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MANDAYA

Davao Oriental is a province of


the Philippines located in the
Davao region in Mindanao.
Its capital is Mati City and
borders Compostela Valley to the
west, and Agusan del Sur and
Surigao del Sur to the north.

meaning "first," and "daya"


meaning "upstream" or "upper
portion of a river," and therefore
means
"the
first
people
upstream".
It refers to a number of groups
found along the mountain ranges
of Davao Oriental, as well as to
their customs, language, and
beliefs.
The Mandaya are also found in
Compostela and New Bataan in
Davao
del
Norte.

The
Mandaya
generally have high
foreheads, prominent
cheekbones,
broad
noses, thick lips and
angular features.

The
Mandaya
are
honorable
people,
peace
loving,
respectful,
docile,
submissive
and
patient.
Many
have
thick
beards and wear their
hair long.

The most outstanding


man in the tribe is
called the Tigulang
(old man).
They
obey
consult him.

and

They have a legal


code
and
penal
customs.
Idolatry,
polygamy
and slavery are the
rule
among

The
Mandaya
are
colourful dressers. The
women are fond of
sporting
variegated
earrings, anklets and a
head-dress.
This
homemade
jewelry
when worn makes the
women feel confident,
beautiful
and
fashionable. Mandaya
jewelry is a measure of
one's economic status
in
the
Community.
These ornaments worn
daily by both men and
women add to one's
prestige.

The Mandaya of Davao build


their dwellings high in the
branches of trees and often in
the edges of cliffs which can be
reached only from one direction.

The tree houses are of two kinds


the first is a crude one simply
resting on the limbs of trees and
conforming in size and shape to
the nature of the supporting
branches.

This
type
sometimes
has
horizontal sides and sloping
roofs. The roof usually slides
directly from the ridgepole to the
edge of the platform, thus doing
away with the need for side
walls.

The more typical Mandaya


house is built on top of a tree
that has been cut 15 to 20 feet
above the ground with the
stumps serving as foundation.
Many more smaller poles are
placed not only to support the
flooring but also to extend
upward to form the wall and
the roof.

An upper flooring made of


beaten
bark
rests
on
crossbeams lashed by rattan to
the uprights.
Above
the
flooring
are
horizontal poles forming the
framework for attaching walls
of nipa palms.

In some houses two or three


foundation
poles
extend
above the floor to support
the ridge pole.
In other
houses the Mandaya would
have kingposts resting on
the beams which in turn are
supported by corner poles.
From the ridge, a number of
smaller rods extend over the
side walls and on them rests
the roofing of nipa palm.
Several inches of space
intervene between the roof

The whole tree house is so


firmly lashed together by
rattan that it can withstand
the severest of storms,
although it moves and
creaks with every gust of
wind. In such a case the
house is secured further by
anchoring it with rattan lines
to nearby trees.

MANDAYA HOUSE
The typical Mandaya house is built on a
tree stump 15 to 20 feet high.

MANDAYA HOUSE
The extra high stilts of this Mandaya
house have required diagonal bracing.
Between the roof and the high sidings are
slit windows

MANDAYA HOUSE
Lower stilts and bigger openings show
trust in ones neighbors.

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