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Technical Seminar Presentation-2004

National Institute of Science & Technology

Compact Microstrip Antenna


By
Danish Kumar Hotta
Roll No: EC 200117169

Under the guidance of


Mr. Rowdra Ghatak

Presented By: Danish Kumar Hotta [EC200117169]


Technical Seminar Presentation-2004

Introduction
National Institute of Science & Technology

• The microstrip antenna is a very thin metallic strip,


placed a small fraction of a wavelength above a
ground plane, separated by a dielectric.

• Where size, weight, cost, performance, ease of


installation, are of primary concern, microstrip
antennas are the best solutions.

Presented By: Danish Kumar Hotta [EC200117169]


[2]
Technical Seminar Presentation-2004

Construction and Geometry


National Institute of Science & Technology

• 2.2 < Єr < 12. Low dielectric=>better efficiency, larger B/W.


• A microstrip patch antenna is a radiating patch on one side of
a dielectric substrate, which has a ground plane on the
underside. The EM waves fringe off the top patch into the
substrate, reflecting off the ground plane and radiates out into
the air.

Presented By: Danish Kumar Hotta [EC200117169]


[3]
Technical Seminar Presentation-2004

Types of Microstrip antennas


National Institute of Science & Technology

a) Single radiating patches


Square, rectangular, dipole, circular, elliptical,
triangular, etc.
b) Single slot radiator
Narrow slot, circular ring slot, wide slot, circular
patch slot.
c) Microstrip traveling wave antennas
Comb, meander line type, rectangular loop type,
Franklin – type MTWA.
d) Microstrip antenna arrays
Consists of series of antennas connected with each
other to give better performance.

Presented By: Danish Kumar Hotta [EC200117169]


[4]
Technical Seminar Presentation-2004
National Institute of Science & Technology

Feeding methods
a) Microstrip feed
Easy to fabricate, simple to match by controlling the inset
position and relatively simple to model.
b) Coaxial probe feed
Easy to fabricate, low spurious radiation; difficult to
model accurately; narrow bandwidth of impedance
matching.
c) Aperture coupling (no contact), microstrip feed line and
radiating patch are on both sides of the ground plane, the
coupling aperture is in ground plane
Low spurious radiation, easy to model; difficult to match,
narrow bandwidth.
d) Proximity coupling (no contact), microstrip feed line and
radiating patch are on the same side of the ground plane
Largest bandwidth (up to 13%).

Presented By: Danish Kumar Hotta [EC200117169]


[5]
Technical Seminar Presentation-2004
National Institute of Science & Technology

Criteria for substrate selection

a) Possibility for surface-wave excitation


b) Effects of dispersion on the dielectric constant and low
tangent of the substrate
c) Magnitude of copper loss and dielectric loss
d) Anisotropy in the substrate
e) Effects of temperature, humidity, and aging
f) Mechanical requirements: conformability, machinability,
solderability, weight, elasticity, etc.
g) Cost

Presented By: Danish Kumar Hotta [EC200117169]


[6]
Technical Seminar Presentation-2004
National Institute of Science & Technology

Polarization types

• Linear polarization

• Circular polarization

Presented By: Danish Kumar Hotta [EC200117169]


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Technical Seminar Presentation-2004

Bandwidth consideration
National Institute of Science & Technology

Narrowband Vs. Broadband Bandwidth measurement

Presented By: Danish Kumar Hotta [EC200117169]


[8]
Technical Seminar Presentation-2004
National Institute of Science & Technology

Design methodology
Research

Determining substrate Permittivity

Design feed impedance

Investigate broad band techniques

Design the broadband patch

Bench mark with commercially available antenna


Presented By: Danish Kumar Hotta [EC200117169]
[9]
Technical Seminar Presentation-2004
National Institute of Science & Technology

Some important structures


•Rectangular patch

Transmission model

Cavity model

• Circular patch

Presented By: Danish Kumar Hotta [EC200117169]


[10]
Technical Seminar Presentation-2004
National Institute of Science & Technology

Conclusion
• Disadvantages:
• Relatively low efficiency (due to dielectric
and conductor losses)
• Low power
• Spurious feed radiation (surface waves,
strips, etc)
• Narrow frequency bandwidth (at most a
couple of percent)
• Relatively high level of cross polarization
radiation
• Applications:
Radio and wireless communications, aircrafts,
spacecraft and missile.
Presented By: Danish Kumar Hotta [EC200117169]
[11]
Technical Seminar Presentation-2004
National Institute of Science & Technology

Presented By: Danish Kumar Hotta [EC200117169]


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