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ALTERNATIVE METHODS TO ASSESSMENT

TRADITIONAL ASSESSMENT METHODS

TRADITIONAL ASSESSMENT METHODS

BEHAVIORIST EDUCATIONAL THEORY


Learning = Change in behavior

TRADITIONAL ASSESSMENT METHODS

Curriculum designed to teach the same topics, at the same pace, sequence and method Assessment uniform in content, formats, testing conditions, and time limits

TRADITIONAL ASSESSMENT METHODS

students focus too much on the credit rather than aiming for authentic learning

Schools and educators tend to teach the test itself due to pressure to the school credibility and prestige

CONSTRUCTIVISM

CONSTRUCTIVISM

STUDENT
Learns at different paces and processes information in different ways, depending on his/her

background, interest and motivation, values and prior knowledge

CONSTRUCTIVISM

LEARNING
complex, gradual, and individual
not just merely a change in behavior

Memorization vs. Understanding


Responsibility of student over own learning Intrinsic motivation

CONSTRUCTIVISM

EDUCATOR
personal observations in the classrooms as a more helpful way of assessing individualize learning by adjusting the lesson plan to the specific needs of students let the student take part in formulating the teaching methods

CONSTRUCTIVISM

ALTERNATIVE METHODS
assessment + learning
part of the whole learning experience stimulate more productive learning more process-oriented than productoriented.

CONSTRUCTIVISM

ALTERNATIVE METHODS
students createconstructed responses" rather than select from a pool of choices can also be standardized
Criteria/rubrics Same conditions/topic/guidelines

achievements of each student treated differently

CONSTRUCTIVISM

EXAMPLES OF CONSTRUCTED RESPONSES


Portfolio Performance task Project Demonstration of mastery Simulation Profile documentation of academic and non-academic
achievements through ratings, critics from teachers, peers and parents, certificates and descriptions.

PORTFOLIO

PORTFOLIO

a collection of student work gathered for a particular purpose that exhibits to the student and others the students effort, progress or achievement in one or more areas

PORTFOLIO

CONTENT:
Introduction* Student artifacts/works Student reflections* Self-evaluation* Short- or long-term goals* Parent and peer evaluation Traditional assessments tools **

PORTFOLIO

STUDENT
Select items for their own portfolios Reflect on their own works Monitor their own progress Create goals based on his/her current achievements

PORTFOLIO

TEACHER:
Monitor student growth Record lessons learned Use for parent consultation and advising Encourage/motivate students Help students achieve self-actualization /sense of fulfillment

PORTFOLIO

PORTFOLIO:
Contain variety of work from diff fields Content selected by both teacher and student Teachers select general items first Teacher may set criteria from which the student will select entries Peers and parents may also select entries

PORTFOLIO

SHOULD BE:
1. Continuous and ongoing
to show development overtime

2. Multidimensional
contains a wide variety of artifacts

3. Selective
artifacts selected for value and not for the sake of collecting alone

4. Reflective 5. Has clearly defined criteria

PERFORMANCE TASKS

PERFORMANCE TASKS

TASKS:
Should tap both broader/general concept and the application of more specific processes Can be applied in everyday life or in their future professions Can be used/watched by a larger audience beyond classroom

PERFORMANCE TASKS

PERFORMANCE TASKS
Will help students give value to tasks and gain sense of fulfillment Encompass higher-order thinking skills
problem solving, synthesizing lessons, independent inquiry

Help master procedures and processes Student should have some choice/influence in selecting the task

LEARNING LOGS AND JOURNALS

LEARNING LOGS AND JOURNALS

LOGS
Brief/concise entries

JOURNALS
Longer and more descriptive More personal and narrative in content Subjective opinions Personal experiences and feelings

LEARNING LOGS AND JOURNALS

Help connect lessons taught in class to other subject areas and even outside school Serves as a way of note-taking Help teacher monitor levels of interest and motivation Serves as a means of constant teacherstudent interaction

OBSERVATION CHECKLIST

OBSERVATION CHECKLIST

HELP TEACHERS TO:


Monitor progress of students Monitor rate of development Monitor competence and knowledge on specific skills

OBSERVATION CHECKLIST

HELP TEACHERS TO:


Track who have mastered important skills Track who needs further aid See if changes in curriculum is needed Present student progress in parent consultations

GRAPHIC ORGANIZERS

GRAPHIC ORGANIZERS

Visual maps that simplifies complex relationships or concepts with the use of sequencing, comparing and contrasting, and classifiying.
These skills are needed to enable students organize and clearly understand the lesson

GRAPHIC ORGANIZERS

Will help them find patterns and make sense out of the info given to them by drawing conclusions on relationships and interconnections of the specific concepts

GRAPHIC ORGANIZERS

Teacher will be able to see if student can communicate lesson in simplest way possible Student will think of possible applications of the concepts

GRAPHIC ORGANIZERS

USES:
Representation of abstract concepts Representation of relationships b/w these concepts Method to organize/think of addtl ideas related to the concept Depiction of the relation of newly taught knowledge with past lessons Strategy to recall and record info

INTERVIEWS AND CONFERENCES

INTERVIEWS AND CONFERENCES

EXAMPLES: Conversations Oral examinations Book interviews Discussions of comments and reflections Grade consultations

INTERVIEWS AND CONFERENCES

TEACHERS:
Evaluate student reasoning and narratives Evaluate communicative and social skills Provide opportunity to know if student applies the lesson Respond more clearly and individually to student Foster a good teacher-student relationship

INTERVIEWS AND CONFERENCES

STUDENT Help clarify thinking Would feel that their ideas and opinions matter

INTERVIEWS AND CONFERENCES

SELF-EVALUATION Evaluate own progress Set own short- and long-term goals Appreciate own achievements

CRITICISMS

CRITICISMS

INTERVIEWS/PRESENTATION
Subjective especially peer evaluation Descending interest/focus of evaluators Influence from previous presentors

CRITICISMS

SELF-ASSESSMENT

Encourage narcissistic, self-indulgent and selfcentered personality Students gain too much control over own learning May result to boundless and unreceiving attitute from students denial of failure Might influence them to reject honest criticisms from others Create illusions of undeserved credit

CRITICISMS

PORTFOLIOS
Can simulate illusions of achievement Students and teachers tend to value form over content Visual appearance might distract assessor
Well-done visuals may mask mediocre content

CRITICISMS

PERFORMANCE TASKS
Students might do things purely for purpose of grades (or for making a portfolio) rather than for learning Real-life tasks become chores and lose their value
Ex. Outreach