects both in and out of class that demonstrate the knowledge and awareness of styles, concepts, and issues involved in visual arts.

A,B,C Model ARTF 165A (contd)


Art-Fine Art 165A Composition in Painting I 3 Units

A. OUTLINE OF TOPICS: The following topics are included in the framework of the course but are not intended as limits on content. The order of presentation and relative emphasis will vary with each instructor. I. Still-life A. Set of objects arranged by the instructor B. Students' own objects II. Landscape A. Seascape B. Cityscape III. ETC.

A,B,C Model ARTF 165B


Art-Fine Art 165B Composition in Painting II 3 Units

CATALOG COURSE DESCRIPTION:

This course continues the introduction to oil/acrylic painting methods begun in Art 165A and provides for the continued development of concepts of pictorial space, composition, and color. The course is designed to further develop students' creative abilities and critical

thinking through the construction of images designed to address specific pictorial problems and goals. This course is intended for students who are preparing for a major in Art as well as for those who wish to improve their artistic skills.

STUDENT LEARNING OUTCOMES: Upon successful completion of the course the student will be able to:

1. Construct representational and non-representational images which are coherently composed and vividly executed.
2. Create images that are articulate in their presentation of descriptive, symbolic, or expressive content. 3. Compose images that demonstrate an ability to address a variety of subject matter using various pictorial means. 4. Explain their visual decisions and design intentions.

A,B,C Model ARTF 165B (contd)


Art-Fine Art 165B Composition in Painting II 3 Units

A. OUTLINE OF TOPICS:
The following topics are included in the framework of the course but are not intended as limits on content. The order of presentation and relative emphasis will vary with each instructor.

I. Students in Art 165B will address the issues of naturalistic description and visual organization as well as the handling of paint with more rigor, and in greater depth, than time allowed them to do in Art 165A.
A. Representation of volumetric objects (e.g., still life subject matter, portrait heads, the human body, etc.)in limited three-dimensional space using the following means: 1. Clear delineation of external contours and overlaps (occluding edges) 2. Controlled use of dark and light values, warm and cool colors

A,B,C Model ARTF 165C


Art-Fine Art 165C
CATALOG COURSE DESCRIPTION:

Composition in Painting III 3 Units

This course continues the study begun in Art 165A and 165B of oil/acrylic painting methods and techniques. Composition, color, and application of general

design principles are explored at a more advanced level of creativity and sophistication. A variety of subject matter such as still life, landscapes, portraits and non-objective subjects, and a variety of stylistic approaches such as cubism, collage, realism, and expressionism are explored. The course is designed to develop students' creative abilities and critical thinking in visual terms through the use of individual assignments tailored to students' skills. The course is intended for students who are preparing for a major in art, as well as for those who wish to improve their artistic skills.

STUDENT LEARNING OUTCOMES: Upon successful completion of the course the student will be able to: 1. Create new paintings that are informed by extensive research in art history and are in an established pictorial mode.
2. Compose

pictures using organizational strategies developed to serve the cultural goals, or address the cultural concerns, of a particular time and place that have been adapted to serve the goals and to address the concerns of this current time and place.

3. Explain their compositional devices and strategies, and their design intentions.

A,B,C Model ARTF 165C (contd)


Art-Fine Art 165C Composition in Painting III 3 Units

A. OUTLINE OF TOPICS: The following topics are included in the framework of the course but are not intended as limits on content. The order of presentation and relative emphasis will vary with each instructor.
I. Students

in Art 165C will investigate a specific art historical style or mode of spatial representation/organization by designing
and painting (in consultation with the instructor) original images in that style or system of construction. Examples of topics follow. A. Schematic representation or construction: What are some pictorial characteristics of ancient Egyptian art, folk art, children's art, and much medieval art?

1. Depicted objects seldom overlap 2. Flat colors are applied within clear, perhaps outlined, boundaries 3. Size, color choices, and degree of elaboration are relative to the importance of the subject, regardless of location in three-dimensional space 4. Orthographic (front, side, top) views are often combined with single object descriptions

B. ETC.

A,B,C Model ARTF 165D


Art-Fine Art 165D Composition in Painting IV 3 Units

CATALOG COURSE DESCRIPTION:

This course is the culmination of a four-semester sequence of study of oil/acrylic painting methods and techniques. The student
continues to explore and develop skills and techniques in subject matter such as stilllife, landscape, portrait, and non-objective subject matter, demonstrating an advanced level of creativity and critical thinking in visual terms. This course is intended for students preparing for a major in Art and may also be of interest to those who wish to improve their artistic skills. STUDENT LEARNING OUTCOMES: Upon successful completion of the course the student will be able to: 1. Formulate his/her thinking about some aspect of

contemporary life in terms of painted visual images.


2. Analyze and describe his/her expressive intentions in terms of particular formal and subject matter choices made during the painting process. 3. Research and implement the procedures required for successfully submitting work to juried shows off-campus.

A,B,C Model - 165D (contd)


Art-Fine Art 165D Composition in Painting IV 3 Units

A. OUTLINE OF TOPICS: The following topics are included in the framework of the course but are not intended as limits on content. The order of presentation and relative emphasis will vary with each instructor. I. Students in ARTF 165D will have achieved some mastery of naturalistic representation, visual organization and paint handling in ARTF 165B and some mastery of various painting styles in ARTF 165C and in ARTF 165D they will receive instruction in how to find graphic means to address issues pf social (or philosophical, theological or political) content in a clear, intelligible and individual "voice." A. ETC