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SELECTION OF STORIES FOR

YOUNG LEARNERS
APPROPRIATE
LANGUAGE
LEVEL
It is essential for a teacher to evaluate stories
from story books, especially for a beginning
reader than fluent readers.
This also deals with the reading level of
vocabulary and sentence structure of young
learners.
Young learners might feel bored if the story
selected is not to their reading level.
The language in the story needs to be mostly
known or understood by the children.
Its quite alright for there to be some new words
these can be introduced during the pre-reading or
pre-telling part of the lesson.
It is also important to remember that children
can (hear and) understand much more than
they can say. So, for example, while they may
only be able to say sentences in the present
simple tense, they should be able to handle a
story told in the past tense.
Some (educational) story books or readers
come with information about the vocabulary
count and the ability level the story was written
for.

There are several matters that should be taken into
consideration when selecting stories for example,
the level of difficulty which refers to the reading level,
listening level and conceptual level of a work of
literature
(Brown & Tomlinson, 1993)

MATTERS THAT HAS TO BE
TAKEN INTO
CONSIDERATION.
are written and illustrated by
independent, creative professionals

are leveled for shared, guided and
independent reading, as well as by
Reading Recovery,

includes fiction and non-fiction,
illustrations and photographs, multi-
cultural themes, and a variety of trim sizes
and formats across many genres of
writing.

are 8,12 or 16 pages in length.

are appropriate for dual language
instruction and assessment.

IMPORTANCE OF USING
APPROPRIATE LANGUAGE LEVEL
HOW TO SELECT STORIES WITH APPROPRIATE
LANGUAGE LEVEL

Notice the commas and full stops pay attention to
the types of sentences.
Are the sentences mostly simple and/or
compound, or are there a lot of complex sentences
which can be hard to follow (and even hard to read
aloud).

What tenses are they? Are they mostly simple
present and simple past? Present perfect is not too
hard but past perfect can start being difficult.
Passive / Active verbs. Passive verb can be a
problem if there are a lot of them.
Generally complex types of verbs tend to go along
with complex sentences.



Are there a lot of different noun that you are going
to have to explain the meanings of?

Are there some words that you have been teaching
them?