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OBSERVING AND

RECOGNIZING PATTERN
OF BEHAVIOUR
Prepared by:
Ang Fong Ying
Vornica Ruby
Shyreal Geoffrey
Overvie
w
Patterns of Non-
Disruptive
observable disruptive
behaviour
behaviour behaviour

Violent

Non-violent
PATTERNS OF
OBSERVABLE
BEHAVIOUR
Patterns of Observable
Behaviour
Classrooms are complex social systems in which
teachers and pupils interact in a variety of ways across
contexts.
There are different individual needs, values, ways of
behaving, interacting and socializing with one another
during T&L activities.

Bring challenges to both teachers and pupils.


Pupils: hard to sit through a class period and share the same
environment without causing any disruptions
Teachers: need to create effective learning environments and
at the same time to recognize individual emotional needs and
deal with behavioural problems.

Hence, teachers need knowledge on recognizing


patterns of pupils behaviour and skill on managing pupil
behaviour to ensure the teaching-learning process is
effectively delivered
Definition of Behaviour
In order to understand behavioural problem and how they
affect pupils engagement in the learning process, first we
need to define the concept behaviour.

Charles (2008) defines


behaviour as everything
The concept of behaviour
people do, good or bad,
is fairly straightforward
right or wrong, helpful or
and explicit.
useless, productive or
wasteful (p.8).

Desirable school behaviour :


students show self-control,
responsibility, and
consideration and respect
for others involve
cooperation and helpfulness.
How behaviour is shaped?
Through the context and situation in which it occurs.

it explains why some pupils may behave in one way at school and
another way at home.
behaviour is shaped by ones values, expectations of significant
others as well as society.
Pupils relationships with teachers, peers, parents and school
community shape their interactions and responses to the situation or
environment.
Hence, the ways a pupil responds to situations or environments
reflect his/her behaviour. This suggests that behaviour is social in
nature and its social norms determine what is considered appropriate
and inappropriate behaviour.
Inappropriate behaviour, in this context of discussion, is also referred
to as misbehaviour.
Misbehaviour
The concept of misbehaviour is indistinct
and implicit.
Very subjective different people have
different interpretation on what is
appropriate and inappropriate behaviour.

According to Charles (2008), misbehaviour is


behaviour that is inappropriate for the setting
or situation in which it occurs.

Examples of misbehaviour:
Fighting, interfering with the work of other
children, running about the class, talking
out of turn and shouting out
General Descriptions of
Misbehaviour
Behaviour problem differ in
frequency and intensity, yet
Behaviour problems
they are similar in type.
challenge all teachers,
Although some schools do
regardless of the school,
not experience any
grade level, or geographical
violence, all schools have
location
some pupils who generally
goof off and disturb others.

Behaviour problems disturb


teachers and pupils,
negatively affect the
teaching and learning
process, and ultimately
hinder academic
achievement.
Having a general disinclination to
participate, sulking, not caring,
Apathy
being afraid of failure, not wanting
to try or do well
Chatting during instructional time
Types of Misbehaviour

Needless talk
about things unrelated to the lesson

Physical and verbal attacks on


Aggression
teachers, pupils, or property

Acts contrary to accepted morality,


Immorality
such as cheating, lying and stealing

Defiance of Refusal to do as the teachers


authority requests

Class Talking loudly, calling out, walking


disruptions the room, clowning, tossing things

Fooling around, out of seat, not


Goofing off doing assigned tasks, dawdling,
daydreaming
NON-
DISRUPTIVE
BEHAVIOUR
What is non-disruptive
behavior?

Minor irritants and merely motivational


problems but if these behaviours are
prolonged, repetitive, persistent and
spread they may become disruptive
( Charles, 2002; Levin & Nolan, 1991)
daydreaming,
doodling and
looking out quietly draw
talk during a the window pictures on a
transition piece of paper
between while lesson is
activities being
presented

Example
s of non-
not prepared refuse to turn
for class disruptiv in homework
e
behavior
These behaviours minor
irritants as long as they are
brief in duration

Teachers need to plan


effective motivational
strategies to work with them
individually in order to
protect the classs rights to
learn in a safe learning
environment.
DISRUPTIVE
BEHAVIOUR
Definition
Levin & Nolan (1991) define disruptive
behaviour as having the following
characteristics:
Interferes with the teaching act;
Interferes with the rights of others to learn;
Psychologically and physically unsafe; and
Destroys property.

Disruptive behaviour defined as behaviours


that hamper the ability of instructors to
teach and students to learn.- Madison , 2015
Violent behavior
The person who have the following
features:
Intentional use of force or power
Threatens against, attempts to harm or
does harm oneself, another person, a
group or community
Lead to psychological harm to others or
cause death
(WHO Global Consultation on Violence and Health,1996)
Threw
things at
someone
else

Intoleran
Verbal
ce to Exampl abuse
others
e of
violent
behavi
or
Harassme
Physical nt of
violence teacher
or other
students
Non- Violent behavior
Behavior that does not lead to
psychological harm to others or
cause death
Responsible to manage:
School
Teacher
parents
Effect of disruptive behavior in classroom
Reason for disruptive behavior
Managing disruptive
behavior
Bibliography
Charles, G. W. (2008). Building
Classroom Discipline (9th ed.). USA:
Pearson Education Inc.
Managing the Primary ESL Classroom
TSL 3109: Bahasa Inggeris Major.
(2012). Cyberjaya: Institut Pendidikan
Guru, Kementerian Pelajaran Malaysia.