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The Transit Metropolis

What is a Transit Metropolis?

Transit metropolis is a region where a


workable fit exists between transit
services and urban form
Perhaps compact mixed use development
well suited to rail
Perhaps flexible bus services well suited to
dispersed development
Viewed as a paradigm for sustainable
regional development

Types of Transit Metropolises

Adaptive Cities- transit oriented cities that


have invested in rail systems to guide urban
growth and achieve larger societal objectives
Such as preserving open space, producing
affordable housing in rail served communities
All feature compact mixed use suburban
communities and new towns concentrated
around rail nodes
Examples: Stockholm, Tokyo, Singapore and
Copenhagen

Types of Transit Metropolises

Adaptive Transit- places that have


accepted spread out low density patterns
of growth
Seek to appropriately adapt transit
services and new technologies to these
environments
Karlsruhe (dual track systems); Adelaide
(track guided buses) and Mexico City
(small vehicle entrepreneurial services)

Types of Transit Metropolises

Strong Core Cities- integrating transit and


urban development within a more
confined central city context
Provide integrated tram services around
mixed traffic tram and light rail system
Trams designed into streetscapes and
coexist with pedestrian and bicycle traffic
Examples: Zurich and Melbourne

Types of Transit Metropolises

Hybrid: adaptive cities and adaptive transit


Create workable balance between
concentrating development along main line
transit corridors and adapting transit to
serve their spread out suburbs and exurbs
Munich-heavy rail trunk line services, light
rail and conventional bus services have
strengthened central city while also serving
suburban growth axes

Forming the Transit Metropolis:


Complementary Demand Side Approaches

Transportation Demand Managementaims to make more efficient use of


transport resources already in place by
shifting demand (to carpools) or
eliminate trips (telecommuting);
inefficient parking space- more efficient
management; parking availability
dissuades use of public transit

Forming the Transit Metropolis:


Complementary Demand Side Approaches

Restraints on Automobile Use- traffic


calming local streets belong to
residents- barriers, etc
Banning traffic from downtown areas
License plate will determine when
auto can enter the CBD

Forming the Transit Metropolis:


Complementary Demand Side Approaches

Regulation of Auto Performanceimprove performance rather than


attempt to change travel behavior
Re-engineer cars to improve fuel
efficiency (GM, etc and move to
hybrid vehicles)
Lower emissions- Clean Air Act

Forming the Transit Metropolis:


Complementary Demand Side Approaches

Setting the Right Prices- Proper pricing


eliminates the need for heavy handed
controls over car use and public
intervention into private land markets
Congestion fees, carbon taxes and parking
surcharges
Higher motoring fees will people over time
move closer to jobs and transit stops to
economize on travel?
Elitist view and unrealistic to charge more??

Forming the Transit Metropolis:


Complementary Supply Side Approaches

Advanced Technologies- GPS systems


to avoid congestion spots and eliminate
need to travel; smart roadwaysautomatically adjust traffic signals
Telecommunications- e-commerce and
virtual shopping
Nonmotorized transport- bicycle
facilities and provisions