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Presented by: Victoria and Rachel

A stroke is a sudden loss of brain function, and it can be caused by two

A stroke is a sudden loss of brain

function, and it can be caused by two types of strokes.

Hemorrhagic Stroke Ischemic Stroke
Hemorrhagic Stroke Ischemic Stroke
Hemorrhagic Stroke
Ischemic Stroke
Ischemic stroke occurs when an artery in the brain becomes blocked, and results in a lack
Ischemic stroke occurs when an artery in the brain
becomes blocked, and results in a lack of blood flow
to the affected area.
Hemorrhagic stroke is a ruptured blood vessel in the brain.
Hemorrhagic stroke is a ruptured blood vessel in the brain.
A Stroke can affect people differently depending on the area damaged in the brain. It canhttps://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PwwuVZORiMc " id="pdf-obj-5-2" src="pdf-obj-5-2.jpg">

A Stroke can affect

people differently

depending on the area damaged in the brain.

It can affect your

memory, muscle control

or even cause death.

Video

AGE & GENDER

AGE & GENDER SMOKING HIGH BLOOD PRESSURE PERSONAL OR FAMILY HISTORY OF STROKE RACE & ETHNICITY

SMOKING

AGE & GENDER SMOKING HIGH BLOOD PRESSURE PERSONAL OR FAMILY HISTORY OF STROKE RACE & ETHNICITY
AGE & GENDER SMOKING HIGH BLOOD PRESSURE PERSONAL OR FAMILY HISTORY OF STROKE RACE & ETHNICITY

HIGH BLOOD PRESSURE

AGE & GENDER SMOKING HIGH BLOOD PRESSURE PERSONAL OR FAMILY HISTORY OF STROKE RACE & ETHNICITY
PERSONAL OR FAMILY
PERSONAL OR FAMILY

HISTORY OF STROKE

AGE & GENDER SMOKING HIGH BLOOD PRESSURE PERSONAL OR FAMILY HISTORY OF STROKE RACE & ETHNICITY

RACE & ETHNICITY

AGE & GENDER SMOKING HIGH BLOOD PRESSURE PERSONAL OR FAMILY HISTORY OF STROKE RACE & ETHNICITY

HEART DISEASES

AGE & GENDER SMOKING HIGH BLOOD PRESSURE PERSONAL OR FAMILY HISTORY OF STROKE RACE & ETHNICITY

UNHEALTHY CHOLESTEROL LEVELS

UNHEALTHY CHOLESTEROL LEVELS LACK OF PHYSICAL ACTIVITY OVERWEIGHT & OBESITY STRESS & DEPRESSION BINGE DRINKING AND

LACK OF PHYSICAL ACTIVITY

UNHEALTHY CHOLESTEROL LEVELS LACK OF PHYSICAL ACTIVITY OVERWEIGHT & OBESITY STRESS & DEPRESSION BINGE DRINKING AND

OVERWEIGHT & OBESITY

UNHEALTHY CHOLESTEROL LEVELS LACK OF PHYSICAL ACTIVITY OVERWEIGHT & OBESITY STRESS & DEPRESSION BINGE DRINKING AND
UNHEALTHY CHOLESTEROL LEVELS LACK OF PHYSICAL ACTIVITY OVERWEIGHT & OBESITY STRESS & DEPRESSION BINGE DRINKING AND
UNHEALTHY CHOLESTEROL LEVELS LACK OF PHYSICAL ACTIVITY OVERWEIGHT & OBESITY STRESS & DEPRESSION BINGE DRINKING AND

STRESS & DEPRESSION BINGE DRINKING AND SUBSTANCE MISUSE

UNHEALTHY CHOLESTEROL LEVELS LACK OF PHYSICAL ACTIVITY OVERWEIGHT & OBESITY STRESS & DEPRESSION BINGE DRINKING AND
UNHEALTHY CHOLESTEROL LEVELS LACK OF PHYSICAL ACTIVITY OVERWEIGHT & OBESITY STRESS & DEPRESSION BINGE DRINKING AND

UNHEALTHY DIET

UNHEALTHY CHOLESTEROL LEVELS LACK OF PHYSICAL ACTIVITY OVERWEIGHT & OBESITY STRESS & DEPRESSION BINGE DRINKING AND
There are several kinds of medications that doctors may administer or prescribe to a stroke patient:
There are several kinds of medications that doctors may administer or prescribe to a stroke patient:

There are several kinds of medications that doctors may

administer or prescribe to a

stroke patient:

Tpa (tissue plasminogen

activator), which is a clot buster;

blood thinners; and drugs that lower high blood pressure and cholesterol.

Procedures such as removing

blood clots, repairing blood vessels, and removing plaque may also be performed.

Ischemic strokes Hemorrhagic strokes • Ischemic strokes account for about 84% of all strokes. Hemorrhagic strokes,

Ischemic strokes

Ischemic strokes Hemorrhagic strokes • Ischemic strokes account for about 84% of all strokes. Hemorrhagic strokes,

Hemorrhagic strokes

Ischemic strokes Hemorrhagic strokes • Ischemic strokes account for about 84% of all strokes. Hemorrhagic strokes,

Ischemic strokes account for about 84% of all strokes. Hemorrhagic strokes, however, account for only about 16% of strokes. • Hemorrhagic strokes are less common but cause 40% of all stroke deaths. Every seven minutes, a Canadian dies of heart disease or stroke. • 9 out of 10 Canadians have at least one risk factor for stroke. • Each year over 14,000 Canadians die from stroke. According to the World Health Organization, 15 million people suffer stroke worldwide each year. Of these, 5 million die and another 5 million are permanently disabled. • Up to 80% of strokes are preventable .

• A stroke is also known as a brain attack. • Healthy habits delay the onset
• A stroke is also known as a brain attack. • Healthy habits delay the onset

A stroke is also known as a brain attack. Healthy habits delay the onset of a stroke by as much as 14 years. • It’s a myth that only older adults have strokes. Stroke can happen to anyone at any time, including teenagers, children, and babies. In developed countries, the incidence of stroke is declining, largely due to efforts to lower blood pressure and reduce smoking. However, the overall rate of stroke remains high due to the aging of the population.

LEFT RIGHT BRAIN BRAIN
LEFT RIGHT BRAIN BRAIN
LEFT RIGHT BRAIN BRAIN
LEFT
RIGHT
BRAIN
BRAIN

The F in F. A. S. T. stands for

Face

The F in F. A. S. T. stands for Face CHECK : Does the face look

CHECK: Does the face look uneven?

The F in F. A. S. T. stands for Face CHECK : Does the face look

The A in F. A. S. T. stands for

Arm

The A in F. A. S. T. stands for Arm CHECK : Does one arm drift

CHECK: Does one arm drift down?

The A in F. A. S. T. stands for Arm CHECK : Does one arm drift

The S in F. A. S. T. stands for

Speech

The S in F. A. S. T. stands for Speech CHECK : Does their speech sound

CHECK: Does their speech sound strange? Ask them to repeat a sentence.

The T in F. A. S. T. stands for

Time

The T in F. A. S. T. stands for Time If you notice any of these
The T in F. A. S. T. stands for Time If you notice any of these

If you notice any of these STROKE warning signs and symptoms, even if the symptoms go away, then it is TIME to call 9-1-1! CHECK the time so you know when the first symptoms appeared. And try to act as F. A. S. T. as possible because every second brain cells die, and time lost is brain lost.

PSWs can help stroke survivors:  With activities of daily living, such as bathing and dressing,

PSWs can help stroke survivors:

  • With activities of daily living, such as bathing and dressing, as 75% of stroke survivors need help with ADLs

  • Relearn routine activities of living

  • Regain abilities so they can go back to living like they used to

  • Cope with challenges and frustrations

  • Do things they can’t do for themselves yet

  • Educate family members about stroke

PSWs can help stroke survivors:  With activities of daily living, such as bathing and dressing,
  • You can also provide the stroke survivor with support and encouragement

Vincent, C., Deaudelin, I., Robichaud, L., Rousseau, J., Viscogliosi, C., Talbot, L. R., & Desrosiers, J.

Vincent, C., Deaudelin, I., Robichaud, L., Rousseau, J., Viscogliosi, C., Talbot,

L. R., & Desrosiers, J. (2007). Rehabilitation needs for older adults with stroke living at home: perceptions of four populations. BMC geriatrics, 7(1),

20.

The goal of this study was to investigate the partly met and unmet rehabilitation needs of older adults who had suffered a stroke and who live in the community. Using the focus group technique and audio recordings,

the research team was able to reduce, categorize, and examine the data. A

total of 12 groups and 72 individuals were analyzed, thus, providing the researchers with sufficient data to draw conclusions from. They concluded that a greater knowledge of the needs of stroke survivors is required by those different types of people involved in the rehabilitation process. Also, it is the belief of the researchers that better knowledge of the partly met or unmet rehabilitation needs, such as achieving the activities and social roles

the stroke survivors value, is essential for improving rehabilitation services,

and will ultimately benefit the stroke survivor because social participation is recognized as being the main goal of rehabilitation.

Vincent, C., Deaudelin, I., Robichaud, L., Rousseau, J., Viscogliosi, C., Talbot, L. R., & Desrosiers, J.
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