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DOG BITE

SCORPION BITE

SPIDER BITE

HONEY BEE BITE

SNAKE BITE

SNAKE BITE
THERE ARE TWO KIND OF SNAKES IN WORLD. 1) POISONOUS 2) NON-POISONOUS

SNAKE BITE
IDENTIFICATION OF SNAKE.

SNAKE BITE
There are about more than 2500 different kinds of snakes.Only about 200 Of them are poisonous.All snake-bites are not fatal.Only a small a small Quantity of venom might have been injected,others may be dry-bites. Most people die,not because of the venom,but from fear.However all Snake bites are treated as if bitten by poisonous ones. FIRST AID FOR SNAKE- BITES
1. 2. 3. 4. 5. Lay the patient down,give him rest.Calm and reassure him,never make him walk or sleep. If the bite is on the arm or leg,apply a constructive bandage tight enough to obstruct & stop the flow of the venom to all body ports. Wash the wound with soap and water.Flush the wound with water. Cover with sterilized dressing Get medical aid.If the snake has been identified report its type to get immediate anti-venom.

6.

If breathing fails, commence artificial respiration

Poison is any substance: solid, liquid or gas, that tends to impair health or cause death when introduced into the body or into the skin surface. A poisoning emergency can be life threatening.

Ways

occur
By By By

in which poisoning may


ingested poison - inhalation - injection, animal bites

mouth breathing skin

Common

poison
Pain

Household

Sleeping

pills

relievers and rodent poisons

Insect

Kerosene

Denatured

alcohol

Acids including boric

Poisonous

plants Contaminated water fume

Ingested
Is

poison:

one that is introduced into the digestive tract by way of the mouth. One form of ingestion poisoning is food poisoning, a general form that covers a variety of conditions. Suspect food poisoning if: The victim ate food that didnt taste right or that may have been old, improperly prepared, contaminated, left at room temperature for a long time, or processed with an excessive amount of chemicals. Several people who ate together become ill.

Signs and Symptoms

Altered mental status


History of ingesting poisons

Burns around the mouth


Odd breath odors

Nausea, Vomiting
Abdominal pain Diarrhea

Instances when vomiting should not be induced

If unresponsive Cannot maintain an airway

Has ingested an acid (Corrosive), or a petroleum product such as gasoline or furniture polish

Has a medical condition that could be complicated by vomiting such has heart attack, seizures and pregnancy.

First Aid
If
If

Corrosive give water (Not plenty Of)


non Corrosive induce vomit

Inhaled poison is a poison breathed into the lungs.(By Breathing)


Signs

and Symptoms of inhaling poisons

History

Breathing
Chest

difficulty

pain burning sensation in the throat headache. unresponsiveness (advanced stages) FIRST AID STEPS
Dizziness,

Cough,

Try

to identify the poison

Place

the victim on his or her left side


ABCs Save any empty container, spoiled food for analysis

Monitor Save

any vomits and keep it with the victim if he or she is taken to an emergency facility.

Absorbed Poison is a poison that enters the body through the skin
Sign

and Symptoms of exposures

History

Liquid
Burns

or powder on the skin.

Burns can be caused by flame, UV radiation, hot liquids, electricity, lightning and certain chemicals. It is an injury involving the skin, including muscles, bones, nerves and body vessels. Major burns are a medical emergency and require urgent medical attention.

Types of Burns
Minor Major

Common Causes
Carelessness with match and cigarette smoking. Scalds from hot liquid.

Defective heating, cooking and electrical equipment.


Immersion in overheated bath water. Use of such chemicals, as lye, strong acids and string detergents.

The definition of a major


burn is injury to more than 20 per cent of the total body surface area for an adult. (In general, one arm is considered nine per cent, and one leg as 18 per cent.) For children, a major burn is defined as injury to 10 per cent or more of their total body surface area.

Area of Burns

The depth. The deeper the burn, the more severe it is. Three depth classifications are used: 1st degree Superficial 2nd degree Partial Thickness 3rd degree Full Thickness

The extent to the affected body surface area. This means estimating how much body surface area the burn covers. Location of the burns. Burns on the face, hands, feet and genitals are more severe than on the other body parts. Victims age and medical condition. Determine if other injuries or pre-existing medical problems exist or if the victim is elderly (over 55) or very young (under 5).

Minor Burns
First-degree burn
Outer layer of skin
Red Swelling Pain

Superficial - these burns cause damage to the first or top layer of skin. The burn site will be red and painful.

Minor Burns
Second-degree burn First and Second Layer
Blisters Severe pain

Swelling
If the second-degree burn is no larger than 2 to 3 inches in diameter, treat it as a minor burn.
Contd.

Partial thickness - includes damage to

the first and second skin layers. The burn site will be red, peeling, blistering and swelling with clear or yellow-colored fluid leaking from the skin. The burn site is very painful.

FIRST AID FOR Minor Burns


For minor burns, Including second-degree burns limited to an area no rather than 2 to 3 inches in diameter, take the following action: Cool the burn.
Hold the burned area under cold running water for at least 5

minutes, or until the pain subsides.


Cooling the burn reduces swelling by conducting heat away

from the skin. Don't put ice on the burn.


Relieve pain by immersing the burned area in cold water or

by applying a wet, cold cloth. If cold water is unavailable, use any cold liquid you drink to reduce the burned skins temperature. Cover the burn with a dry, non-sticking, sterile dressing or a clean cloth.

Don't use fluffy cotton, which may irritate the

skin.
Wrap the gauze loosely to avoid putting

pressure on burned skin.


Bandaging keeps air off the burned skin,

reduces pain and protects blistered skin.

Minor Burns
Caution !!!
Don't use ice.
Putting ice directly on a burn can

cause frostbite, further damaging your skin.


Don't break blisters. Broken blisters are vulnerable to infection.

Major Burns

Third-degree burn
The most serious burns are painless and involve all layers of the skin.

Fat, muscle and even bone may be affected. Areas may be charred blacker appear dry and

white.
Difficulty inhaling and exhaling, carbon

monoxide poisoning or other toxic effects may occur if smoke inhalation accompanies the burn.

Full thickness
damage to both skin layers, plus

the underlying tissues, muscle, bone and organs.


The burn site generally appears

black or charred with white exposed fatty tissue or bone.


Yellow in the wound is likely to

be exposed muscle tissue.


The nerve endings are generally

destroyed and, therefore, there is little or no pain experienced at the site of the full thickness burn.
However, surrounding partial

thickness burns will be very painful.