Vous êtes sur la page 1sur 43

Management of Health & Safety at Work Regulations 1992

Management of Health & Safety at Work Regulations 1992 EAL Advanced Diploma QETA 001 Learning Outcome
Management of Health & Safety at Work Regulations 1992 EAL Advanced Diploma QETA 001 Learning Outcome

EAL Advanced Diploma QETA 001

Learning Outcome 1.1

Appointment Responsibilities

Appointment Responsibilities
Appointment Responsibilities

Management of Health & Safety at Work Regulations 1992

The MHSWR bring in a number of important new safety management concepts, e.g. general risk assessments, assessment of human capability when allocating tasks, competent persons, both generally and in the event of emergency, and clarify the situation relating to contractors and sub-contractors working on an employer's premises.

They also extend and specify existing duties on employers under HSWA, particularly in the case of training. Furthermore, it should be appreciated that the majority of these duties are of an absolute nature compared with those under HSWA, where the duties are qualified by the term 'so far as is reasonably practicable'.

Management of Health & Safety at Work Regulations 1992 The MHSWR bring in a number of

Management of Health & Safety at Work Regulations 1992

Under these regulations an employer shall -

  • (a) make a suitable and sufficient assessment of the risks to employees and persons not in his

employment.

  • (b) make and give effect to such arrangements as are appropriate for the effective planning,

organisation, control, monitoring and review of the preventive and protective measures.

  • (c) ensure that his employees are provided with such health surveillance as is appropriate having

regard to the risks to their health and safety which are identified by the assessment.

  • (d) appoint one or more competent persons to assist him in undertaking the measures he needs

to take to comply with the requirements and prohibitions imposed upon him by or under the relevant statutory provisions

  • (e) (i) establish and where necessary give effect to appropriate procedures to be followed in the

event of serious and imminent danger to persons at work in his undertaking;

(ii) nominate a sufficient number of competent persons to implement those procedures in so far as they relate to the evacuation from premises of persons at work in his undertaking; and

(iii) ensure that none of his employees has access to any area occupied by him to it is necessary to restrict access on grounds of health and safety unless the employee concerned has received adequate health and safety instruction.

which

Management of Health & Safety at Work Regulations 1992

(f) provide his employees with relevant and comprehensible information on -

(i) the risks to their health and safety identified by the assessment;

(ii) the preventive and protective measures;

(iii) the appropriate procedures to be followed for serious and imminent danger and for danger areas;

(iv) the identity of those who are deemed as competent persons

(v) the risks notified to him.

Management of Health & Safety at Work Regulations 1992 (f) provide his employees with relevant and

Management of Health & Safety at Work Regulations 1992

g) where two or more employers share a workplace, (whether on a temporary or permanent basis) -

(i) co-operate with the other employers concerned so far as is necessary to

enable

them to comply with the requirements and prohibitions imposed upon the relevant statutory provisions;

them by or under

(ii) take all reasonable steps to co-ordinate the measures he takes to comply

with

the requirements and prohibitions imposed with the measures the other taking to comply with same;

employers are

(iii) take all reasonable steps to inform the other employers concerned of the risks to their employees' health and safety arising out of or in connection with the conduct by him of his undertaking.

Management of Health & Safety at Work Regulations 1992

(h) ensure that the employer of any employees from an outside undertaking who are working in his undertaking is provided with comprehensible information on -

  • (i) the risks to those employees' health and safety arising out of or in connection with the

conduct by him of his undertaking;

(ii) the measures taken by that first-mentioned employer in compliance with the requirements and prohibitions imposed upon him by or under the relevant statutory provisions insofar as they relate to those employees;

(j) in entrusting tasks to his employees, take into account their capabilities as regards health and safety.

(k) ensure that his employees are provided with adequate health and safety training;

  • (i) on recruitment;

(ii) on being transferred, given a change of responsibilities, on the introduction of new work equipment or a change respecting existing work equipment, on the introduction of new technology, or the introduction of a new system of work or change in an existing system of work.

The above training shall -

  • (i) be repeated periodically where appropriate;

(ii) be adapted to take account of new or changed risks to the health and safety of the employees concerned; and take place during working hours

Management of Health & Safety at Work Regulations 1992 (cont)

(I) provide any temporary worker i.e. a person employed under a fixed- term contract of employment or one employed in an employment business, with comprehensible information on -

(i) any special occupational qualifications or skills required to be held by that employee if he is to carry out his work safely;

(ii) any health surveillance required to be provided to that employee by or under the relevant statutory provisions;

(m) ensure that every person carrying on an employment business whose employees are required to carry out work in his undertaking is provided with comprehensible information on:

(i) any special occupational qualifications or skills required to be held by those employees if they are to carry out their work safely;

(ii) the specific features of the jobs to be filled by those employees (in so far as features are likely to affect their health and safety);

those

and the person carrying on the employment business concerned shall ensure that the information so provided is given to the said employees

Note: Self-employed persons have, in most cases, identical duties to that of an employer under the regulations.

Management of Health & Safety at Work Regulations 1992

Duties of employees under the MHSWR

1. Every employee shall use any machinery equipment, dangerous substance, transport equipment, means of production or safety device provided to him by his employer in accordance both with any training in the use of the equipment concerned which has been received by him and the instructions respecting that use which have been provided to him by the said employer in compliance with the requirements and prohibitions imposed upon that employer by or under the relevant statutory provisions.

2. Every employee shall inform his employer or any other employee of that employer with specific responsibility for the health and safety of his fellow employees -

(a) of any work situation which a person with the first-mentioned employee's training and instruction would reasonably consider represented a serious and immediate danger to health and safety;

and

(b) of any matter which a person with the first-mentioned employee's training and instruction

would reasonably consider represented a shortcoming in the employer's

protection

arrangements for health and safety, insofar as that situation or matter either affects the health and

safety of that first-mentioned employee or arises out of or in

connection with his own activities at

work, and has not previously been reported to his

employer in accordance with this paragraph.

RISK ASSESSMENT EAL Advanced Diploma QETA 001 Learning Outcome 1.1
RISK ASSESSMENT EAL Advanced Diploma QETA 001 Learning Outcome 1.1

RISK ASSESSMENT

RISK ASSESSMENT EAL Advanced Diploma QETA 001 Learning Outcome 1.1

EAL Advanced Diploma QETA 001

Learning Outcome 1.1

Risk Assessment

The Health and Safety Executive Regulation 3(1) of the Management of Health & Safety at Work Regulations 1992 makes an assessment of risk a legal obligation for companies.

Such a risk assessment enables the company to identify potential hazard in the workplace and to assess the potential risk to employees and to anyone present on the premises by invitation. Carrying out such an assessment helps to identify all the protective and preventative measures that have to be taken to comply with the PUWER regulations.

Risk Assessment

Risk assessment is the process of identifying and evaluating a hazard to determine the level of action required to reduce a risk to an acceptable level.

It is nothing more than a careful examination of what in the workplace could cause harm to people, so that we can weigh-up whether the department has taken enough precautions or are required to take additional precautions, to prevent harm occurring.

What is a Hazard?

What is a Hazard? • A Hazard is anything that has the potential to cause harm,

A Hazard is anything that has the potential to cause harm, e.g. chemicals, electricity, working up a ladder, using a crane, forklift.

What is a Risk?

The Risk is the likelihood that the hazard will cause harm and the severity of the consequence.

For Example:

If you are cleaning the oven with corrosive cleaner without using gloves or apron there is a great risk of being harmed.

If you wear all protective clothing and gloves and adhere to all safety precautions the risk is low.

If you change the chemical to a safer type and adhere to all precautions the risk will be even lower.

If you change the chemical to a safer type and adhere to all precautions the risk

Five Steps to Risk Assessment

When undertaking risk assessment on work equipment it must be decided what the requirements are already complied with and, if not, what additional action must be taken to ensure compliance.

  • 1. Look for the hazards.

  • 2. Decide who might be harmed and how.

  • 3. Evaluate the risks and decide whether the existing precautions are adequate or whether more should be done.

  • 4. Record your findings.

  • 5. Review your assessment and revise it if necessary.

Five Steps to Risk Assessment When undertaking risk assessment on work equipment it must be decided

Step 1. Hazard Identification

Walk around the workplace and look afresh at what could REASONABLY be expected to cause harm.

Previous Accident Reports. Brainstorming Knowledge of Employees Material Safety Data Sheets (MSDS) Manufacturers Instruction Books Ask, “What If ….?”

Step 1. Hazard Identification • • • • • • • Walk around the workplace and

Step 1. Hazard Identification

The following are examples of plant, equipment or activities that are usually associated with a hazard:

Work at heights, and access to/from it (roof work, ladders, scaffolds).

Work below ground level and in confined spaces (tanks, ducts, trenches)

Manual handling of loads.

Work with electricity (portable tools, extension leads)

Hazardous chemical substances.

Step 1. Hazard Identification

Step 1. Hazard Identification • • • • • • • • • • Display screen
Step 1. Hazard Identification • • • • • • • • • • Display screen

Display screen equipment. Pressure vessels / vacuum works Flammable liquid and gases Machinery and plant (machinery requiring guarding). Grinding/milling machines Woodworking machines. Portable power tools. Noise Vehicles (forklift, cranes) Disposal of special wastes.

Step 1. Hazard Identification • • • • • • • • • • Display screen
Step 1. Hazard Identification • • • • • • • • • • Display screen
Step 1. Hazard Identification • • • • • • • • • • Display screen
Step 1. Hazard Identification • • • • • • • • • • Display screen
Step 1. Hazard Identification • • • • • • • • • • Display screen

List of Hazards

Slipping/tripping hazards (poorly maintained floors or stairs).

Fume (from welding)

Dust (from grinding)

Manual handling

Poor lighting

Temperature

Electricity (poor wiring)

Ejection of material (from plastic moldings)

Chemicals (battery acids)

Pressure systems (steam boilers).

List of Hazards • Slipping/tripping hazards (poorly maintained floors or stairs). • Fume (from welding) •

Step 2. Who Might Be Harmed and How

Generally it will be staff occupying the workplace.

Attention must be paid to:

Visitors Contractors Cleaning staff Maintenance staff Inexperienced staff

Step 2. Who Might Be Harmed and How Generally it will be staff occupying the workplace.

Step 3. Assessment of the Risk

For the hazards listed; You must ask yourself do the precautions already taken:

  • 1. Meet the standards set by the legal requirement?

  • 2. Comply with a recognized industry standard?

  • 3. Represent good practice?

  • 4. Reduce risk as far as reasonably practicable?

Step 3. Assessment of the Risk For the hazards listed; You must ask yourself do the

Likelihood (Probability)

Most Unlikely – Unlikely – Likely – Most Likely

Example – Working at Height

The probability of falling off an edge is more likely the closer you are working to it

Likelihood (Probability) Most Unlikely – Unlikely – Likely – Most Likely Example – Working at Height
Likelihood (Probability) Most Unlikely – Unlikely – Likely – Most Likely Example – Working at Height
Likelihood (Probability) Most Unlikely – Unlikely – Likely – Most Likely Example – Working at Height
Likelihood (Probability) Most Unlikely – Unlikely – Likely – Most Likely Example – Working at Height
Likelihood (Probability) Most Unlikely – Unlikely – Likely – Most Likely Example – Working at Height
Likelihood (Probability) Most Unlikely – Unlikely – Likely – Most Likely Example – Working at Height
Likelihood (Probability) Most Unlikely – Unlikely – Likely – Most Likely Example – Working at Height
Likelihood (Probability) Most Unlikely – Unlikely – Likely – Most Likely Example – Working at Height
Likelihood (Probability) Most Unlikely – Unlikely – Likely – Most Likely Example – Working at Height

15 Mtrs.

8 Mtrs.

1 Mtr.

Consequences

Trivial – Slight Injury – Serious Injury – Major Injury(Death)

Example – Working at Height

If these three workers fell down these heights, the consequences will be different

15 Mtrs. 8 Mtrs.
15 Mtrs.
8 Mtrs.
Consequences Trivial – Slight Injury – Serious Injury – Major Injury(Death) Example – Working at Height
Consequences Trivial – Slight Injury – Serious Injury – Major Injury(Death) Example – Working at Height

1 Mtr.

Consequences Trivial – Slight Injury – Serious Injury – Major Injury(Death) Example – Working at Height

Step 4- Recording of Assessment Findings

Formal written record.

Any suitable form.

Where the risk is considered to be low, either from experience or from the calculation of risk rating, this must be stated in the form and no further action is then required.

If the risk is deemed to be medium or high, the further action needed to control that risk must be clearly stated on the risk assessment form.

Risk Control

RATING ACTION BANDS

RATING BANDS

ACTION REQUIRED

1 & 2 Minimal Risk

Maintain Control Measures

3 & 4 Low Risk

Review Control Measures

6 & 8 Medium Risk

Improve Control Measures

9,12 &16 High Risk

Improve Controls Immediately & Consider Stopping Work

Example

The task of shredding documents in a paper shredder.

  • 1. Begin with identifying hazards:

Entanglement: (being drawn into the document shredder.) Contact with moving parts Overheating leading to fire

Example The task of shredding documents in a paper shredder. 1. Begin with identifying hazards: –

Likelihood (Probability)

Most Unlikely (1) XXXXXXXXXX

Unlikely (2)

Likely (3)

Most Likely (4)

Likelihood (Probability) Most Unlikely (1) XXXXXXXXXX Unlikely (2) Likely (3) Most Likely (4)

Consequences

  • 1 Trivial Injury/ies

 
  • 2 Slight Injury/ies

 
  • 3 Serious Injury/ies

XXXXXXXXXXXX

  • 4 Major Injury/ies or death

 
Consequences 1 Trivial Injury/ies 2 Slight Injury/ies 3 Serious Injury/ies XXXXXXXXXXXX 4 Major Injury/ies or death

Risk

(Consequences x Probability)

   

Consequences

Probability

Slightly Harmful

Harmful (2)

Extremely

(1)

Harmful (3)

Most Unlikely (1)

1

2

3

Unlikely (2)

2

4

6

Likely (3)

3

6

9

Most Likely (4)

4

8

12

Risk

(Consequences x Probability)

   

Consequences

 

Slightly Harmful

Harmful (2)

Extremely

Probability

(1)

Harmful (3)

Most Unlikely (1)

1

2

3

Unlikely (2)

2

4

6

Likely (3)

3

6

9

Most Likely (4)

4

8

12

Risk Control

Risk Level

Action and Timescale

 

Efforts should be made to reduce the risk, but the

3

costs of prevention should be carefully measured and limited;

Risk prevention measures should be implemented within a defined time period;

Where the risk is associated with extremely harmful consequences, further assessment may be necessary to establish more precisely the likelihood of harm as a basis for determining the need for improved control measures.

Risk Control

When a risk assessment has identified a hazard as having unacceptable risks we have to put in place control measures to eliminate the risk or reduce the risk to an acceptable level.

In order to place these control measures in the correct sequence we call this the :

Hierarchy of Control

Hierarchy of Control

1.

Elimination

  • 2. Substitution

  • 3. Isolation

  • 4. Engineering Control

  • 5. Administrative Control

  • 6. Provide Personal Safety Devices.

1. Elimination

The most satisfactory method of dealing with a hazard is to eliminate it.

1. Elimination The most satisfactory method of dealing with a hazard is to eliminate it.

2. Substitution

Substituting dangerous process or substance with one that is not as dangerous.

(e.g.) Water based paints rather than those contain lead.

3. Isolation

Separate or isolate the hazard from people.

(e.g.)

A guard is placed over a piece of moving machinery.

A fence with gate around machines.

4. Engineering Control

Fixing local ventilation system to remove harmful fumes. Fixing dust collector with proper filters. Fixing proper shock absorber to reduce noise. Illumination / A/C

4. Engineering Control Fixing local ventilation system to remove harmful fumes. Fixing dust collector with proper

5- Administration Control

Modification of the likelihood of an accident happening.

Reducing the number of people exposed to the danger and providing training to those people who are exposed to the hazard.

Training of electricians (licensed).

Danger signs, written safety systems of work.

6. Personal Protective Equipment

To be considered only when all other control methods are impractical.

6. Personal Protective Equipment To be considered only when all other control methods are impractical.

7. Procedures

Must be considered when multi trade tradesmen are working on one task.

7. Procedures Must be considered when multi trade tradesmen are working on one task.

Step 5. Monitoring and Review

To review the assessment periodically usually 12 monthly.

The introduction of new machines, substances or people into the work place may introduce new risks or change the category of an existing risk from low to medium or high.

Only when there is a significant change.