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COGNITIVE AND PSYCHOSOCIAL OF GIFTED AND TALENTED

NURASHIKIN BINTI MOHAMAD ASRI PEK

150025

NURSYAMIMI BINTI MOHD ZAMRI PEK 150026 PANG XING YI PEK 150028

COGNITIVE

DEVELOPMENT

9 MULTIPLE INTELLIGENT BY HOWARD GARDNER

  • 1. Verbal-linguistic intelligence

  • 2. Logical-mathematical intelligence

  • 3. Spatial-visual intelligence

  • 4. Bodily-kinesthetic

  • 5. Musical intelligences

  • 6. Interpersonal intelligence

  • 7. Intrapersonal

  • 8. Naturalist intelligence

  • 9. Existential intelligence

PSYCHOSOCIAL

DEVELOPMENT

8 PSYCHOSOCIAL STAGES BY ERIC ERIKSON

  • 1. Trust vs Mistrust

  • 2. Autonomy vs Shame

  • 3. Initiative vs Guilt

  • 4. Industry vs Inferiority

  • 5. Identity vs Role Confusion

  • 6. Intimacy vs Isolation

  • 7. Generativity vs Stagnation

  • 8. Ego Integrity vs Despair

FACTORS RELATED TO GIFTED COGNITIVE DEVELOPMENT

Speed of Processing Differences

  • - Processing speed is highly correlated with intelligence

  • - Gifted individuals nearly always include words like “quick thinker” and “fast learner,” and gifted children are often expected to complete classroom assignments more quickly and efficiently than their peers (Sternberg, 1985).

  • - There are three types of speed processing differences:

1) Simple Speed of Processing Differences. 2) Inferred Speed of Processing Differences. 3) Problem Solving Time.

FACTORS RELATED TO GIFTED COGNITIVE DEVELOPMENT

1. Simple Speed of Processing Differences.

-. Gifted children and adults perform elementary cognitive tasks faster than their real age.

-. In many of these simple speed of processing studies, speed only correlates with IQ when a more complex task

2. Inferred Speed of Processing Differences.

-. suggest that these tasks measure the beginnings of the same cognitive processes assessed by IQ tests.

-. Because measures of habituation and preference are useful in prediction, many researchers have recently promoted them as tools for identifying gifted infants and toddlers.

-. Those who are “short lookers” or “quick habituators” are more likely to be intelligent later in life.

FACTORS RELATED TO GIFTED COGNITIVE DEVELOPMENT

  • 3. Problem Solving Time

- The research in the gifted education field shows that gifted children actually spend more time on certain parts of cognitive tasks.

- Researchers found that although gifted adolescents took less overall time to solve the complex pattern recognition problems, they took more time during the problem exploration and planning stages.

FACTORS RELATED TO GIFTED COGNITIVE DEVELOPMENT

Knowledge Base

  • - Breadth and depth of knowledge are two of the most important and obvious characteristics teachers and parents look for when identifying gifted children.

  • - General knowledge is also one of the primary attributes assessed on many intelligence tests.

  • - The way knowledge is organized impact performance on many cognitive tasks, including memory, problem solving, and reading.

  • - Gifted children more detailed knowledge base may afford them more thinking “space” to perform at a higher level than their peers.

FACTORS RELATED TO GIFTED COGNITIVE DEVELOPMENT

Metacognition

  • - Metacognition is the process of thinking about thinking. It is the process of developing self-awareness and the ability to self-assess. It is contemplation about one's education and learning - past, present, and future.

  • - According to Sternberg (1985, 1999), metacognitive skills, or “metacomponents”, include skills like problem recognition, problem definition, problem representation, strategy formulation, resource allocation, monitoring of problem solving, and evaluation of problem solving.

  • - Gifted children using metacognitive strategies, such as developing problem solving plans and organizing their knowledge hierarchically, in ways similar to those of adults who were experts in the tasks.

ENVIRONMENTAL

INFLUENCES ON

PSYCHOSOCIAL

ADJUSTMENT

ENVIRONMENTAL INFLUENCES ON PSYCHOSOCIAL ADJUSTMENT FACTORS INTERPERSONA FACTORS L L INTERPERSONA THE THE FAMIL FAMIL Y
ENVIRONMENTAL INFLUENCES ON PSYCHOSOCIAL ADJUSTMENT FACTORS INTERPERSONA FACTORS L L INTERPERSONA THE THE FAMIL FAMIL Y
FACTORS INTERPERSONA FACTORS L L INTERPERSONA
FACTORS
INTERPERSONA
FACTORS
L L
INTERPERSONA
FACTORS INTERPERSONA FACTORS L L INTERPERSONA
THE THE FAMIL FAMIL Y Y

THE THE FAMIL FAMILYY

THE THE SCHOOL SCHOOL

INTERPERSONAL FACTOR

INTERPERSONAL FACTOR Maladaptive (At-risk Bahavior) -Persistent negative stereotype -Interfere with social activity Adaptive (Resilient behaviour) -Personality

Maladaptive (At-risk Bahavior)

-Persistent negative stereotype -Interfere with social activity

INTERPERSONAL FACTOR Maladaptive (At-risk Bahavior) -Persistent negative stereotype -Interfere with social activity Adaptive (Resilient behaviour) -Personality

Adaptive (Resilient behaviour)

-Personality positive -Have the collection of conceptual

THE FAMILY

Can stimulate or hinder the social and emotional adjustment

Most important factor (Fine 1977) Child’s personality depends on the health of the family Mutually supportive and low conflict are important

THE SCHOOL

Included the environment established by teachers and peers

May also include the programming decision

Supportive school:

- Provide accommodations for

advanced

abilities and achievement

- Offer an intellectual environment - Provide access to intellectual peers

PSYCHOSOCIAL OF GIFTED AND TALENTED

PSYCHOSOCIAL OF GIFTED AND TALENTED SOCIAL SELF CONCEPT MENTAL HEALT DEPRESSION, ANXIETY & SUICIDE PSYCHIATRIC DISORDER
PSYCHOSOCIAL OF GIFTED AND TALENTED SOCIAL SELF CONCEPT MENTAL HEALT DEPRESSION, ANXIETY & SUICIDE PSYCHIATRIC DISORDER
PSYCHOSOCIAL OF GIFTED AND TALENTED SOCIAL SELF CONCEPT MENTAL HEALT DEPRESSION, ANXIETY & SUICIDE PSYCHIATRIC DISORDER

SOCIAL

SELF CONCEPT

MENTAL HEALT

DEPRESSION, ANXIETY & SUICIDE

PSYCHIATRIC

DISORDER

COMPETENCE

SELF CONCEPT

About one-self, in another word ‘personality’ Change over time Directly related to adjustment & psychology health Most previous researches showed no differences between gifted and non-gifted Colangale & Pfleger (1978) **

- Belief in one’s own abilities to be successful and to achieve goals

MENTAL HEALTH

Martin analysis data from NCPP and TLCSC

Indicate factors influence child’s health and development

Gifted have lower incidence of mental illness

Enhance planning, problem solving, and adjustments protect against mental illness

SOCIAL COMPETENCE

Frequently evaluated when talking about child’s psychology adjustment

Found some have advanced social adjustment but some have difficulties in sociality

Conclusion: Gifted has diverse group on social competence

PSYCHIATRIC DISORDER

Majority researches focused on adults

Mostly research about intellectual functioning of people with eating disorder

Early labeling of children as gifted may increase parental expectations for performance

Overvalue gifted child

Intensify the child’s expectations to meet parental needs

Stress may contributes to the onset of eating disorders

DEPRESSION, ANXIETY AND SUICIDE

Researches measure the specific variables known to correlate with psychological health & illness Depression: - Have similar/lower level of depression Suicide: - Perfectionism, fear of failure or success may lead to suicide - Gifted commit suicide at rates higher than general population - Most prevalent Anxiety: - No significant differences (RCMAS) Conclusion: Can observe depressive symptoms suicidality similar rate in gifted and

non-

gifted