Vous êtes sur la page 1sur 17

Life Cycle Cost

Analysis of Emerging
Technologies
in
Sewerage Treatment
Plants
SAMEERA SIMHA T.P
SPA/BEM/598
INTRODUTION
Current demand for water in developing countries is mainly
from agriculture.
India accounts for 2.45% of land area and 4% of water
resources of the world but represents 16% of the world
population.
Total wastewater generation from Class I cities (498) and
Class II (410) towns in the country is around 35,558 and 2,696
MLD respectively
Installed sewage treatment capacity is just 11,553 and 233
MLD, for Class I & II respectively thereby leading to a gap of
26,468 MLD
Water & Waste Water Treatment market in India expected to
reach around INR 22,000 Crs by FY 2018
Around 25 to 30 organised companies operating across India
offering wide range of products & solutions.

Probable Water Demand in the World.

Source: Ernst & Young Report 2012
Literature Review
PUBLISHED WORK

Recommendations and Guidelines for Sewage Treatment in Class I
Towns
Status Of Sewerage And Sewage Treatment Plants In Delhi By CPCB
2004
Standard Practice for Measuring Life-Cycle Costs of Buildings and
Building Systems
IS 13174 (Part 1): 1992 Indian Standard Life Cycle Costing
IS 13174 (Part 2): 1994 Indian Standard Life Cycle Costing
Guidelines for Life Cycle Cost Analysis Stanford University Land and
Buildings October 2005
Manual On Sewerage And Sewage Treatment Part A: Engineering
The STP Guide Design, Operation and Maintenance, First Edition
KSPCB
Recent Trends in Technologies in Sewerage System Ministry of Urban
Development Government Of India
Technical Instructions On Sewage Treatment Plant Works Directorate
Engineer-In-Chief Branch Military Engineer Services
Water Sector In India Emerging Investment Opportunities September
2011 Ernst & Young.

Books , Journal & Conference Proceedings

Wastewater Production, Treatment and Use in India
Authors : R Kaur1 SP Wani, AK Singh and K Lal
Journal : Indian Council of Agricultural Research, New Delhi, India
Performance Evaluation Of Sewage Treatment Plant Based On Advanced
Aerobic Biological Filtration And Oxygenated Reactor (BIOFOR) Technology-
A Case Study Of Capital City -Delhi, India
Authors: Charu Sharma , S.K Singh
Journal: International Journal of Engineering Science and Innovative
Technology (IJESIT)
UASB Technology for Sewage Treatment in India: Experience, Economic
Evaluation And Its Potential In Other Developing Countries
Authors: Nadeem Khalil, Rajiv Sinha, A K Raghav, A K Mittal
Journal: Twelfth International Water Technology Conference, IWTC12 2008,
Alexandria, Egypt


Innovative Technologies for Urban Waste Water Treatment
Authors: Mukesh Grover
Fundamentals of Biological Wastewater Treatment.
Authors: Udo Wiesmann, In Su Choi, Eva-Maria Dombrowski
Publisher: WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co.
Sewage Treatment and Air Pollution Engineering
Authors: S.K.Garg
Publisher: Khanna Publishers New Delhi
Waste Water Engineering
Authors: Dr B.C. Punmia , Arun Kumar Jain, Ashok Kumar Jain
Publisher: Khanna Publishers New Delhi

Unpublished Works .

Energy and Cost implication of water recycling in Buildings
Authours : Sanskriti Tiwary ,Seminar Report 2013 Building Engineering and
Management ,School of Planning and Architecture New Delhi .

Energy Efficiency and Performance Based Selection of Treatment Systems for
Reuse of Grey Water .
Authours : Yogendra Pal Singh Yadav ,Thesis 2014 Building Engineering and
Management ,School of Planning and Architecture New Delhi

Sewage Treatment Process
T
E
R
T
I
A
R
Y


T
R
E
A
T
M
E
N
T

Tertiary treatment
Expected effluent
quality after tertiary
treatment:
BOD < 10
mg/L
SS < 5
mg/L
Phosphate <
0.5 mg/L
MPN of fecal
coliforms < 10/
100 mL
Primary &Secondary Treatment
Expected effluent
quality after primary and
secondary treatment:
BOD < 30 mg/L SS < 20 mg/L Nitrified effluent
Prelimanary Treatment
Expected effluent quality
after Prelimanary
treatment
No Floating Materials and
Polythene Bags
Disposal of screening and
Grit
Effluent Standards of MoEF , GOI


Parameter
Inland
Surface
water

Public
sewer

Land
for
Irrigatio
n
Marine
coastal
area
1 SS 100 600 200 100
2 TDS 2100 2100 2100
3 pH 5.5 to 9.0
4 Temperature, C (A)* (A)*
5 Oil & Grease 10 20 10 20
6 Total Residual chlorine 1 1
7 Ammonia. Nitrogen as
N
50 50 50
8 Total Kjeldahl Nitrogen
as N
100 100
9 Free Ammonia 5 5
10 BOD 30 350 100 100
11 COD 250 250
12 Dissolved phosphorous
as P
5
13 Nitrate Nitrogen as N 10 20

NRCD Guideline for Faecal Coliform
Discharge onto land Discharge onto
water


Desirable
Max
permissible

Desirable
Max
permissibl
e
Faecal Coliform 1000 10000 1000 10000
Contd .
Effluent Standards of CPCB Standards for
Disposal & Reuse of Treated Water

Disposal to
Water Bodies
Reuse of Treated
water
Ph 5.5-9 6.5-8.5
TSS <50 mg/l <10 mg/lit
BOD <30 mg/l <10 mg/lit
COD <250 mg/l <150 mg/lit
Residual Chlorine <1.0 mg/l <1 mg/lit
Coliform <10 counts/100
ml
<100 counts/100 ml
(desired nil)
EVOLUTION OF SEWAGE TREATMENT PLANTS.
1860 Septic Tank
1868 Trickling Sand Filter
1914 - ASP
BIOFOR (TM )
TECHNOLOGIES IN SEWAGE TREATMENT.
Activated Sludge Process (ASP)
Moving Bed Bio Reactor (MBBR)
Sequential Batch Reactor (SBR)
Rotating Biological Contractors(RBCs)
Membrane Bio Reactor (MBR)
Biological Filtration and Oxygenated Reactor (BIOFOR)
Submerged Aeration Fixed Film Technology (SAFF)
Fixed Bed Biofilm Activated Sludge Process (FBAS)
9 Up flow Anaerobic Sludge Blanket Reactor (UASBR)
Waste Stabilisation Pond
Constructed Wetlands
Emerging Technologies
Sequencing Batch Reactor (SBR)
Moving Bed Bio Reactor (MBBR)
Membrane Bio Reactor (MBR)
BIOFOR Technology
Submerged Aeration Fixed Film (SAFF) Technology
Fixed Bed Biofilm Activated Sludge Process (FBAS)
Waste Stabilization Ponds
Source : Ministry of Urban Development & CPHEEO.
Comparison of Sewage Treatment Technologies