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AR.SAPNA DHIMAN

SHIVANI VOHRA

AR.ANU ARORA

B.ARCH.

AR.VIKAS SHARMA

6 SEMESTER

Early life
Raj Rewal was born in 1934 in Hoshiarpur,
Punjab, India.
He created a revolution in geometric design
systems.
Creation of geometric systems and
responding visual
imageries are apparent in Raj Rewals
architectural works.
He even went to School of Art in Delhil for six
months before joining
the School of Architecture.
He chiseled his art in London's
Architectural Association School of Architecture

Awards
Gold Medal from Indian Institute of Architects
Robert Mathew Award from the Commonwealth
Associations of Architects

Career
He lived in Delhi and Shimla for a couple of years in his childhood that is from
19391951.
He attended Harcourt Butler higher secondary school
. In 1951-1954, he attended Delhi School of Architecture in New Delhi.
He was very imaginative and a creative person.
His imaginative perception helped him go a long way.
He believed in gaining knowledge and then applied his
knowledge mingled with creativity in his projects.
After completing the post graduation in Architecture; in 1955-1961,
he moved
to London and attended the architectural association of architecture for one
year.
He completed his formal professional training
at the Brixton school of building, London.
Raj Rewal took up his first job as an assistant stage manager for several
avante grade theatre

Professional Life Experiences


He completed his Graduation in the field of Architecture
in Europe.
He met with 3 encounters which shaped his
architectural ideology. He developed his ideology
and followed it for the rest of his life.
First encounter, he relates to his interest in structures during
which he developed
during the review of his diploma projects.
Second one accounts on his working experience that he gained
while he was
working as an assistant manager
for several Avante Grade theatre productions in London.
As a set designer for the drama shows, he learnt
that each dramatic work had a particular character which
he interpreted as the rasa of the building.

Third encounter, as I mentioned earlier, he


worked with Michel Ecohard
in Paris, before beginning
his own architectural practice. In this office, he
learned the principles of Urban design and
Planning.

Later on, he was offered an opportunity to


work on the design of
a space frame structure that was going to
be
constructed as a Museum in Kuwait.

His philosophy
Structural expressions and cubic volumes
Honesty in expression
Concern for climatic sensitivity
Memory and geometry

Features of his designUrban fabric


Clusters
Streets
Gateways
Inner courtyards
Roof gardens

HIS WORKS
-Hall of Nations, New Delhi
-State Trading Corporation, Delhi
-Scope Office Complex, New Delhi
-Asian Village Housing
-State trading corporation,New Delhi

HALL OF NATIONS & HALL OF


INDUSTRIES,NEW DELHI
Overall view
Exhibition Pavilions at Pragati
Maidan
in New Delhi has been designed
by him.
The main pavilion of the Hall of
Nations has a clear span of 78
metres and a height varying from
three metres to 21 metres, thereby
providing a vast capacity for items
to be exhibited, from books to
bulldozers

Plan of G.F. of the complex


The Hall of Nations and the Hall
of Industries make up the
industrial exhibition complex
. The Hall of Industries consists
of four space-frame
structures each spanning 144
feet. The Hall of Nations
is a single space frame with a
clear span of 256 feet.
The buildings are linked together
at their mezzanine
levels by a series of circulation
ramps that enclose
an outdoor exhibition area.
The building and sanitary
services are housed under the
ramps.

The depth of the structural system


was utilized as a Sun breaker and
conceived of in terms
of the traditional 'jali', a geometrical
pattern of perforation
that serves to obstruct directs rays
of the harsh Sun while permitting air
circulation.

Stuctural detail

A special 9 member joint was evolved for


precast construction
but the builder preferred in-situ
construction.
The joint was modified to suit the
adopted technique
The 'Halls of Nations' is supported on pile
foundations
tied together with post tensioned plinth
beams
stressed in stages. The 'Hall of Industries' rest on
spread footings
tied together with high tensile steel bars.
The entire complex was analysed, designed
and built in a period of fifteen months

Interior of hall of nations


Mr. Raj Rewal, being a
French qualified Architect
and exposed to foreign
Architectural designs,
designed
a unique Space Frame
Structure
as adopted in the West,
108 feet high
for the large display
area, calling it the Hall
of Nations.
He also designed 4
smaller buildings 68 feet
in height with
a similar space frame
structure for the rest of
the display area,
called the Hall of
Industries.

Designed as space frame in reinforced concrete; the


first of its kind in India,
and perhaps in the world; the 'Hall of Nations
provides an uninterrupted exhibition area of
approximately 6,700 sqm in a 82m x 82m x 27m
high truncated pyramid supported on eight points

Each of the four 'Halls of


Industries' is similar in design
and is 44m x 44 m x 16m high.
Free standing coffered
mezzanine floors
cantilevering out of cylindrical
shafts provide
additional exhibition area in
each hall.

PARLIAMENT LIBRARY, NEW DELHI


He was assigned a Project of
the design of a Parliament
Library which he designed
beautifully
with lot of grace and also adding
majestic qualities to the
structure.
He convinced the European
consultants to develop an
unusual
structural system for the Ismaili
centre and the central public
works
department to undertake the
construction of stone columns
and ferro cement domes for the
Parliament Library.

The calm pond in one courtyard symbolizes equality.

Section looking south, showing the digital library (left),


the full height central core, and the scholars' library (right).

Symbolically a house of
knowledge, the Parliament Library
has its site
next to the Parliament
House in Lutyens Delhi.

Both visually and symbolically,


the central hall of the existing
Parliament denotes power,
consensus and democracy and is
linked to the central core of the
new complex

In the atrium at the entrance to the library,


natural light reduces the need for electrical lighting.

The ceiling of the entrance hall as seen from the ground floor.
Daylight enters through square glass panels set among shallow domes.

For the library, a formal structure is


conceived within the Indian tradition,
built in a contemporary idiom to
capture
the essence without mimicry of past
historical styles.
The site measures 10 acres with a
built-up area of 50,000 sqm

The design for the existing


Parliament follows the "Beaux Arts",
the central line axis planning
criteria. It is circular in plan
with three axes culminating in a
central dome

Courtyards form an important


feature of the design
vocabulary, keeping in mind Delhi's
extreme climate.
They help in creating a dust free
atmosphere and in reducing the
summer heat

The height of the building is restricted to


of the Parliament House
the podium level

ASIAN GAMES VILLAGE,NEW DELHI


Asian Games Village was built in 1982 to house athletes
for the games.
500 housing units were designed as a group housing in
35 acres.
The aim was to create an urban pattern of low rise high
density
based on a sequence of open spaces linked by shaded
pedestrian pathways. The peripheral roads are
connected
to the cul-de-sac parking squares which in turn give way
to
individual garages or car porches attached to the houses
or apartment blocks.
The central spline of the layout is reserved for pedestrian courts
and streets of various clusters.
About eight percent of the houses and apartments have
access from pedestrian enclosures as well as parking squares.

PLANNING OF ASIAN GAMES VILLAGE,NEW DELHI


The concept is based on a
sequence of open spaces,
interlinked \with narrow
pedestrian
streets shaded and kept
alive through a careful
mix with recreational and
communal area. The
streets
are consciously broken
up into visually
comprehensible units,
often with gateways, so
there are pauses, point of
rest and changing vistas

STATE TRADING CORPORATION BUILDING


Post Independence
1989
By Raj Rewal Born in 1934, Raj Rewal,
put his heart and soul into designing,
using his European
and American education and inspiration
drawn from
traditional Indian architecture. The large State
Trading Corporation (STC) building, a blend of red and
yellow
sandstone, draws inspiration from Mughal architecture
. Raj Rewal implemented the use of space in the streets
of
Jaisalmer in his housing projects. STC building is the
best example
of his style.

The STC building has a unique structure that permits flexibility.


Vertical structural cores accommodating lifts and service support
virendeel girders on alternate floors of the faade surface.
The girders provide support to column free floor plates
that have a 15 meters span.

The building comprises 'L-shaped' office blocks


that are in response to the heights of the
adjoining buildings. The highest part of the
building is
defined by a cubic volume at the junction of the
L-shaped configuration.
A low, three story volume partially fills the space
created by the L-shaped adjoining towers.
The space houses a commercial emporium.

Sectional view of STC BUILDING