Vous êtes sur la page 1sur 37

A report on Construction

Materials and Testing


---------------------------
Presenters:

Melanio A. Villaverde
Presentation Editor

Kelly C. Cervantes
Multimedia Researcher
Menalyn Ninon
Multimedia Researcher

Wood
Angela Andal
Article Researcher

Asher Dennis S. Sariego

Preservation
Article Researcher
Conserve

Maintain
Preserve Keep up

save
What do we
preserve?
Foods Beverages Paints

Cosmetics Pharmaceutical Wood


Why do we
preserve?
1. To prevent decomposition by microbial growth

2. To prevent the undesirable chemical changes


Preservative
Terms
a substance or a chemical that is added to products to prevent
decomposition by microbial growth or by undesirable chemical
changes
Wood preservation (Timber Treatment)

All measures that are taken to ensure a long life of wood


and to prevent its natural decay refer to wood preservation.
- is the process of protecting timber from diseases,
decay, worms and insects.
History
Methods of Wood
Preservation
1. Tarring

2. Painting

3. Charring

4. Creosoting

5. Varnishing and French Polishing


to wood
preservation:
1. Should be mature and well ventilated

2. Timber must be thoroughly seasoned


Sap
Tarring
- coats timber with usually hot coal tar
- adopted only for outdoor work of a rough character

Usually tarred:
Embedded portions of timber
fence posts
ends of door and window frames
battens and beams built in
Tarring is not done in:
structural members that are open to
view
Tarring
Tarring
Painting
- essentially liquids applied on the surfaces of timber and
other materials in two to three coats and renewed from
time to time
- it gives good appearance for decorative purposes, it
protects the surface from atmospheric actions and actions
by other liquids, fumes and gases and provides smooth
surface for paint
Solignum easy is
cleaning.
a special paint which protects the timber
from the attack of termites.
Painting
Painting
Charring
- applied to surfaces of timber to be buried underground or to be
inserted in moist soil, with the object of closing the surface pores
of timber permanently.

- timber is placed over a wood fire until it is charred 6 mm to 12


mm deep then quenched with water.

- it prevents rotting and attacks of worms.


Charring
Charring
4. Creosoting or
Bethels Method
- timber is kept in a vacuum and air-tight timber, into which
creosote under a pressure of 10 kg/cm2 at 48 C is forced.

- timber absorbs oil in two to three hours.

- employed for preservation of railway sleepers, poles and piles.

- it increases the life of timber and preserves effectively against


rots and white ants but costly.

- Creosote oil is obtained by distillation of coal tar.


Creosoting or
Bethels Method
Creosoting or
Bethels Method
Varnishing or
French Polishing
Varnish

- a transparent surface coating which is applied as a liquid


and changes to a hard solid.

- consists of resins, solvents and driers.

- it protects the painted body from atmospheric actions, to


bring the brilliant appearance of the wood grains and ornamental
work and enhance the enameled surface.
Varnishing
Varnishing
Varnishing or
French Polishing
French Polish

- a kind of spirit varnish prepared from various gums


dissolved in methylated spirit .

- this is a thin varnish gently rubbed with cotton.

- used on hardwood surfaces to hide the effects of grain


French Polish
Hazards
Wood that has been industrially pressure-treated with approved
preservative products poses a limited risk to the public, and
should be disposed of properly
Important considerations in the use of wood
in engineering work
1. Its mechanical properties are extremely variable, unlike steel and concrete.
2. Strength is influenced by species, locality, density, moisture content, and
defects
3. All wood gain strength and stiffness when thoroughly air-dried or kiln-dried

4. Timber in construction is practically never subjected to pure tensile stresses.

5. Timber members have better elastic shock resistance than steel.

6. Timber differs from most materials in that the rate of application of load has
more pronounced effect on strength and stiffness.
Any questions
1. What are the methods of
wood preservation?

2. Why do we preserve
woods (timber)?
References
http://www.civilengineeringx.com/traditional-materials/preservation-of
-timber
/
http://
civilconstructionmanagement.blogspot.com/2014/02/preservation-of-t
imber.html
http://timber.lk/Seasoning/index.html
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wood_preservation
http://www.popularmechanics.com/technology/infrastructure/g2679/bes
t-wooden-structures-in-the-world
/