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Food Safety and

Sanitation
Next Generation Science / Common Core Standards Addressed!

 CCSS. Math. Content.HSS‐ID.A.2 Use statistics appropriate to the shape of


the data distribution to compare center (median, mean) and spread
(interquartile range, standard deviation) of two or more different data sets.

 CCSS. ELA Literacy.WHST.11‐12.6 Use technology, including the Internet, to


produce, publish, and update individual or shared writing products in
response to ongoing feedback, including new arguments or information.
Bell Work / Student Learning Objectives

 Explain the causes of food-borne


illnesses.
 Describe methods for preventing food-
borne illnesses.
 Explain procedures used in food
sanitation.
 Explain the Hazard Analysis and
Critical Control Point (HACCP)
System.
Terms

 Cleaning  HACCP (Hazard


 Food-borne illness Analysis and
Critical Control
 Food-borne Point)
infection  Metabolites
 Food-borne  Pathogen
intoxication  Personal hygiene
 Food sanitation  Sanitizing
Interest Approach

 What type of items are worn by


workers in fast food restaurants?
 What signs are posted in the

restaurant that relate to worker


hygiene?
 Why?
Food-borne illnesses
 Food-borne illness is sickness in
humans caused by a pathogen.
 A pathogen is a microorganism
that inflicts illness in humans.
 A food-borne illness is rarely life
threatening. It can, however, cause
great discomfort in humans.
Food-borne illness can be
traced to two basic causes:

 Food-borne infection is caused by


ingesting a microorganism in a
contaminated food source.
 Food-borne intoxication is an illness
that is caused by consuming a food
that contains harmful metabolites from
a microorganism.
What procedures can be used to
prevent food-borne illnesses?

 Preventing food-borne
illness is fairly easy.
 Using common sense
and a few basic
procedures, both food
processors and
homeowners can enjoy
safe foods.
Safety procedures

 Food temperature- match temp. to


product.
 Ensure proper cooking temperature.
 Separate cooked and uncooked foods.
 Wash hands and use utensils.
 Marinate in the refrigerator.
What procedures are employed to
insure cleanliness in the food
processing environment?
 Food sanitation is the overall
cleanliness and hygiene in the food
processing environment.

 This includes the cleanliness of the


equipment used in a food processing
plant and the hygiene of the workers
using the equipment.
Sanitation is critical!
Environment

 The food preparation environment


is kept safe through:
 Waste removal
 Cleaning and sanitizing
Personal hygiene

 Personal hygiene involves keeping


the following clean:
 Clothing
 Hands

 Hair

 Footwear

 Floor and Work Surfaces


What is HACCP and why was
it established?

 HACCP - Hazard
Analysis and Critical
Control Point
 HACCP is a program
designed to analyze
every food processing
system for its key
production points and
points of contamination.
HACCP

 HACCP was developed jointly by the


U.S. Army and The Pillsbury Company.
 It is administered by the United States
Department of Agriculture
HACCP is guided by seven
basic principles:
 Assess all potential
hazards from the growing
stage through the
preparation stage.
 Determine critical points
where controls are
necessary to reduce
hazards.
 Establish requirements to
be met at each critical
point.
HACCP is guided by seven
basic principles:
 Establish procedures to monitor each
critical point.
 Establish corrective procedures when
monitoring uncovers problems.
 Establish record-keeping procedures.
 Establish procedures to monitor the
effectiveness of the plan.
In establishing a HAACP program, a
food processor’s goal is to meet
three basic objectives:

 To destroy, eliminate, and reduce


hazards.
 To prevent recontamination of the

food product.
 Inhibit the growth and production
of any toxins that may be present.
Hazards must be identified and
ranked according to the following
system:

 Hazard A - applies to products


designated for consumption by at-risk
populations.
 At-risk populations include infants and
the elderly.
 Hazard B - applies to products
containing ingredients known to be
toxic.
Hazards must be identified and
ranked according to the following
system:

 Hazard C - the process used does


not contain a step that effectively
controls the toxin identified.
 Hazard D - applies to products that
are subject to recontamination
after processing and before
packaging.
Hazards must be identified and
ranked according to the following
system:

 Hazard E - applies to products that


have a substantial potential for
contamination in distribution or
consumer handling that could
render the product harmful.
Review/Summary
 How are food-borne illnesses caused?
 What procedures can be used to
prevent food-borne illnesses?
 What procedures are employed to
insure cleanliness in the food
processing environment?
 What is HACCP and why was it
established?
The End!