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Working in Teams

Dr. Ken Haycock


February, 2007

Six Phases of Project


Enthusiasm
Disillusionment
Panic
Search for the guilty
Punish the innocent
Praise and honor the non-participants

Overview
definitions
criteria for success
stages in team growth
common problems
other considerations

Learners retain
10% of what we READ
20% of what we HEAR
30% of what we SEE
50% of what we SEE and HEAR
70% of what we TALK OVER WITH OTHERS
80% of what we USE AND DO IN REAL LIFE
95% of what we TEACH SOMEONE ELSE
Margaret Trask, AIMA Training and Consulting, National Library of Australia, From a paper presented at the IFLA Preconference
on Continuing Education, 1993.

Definitions
committee
group
team

Definition of Teams
A team is a small number of people
with complementary skills
who are committed to a common purpose,
common performance goals and
a common approach,
and for which they hold themselves
mutually accountable.
Katzenbach, J. & Smith, D. (1993). The wisdom of teams. Harvard Business School Press.

My Contribution
What strengths do I bring to my team?
What behaviours of other members of
the team really push my buttons?
What are the implications for how we
work together?
How do I need to modify my
preferences for the sake of team
performance?

Criteria for Success


clarity in team goals
clearly defined roles/responsibilities
established ground rules
clear communication
beneficial team behaviors
balanced participation

Peter Scholtes et al. (1988). The team handbook. Joiner Associates.

Criteria for Success


well-defined decision procedures
awareness of both content and process
productive use of conflict
use of evidence

[scientific approach]

an improvement plan
Peter Scholtes et al. (1988). The team handbook. Joiner Associates.

Stages of Team Development


STAGE 1: Forming
STAGE 2: Storming
STAGE 3: Norming
STAGE 4: Performing

Peter Scholtes et al. (1988). The team handbook. Joiner Associates.

Leading Team Development


STAGE 1:
Forming
STAGE 2:
Storming
STAGE 3:
Norming
STAGE 4:
Performing
Peter Scholtes et al. (1988). The team handbook.
Joiner Associates.

Characteristics

of Each
Typical
Behaviors to
Expect
Action
Required

The Search for Clarity


What will be our goals?
What are the characteristics of an
effective team leader?
What are the other roles and
responsibilities in our team?
What will be our ground rules?
What will be the consequences for
noncompliance?

Common Problems
foundering
overbearing

participants
dominating participants
reluctant participants
feuding members

Peter Scholtes et al. (1988). The team handbook. Joiner Associates.

Common Problems
attribution

wanderlust: digressions and tangents


discounts and plops
unquestioned acceptance of opinion as fact
rush to accomplishment

Peter Scholtes et al. (1988). The team handbook. Joiner Associates.

Dysfunctional Behaviors

blocking
power-seeking
recognition-seeking
rejecting
refusing
clowning

Managing Conflict

decide if the conflict is worth confronting


Initiate the conflict in a non-defensive way
define the problem(identify specifics, listen,
agree to causes)
generate feasible solution(s)
plan the implementation
plan an evaluation
--Blanchard Training and Development

Stages of Team Development


STAGE 1: Forming
STAGE 2: Storming
STAGE 3: Norming
STAGE 4: Performing

High Performance
Purpose
Empowerment
Relationship and Communication
Flexibility
Optimal Performance
Recognition and Appreciation
Morale

Team Meetings
so why bother?
planning/goals
roles/responsibilities
logistics, rules
assessment

In essence...

groups have patterns of development


development is not automatic
groups can be normal or dysfunctional
healthy groups are the result of the positive
individual energy of motivated people
group health is everyone's responsibility
--Blanchard Training and Development

To your success...
characteristics
criteria
what to expect
the process
monitor and adjust
continuous improvement

More information?
Baldwin, D. & Migneault, R. (1996). Humanistic
management by teamwork: An organizational and
administrative alternative for academic libraries.
Englewood, CO: Libraries Unlimited.
Katzenbach, J. & Smith, D. (1993). The wisdom of teams.
Cambridge: Harvard Business School Press.
Scholtes. P. et al. (1988). The team handbook: How to
use teams to improve quality. Joiner Associates.
Wellins, R., Byham, W. & Dixon, G. (1994). Inside teams.
San Francisco: Jossey-Bass.