Vous êtes sur la page 1sur 9

Sculpture

Team 7:
Georgina Valencia Gutierrez
Adan Texquis Aleman
Ricardo Duarte Ruiz
Jesualdo Carranza Pineda
Rosa
Mario Cesar Pineda Nez


Lzaro Crdenas, Michoacn, 29-Septiembre-2014
WHAT IS?
Sculpture is the branch of the visual
arts that operates in three dimensions
and one of the plastic arts. Durable
sculptural processes originally
used carving (the removal of material)
and modelling (the addition of
material, as clay),
in stone, metal,ceramics, wood and
other materials but, since modernism,
shifts in sculptural process led to an
almost complete freedom of materials
and process.
HOW IT CAME ABOUT?
Three-dimensional art begins
with prehistoric sculpture.
The earliest known works of
the Stone Age are The Venus
of Berekhat Ram and The
Venus of Tan-Tan, both
primitive effigies dating to
230,000 BCE or earlier.
Thereafter, sculptors have
been active in all ancient
civilizations, and all major art
movements up to the
present.

HOW IF IT HAS CHANGER OVER-TIME?
The materials used in sculpture are diverse,
changing throughout history. The classic
materials, with outstanding durability, are
metal, especially bronze, stone and pottery,
with wood, bone and antler less durable but
cheaper options. Precious materials such
as gold, silver,jade, and ivory are often used
for small luxury works, and sometimes in
larger ones, as in chryselephantine statues.
More common and less expensive materials
were used for sculpture for wider
consumption, including hardwoods (such
as oak, box/boxwood,
and lime/linden);terracotta and
other ceramics, wax (a very common material
for models for casting, and receiving the
impressions of cylinder seals and engraved
gems), and cast metals such
as pewter and zinc (spelter).

WHAT IS USED FOR?
The function of sculpture is
not to decorate but to
integrate, not to entertain
but to orientate man within
the context of his universe.
Sculpture inhabits actual
space in all its dimensions,
and by its own inherent
structural logic is able to
impress upon our
imagination a sense of
reality.
HOW AND WHY IT HAS HAD A SUCH AN IMPACT?
Worldwide, sculptors have usually
been tradesmen whose work is
unsigned; in some traditions, for
example China, where sculpture did
not share the prestige of literati
painting, this has affected the status
of sculpture itself. Even in Ancient
Greece, where sculptors such
as Phidias became famous, they
appear to have retained much the
same social status as other artisans,
and perhaps not much greater
financial rewards, although some
signed their works.
EXAMPLES
Eel Walker








A smaller sized dragon with lattice wings and fins.

EEL WALKER
This is a personal project I've been working on
for awhile now. I finally took it to the foundry
today to get molded and cast in bronze. It's
sculpted in oil base clay and stands around 18"
tall.
BLUE-EYED GIFT DRAGON