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ORNAMENTS

Renaissance
Philosophy of
Humanism

Above all, Renaissance art


was driven by the new
notion of "Humanism," a
philosophy which had
been the foundation for
many of the achievements
(eg. democracy) of pagan
ancient Greece. Humanism
downplayed religious and
secular dogma and instead
attached the greatest
importance to the dignity
and worth of the
individual.

Effect of Humanism on Art


The emergence of the individual figure, in place of
stereotyped, or symbolic figures.
Greater realism and consequent attention to detail, as
reflected in the development of linear perspective and the
increasing realism of human faces and bodies; this new
approach helps to explain why classical sculpture was so
revered, and why Byzantine art fell out of fashion.
An emphasis on and promotion of virtuous action: an
approach echoed by the leading art theorist of the
Renaissance Leon Battista Alberti (1404-72) when he
declared, "happiness cannot be gained without good works
and just and righteous deeds".

Ornament Prints and Pattern


Book

Sgraffito
Sgraffito and sgraffiti come from
the Italian wordgraffiare("to
scratch"), ultimately from the
Greek(grphein, "to
write").
a technique either of wall decor,
produced by applying layers
ofplastertinted in contrasting
colours to a moistened surface,
or inceramics, by applying to an
unfired ceramic body two
successive layers of
contrastingslip, and then in
either case scratching so as to
reveal parts of the underlying
layer.

Plataresque
SpanishPlateresco,
(Silversmith-like).
Characterized by an intricate
and minutely detailed relief
ornament that is generally
applied to the surface of
buildings for extravagant
decorative effect and without
regard for structural
articulation.

Renaissance Abaresque
Renaissance arabesques
maintained the classical
tradition of median
symmetry, freedom in detail,
and heterogeneity of
ornament. The arabesque of
this period also allowed the
inclusion of a broad range of
elementshuman beings,
beasts, birds, fishes, flowers
in imaginative or fantasy
scenes, usually with copious
interlacings of vines,
ribbons, or the like.

Solomonic Column
ahelicalcolumn,
characterized by a
spiraling twisting shaft
like a corkscrew. It is not
signified by a
specificcapitalstyle and
may be crowned with
any design, for example,
a Roman
Doricsolomonic,Corinthi
ansolomonic
orIonicsolomonic
column.

OTHER BUILDING
COMPONENTS
COLUMNS, WINDOWS, DOORS

Columns
The orders can either be structural, supporting an arcade or architrave, or purely
decorative, set against a wall in the form of pilasters. During the Renaissance,
architects aimed to use columns, pilasters, andentablaturesas an integrated system.
One of the first buildings to use pilasters as an integrated system was in theOld
Sacristy(14211440) by Brunelleschi.

Tuscan

Doric

Ionic

Corinthia
n

Composi
te

Windows

Windows may be paired and set


within a semi-circular arch. They
may have square lintels and
triangular or segmental
pediments, which are often used
alternately. Emblematic in this
respect is thePalazzo Farnesein
Rome, begun in 1517.
Courtyard of Palazzo Strozzi,
Florence
In the Mannerist period the
Palladian arch was employed,
using a motif of a high semicircular topped opening flanked
with two lower square-topped
openings.

Doors
Doors usually have
square lintels. They
may be set within an
arch or surmounted
by a triangular or
segmental
pediment. Openings
that do not have
doors are usually
arched and
frequently have a
large or decorative
keystone.

Renaissance
Staircase

Renaissance staircase in Birgos Cathedral, Spain

Renaissance Color Palette


primary colors of yellow ochre, burnt sienna and
Payne's grey. Add deep jewel tones and an earth
palette

references
http://www.visual-arts-cork.com/renaissance-art.htm
https://www.britannica.com/art/arabesque-decorativestyle
http://www.apartmenttherapy.com/colortherapy-a-124882