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Welcome to

Scoutmaster and
Assistant Scoutmaster
Leader Specific
Training
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Welcome
Preopening
Opening
Welcome

Introductions
We were new once too!
briefly introduce your patrol member:
Give name, unit, position, district
One fun (Scouting related) fact

Scout handshake

Session One: Getting Started

Scouting Welcomes You

The Promise of Scouting

The Promise of Scouting


Why do you think boys join Scouting?

Deliver the Promise

To deliver the Promise of Scouting,


there are things you must:
Know
Be
Do
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Know This

Be confident; you can do this


Abundant resources already exist
You are part of a supportive team
Here are the steps to confidence
Show up
Build on your strengths
Use existing resources
Ask!

Training Overview
Online: Fast Start, This Is Scouting
Scoutmaster and Assistant Scoutmaster Training
Getting Started
Lighting the Fire
Keeping It Going

Introduction to Outdoor Leader Skills

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Written Resources
Aims and Methods of Scouting
Handbooks
Scout Handbook
Scoutmaster Handbook

Other BSA literature


Outdoor literature

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The Aims of Scouting


Character development
Citizenship training
Mental and physical
fitness

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The Role of the Scoutmaster

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What comes first?


Scoutmaster Training
Getting started: The role of a SM in a Boy-Led troop
Lighting the fire: Program
Keeping it going: Planning and administration

Expectations

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The Qualities of a Scoutmaster


Describe your image of a Scoutmaster

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What a Scoutmaster Must Be


A role model
A friend to the boys
An example, wearing the uniform

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What a Scoutmaster Must Know

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Boys are the leaders


Patrol method
The skills to deliver the Scouting promise
The resources: training, literature

What a Scoutmaster Must Do

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Give direction
Provide coaching
Support
Empower
Have fun

Being these things,


Knowing these things,
Doing those things,
are within your abilities

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Questions?
about your role?
about your expectations?

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Troop Organization

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The Boy Led Troop


SM Handbook, Chapter 3

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Troop Structure

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Troop Structure

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The Boy Led Patrol


SM Handbook, Chapter 4

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Three Kinds of Patrols


Regular patrols
New-Scout patrols
Venture patrols

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Patrol Leaders
Elected
Responsible for patrol
activities
Represent the patrol a
the PLC
APL and other
positions are
appointed
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The Leader of the Troop


The SPL
Elected by all youth members of the troop.
Not in a patrol
Appoints his ASPLs & staff

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The Primary
Leadership Body of the Troop
The
PLC

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The Organization of Scouting


National Council BSA

Region: Southern

Council: Heart of Virginia

District: Cardinal

Chartered Organization

Troop
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Patrol

Troop Organization: Summary


The Troop is a framework for everyone to get the
most out of the program
Boys get opportunities to learn
Variety of challenges to match interest and
development
Deliver the Promise of Scouting
Driving Force: BLTUPM

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Break

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Troop Meetings

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Why have Troop Meetings?

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Troop Meetings
They need to be:
To be fast-paced,
interesting, and varied.
To lead toward exciting
troop activities in the
outdoors.
To be the glue that holds a
troop together.
and more.

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In order to:
Motivate boys
Strengthen patrols
Promote patrol spirit
Encourage Scouts to learn
and practice Scouting skills
Allow Scouts to exercise
leadership

Who Plans and Runs


the Troop Meeting?

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Who Plans and Runs


the Troop Meeting?

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Troop
Meeting Plan
Preopening
Opening Ceremony
Skills Instruction
Patrol Meetings
Interpatrol Activity
Closing
After the Meeting

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The Troop Meeting


Preopening
Opening5 minutes
Skills Instruction 1520 minutes
Patrol Meetings 520 minutes
Interpatrol Activity 1520 minutes
Closing5 minutes
After the meeting
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VIDEO NO. 1: BEFORE THE


MEETING
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VIDEO NO. 2: AFTER THE MEETING

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VIDEO NO. 3: TEACHING THE


SENIOR PATROL LEADER
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Troop Meetings and the


Scoutmaster
Support and guide senior patrol leader
The Scoutmasters Minute
Review plans for the next meeting

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We Did It Ourselves.

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Break

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Scout Sign
A Sign of Respect,
not Control

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Working With Boy Leaders


The Patrol Method

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Question
When it comes to working with boys,
what are your greatest concerns?

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The Patrol Method


The patrol method is not a way to operate a Boy
Scout troop, it is the only way. Unless the patrol
method is in operation you dont really have a Boy
Scout troop
Robert Baden-Powell,
the founder of Scouting

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Keys to Troop Leadership

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Use the Patrol Method


Be a good listener
Provide positive reinforcement
Match leadership styles to the needs of your Scouts
Never do anything a boy can do
B-P

Setting The Example


You set the tone
You support and inspire
You trust them with positions of leadership
The object of the patrol method is
not so much saving the Scoutmaster trouble
as to give responsibility to the boy B-P

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Setting High Standards


Steer away from
Vulgarity
Disrespect
Bullying
Inappropriate teasing

Every boy should feel


Welcome
Respect
Secure

Scouting is a game for boys


under the leadership of boys
under the direction of a man. B-P
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Use a Simple Powerful Tool

Listen
You care about the boy
Their thoughts and ideas have weight
Youre opening lines of communication
It will lead to fresh ways of doing things

You need information about each boy


Seek first to understand; then to be understood Covey
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What Scouting Can Provide a Boy


Sense of belonging
Achievement and
recognition
Self-esteem
Self-confidence

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Self-discipline
Self-reliance
Healthy interaction
Experience of
teamwork

Patrol Leaders Council

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The Patrol Leaders Council


Planning troop meetings
Outdoor activities

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The Leading EDGE


Explaining
Demonstrating

Guiding
Enabling

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VIDEO NO. 4: PATROL LEADERS


COUNCIL
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Patrol Leaders Handbook

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VIDEO NO. 5: ACTIVITY REVIEW

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Group Activity

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Patrol Activity
Patrol Leaders, come to the Senior Patrol Leader

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1.

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a) At troop meetings, do the patrol leaders have all the information and plans, or
b) Do I keep a lot of the information to myself?
2. a) Before our camping trips, do the patrols usually plan their own menus and buy their
own food, or
b) Does someone usually do it for them?
3. a) Do patrols elect their own leaders, or
b) Do I select them to make sure the right person is chosen.
4. a) Do our troop meetings do anything to make patrols stronger, or
b) Do they have little effect on patrols one way or the other?
5. a) Do I spend time coaching my senior patrol leader, or
b) Am I more likely just to marvel at his inability to do things?
6. a) Does the troop leaders' council do most of the program planning, or
b) Do I do most of it myself?
7. a) Do I have time for individual boys, or
b) Am I usually too busy?
8. a) Am I mostly in the background at troop meetings, or
b) Do I run most of the meetings?
9. a) Does Scouting in my troop consist of some troop and some patrol activities and
meetings, or
b) Mostly troop activities and meetings?
10. a) Do I get more kick out of watching boys lead activities, or
b) Leading activities myself?

Summary

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Session One Summary

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Role of a Scoutmaster
Troop organization
Troop meetings
Using the four styles of leadership
The patrol leaders council

You can deliver the promise of Scouting!


What will your action plan be?

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