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Assessable construction

design for disabled people


Presented by Aung Kaung Myat

Content

Introduction
Problem statements
Objectives
Research Questions
Conclusion

Introdution

Rare to see building constructions with assessable building design

Make it assessable for disabled people

Types of disabled person

Wheelchair users
People with limited walking abilities
The sightless
The partially sighted
The hearing impaired

Problem statements
Urban design consideration
Lack special provisions for the disabled
Not Having ramp
Prior to wheel chair users
Architectural design consideration
Door problem
Entrance
Not having railing and handrail

Objectives

To fulfill the needs of all people equally

To integrate disabled people into society

To provide a barrier-free environment for the


independence, convenience and safety

To able to commute between home , work and other


destinations

Research questions

What are the constraints of assessable construction


design for disable person?

Which sort of design is suitable for what kind of buildings?

Is it really assessable for all kinds of disabled person?

How to input safety program in assessable design for


safety for disabled people?

Urban design consideration

Obstructions
Signage
Street furniture
Pathway
Curb Ramps
Pedestrian Crossing
Parking

Architectural design
consideration

Ramps
Elevators
Platform lifts
Stairs
Railings and handrails
Entrance
Vestibules
Doors
Corridors
Rest rooms

Obstructions

Obstructions should be placed outside the path of travel


wherever possible.
Obstructions in the pathway should be easy to detect, and
if possible, should be placed along one continuous line.
Protruding elements should be avoided.
The minimum width of a clear unobstructed path should be
0.90 m.

Design features for


sightless

A 0.10 m raised platform


Tactile warning markings on the ground around the
obstruction
The warning markings should extend over a width of at
least 0.60 m
Overhanging vegetation should be clipped to a minimum
clear height of 2.00 m

Street furniture

Bus stops, benches, mail boxes, lampposts, signboards, telephone booths, public
toilets, newspaper kiosks, planting tubs, garbage bins, etc.
Resting spaces with benches should allow a minimum of 1.20 m of adjoining space
for a wheelchair
Resting facilities should be provided at regular intervals between 100.00 m and
200.00 m
Telephones for the hearing impaired should be equipped with hearing aid devices
and amplifiers
Used push-button telephone numbering system rather than dial numbering system
The minimum unobstructed area in front of the telephone counter should be 1.20 m
x 0.85 m

Pathway

Guide strips are used to help


identify travel routes
Guide strips should be laid in a
simple and logical manner and
should not be located close to
manholes or drains
Where travel routes change
direction, there should be a
gradual change in the direction
of the guiding strip

Curb ramp

Unobstructed width of the pathway should be not less than 0.90 m


Curb ramps should be located away from places where water accumulates
The maximum slope of a curb ramp should be 1:12
90 turn
Landings should be provided every 10.00 m, at every change of direction and at the
top and bottom of every ramp
A protective handrail at least 0.40 m high must be placed along the full length of
ramps

Conclusion

Give assessable design knowledge