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Despite its bad environment and health conditions, Kibera continued to grow rapidly during the 1970's. The slum started booming with a population increasing from estimated 6000 inhabitants in 1965 to 62.000 in 1980, 250.000 in 1992, and 500.000 in 1998, with an estimated growth ratio of 17% per year. The population in Kibera continues to grow by 5% every year.

The Israeli-Hamas war lasted for 22 days, and in the wake of the ceasefire in the Gaza Strip, surviving Palestinians returned to homes crushed beyond repair and mourning of lost relatives. 13 Israelis and more than 1300 Palestinians were killed. An estimated 4000 buildings were destroyed. 50.000 Gazans were left homeless, and the areas where Israeli tanks and artillery poured in at the start of the ground war are devastated: Beit Lahiya, El Atatra and large sections of Jabaliya, as well as the outer Gaza City neighbourhoods of Zeitoun and Toufah. UN estimates it will cost several billion dollars to rebuild the Gaza Strip.

The Israeli-Hamas war lasted for 22 days, and in the wake of the ceasefire in the Gaza Strip, surviving Palestinians returned to homes crushed beyond repair and mourning of lost relatives. 13 Israelis and more than 1300 Palestinians were killed. An estimated 4000 buildings were destroyed. 50.000 Gazans were left homeless, and the areas where Israeli tanks and artillery poured in at the start of the ground war are devastated: Beit Lahiya, El Atatra and large sections of Jabaliya, as well as the outer Gaza City neighbourhoods of Zeitoun and Toufah. UN estimates it will cost several billion dollars to rebuild the Gaza Strip.

Chinese propaganda posters are associated with the image of Mao Zedong in all different forms. Here a poster hangs in a souvenir shop in the shopping area along Houhai Lake in Beijing, while a young crowd is gathering on their motor bikes.

China's capital has undergone a transformation so thoroughgoing that "makeover" doesn't begin to describe the change. Entire neighbourhoods have been ripped down and rebuilt. Cutting-edge western architects have created futuristic landmarks amid the forests of gleaming new office towers. The ancient capital has taken on an edgy, neon-electric 21stcentury feel with swanky five-star hotels and late-night shopping. But why have the Chinese buried their history and almost destroyed one of the world's most fabled cities, virtually extinguishing the culture of one of the greatest and oldest civilizations within the span of a single lifetime? In order to get Beijing ready for the Olympics, the Chinese has said farewell to Peking.