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1 COMMUNICATION MODULE-2 BY:SANIYA CHAWLA Saniya Chawla, Faculty Associate,MCA-GP-1,2011 1/2/2018
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COMMUNICATION
MODULE-2
BY:SANIYA CHAWLA
Saniya Chawla, Faculty Associate,MCA-GP-1,2011
1/2/2018

+ COMPONENTS OF COMMUNICATION

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  • Verbal Messages - the words we choose

Para verbal Messages - how we say the words

Nonverbal Messages - our body language

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+ TYPES OF COMMUNICATION 1/2/2018 Saniya Chawla, Faculty Associate,MCA-GP-1,2011
+ TYPES OF COMMUNICATION 1/2/2018 Saniya Chawla, Faculty Associate,MCA-GP-1,2011
+ TYPES OF COMMUNICATION 1/2/2018 Saniya Chawla, Faculty Associate,MCA-GP-1,2011
+ TYPES OF COMMUNICATION 1/2/2018 Saniya Chawla, Faculty Associate,MCA-GP-1,2011

TYPES OF

COMMUNICATION

1/2/2018

Saniya Chawla, Faculty

Associate,MCA-GP-1,2011

+ FORMAL COMMUNICATION

  • Formal communication is that which is connected with the formal organizational arrangement and the official status or the place of the communicator and the receiver.

  • It moves through the formal channels authoritatively accepted

positions in the

organization chart.

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+ INFORMAL COMMUNICATION

  • Informal communication arises out of all those channels that fall outside the formal channels and it is also known as grapevine.

  • It is established around the societal

affiliation of members

of the organization.

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+ INTERNAL COMMUNICATION

  • Internal communication is a subset of effective business communication, which is built around this simple foundation: communication is a dialogue, not a monologue.

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+ EXTERNAL COMMUNICATION

  • External communication covers how a provider interacts with those outside their own organisation

  • This may be with the public, employers,

community organizations, local authorities, job centers, careers offices, funding bodies, specialist agencies and other training providers.

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+ UPWARD COMMUNICATION

  • Upward Communication is the process of information flowing from the lower levels of a hierarchy to the upper levels.

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+ DOWNWARD COMMUNICATION

Communication which flows from the

superiors to subordinates are known

as downward communication.

In an organization structure, the superiors utilize their abilities to attain the desired targets, which

mean that they may be engaged in

issuing commands, directions and policy directives to the persons working under them (at lower levels).

Some examples of downward

communication include notice,

circulars, instructions, orders, letters, etc.

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+ LATERAL COMMUNICATION

  • Communication between people at the same hierarchical rank but in different functional areas is called horizontal or lateral communication.

  • This flow of communication

is becoming increasingly important as business become more large, complex and specialized.

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+ INTERACTIVE COMMUNICATION

  • Interactive communication is an exchange of ideas where both participants, whether human, machine or art form, are active and can have an effect on one another.

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  • It is a dynamic, two-way flow of information.

+ MASS COMMUNICATION

  • Mass communication is the term used to describe the academic study of the various means by which individuals and entities relay information through mass media to large segments of the population at the same time.

  • .

  • It is usually understood to relate to newspaper and magazine publishing, radio, television and film, as these are used both for disseminating news and for advertising

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+ VERBAL COMMUNICATION (7%)

  • The basis of communication is the interaction between people. Verbal communication is one way for people to communicate face-to-face.

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  • Some of the key components of verbal

communication are sound, words, speaking, and

language.

  • Face to face discussions, speeches, television, radio, telephone conversations, seminars, videos etc. are the types of verbal Communications.

+ CONTD…

  • Verbal communication also includes the written word. Written

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includes emails, books, letters, magazines, newspapers, notes,

faxes, announcements, commercials etc.

  • Anything that is written is also verbal communication.

  • Oral communication has also besides real words, mere grunts,

cries, whimpers that people make.

  • Each sound we make can be interpreted and seen as a certain language.

  • Communicating with others is done more easily and it’s easier

also to understand if the two people speak the same language.

+ NON VERBAL COMMUNICATION

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  • Nonverbal communication is any kind of communication not involving words.

  • When the term is used, most people think of facial expressions and gestures, but while these are important elements of nonverbal communication, they are not the only ones.

  • Nonverbal communication can include vocal sounds that are not words such as grunts (CRY), and whimpers (cry softly, weep).

  • To deliver the full impact of a message, use nonverbal behaviors to

raise the channel of interpersonal communication: Eye contact, Facial Expressions, Gestures, Posture and body orientation, Proximity, Vocal.

+ MAIN TWO TYPES OF NON-VERBAL COMMUNICATION

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BODY LANGUAGE
BODY
LANGUAGE
GESTURES
GESTURES

+ TYPES OF NON VERBAL COMMUNICATION

  • A. Body Language or Kinesics

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  • B. Clothing or Artifactual Communication

  • C. Voice or Paralanguage

  • D. Space and Distance, or Proxemic factors

  • E. Color

  • F. Time, or Chronemics ; and

  • G. Touch, or Haptics

+ BODY LANGUAGE

  • The bodily gestures, postures, and facial expressions by which a person communicates nonverbally with others”- (Soukhanov 1992:211).

  • KINESICS

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  • POSTURE

  • GESTURE

  • FACIAL EXPRESSIONS

  • GAZE / EYE CONTACT

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+ Basic Types of Body Language postures 1/2/2018 Saniya Chawla, Faculty Associate,MCA-GP-1,2011
+ Basic Types of Body Language postures 1/2/2018 Saniya Chawla, Faculty Associate,MCA-GP-1,2011
+ Basic Types of Body Language postures 1/2/2018 Saniya Chawla, Faculty Associate,MCA-GP-1,2011
+ Basic Types of Body Language postures 1/2/2018 Saniya Chawla, Faculty Associate,MCA-GP-1,2011

Basic Types of Body

Language postures

1/2/2018

Saniya Chawla, Faculty

Associate,MCA-GP-1,2011

+ OPEN/CLOSED

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People with arms folded and legs crossed and bodies turned away are signaling that they are rejecting messages.

  • People showing open hands, fully facing you and both feet planted on the ground are accepting them.

+ FORWARD/BACKWARD

When people are leaning forward and pointing towards you they are actively accepting or rejecting the message.

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When they are leaning back, looking up at the ceiling, doodling on a pad, cleaning their glasses they are either passively absorbing or ignoring it.

+ BODY LANGUAGE

  • Facial expression(s)

  • Eyes

  • Lips

  • Arms

  • Hands

  • Fingers

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+ THE FACE

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The face is an important source of information.

Since the face cannot be easily hidden, it is an important source of nonverbal information and communicates a variety of emotions

.In addition, eye contact, pupil size, and the smile provide additional cues to informed observers.

+ EYES

  • Centered Focused

  • Gazing Up-Thinking

  • Gazing Down-Shame

  • Gaze on the Side-Guilty

  • Wandering-Disinterested, Bored

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+ LIPS

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Parted-Relaxed, Happy Together-Possibly Concerned Wide Open-Very Happy / Very Angry

+ ARMS

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  • Arms Crossed-Angry, Disapproving

  • Open-Honest, Accepting

+ HANDS

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On Top of the Head-Amazement Scratching Head-Puzzled , Confused

  • Rubbing Eyes-Tired Rubbing Chin folded-THINKING, SHY

+ FINGERS

Fingers Interlocked-TENSE

  • Pointing at you-ANGRY OK Signal-FINE

  • V Sign-PEACE

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+ OCULAR (EYE-CONTACT)

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  • For how long can you maintain an eye contact.

  • 3 to 4 seconds- 2 BLINKS WITH ONE PERSON AND SHIFT

+ Semiotics (dress decorum)

  • For formal interviews

  • Informal interviews

  • For male

  • For female

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+ ARTIFACTUAL COMMUNICATION AND COLOR

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  • Artifactual communication, is an integral part of the nonverbal package.

  • It includes the use of personal adornments such as clothing, jewellery, makeup, hairstyles, and beards.

  • People are apt to make inferences about us based on the way we dress.

+ PARALINGUISTIC (LIKE LANGUAGE)

  • WHEN YOU EXPRESS

  • WHEN YOU SPEAK

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  • IT IS THE MOST IMPORTANT ASPECT OF YOUR COMMUNICATION

+ Space and Distance, or Proxemic factors

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  • Edward Hall says there are four different distances that we keep between ourselves and other people:

  • intimate distance-0 to 18 inches;

  • personal distance-18 inches to 4 feet;

  • social distance-4 to 12 feet;

  • And public distance-12 feet to the limit of sight.

+ HAPTICS (TOUCH BEHAVIOUR)

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DRAWING ATTENTION OF THE PEOPLE BY:

1.TAKING NAME 2.SLIGHT TOUCH

+ BODY LANGUAGE-SUMMARY

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  • Body language is body movements that depend on a person’s attitude or feelings.

  • Body language includes the way people walk, how they stand, and their facial features.

  • In other words, any kind of meaning that is shown by a person's body attitude or movements.

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+ EXAMPLE OF BODY LANAGUAGE

36 EXAMPLE OF BODY LANAGUAGE  For example, when a boy is sad he may drop
  • For example, when a boy is sad he may drop his head and walk slowly. Or, if a girl is happy, she might run and jump or stand up straight and put her hands in the air. People don't have to say anything to show how they feel about things. The color of people's skin may even show how they feel.

Saniya Chawla, Faculty Associate,MCA-GP-1,2011

1/2/2018

+ CONTD…

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  • For example, if people with light colored skin get embarrassed, their skin may turn red, or if they are worried, they might get pale. Body language can be voluntary (on purpose) or involuntary (a person can’t help it). An interesting fact is that blind children will smile when happy even though they have never seen a smile.

+ GESTURES

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  • Gestures are communications like facial expressions, hand signals, eye gazing, and body postures.

  • Examples include smiles, handshakes, waving, and raising certain fingers to say something.

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39 Saniya Chawla, Faculty Associate,MCA-GP-1,2011 1/2/2018

+ EXAMPLE OF GESTURE

  • For instance, if you saw a friend at a noisy carnival, you might smile and wave at your friend. You might also point at the Ferris wheel if you wanted to meet your friend there. You could do all of these things without saying a word.

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+ IMPORTANCE OF COMMUNICATION

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  • Communication promotes motivation.

  • Communication is a source of information.

  • Communication also plays a crucial role in altering individual’s attitudes.

  • Communication also helps in socializing.

  • communication also assists in controlling process.

+ Woodrow Wilson

If I am to speak ten minutes, I need a week for preparation; if fifteen minutes, three days; if half an hour, two days; if an hour, I am ready now.

1/2/2018

Saniya Chawla, Faculty Associate,MCA-GP-1,2011

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+ VIDEO OF BODY LANGUAGE

1/2/2018

Saniya Chawla, Faculty Associate,MCA-GP-1,2011

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+
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+ THE WRITING PROCESS 1/2/2018 Saniya Chawla, Faculty 44 Associate,MCA-GP-1,2011
+ THE WRITING PROCESS 1/2/2018 Saniya Chawla, Faculty 44 Associate,MCA-GP-1,2011
+ THE WRITING PROCESS 1/2/2018 Saniya Chawla, Faculty 44 Associate,MCA-GP-1,2011
+ THE WRITING PROCESS 1/2/2018 Saniya Chawla, Faculty 44 Associate,MCA-GP-1,2011

THE WRITING PROCESS

1/2/2018

Saniya Chawla, Faculty

44

Associate,MCA-GP-1,2011

+ INRODUCTION

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Whether you know it or not, there’s a process to writing which many writers follow naturally. If you’re just getting started

as a writer, though, or if you always find it a

struggle to produce an essay, short story or blog, following the writing process will help.

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+ 46 STEPS OF WRITING PROCESS 1/2/2018 Saniya Chawla, Faculty Associate,MCA-GP-1,2011
+ 46 STEPS OF WRITING PROCESS 1/2/2018 Saniya Chawla, Faculty Associate,MCA-GP-1,2011
+ 46 STEPS OF WRITING PROCESS 1/2/2018 Saniya Chawla, Faculty Associate,MCA-GP-1,2011

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+ 46 STEPS OF WRITING PROCESS 1/2/2018 Saniya Chawla, Faculty Associate,MCA-GP-1,2011

STEPS OF WRITING

PROCESS

1/2/2018

Saniya Chawla, Faculty

Associate,MCA-GP-1,2011

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+ 1. Prewriting

  • This covers everything you do before starting your rough draft. As a minimum, prewriting means coming up with an idea!

  • Ideas and Inspiration

1.Ideas are all around you. If you want to write but you don’t have any ideas, try:

2.Writing about incidents from your daily life, or childhood.

3. Keeping a notebook of ideas jotting down those thoughts that occur throughout the day.

+ TIP

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Once you have an idea, you need to expand on it. Don’t make the mistake of jumping straight into your writing – you’ll end up with a badly structured piece.

+ Building on Your Idea

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Free writing: Open a new document or start a new page, and write everything that comes

into your head about your chosen topic. Don’t

stop to edit, even if you make mistakes.

Brainstorming: Write the idea or topic in the center of your page. Jot down ideas that arise from it sub-topics or directions you could take with the article.

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+ Once you’ve done one or both of these, you need to select what’s going into
+ Once you’ve done one or both of these, you need to select what’s going into
+ Once you’ve done one or both of these, you need to select what’s going into
+ Once you’ve done one or both of these, you need to select what’s going into

Once you’ve done one or both of these,

you need to select what’s going into

your first draft.

1/2/2018

Saniya Chawla, Faculty

50

Associate,MCA-GP-1,2011

+ Planning and Structure

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First, decide which ideas you’ll use. During your free writing and brainstorming, you’ll

have come up with lots of thoughts. Some

belong in this piece of writing: others can

be kept for another time.

Then, decide how to order those ideas. Try to have a logical progression.

+ 2. Writing

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Sit down with your plan beside you, and start your first draft (also known as the rough draft or rough copy). At this stage, don’t think about word-count, grammar, spelling and punctuation. Don’t worry if you’ve gone off-topic, or if some sections of your plan don’t fit too well. JUST KEEP WRITING.

+ Some things that many writers find helpful when working on the first draft include:

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  • Setting aside at least thirty minutes to concentrate: it’s hard to establish a writing flow if you’re just snatching a few minutes here and there.

  • Going somewhere without interruptions: a library or coffee shop can work well, if you don’t have anywhere quiet to write at home.

  • Switching off distracting programs: if you write your first draft onto a computer, you might find that turning off your Internet connection does wonders for your concentration levels!

+ TIP

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Writing requires concentration and energy. If

you’re a new writer, don’t try to write for

hours without stopping. Instead, give yourself

a time limit (like thirty minutes) to really

focus without checking your email!

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+ 3. Revising

Revising your work is about making “big picture” changes. You might remove whole sections, rewrite entire paragraphs, and add in information which you’ve realized the reader will need. Everyone needs to revise even talented writers.

The revision stage is sometimes summed up with the A.R.R.R. (Adding, Rearranging,

Removing, Replacing) approach:

+ TIP

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If you’re not sure what’s working and what isn’t, show your writing to someone else. This

might be a writers’ circle, or just a friend

who’s good with words. Ask them for

feedback. It’s best if you can show your work

to several people, so that you can get more than one opinion.

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+ 4. Editing

The editing stage is distinct from revision, and needs to be done after revising. Editing involves the close-up view of individual

sentences and words. It needs to be done after

you’ve made revisions on a big scale:

When editing, go through your piece line by line, and make sure that each sentence, phrase and

word is as strong as possible. Some things to

check for are:

+ CONTD ..

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  • Have you used the same word too many times in one sentence or paragraph? Use a thesaurus to find alternatives.

  • Are any of your sentences hard to understand? Rewrite them to make your thoughts clear.

  • Which words could you cut to make a sentence stronger? Words like “just” “quite”, “very”, “really” and “generally” CAN OFTEN BE REMOVED.

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+ CONTD…

  • Are your sentences grammatically correct? Keep a careful look out for problems like SUBJECT-VERB AGREEMENT and staying consistent in your use of the PAT, PRESENT AND FUTURE TENSE.

  • Is everything spelt correctly? Don’t trust your spell- checker – it won’t pick up every mistake. Proofread as many times as necessary.

  • Have you used punctuation marks correctly? COMMAS often cause difficulties. You might want to check out the Daily Writing Tips articles on PUNCTUATION.

+ TIP

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Print out your work and edit on paper. Many writers find it easier to spot mistakes this way.

+ 5. Publishing

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  • The final step of the writing process is publishing. This means different things depending on the piece you’re working on.

  • Bloggers need to upload, format and post their piece of completed work.

  • Students need to produce a final copy of their work, in the correct format. This often means adding a bibliography, ensuring that citations are correct, and adding details such as your student reference number.

+ CONTD…

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  • Journalists need to submit their piece (usually called “copy”) to an editor. Again, there will be a certain format for this.

  • Fiction writers may be sending their story to a magazine or competition. Check guidelines carefully, and make sure you follow them.

+ TIP

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Your piece of writing might never be published. That’s okay – many bestselling authors wrote lots of stories or articles

before they got their first piece published.

Nothing that you write is wasted, because it all contributes to your growth as a writer.

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+ 64 WRITING ROUTINE MEMOS 1/2/2018 Saniya Chawla, Faculty Associate,MCA-GP-1,2011
+ 64 WRITING ROUTINE MEMOS 1/2/2018 Saniya Chawla, Faculty Associate,MCA-GP-1,2011
+ 64 WRITING ROUTINE MEMOS 1/2/2018 Saniya Chawla, Faculty Associate,MCA-GP-1,2011

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+ 64 WRITING ROUTINE MEMOS 1/2/2018 Saniya Chawla, Faculty Associate,MCA-GP-1,2011

WRITING ROUTINE

MEMOS

1/2/2018

Saniya Chawla, Faculty

Associate,MCA-GP-1,2011

+ DEFINITION-

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  • A letter is not a memo, nor is a memo a letter.

  • A memo is a short, to the point communication conveying your thoughts, reactions or opinion on

something.

  • A memo can call people to action or broadcast a bit of timely news. With memo writing, shorter is better.

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+ 66 BASIC MEMO FORMAT 1/2/2018 Saniya Chawla, Faculty Associate,MCA-GP-1,2011
+ 66 BASIC MEMO FORMAT 1/2/2018 Saniya Chawla, Faculty Associate,MCA-GP-1,2011
+ 66 BASIC MEMO FORMAT 1/2/2018 Saniya Chawla, Faculty Associate,MCA-GP-1,2011

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+ 66 BASIC MEMO FORMAT 1/2/2018 Saniya Chawla, Faculty Associate,MCA-GP-1,2011

BASIC MEMO FORMAT

1/2/2018

Saniya Chawla, Faculty

Associate,MCA-GP-1,2011

+ Decide if it’s to be persuasive or informative.

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  • While many memos are a combination of the two (“In order to process your claim promptly, please submit it no later than January 15.”), sometimes memos have to be one or the other for the reader to take the appropriate action.

  • A persuasive memo engages the reader’s interest before issuing a directive, where as an informative memo outlines the facts and then requests the reader’s actions.

+ Clearly state the purpose of communication in the subject line.

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Most memo formats have the basics of the header,

like “to,” “from” and “date” in place. But you have a

responsibility to make the subject line as descriptive as possible so the reader understands

the intent.

  • A memo simply titled “Vacation Time” might appear to be good news until the document explains that vacation time won’t be granted unless

first requested in writing. Thus, a better memo title

might be “New Vacation Time Request Policy".

+ Write memos with purpose and make that purpose known in the first paragraph

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  • Outline the purpose and the desired action in the memo’s first paragraph.

  • Readers will become conditioned to the importance of a memo and gain that knowledge as soon as they open it.

+ K.I.S.S. Keep It Simple, Short

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  • Most memo formats accommodate one page of information. This means that the topic details should be concise, with clear directives and contacts for follow-up.

  • If it’s a complex topic extending into multiple pages, still keep the language as direct as possible, add headings or bullets to guide the reader and conclude with a summary paragraph of key points.

  • Reinforce the reader’s necessary action. At the end of the memo, specifically direct the reader to the desired action.

+ Effective business communication improves workflow and relationships

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Use the tools of memo formats and well- constructed information to your advantage.

+ PARTS OF A MEMO

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There are three basic reasons to write a memo:

to persuade action to issue a directive or to provide a report.

+ Heading

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  • The heading segment follows this general format:

  • TO: (readers' names and job titles) CC: (any people you are copying the memo to) FROM: (your name and job title) DATE: (complete and current date) SUBJECT: (what the memo is about, highlighted in some way)

  • Make sure you address the reader by his or her correct name and job title.

  • Be specific and concise in your subject line.

+ Opening Segment

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  • The gist of a memo should occur in the opening sentences/paragraphs.

  • It's a good idea to include some information about the context, a task statement and perhaps a purpose statement.

  • The context is the event, circumstance, or background of the problem you are solving or the directive you are giving.

  • In the task statement describe how you are doing to deal with a situation.

  • Finally, the purpose statement of a memo gives your reason for writing it and forecasts what is in the rest of the memo.

+ Summary Segment

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  • If your memo is longer than a page, you may want to include a separate summary segment.

  • This segment provides a brief statement of the key recommendations you have reached

  • These will help your reader understand the key points of the memo immediately.

  • This segment may also include references to methods and

sources you have used in your research, but remember to

keep it brief.

+ Discussion Segments

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  • Begin with the information that is most important. This may mean that you will start with key findings or recommendations.

  • Start with your most general information and move to your specific or supporting facts. (Be sure to use the same format when including details: strongest--->weakest.)

  • For easy reading, put important points or details into lists rather than paragraphs when possible.

  • Be careful to make lists parallel in grammatical form.

+ Closing Segment

  • You're almost done.

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  • After the reader has read your information, you want to close with a courteous ending stating what action you want your reader to take.

  • Make sure you consider how the reader will benefit from the desired actions and how you can make those actions easier.

  • For example, you might say, "I will be glad to discuss this

recommendation with you during our Tuesday trip to the spa

and follow through on any decisions you make."

+ Persuasive Memorandum

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  • To: Mary McGee, Alistair Warwranka, George Lipton CC: Dorothy Barrie From: The Boss Date: June 1, 2006 Re: Need for New Memo Format

+ CONTD…

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  • I’ve noticed that we don’t seem to be able to communicate important changes, requirements and progress reports throughout the company as effectively as we should. I propose developing one consistent memo format, recognizable by all staff as the official means of communicating company directives.

  • While I know this seems like a simple solution, I believe it will cut down on needless e-mail, improve universal communication and allow the staff to save necessary information for later referral.

+ CONTD…

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  • Please talk among yourselves to determine the proper points of memo writing and return the input to me by 12 noon. I will then send out a notice to the entire staff regarding the new memo format.

  • Thank you for your prompt attention to this.

+ Directive Memo

  • To: All Staff From: The Boss Date: June 1, 2006 Re: New Memo Format Effective June 1

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+ CONTD…

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  • In order to make interoffice communications easier, please adhere to the following guidelines for writing effective memos:

  • Clearly state the purpose of the memo in the subject line and in the first paragraph.

  • Keep language professional, simple and polite.

  • Use short sentences.

  • Use bullets if a lot of information is conveyed.

  • Proofread before sending.

+ CONTD ..

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  • Address the memo to the person(s) who will take action on the subject, and CC those who need to know about the action.

  • Attach additional information: don’t place it in the body of the memo if possible.

  • Please put this format into practice immediately. We appreciate your assistance in developing clear communications.

If you have any questions, please don’t hesitate to call me.

Thank you.

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+ 84 BUSINES LETTERS 1/2/2018 Saniya Chawla, Faculty Associate,MCA-GP-1,2011
+ 84 BUSINES LETTERS 1/2/2018 Saniya Chawla, Faculty Associate,MCA-GP-1,2011
+ 84 BUSINES LETTERS 1/2/2018 Saniya Chawla, Faculty Associate,MCA-GP-1,2011

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+ 84 BUSINES LETTERS 1/2/2018 Saniya Chawla, Faculty Associate,MCA-GP-1,2011

BUSINES LETTERS

1/2/2018

Saniya Chawla, Faculty

Associate,MCA-GP-1,2011

+ 123 Winner's Road New Employee Town, PA 12345

March 16, 2001

Ernie English

1234 Writing Lab Lane

Write City, IN 12345

Dear Mr. English:

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+ FIRST PARAGRAPH

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  • The first paragraph of a typical business letter is used to state the main point of the letter.

  • Begin with a friendly opening; then quickly transition into the purpose of your letter.

  • Use a couple of sentences to explain the purpose, but do not go in to detail until the next paragraph

+ SECOND PARAGRAPH

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  • Beginning with the second paragraph, state the supporting details to justify your purpose.

  • These may take the form of background

information, statistics or first-hand accounts.

  • A few short paragraphs within the body of the letter should be enough to support your reasoning.

+

Finally, in the closing paragraph, briefly

restate your purpose and why it is

important.

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  • If the purpose of your letter is employment related, consider ending your letter with

your contact information.

  • However, if the purpose is informational,

think about closing with gratitude for the

reader's time.

+

  • Sincerely,

(SIGNATURE)

Lucy Letter

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+ 90 WRITING AN EFFECTIVE E-MAIL 1/2/2018 Saniya Chawla, Faculty Associate,MCA-GP-1,2011
+ 90 WRITING AN EFFECTIVE E-MAIL 1/2/2018 Saniya Chawla, Faculty Associate,MCA-GP-1,2011
+ 90 WRITING AN EFFECTIVE E-MAIL 1/2/2018 Saniya Chawla, Faculty Associate,MCA-GP-1,2011

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+ 90 WRITING AN EFFECTIVE E-MAIL 1/2/2018 Saniya Chawla, Faculty Associate,MCA-GP-1,2011

WRITING AN EFFECTIVE

E-MAIL

1/2/2018

Saniya Chawla, Faculty

Associate,MCA-GP-1,2011

+ Sample Email Thank You Letter

  • Subject Line of Email Message:

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Thank You - Assistant Account Executive Interview

+ Email Message:

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  • It was very enjoyable to speak with you today about the assistant account executive position at the Smith Agency. The job seems to be an excellent match for my skills and interests. The creative approach to account management that you described confirmed my desire to work with you.

  • In addition to my enthusiasm, I will bring to the position strong writing skills, assertiveness, and the ability to encourage others to work cooperatively with the department.

  • I appreciate the time you took to interview me. I am very interested in working for you and look forward to hearing from you regarding this position.

+ Contd…

  • Sincerely, Your Name Email Address

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+ BAD E-MAIL MESSAGES

  • Use of Abbreviations

  • Virus file

  • Writing long e-mail messages

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  • If internal- DONOT WRITE YOUR FULL NAME AND DESIGNATION

+ Sending an Email to Multiple Recipients - Cc:

and Bcc:

Use Cc and Bcc to send an email to more than one person easily and fast.

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"Cc" is short for "carbon copy". Bcc: Blind Carbon Copy

+ ISSUES TO BE DEALT WITH

Issues to be dealt with :

1. Confidential matter, Security

2.Spam

3.Address goof-ups 4.Server jamming 5.Reckless copying 6. Attachment goof-up

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+ GOLDEN RULE

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  • Keep your message in email short (one screen); Should not be long that one has to scroll down.

  • Subject statements should be short, crisp and clear.

  • Never ever be spontaneous in responding to e- mails in extreme (appointment/ firing)

+
+
+ 98 PERSUASIVE MESSAGES 1/2/2018 Saniya Chawla, Faculty Associate,MCA-GP-1,2011
+ 98 PERSUASIVE MESSAGES 1/2/2018 Saniya Chawla, Faculty Associate,MCA-GP-1,2011
+ 98 PERSUASIVE MESSAGES 1/2/2018 Saniya Chawla, Faculty Associate,MCA-GP-1,2011

98

+ 98 PERSUASIVE MESSAGES 1/2/2018 Saniya Chawla, Faculty Associate,MCA-GP-1,2011

PERSUASIVE MESSAGES

1/2/2018

Saniya Chawla, Faculty

Associate,MCA-GP-1,2011

+ Catch/Capture/Grab attention Positive & Fact based

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99

Build Interest give information

Overcome resistance highlight strength

Motivate action/ positive response

+ EXAMPLE-POSITIVE MESSAGE

  • Dear Dr. Sharma:

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100

Because you’re a local Lucknow author, we thought

it might not be too much trouble for you to speak at our Annual Day function on July 26.

Some of our business students here at LBSIM

admired your book Beyond Race and Gender, which appeared last spring and became such a hit across the nation. One of our professors said you

were now the nations diversity management guru.

+

N Shankar, CMD, Globus Infocom and GM

TELCO, Delhi, Mr. S K Dambhare were speakers in the past on our Annual Day. Our banquets usually begin at 6:30 with a social

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hour, followed by dinner at 7:30 and the speech

from 8:30 until 9 or 9:15.We can arrange transportation for you and your guest, if you need it.

We realize that you must be very busy, but we

hope you’ll agree. Please let our adviser,

professor RK Mishra, have the favour of an early response.

Sincerely

+
+
+ 102 NEGATIVE MESSAGES 1/2/2018 Saniya Chawla, Faculty Associate,MCA-GP-1,2011
+ 102 NEGATIVE MESSAGES 1/2/2018 Saniya Chawla, Faculty Associate,MCA-GP-1,2011
+ 102 NEGATIVE MESSAGES 1/2/2018 Saniya Chawla, Faculty Associate,MCA-GP-1,2011

102

+ 102 NEGATIVE MESSAGES 1/2/2018 Saniya Chawla, Faculty Associate,MCA-GP-1,2011

NEGATIVE MESSAGES

1/2/2018

Saniya Chawla, Faculty

Associate,MCA-GP-1,2011

+

Introduction : Catching/ Capturing/ Grabbing attention; neutral statement.

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Body of the Msg. : Cite reasons for the bad msg.; concise and clear as possible.

End : Substantiate sincerely; scope for feedback

+ EXAMPLE OF NEGATIVE MESSAGE

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Abhay Chaudhary, Senior Manager, HRD in HCL has denied permission to K Ramakrishna, one of his sales executive,

to attend a sales conference, as per the

following memo:

……………………………….

Memo To: K Ramakrishna

+

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We can’t allow you to attend the conference in

august, Ramakrishna. Perhaps you didn’t know the

budget planning meetings are scheduled for that

month.

Your expertise is needed here to help our telecommunications network on schedule. Without

you, the entire system- which is shaky at best- might fall apart. I am sorry to have to refuse your

request to attend the conference. I know this is

small thanks for the fine work you have done for us. Please accept my humble apologizes.

+

In the winter I’m sure your work schedule

will be lighter, and we can release you to

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attend a conference at that time.

………………………

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THANK YOU!!!!!!!!!!!! ???????????????
THANK
YOU!!!!!!!!!!!!
???????????????