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EUROPEAN ELECTIONS

2014
The importance of voting for
EUROPEAN PARLIAMENT
University Assistant PhD Elena Simona Vrnceanu
Alexandru Ioan Cuza UniversityofIasi, Romania
Faculty of Philosophy and Social-Political Science

Muncel, Romania
5-7 May 2014

Young European Citizen


Young European Citizen is:
1. living in one of the 28 countries
2. studding/working
3. interested in her/his age problems (learning,
jobs, families, loveetc.)
Why should I go to vote for European
Parliament?
Because of reason 1, 2, 3
1.Im also living in European Union
2.Im studding/working for an European work
market
3.Im living the European youth dilemma
based on a social, economical, political
framework of European Union

Young European Citizen


The aim of our seminar:
To understand, to explain and to promote the role
of European Parliament (EP) as an expression of
representativity, responsibility and power in
European institutional designee.
Specific objectives of our meeting are:
to explain the evolution of EP
to present an overview of EP elections
to find the best solutions in order to determine
young people to vote
That is why we need to develop a matrix based
on strong arguments for convincing young
electors to be responsible for their political
future.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sV8MwBXmewU
(GAIA)

Mission (Im)Possible

Tom Cruise: Mission Impossible


A mediocre presentation is available to everyone!
A good one is for the best students!! and
A great one is only for a few cases!!
Ill stick to a comprehensive and realistic presentation!!

One word.
Please write one single word that
can
describe your opinion about EP

One word.
Explain the word that you chosen
earlier

Analytical Approach of
European Parliament

Concepts:
Evolution
Power of decision
Role in institutional designee
The elections process
The responsibilities of European citizens
Vote Perspectives

Historical overview
With 142 Members, the Assembly met for the first time in
Strasbourg on 19 March 1958 as the European
Parliamentary Assembly, subsequently changing its name
to
European Parliament.

European Coal and Steel Communitys Common


Assembly - Treaty of Paris (1951)
was expanded to cover all three Communities
European Economic Community and the European Atomic
Energy Community (Euratom) - Treaty of Rome in (1957)
The European Parliament in over 50 years developed its role
and powers considerably.

Historical overview
(The three places)

Hemicycle of the
European Parliament in Place of work of the General
Secretariat of EP in
Brussel
Luxembourg

Hemicycle of the European


Parliament in Strasbourg

The first direct elections then took place between


7 and 10 June 1979.

Historical overview

Enlargements of the EU increased the number of EP Members

The

Treaty of Lisbon, however, provides for 751 Members

Gradual increase in powers: the reform treaties

The Single European Act (1987) - introduction of the cooperation procedure


The Maastricht Treaty (1993) - introduced codecision by the EP and the
Council in certain areas of legislation and extended the cooperation procedure to
others
The Treaty of Amsterdam (1999) - extended codecision to more areas of
legislation and reformed the procedure, putting Parliament as co-legislator on an
equal footing with the Council.
The Treaty of Nice (2003) - extended the scope of the codecision procedure in
seven provisions of the EC Treaty: measures to support antidiscrimination action
of the Member States, certain measures for issuing visas, measures on asylum
and on certain refugee matters, measures in the field of judicial cooperation in
civil matters, support measures in the industrial field, actions in the field of
economy and social cohesion and regulations governing political parties at
European level and in particular the rules regarding their funding.

Historical overview

Treaty of Lisbon (2009) - has been given to the European Parliament


important new powers over EU legislation, the EU budget and international
agreements. In particular, the extension of codecision into virtually all areas of
legislation will ensure the European Parliament (representing the citizens) is
placed fully on an equal footing with the Council (representing Member States).

Lawmaking: the codecision procedure, is now called the ordinary legislative


procedure and it is extended to several new fields: legal immigration, penal judicial
cooperation (Eurojust, crime prevention, alignment of prison standards, offences and
penalties), police cooperation (Europol) and some aspects of trade policy, fisheries and
agriculture.

Budget: the new treaty confirms and formalizes the established practice of working
with a multiannual financial framework (MFF), which Parliament will have to approve in
the future.

International agreements

Historical overview
Some important events of European Parliament
(1998) The single
currency and
the European
Parliament

(2000) The Charter of


Fundamental Rights of
the European Union
Dignity
Freedoms
Equality
Solidarity
Citizens'
Rights
Justice

(1999) Committee of
Independent Experts

Conference
of
Presidents
favors
replacing the current Commission
(leaded by Jacques SANTER) before the
June 1999 elections
- having regard to the first Report by the Committee
of Independent Experts on the allegations of fraud,
mismanagement and nepotism in the Commission,
-having regard to the decision of the President and
the Members of the Commission to resign from office.

(2004) Enlargement
Process

Parliaments functions and powers

Participation in the legislative process

Budgetary authority

The budget is adopted for one year, following the principle of annuality
(the budget year begins on 1 January and ends on 31 December). The
Commission prepares a draft budget, which it submits to the Council.
The budget cannot be implemented until it has been signed by the
President of the European Parliament.

Control over the executive

Although the Commission has the (almost exclusive) right of initiative


in the EU system, the European Parliament can ask the Commission to
put forward a proposal by means of an own-initiative report.

The European Parliament exercises democratic control over the


Commission and there is also a certain parliamentary oversight over
the activities of the Council.

Appeals to the European Court of Justice

Importantly, Parliament has the right to institute proceedings before


the Court of Justice in cases of violation of the treaties by another
institution.

Members of the European Parliament


(MEPs)

Elections and mandate

The distribution of seats among Member States is such that


it is digressively proportional to the population of each
Member State, meaning that MEPs from bigger states
represent more citizens than those from smaller states.

The Lisbon Treaty fixes an upper limit of 751 Members and


stipulates that the smallest Member State shall elect no
fewer than six and the biggest no more than 96 Members.

The proportion of women in the European Parliament has risen


steadily and, since the June 2009 elections, they constitute
about 35% of MEPs.

Committees in the European


Parliament

AFET Foreign Affairs


CRIM Organized crime, corruption and money
laundering
(Special committee)
DROI Human Rights subcommittee PETI Petitions
SEDE Security and Defense subcommittee//FEMM Womens Rights and Gender Equality
DEVE Development
AFCO Constitutional Affairs
INTA International Trade LIBE Civil Liberties, Justice and Home Affairs
BUDG Budgets JURI Legal Affairs
CONT Budgetary Control CULT Culture and Education
ECON Economic and Monetary Affairs
EMPL Employment and Social Affairs
ENVI Environment, Public Health and Food Safety
ITRE Industry, Research and Energy
IMCO Internal Market and Consumer Protection
TRAN Transport and Tourism
REGI Regional Development
AGRI Agriculture and Rural Development
PECH Fisheries

Relations with national


parliaments

regular conferences and meetings between its President


and the presidents of the national parliaments;
meetings and roundtables between Parliaments
committees and their national counterparts;
meetings between parliamentarians on topics of general
interest;
meetings of the Conference of European Community
Affairs Committees (COSAC) which comprises a sixmember European Parliament delegation (appointed by the
Conference of Presidents and led by the two VicePresidents with responsibility for relations with national
parliaments) and delegations from the European affairs
committees of the national parliaments of the EU.

Optimize local and European


Level

What should national parliaments


do in order to increase the
efficiency between local and
European level decisions?
(write a to do list)

Political Groups

The Members of the European Parliament do not sit within


national groups in Parliament, but rather in political groups
according to political affiliation.

A minimum number of 25 MEPs from at least one quarter of


the Member States is required to form a political group.

After the 2009 elections, seven political groups were formed


within the European Parliament. As in the previous term, the
European Peoples Party were the biggest group with the
centre-left S&D group second and the Liberals third. Two new
groups were established: the European Conservatives and
Reformists, and the Europe of Freedom and Democracy
Group.

Political Groups

EPP European Peoples Party (Christian Democrats)


S&D Progressive Alliance of Socialists & Democrats
ALDE Alliance of Liberals and Democrats for Europe
Greens/EFA Greens/European Free Alliance
ECR European Conservatives and Reformists
GUE/NGL European United Left/ Nordic Green Left
EFD Europe of Freedom and Democracy

MEPs by Political Groups

National apportionment of MEP


seats
(766 members in 2014)

Germany 99 (12.9%) France 74 (9.7%) Italy 73 (9.5%)


United Kingdom 73 (9.5%) Spain 54 (7.0%) Poland 51
(6.7%) Romania 33 (4.3%) Netherlands 26 (3.4%)
Belgium 22 (2.9%) Czech Republic 22 (2.9%) Greece
22 (2.9%) Hungary 22 (2.9%) Portugal 22 (2.9%)
Sweden 20 (2.6%) Austria 19 (2.5%) Bulgaria 18
(2.3%) Finland 13 (1.7%) Denmark 13 (1.7%) Slovakia
13 (1.7%) Croatia 12 (1.6%) Ireland 12 (1.6%)
Lithuania 12 (1.6%) Latvia 9 (1.2%) Slovenia 8 (1.0%)
Cyprus 6 (0.8%) Estonia 6 (0.8%) Luxembourg 6 (0.8%)
Malta 6 (0.8%)

Election results by political


group, 1979 to 2009. Left to
right

Radical left
Socialists
Greens
& Regionalists
Greens
CDI or TGI

Non-Inscrits
Liberals
Radical Alliance
CD / EPP
Forza Europa

Conservatives
Eurosceptics
UEN

Rules of Procedure of EP

The functioning of the European Parliament is laid down in the official Rules of
Procedure which determines the composition and duties of the governing bodies.

Role of the President


The President is elected for a term of two and a half years, i.e. half the legislature (the
term is in theory renewable but this has never happened in practice).
The President chairs the plenary sittings of Parliament, the Conference of the
Presidents of Political Groups (seven in number) and the Bureau of Parliament
(including 14 Vice-Presidents).
The President ensures that Parliaments Rules of Procedure are adhered to and,
through his arbitration, guarantees that all the activities of the institution and its
constituent bodies run smoothly.
The President is the representative of Parliament in legal affairs and in all external
relations. They deliver an opinion on all major international issues and makes
recommendations designed to strengthen the European Union.
At the beginning of every European Council meeting (summit of the EU heads of
state and government) the President of the European Parliament sets out Parliaments
point of view and its concerns as regards the items on the agenda and other subjects.
The President of the Parliament and the President of the Council both sign all
legislative acts adopted under codecision. After the European Unions budget has
been adopted by Parliament, the President signs it, rendering it operational.

Agenda

Agenda

Pink weeks for parliamentary committees


The European Parliament has 20 standing committees, each specialising
in a particular field such as the environment, transp
Red weeks for plenary sessions
The plenary session is the focal point of the parliamentary month. This is
when all MEPs assemble in the chamber in Strasbourg or for additional,
shorter part-sessions, in Brussels. ort, industry or the budget (see above).
Blue weeks for political groups
MEPs form groups on the basis of political affiliation rather than
nationality. During group weeks, which are generally the week before
plenary sessions, each political group coordinates and formulates the
positions it will take in the assembly on each of the subjects on the
agenda.
Turquoise weeks: MEPs in their constituency or on external visits
A number of weeks a year are set aside for MEPs to return to their
constituency to deal with local matters and meet their electorate, or to
travel on official parliamentary business to other parts of the world.
During these weeks no meetings are scheduled in Brussels or Strasbourg.

Parliaments Administration

The EP secretariats organizational chart

The central unit of organization of the Parliament is the


Directorate-General (DG). Directorates-General are divided into
Directorates which are themselves divided into Units, the basic
operational and organizational structures. In 2011 the EP
secretariat was composed of 37 Directorates and 233 units.
Important DGs:

DG for the Presidency (DG PRES)

DG for Internal Policies (DG IPOL)

DG for External Policies (DG EXPO)

DG for Communication (DG COMM)

DG for Personnel (DG PERS)

DG for Infrastructure and Logistics (DG INLO)

DG for Translation (DG TRAD)

DG for Interpretation and Conferences (DG INTE)

DG for Innovation and Technological support (DG ITEC)

Legal Service (JURI)

Tell us about EP

The cross-cutting issues

MEPs as advocates of the citizens: this priority involves support to the new tool
of direct citizen participation, the European Citizens Initiative; direct interactive
web based communication with the Parliament; cooperation of Information Offices
with national multiplier groups; enhancing the right of petition; increasing the
support to constituency work.
Full exercise of EP powers conferred on it by the Lisbon Treaty
Strengthen the Community Method: The EP should seek to enhance the
supranational decision-making as opposed to intergovernmental decision-making by
deepening the partnership with the Commission and make dialogue with the Council
Respectful relationship between executive arm and law-makers
More European democracy with more parliamentarism
Defending the values enshrined in the Charter of Fundamental Rights
Raise profile of the EP as the forum for democracy and informed partisan
debate
Regain public trust in the European integration process and restore public
enthusiasm for Europe
Promotion of Human Rights and Democracy worldwide

EPs staff on 1 January


2012

Posts (personnel on the 1st of January 2012)


6 395
General Secretariat 5 790
90.5%
Permanent staf
4 813
75.2%
Temporary staf
977
15.3%
Political groups
605
9.5%
Places of work of the General Secretariat
Strasbourg
98
1.5%
Luxembourg
2 461
38.5%
Brussels
3 601
56.3%
Other 235
3.7%
Categories of staf
Administrators
2 500
39.1%
Assistants (AST officials)3 208
50.2%
Other 687
10.7%
Categories of job in the General Secretariat6
Linguistic assistance 1 707
26.7%
Administration
1 189
18.6%
Parliamentary assistance997
15.6%
Communication
575
9.0%
Material and logistical assistance511
8%
Management
594
9.3%
Finance 409
6.4%
Data processing
338
5.3%
Legal assistance
70
1.1%
Average age

100%

46 years

Parliaments Budget

The budget of the EP is part of the general budget of the European


Union.
In global figures, the 2011 EU budget amounted to 144.57 billion

Expenditure Amount (million) Percentage of total expenditure


Staff expenditure
673.7
43%
Investment expenditure on buildings
188.4
12%
Members
195.4
12%
Information technology and telecommunications109.9 7%
Information activities and products 94.2
6%
Political groups 78.5
5%
Other administrative expenditure
62.8
4%
Parliamentary assistance 172.7
11%

Parliamentary Communication

A parliament close to citizens

Transparency in the EP

Traditional ways of communication (in 23


official languages)
A presence in all member states
A special service to welcome visitors (7.500
group visits organized by the Unit)
Parliaments meetings are open to the public

A more intensive use of new technologies

SWOT EP

SWOT EP:

decisions efficiency
representativity
power influence in the institutional
designee
role and competences

EP & European citizen(ship)

Steve Jobs
EP

European citizen

QUESTION: What is the relation between EP and


European citizen ?
ANSWER: decisions, politics, quality of life,

future

We should look carefully to our


future..

The European Parliament: it has


to do with you
Things will be diferent this time!

Its fair to say that the European Parliament elections


matter more than those of national parliaments, because
their outcome will affect the future of an entire continent.
Indeed, more than ever the future of the Belgians and
their children will be decided at the European level.
Change will come from the Union, because no single
Member State not even mighty Germany or nuclear
powers like France or the United Kingdom can hope to
go solo on the international scene or to really weigh in on
big issues like the environment or energy, particularly in
an increasingly interdependent world.

The European Parliament: it has


to do with you

It was Commissioner Viviane Reding who said:


Voters can decide whether Europe should take a more
social or a more market-oriented direction. Voters can
decide whether the future majority in the European
Parliament will favour opening Europe's borders to
immigration or build a Fortress Europe; whether we are
tough with the U.S. when it comes to data protection, or
whether we will instead favour the economic benefits of
free trade.

The European Parliament: it has


to do with you

European Parliament argued for the Erasmus+


budget to be increased by 40% compared to last
year : over 4 million students under the age of
thirty will be able to go abroad to study or
receive training between 2014 and 2020; the
previous figure was 2.8 million people. Such an
investment in education and youth is common
sense, but the programme would not have been
as successful had the Council of the EU been
alone to call the shots.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZM71zffDi90

voter
http://www.elections2014.eu/en/topstories/content/20140428TST45332/html/The-importanceof-voting
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=j_V6pMdPTCo

A student, designers, an entrepreneur and a farmer These


are some of the 400 million of Europeans who will choose
whos in charge in Europe during the European elections
taking place on 22-25 May. I think we have an opportunity
to be a part of something really huge. We need to be a part
of it. We have to vote, said Ricardo, a retired landscape
architect from Spain.

Logo of the European


Parliament election 2014

I DECIDE..

PRESIDENT OF EP

MARTIN SCHULZ

SLOGANS

SLOGANS

SLOGANS

SLOGANS

YOUNG IDEAS FOR


EUROPE

SLOGANS

SLOGANS

SLOGANS

SLOGANS

SLOGANS

SLOGANS

SLOGANS

SLOGANS

9 MAY

EUROPEAN ELECTIONS
2014
Thank you!
University Assistant PhD Elena Simona Vrnceanu
Alexandru Ioan Cuza UniversityofIasi, Romania
Faculty of Philosophy and Social-Political Science

Muncel, Romania
5-7 May 2014